Sailing -- cost?

Questions on how we spend our money and our time - consumer goods and services, home and vehicle, leisure and recreational activities
Post Reply
teacher_in_tx
Posts: 243
Joined: Fri May 07, 2010 8:13 pm

Sailing -- cost?

Post by teacher_in_tx » Sun Sep 05, 2010 1:30 pm

How expensive is sailing as a hobby?

It interests me, but I am trying to get an idea of the cost. So far, it *looks* to be a lot less expensive than, say, learning to fly a small plane.

Can anyone provide a rough idea of initial training cost and subsequent typical daily rental prices for small to mid size sailboats?

-mike

amh
Posts: 100
Joined: Tue Jun 22, 2010 7:52 pm

Post by amh » Sun Sep 05, 2010 2:06 pm

Rental prices probably vary widely depending on what part of the country you're in, and perhaps lake vs. open water.

Personally I don't think lessons are worth the money. You can learn the basic principles from books, and then rent a small (13-16') boat on a lake to get some real world practice. It does help having another person along with you, some things are awkward with only one (more so with larger boats).

Also, don't make the same mistake I made: deciding to buy too big a boat, too soon.

It is a very relaxing pastime however.

btenny
Posts: 4455
Joined: Sun Oct 07, 2007 6:47 pm

Post by btenny » Sun Sep 05, 2010 2:42 pm

Small sailboats like 14-18 feet are very inexpensive to own and sail. You can buy a used boat of this size for $1-6K depending on age and size, etc. Boats this size do not even have an auxillary engine. You can trailer them or car top them where you want to go and keep them in your back yard when not in use. They require almost no maintenance on a yearly basis other than a good wash and clean up and replacing a few fittings occasionally. Yes there some cost to insure it and buy annual boat stickers but that is usually only $200 or so per year. Then if the boat gets to be say 15 years or older you may need to buy new lines (ropes) and sail rigging and maybe a new sail. But if the boat is stored covered the sails and other things might last for 25 years or more so TBD..

As for learning to sail you can teach yourself the basics from a book and then learn enough to have fun by your self. But if you want to become a very good sailer you need to join a sailing club and or take some lessons. Clubs are like golf clubs, cost vary but they offer a lot of social fun as well and a lot of opportunities to learn and race and tour and party and so forth.

Sail boats up to about 20-24 feet are still relatively low cost as they can be trailered and kept at home when not in use. But this size does need a small outboard engine for auxillary power. So this size has more maintenance costs and other expenses. But they are big enough to take along 3-4 people as boat mates so they have advantages. Now the cost of bigger sail boats goes up in hurry over say 25 feet in size as they need dedicated dock space and much bigger sails and more expensive rigging and dedicated motoring engines and so forth. So be aware if you want a big boat you are talking a lot of money.

But sailing is a great hobby and very entertaining and fun for the whole family. You can do it alone or with the wife or with the kids or with a friend. Everyone can get involved. But it is not a sport that that is all relaxing as outsiders think. Sailing takes work and muscle to keep the boat trimmed and moving in the wind. You constantly have to move around the boat to tweek the sails or turn the boat. It takes effort to raise the mast and sails before you even get the boat in the water. It takes time to learn how to sail well and its not easy. Plus in some cases it can be dangerous if you are not careful. But it also very rewarding and fun.

Enjoy.
Bill

nolo
Posts: 24
Joined: Wed Mar 19, 2008 6:08 pm

Re: Sailing -- cost?

Post by nolo » Mon Sep 06, 2010 12:59 am

teacher_in_tx wrote:How expensive is sailing as a hobby?

-mike
Sailing can be inexpensive if you have a small boat like an El Toro which you can store at home, don't need a trailer or boat slip, etc. However, sailing can also be quite expensive for boats 20-25 feet and up. They don't have sayings like those below for naught:

"Sailing is like standing in a cold shower while tearing money to pieces."

"Sailing: the fine art of getting cold and wet while getting nowhere at great expense..."

"Sailboats are wonderful things if you don't mind owning a hole in the water you throw money into."

One thing you might check out is local sailing clubs. They often have inexpensive lessons and the possibility to crew and find out what things are all about.

Nolo, a former sailboat owner

vandering
Posts: 68
Joined: Sun Apr 12, 2009 4:01 pm

Post by vandering » Mon Sep 06, 2010 5:42 am

Am sure everyone familiar with this hoary chestnut:
If it floats, flies or fornicates; rent it. It's cheaper :>)

User avatar
bcboy57
Posts: 270
Joined: Sat Mar 17, 2007 3:41 pm
Location: saginaw bay

Hobie Cat

Post by bcboy57 » Mon Sep 06, 2010 5:56 am

25 years ago, I bought a used 14' Hobie cat for $1,000. That's still all I sail now. Still gets my heart pumping on a good outing out here on Lake Huron.

You can read about sailing but you can't take a book out with you in a big wind and water splashing all over you.

The best teacher is experience........

Martello Shores
Posts: 169
Joined: Sat Feb 28, 2009 1:33 pm

Post by Martello Shores » Mon Sep 06, 2010 7:31 am

I had a small catamaran in college! It was all that got me through long days at my crummy hot summer job--dreaming about sailing at end of day.

Loved sailing with my dad or sister on his 21' Tanzer at their waterfront home. It could be raced but was designed with heavy keel not to flip over. (Yay!) Don't think they're made anymore (?)

Now we have a Laser at the cottage for my trained son. (It can and does flip over. Fast boat!)

All the boats were secondhand and inexpensive--one was a hand-me-down. I see good deals on Craigslist--catamarans, MacGregor with trailer and berth, Lasers. Prices tend to be best late summer on, but there are always interesting boats listed.

Son's formal lessons at yacht club were expensive (no more than camp, though), but some clubs (e.g. one at local university open to public, a single sailors group looking for crew) look very inexpensive. (Son wants to move on to racing next year--THAT could get expensive, I'm afraid. But worth it I'm thinking, as he loves it so.)

If you're like us, for most fun:
1. the boat needs to be near/on the water for quick & easy access;
2. you will want to sail with others eventually, either crew or fellow racers/tourers.

infecto
Posts: 933
Joined: Sat Feb 21, 2009 9:50 pm

Post by infecto » Mon Sep 06, 2010 8:12 am

I would vote taking lessons over reading a book. They might not be cheap but you will not need many of them to understand the basic mechanics. If you are going to be sailing on the ocean I would say lessons are the only way to go.

Unlike planes, boats are as cheap or expensive as you want it to be. You can pick up a used boat for a few grand that comes with its own trailer. Or you can buy something larger that will require a slip.

The problem is most people do not use their boats much so they become very expensive if you are looking at pleasure/$. I know for me I use it whenever possible. Last year we managed to make it down to Nassau which was a lot of fun.

User avatar
tractorguy
Posts: 624
Joined: Wed May 19, 2010 6:32 pm
Location: Chicago Suburb

Starting sailing

Post by tractorguy » Thu Sep 09, 2010 1:41 pm

I've found that most places that have an active sailing community have both "yacht clubs" with a club house and facilities and "sailing clubs" that are a lower cost alternative. Both are good places to meet people who are willing to take you on as crew, train you, and help you decide if you want to buy a boat. I had the most fun sailing when I was a member of one of these.

The sailing clubs don't have to pay for a facility so they typically have very low dues and no initiation fee. You can probably find one in your area by looking on the net or by going to your nearest body of water and looking for a bunch of sailboats with people around them. The yacht clubs are wet versions of country clubs and will certainly advertise.

aerofreaky11
Posts: 106
Joined: Fri May 02, 2008 5:49 am

Post by aerofreaky11 » Sat Sep 11, 2010 8:29 am

I am a pilot and a sailor. Sailing is less expensive. However, the issue with sailing is the maintenance and insurance of the boat. It is not necessarily the price of the "hull."

You have to realize what a foot of line for a halyard costs and how much you have to pay per foot for storage in and or out of the water. In my case, how much for the crane to put the boat in and out and "step" the mast. It costs me a few hundred bucks for the "bottom paint" I put on to prevent marine growth. To have the boat cleaned in the water is not cheap, but is is cheaper than the crane and steam clean option!

OK, so you are starting small. The costs are minimal. However, if you like sailing, you will want something bigger and more comfortable soon. That is big bucks.

Start small. Understand how to sail. Like in flying--stick and rudder first. Some people rush into a bigger boat too fast. I think if you start with a sunfish or a 14 -16 ' boat that is perfect. You'll feel the wind and you'll learn fast.

A "share" is probably a good thing. Also, you'll find that a ton of people hear you have a boat and want to go with you for a sail, but then they never can make the time.

It is a great "thinking" hobby. Sailing is a science. You can get better and the challenge is fascinating.

Go for it and enjoy!

RadAudit
Posts: 2916
Joined: Mon May 26, 2008 10:20 am
Location: Second star on the right and straight on 'til morning

Post by RadAudit » Sat Sep 11, 2010 11:04 pm

Learning to sail costs no more than a six pack of beer.

Go to your local yacht club on their fun sail night (usually during the middle of the week) and carry a six pack of beer. Ask the first guy you see if they have room on the boat for you. If you carry a twelve pack - they'll throw one of their regulars over board to make room for you.

Boaters who do club racing are always looking for crew. So, if you look interested, try to learn and show up every time - there will be a place for you.

I'd try that for about a year or so before getting really in to the sport. Blue jeans, a knit shirt, a hat, sun-screen and non-marking tennis shoes complete the out fit.
FI is the best revenge. LBYM. Invest the rest. Stay the course.

User avatar
zed
Posts: 336
Joined: Wed Jan 07, 2009 3:01 pm
Location: A river runs thru it

Post by zed » Tue Sep 14, 2010 7:58 pm

RadAudit wrote:...
....If you carry a twelve pack - they'll throw one of their regulars over board to make room for you.

.....

Funny but true :idea:

Took a "Learn to sail" course at a local CC for a few dollars. Very worthwhile. Sailed for many years. Very enjoyable pass time. You dont need a big boat to have a good time.

User avatar
tat2ng
Posts: 463
Joined: Tue Feb 20, 2007 9:15 pm
Location: Michigan
Contact:

Post by tat2ng » Sun Nov 21, 2010 10:35 pm

depending on where you are in Texas, there are several pretty active Sunfish fleets around. check them out here: http://sunfishracing.org/

a Sunfish is similar to a Laser as mentioned above, but a little less tippy. a small board-boat, the Sunfish is about 14 feet long, and pretty easy to sail - only need to hold (1) line to adjust the sail, and the tiller to steer the boat. a Sunfish (or similar small dinghy) can be pretty inexpensive - used ones are easy to find on ebay or craigslist. costs increase the newer the boat, and the more serious you get into racing (officially).

my 1st sailboat - a Super Porpoise (similar to a Sunfish) only cost me $50!

good luck!
tag

musbane
Posts: 390
Joined: Sun Oct 26, 2008 11:14 am

Post by musbane » Sun Nov 21, 2010 11:30 pm

I second the sunfish idea. Small, easy to maintain and there are thousands of cheap used ones out there for sale.
Plus, whatever size boat you think you might ultimately wind up with, learn on a small boat. You learn much faster and at a deeper, more instinctive level.

yobria
Posts: 5978
Joined: Mon Feb 19, 2007 11:58 pm
Location: SF CA USA

Post by yobria » Mon Nov 22, 2010 12:46 am

I spent $500 on a four day sailing class this summer. Learned a ton, from knots to sailing etiquette to rigging and of course sailing.

Not my sport, but some love it. The instructors liked to show me the various little parts that cost $50 to replace at West Marine.

What's that rule - the two happiest days of a man's life are the day he buys his boat, and the day he sells his boat :) .

Nick

User avatar
Taylor Larimore
Advisory Board
Posts: 27111
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 8:09 pm
Location: Miami FL

A lifetime sport

Post by Taylor Larimore » Mon Nov 22, 2010 7:15 am

I had my first race in a Sunfish when I was about 40 years old. In a fleet of about 30 Sunfish I came in dead last. I determined to do better.

Last Saturday, at age 86, I skippered a Harbor 20 and we won 3 out of 4 races on Biscayne Bay. Unlike most sports, sailing is something you can enjoy nearly all your life.

Bon Voyage!
"Simplicity is the master key to financial success." -- Jack Bogle

KyleAAA
Posts: 6572
Joined: Wed Jul 01, 2009 5:35 pm
Contact:

Post by KyleAAA » Mon Nov 22, 2010 8:59 am

A new Hobie cat can be had for less than $8,000 and they are small enough to take apart and store in your garage if need be. They are also really, really fast. Now if you want a larger boat that you'll keep at the lake or ocean, that can get quite expensive.

I took a Learn To Sail options class at my alma mater not too long ago. It cost around $90 but it included membership to the sailing club, which means I get to use their boats (420s, hobie cats, a few j/24's) anytime I want for free. I just have to pay the $90/yr membership fee. Many colleges have clubs like this and you usually don't need to be an alumni to join them.
Last edited by KyleAAA on Mon Nov 22, 2010 12:13 pm, edited 1 time in total.

therub
Posts: 181
Joined: Tue Aug 19, 2008 12:28 pm

Post by therub » Mon Nov 22, 2010 12:00 pm

Has anyone ever rented a sail boat on the ocean and taken it out themselves for a week or two?

I would really like to do this some day, but I am not sure if it requires some sort of certifications? Certainly it requires some skill.

I've looked at learning to sail on lake superior. It sounds like it's a pretty good substitute for the ocean, and is just a few hours from my house.

btenny
Posts: 4455
Joined: Sun Oct 07, 2007 6:47 pm

Post by btenny » Mon Nov 22, 2010 12:37 pm

I have several friends who have chartered sail boats and power boats in the various parts of the caribbean where they acted as the skipper. All were experienced with the type of boat they rented. All had to fill out extensive paperwork and take cruises with a captain for a check ride (the first time they rented from the company) to make sure they really knew how to drive the boat in question. But all these people really liked the experience and would do it again. In all cases they had 4 or more people for the boat they chartered so taking friends was necessary and more fun.

Bill

User avatar
rob
Posts: 2952
Joined: Mon Feb 19, 2007 6:49 pm
Location: Here

Post by rob » Mon Nov 22, 2010 2:48 pm

I believe BOAT stands for Break Out Another Thousand :-)

I know a number of former boat owners and a couple of current owners that complain about the cost.... when on land... None of them seem to complain on the water.

This is un-diehard like but I don't think you should try to cost justify a hobby that you enjoy..... Just spend what you can afford and find a way to do it at that level..... a few grand will not buy an America Cup challenger but a row boat is still a boat (sit on the side & close your eyes if you dream it's an outrigger boat).....
| Rob | Its a dangerous business going out your front door. - J.R.R.Tolkien

mikepru
Posts: 38
Joined: Thu Feb 07, 2008 1:10 pm

Post by mikepru » Mon Nov 22, 2010 9:21 pm

You should be able to get a good used sailboat for ~$1000-1500. 18 foot Buccaneer, Hobie Wave, Laser, ODay Daysailor, etc. Lots of good sailboats out there. Look on sailing texas dot com. They have a TON of used boats. You can tow it, or dry dock it for $150 or so, depends a lot on the area. Also , get a sailboat appropriate for the lake or whatever you will be sailing on. Definitely, take a lesson or 2. The owner might be willing to give you a free lesson or 2. Also, in general, buy a slightly better boat than a more beat-up boat--you'll spend $$ and time repairing and replacing; cost more in the short and long term. Just looked on sailing texas; has a hobie bravo, compac 16, precision 165, and buccaneer for sale; all good beginner boats. Write with any questions. Sailing is a terrific sport. I race a Hobie 17 in midwest. TON of fun.

rocket
Posts: 703
Joined: Sat Aug 11, 2007 7:24 am
Location: Hard Scrabble, MS

Burn a $100 bill. If that bothers you, you should not own

Post by rocket » Wed Nov 24, 2010 7:57 am

Burn a $100 bill. If that bothers you, you should not own a boat.

I sailed and raced a Laser sailboat. Sailing is NOT serene and peaceful. Racing sailboats is demanding and fustrating. The smaller the boat, the more fun sailing is.

furnace
Posts: 284
Joined: Tue Oct 20, 2015 3:38 pm

Re: Sailing -- cost?

Post by furnace » Tue Jul 26, 2016 8:36 am

Can someone please give me feedback on this idea?

I am interested in traveling in a boat along the Intracoastal Waterway (ICW) on the East Coast. I would buy a small sailboat, remove the mast, and power with an outboard. Why would I want to a sailboat but not sail? A sailboat is low cost and has sleeping and cooking space. The ICW is not very windy in many parts, so sails won't do much except block your view, right?

If I power with a 6hp outboard, I can go about 4-5 knots an hour, at the cost of 1 gallon of fuel per hour. Assuming $4/gal and 10 hours of motoring a day, that's $40 each day. My trip would be 20 days ($800 in fuel) so I would go as far as I could in that time, and sell the boat at the end, with or without the motor, and fly home.

I would backup the 6hp with a second outboard and a dinghy, and do this trip "single handed" or with company. Is this a great idea or no?

User avatar
Taylor Larimore
Advisory Board
Posts: 27111
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 8:09 pm
Location: Miami FL

Re: Sailing -- cost?

Post by Taylor Larimore » Tue Jul 26, 2016 9:18 am

Furnace:
A sailboat is low cost and has sleeping and cooking space. The ICW is not very windy in many parts, so sails won't do much except block your view, right?
You are right about the wind. However, a sailboat is not low cost and it has less sleeping and cooking space than a similar length motorboat.

If you have no boating experience and want to cruise the Intercoastal, consider this:

http://www.americancruiselines.com/Crui ... age-cruise

Best wishes.
Taylor
"Simplicity is the master key to financial success." -- Jack Bogle

texasdiver
Posts: 2498
Joined: Thu Jun 25, 2009 12:50 am
Location: Vancouver WA

Re: Sailing -- cost?

Post by texasdiver » Tue Jul 26, 2016 10:49 am

Lots of good advice here. Learn on a small open dingy. More fun and the concepts are all the same as on a larger boat anyway.

First, find your closest sailing club and hang out with them. People are always looking for crew to go sailing with and there are probably a ton of guys around with boats and no one in the family to sail them with who would be glad to go out with you.

Second, a lot of small boat designs are somewhat regional (or have regional popularity). There is an advantage to having the boat that others around you have for racing and just learning how to use it.

Third, do you research on designs. Some racing designs are very aggressive and wet and require one or two athletic crew to adequately sail. Others are relaxing to take out for an afternoon family sail or single handed. There is also a lot of disparity in rigging and rigging time. Some of the more aggressive racing designs and older designs have a lot of fussy rigging that will take a lot of time at the dock to set up and tune. Other boats are much more plug and play.

Forth, price goes up exponentially with length as does maintenance and storage costs. For Texas (where I used to live) you want to keep your boat on a trailer so you can go wherever, you don't want a larger boat stuck in some marina on a lake. Most Texans have enough storage space at home to keep a boat or alternatively RV type storage lots are plentiful and pretty cheap compared to places like the east and west coast.

As long as you are not trying to get into competitive national class racing on a one design boat then you should be able to find a decent small sailboat on a trailer for pretty cheap. Pay attention to the trailer as well as the boat as that can be nearly half the cost of the boat. In addition to craigslist, many of the one design groups have national classifieds on their web sites so if you find a design that you like you can often find them for sale in your region through the club web site dedicated to that design. Like for example this site for the Flying Scott which is an old but good one design for your purpose: https://www.flyingscot.com/ Here is the club page where you can find used boats: http://www.fssa.com/

Where small boat sailing becomes a giant time and money sink is if you get into serious racing where thousands and thousands of dollars are spent to gain that last 1% of performance.

protagonist
Posts: 5291
Joined: Sun Dec 26, 2010 12:47 pm

Re:

Post by protagonist » Tue Jul 26, 2016 11:07 am

amh wrote:
Personally I don't think lessons are worth the money.
Or spend some time in Boston. Community Boating offers you 7 months of sailing on various boats and rigs at Community Boating on the Charles for $195/year (that was the price years ago, but I don't believe it would have gone up much). Members teach other members for free. It's great fun. You will be a skipper in no time. You can probably join for shorter periods as well.

texasdiver
Posts: 2498
Joined: Thu Jun 25, 2009 12:50 am
Location: Vancouver WA

Re: Sailing -- cost?

Post by texasdiver » Tue Jul 26, 2016 12:05 pm

furnace wrote:Can someone please give me feedback on this idea?

I am interested in traveling in a boat along the Intracoastal Waterway (ICW) on the East Coast. I would buy a small sailboat, remove the mast, and power with an outboard. Why would I want to a sailboat but not sail? A sailboat is low cost and has sleeping and cooking space. The ICW is not very windy in many parts, so sails won't do much except block your view, right?

If I power with a 6hp outboard, I can go about 4-5 knots an hour, at the cost of 1 gallon of fuel per hour. Assuming $4/gal and 10 hours of motoring a day, that's $40 each day. My trip would be 20 days ($800 in fuel) so I would go as far as I could in that time, and sell the boat at the end, with or without the motor, and fly home.

I would backup the 6hp with a second outboard and a dinghy, and do this trip "single handed" or with company. Is this a great idea or no?
There are forums specifically dedicated to cruising the ICW. I'd look there for advice.

User avatar
Epsilon Delta
Posts: 7423
Joined: Thu Apr 28, 2011 7:00 pm

Re: Sailing -- cost?

Post by Epsilon Delta » Tue Jul 26, 2016 12:48 pm

furnace wrote:Can someone please give me feedback on this idea?

I am interested in traveling in a boat along the Intracoastal Waterway (ICW) on the East Coast. I would buy a small sailboat, remove the mast, and power with an outboard. Why would I want to a sailboat but not sail? A sailboat is low cost and has sleeping and cooking space. The ICW is not very windy in many parts, so sails won't do much except block your view, right?

If I power with a 6hp outboard, I can go about 4-5 knots an hour, at the cost of 1 gallon of fuel per hour. Assuming $4/gal and 10 hours of motoring a day, that's $40 each day. My trip would be 20 days ($800 in fuel) so I would go as far as I could in that time, and sell the boat at the end, with or without the motor, and fly home.

I would backup the 6hp with a second outboard and a dinghy, and do this trip "single handed" or with company. Is this a great idea or no?
The small sail boats I'm familiar don't have fuel tanks. They use a Jerry can for the outboard motor. You'll want to carry a reserve, so you're probably talking at least four five-gallon cans. Stowing and filling those is going to be annoying.

Also there are weather conditions I'm perfectly happy sailing in that a 6hp motor isn't going to give you all the control you might desire. Sail boats are steered mostly by trimming the sails. I think you'd be better off with a motor boat of some type.

If your just looking at messing about with boats and are not overly attached to the Intracostal you could also look at something like the Erie or Rideau Canals. You could still get into trouble, but the likelyhood of getting lost at sea would be much reduced.

livesoft
Posts: 61487
Joined: Thu Mar 01, 2007 8:00 pm

Re: Sailing -- cost?

Post by livesoft » Tue Jul 26, 2016 1:05 pm

@furnace, your idea kind of reads like what I imagine the movie Wild w/ Reese Witherspoon might have been like (I did not see the movie) only worse.

I suggest you give it a try for a few hours via some kind of rental or with a friend who has a boat and see how long you last.

I doubt you can go 4-5 knots an hour because of tides and wind.
Wiki This signature message sponsored by sscritic: Learn to fish.

RadAudit
Posts: 2916
Joined: Mon May 26, 2008 10:20 am
Location: Second star on the right and straight on 'til morning

Re: Sailing -- cost?

Post by RadAudit » Tue Jul 26, 2016 1:45 pm

furnace wrote:Can someone please give me feedback on this idea?

I am interested in traveling in a boat along the Intracoastal Waterway (ICW) on the East Coast. I would buy a small sailboat, remove the mast, and power with an outboard. Why would I want to a sailboat but not sail? A sailboat is low cost and has sleeping and cooking space. The ICW is not very windy in many parts, so sails won't do much except block your view, right?

If I power with a 6hp outboard, I can go about 4-5 knots an hour, at the cost of 1 gallon of fuel per hour. Assuming $4/gal and 10 hours of motoring a day, that's $40 each day. My trip would be 20 days ($800 in fuel) so I would go as far as I could in that time, and sell the boat at the end, with or without the motor, and fly home.

I would backup the 6hp with a second outboard and a dinghy, and do this trip "single handed" or with company. Is this a great idea or no?
Furnace, I like your plan. It might need a little work; but, others have done more with less. There are stories of folks who've sailed the Atlantic in boats less than ten feet long and lived to tell the tale. Every couple of years, there's a story of folks who've rowed the Atlantic.

Try combining kayaking (sail assist?) and camping along the way. Maybe a small catamaran or trimaran would help on distance traveled if you keep total weight down.

So, if you are willing to sacrifice some comfort, it's probably doable if you pick your start and stop points correctly. Good luck.
FI is the best revenge. LBYM. Invest the rest. Stay the course.

furnace
Posts: 284
Joined: Tue Oct 20, 2015 3:38 pm

Re: Sailing -- cost?

Post by furnace » Tue Jul 26, 2016 1:50 pm

Taylor Larimore wrote:Furnace:
A sailboat is low cost and has sleeping and cooking space. The ICW is not very windy in many parts, so sails won't do much except block your view, right?
You are right about the wind. However, a sailboat is not low cost and it has less sleeping and cooking space than a similar length motorboat.

If you have no boating experience and want to cruise the Intercoastal, consider this:

http://www.americancruiselines.com/Crui ... age-cruise

Best wishes.
Taylor

Thanks for link to American Cruises, Taylor. I looked them up just now, and the cost is $8000 for the ICW trips and $4500 (or more) for the Mississippi River trips. Not bad for luxury travel, though I would like to see if it's possible to travel the ICW on a budget for the challenge of it.

Would you say the ICW in Florida -- on either coast -- is a candidate for motoring?

furnace
Posts: 284
Joined: Tue Oct 20, 2015 3:38 pm

Re: Sailing -- cost?

Post by furnace » Tue Jul 26, 2016 1:55 pm

Epsilon Delta wrote:The small sail boats I'm familiar don't have fuel tanks. They use a Jerry can for the outboard motor. You'll want to carry a reserve, so you're probably talking at least four five-gallon cans. Stowing and filling those is going to be annoying.

Also there are weather conditions I'm perfectly happy sailing in that a 6hp motor isn't going to give you all the control you might desire. Sail boats are steered mostly by trimming the sails. I think you'd be better off with a motor boat of some type.

If your just looking at messing about with boats and are not overly attached to the Intracostal you could also look at something like the Erie or Rideau Canals. You could still get into trouble, but the likelyhood of getting lost at sea would be much reduced.

There is a large lake near my house that has beautiful scenery. A lot of people like to boat here. The water is a bit shallow, and in the event you fall off the boat, you won't drown. Somehow an adventure is less of an adventure when the element of danger is removed, right? 8-)

jebmke
Posts: 8037
Joined: Thu Apr 05, 2007 2:44 pm

Re: Sailing -- cost?

Post by jebmke » Tue Jul 26, 2016 1:57 pm

furnace wrote: Not bad for luxury travel, though I would like to see if it's possible to travel the ICW on a budget for the challenge of it.
If you don't mind traveling with other people, you might consider signing on with a boat traveling south for the winter. A lot of sailboats from my neck of the woods (Chesapeake Bay) head south via the ICW.
When you discover that you are riding a dead horse, the best strategy is to dismount.

likegarden
Posts: 2610
Joined: Mon Feb 26, 2007 5:33 pm

Re: Sailing -- cost?

Post by likegarden » Tue Jul 26, 2016 2:11 pm

A long time ago during summer vacation in my university I learned how to sail in a 1 week course. It certainly was worth every penny I paid and more. Years later several people from my office rented two sail boats and sailed on a lake north of the Alps (Ammersee), actually capsized one of the boats, not mine, was a great experience. I would suggest to take a course and then buy an open smaller boat, should not be too expensive.

furnace
Posts: 284
Joined: Tue Oct 20, 2015 3:38 pm

Re: Sailing -- cost?

Post by furnace » Tue Jul 26, 2016 2:59 pm

RadAudit wrote:Furnace, I like your plan. It might need a little work; but, others have done more with less. There are stories of folks who've sailed the Atlantic in boats less than ten feet long and lived to tell the tale. Every couple of years, there's a story of folks who've rowed the Atlantic.

Try combining kayaking (sail assist?) and camping along the way. Maybe a small catamaran or trimaran would help on distance traveled if you keep total weight down.

So, if you are willing to sacrifice some comfort, it's probably doable if you pick your start and stop points correctly. Good luck.

Thanks for the encouragement. I just found a blog with some inspiring stories like your 10ft Atlantic crossing: http://www.captainjohn.org/GL-Boat3.html

One guy cruised not just the ICW, but the entire loop including the Mississippi River to the Great Lakes, in a jet ski :mrgreen:
Another went around in an aluminum fishing boat :shock:


------------------------------
The two sisters. . .
Katie McPhail 26, and Elizabeth McPhail 22, completed their 5,800 mile
journey around America's Great Loop in a 16-foot Duroboat. Yes, they stayed
in a lot of motels, they also took along a tent, and a nice bimini top.


My "Frugal Award" Hero:
Buzz Gentes traveled the Loop in his 15-foot sailboat “Dalamar”. Yes, he simply
took the mast off and left it at home to cruise the Great Loop.
He fitted his boat with two, 2-horsepower outboard motors. This arrangement allowed
him to quickly fire up the second motor should the first fail and for additional power if
needed. Traveling at about 5 knots, he averaged more than 150 miles on 6 gallons of
gas. That's an average fuel burn rate of only 0.24 gallons per hour and cruising the
entire Loop on only 224 gallons of fuel.


One day Lyn Morgan decided that he, too, would cruise the Great Loop. He however,
took a different view of it than most. Lyn went and had a customized - souped-up pontoon
boat (actually it is a tri-toon) and completed the journey in what is most likely a record
speed. He did it in 57 days.
That's right. It took him 57 days to race through 120 locks and across 5,300 miles
averaging about 40 miles per hour, he traveled about 200 miles per day.


Larry Harcum, completed America's Great Loop in a Jet Ski.
He traveled 5,805 miles in 87 days. He also towed an (emptied) gutted out jet ski behind
him to carry his supplies. Pretty neat huh.

WhyNotUs
Posts: 1293
Joined: Sun Apr 14, 2013 11:38 am

Re: Sailing -- cost?

Post by WhyNotUs » Tue Jul 26, 2016 3:32 pm

There are a number of crew websites to look for opportunities to crew on a sailboat. Since heading down the ICW is not really sailing, they might take a green crew member. You will mostly be looking out for shifting shallows and other traffic. That would be cheapest version. Also cruisersforum.

If I was just boating down the ICW I would take a power boat rather than sailboat. The keel and mast make the trip much more stressful. I cabin cruiser would do the trick.
I own the next hot stock- VTSAX

User avatar
whatusername?
Posts: 639
Joined: Wed Feb 18, 2015 6:08 pm

Re: Sailing -- cost?

Post by whatusername? » Tue Jul 26, 2016 3:39 pm

nolo wrote:[
One thing you might check out is local sailing clubs. They often have inexpensive lessons and the possibility to crew and find out what things are all about.

Nolo, a former sailboat owner
Heartily second this. Sailing is a fantastic sport, but make sure you ease into the expensive side it rather than cannonball in. A lot of sailing clubs have club boats as well which can run the gamut from little Optis to larger keeled craft. Great opportunity to economically indulge in the sport without major capital outlay.

Post Reply