BBC [really The Guardian] book dare

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LH
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BBC [really The Guardian] book dare

Post by LH »

How many books have you read of the following 100?


http://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/183 ... -challenge
1 Pride and Prejudice X
2 The Lord of the Rings
3 Jane Eyre - Charlotte Bronte X
4 Harry Potter series - JK Rowling X
5 To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee X
6 The Bible -
7 Wuthering Heights - Emily Bronte X
8 Nineteen Eighty Four - George Orwell
9 His Dark Materials - Philip Pullman X (well finally reading the last one, but over half way through it)
10 Great Expectations - Charles Dickens
11 Little Women - Louisa M Alcott
12 Tess of the D’Urbervilles - Thomas Hardy
13 Catch 22 - Joseph Heller
14 Complete Works of Shakespeare: not all of it yet!
15 Rebecca - Daphne Du Maurie X
16 The Hobbit - JRR Tolkien
17 Birdsong - Sebastian Faulk
18 Catcher in the Rye - JD Salinger X
19 The Time Traveler’s Wife - Audrey Niffenegger
20 Middlemarch - George Eliot
21 Gone With The Wind - Margaet Mitchell X
22 The Great Gatsby - F Scott Fitzgerald X
23 Bleak House - Charles Dickens:
24 War and Peace - Leo Tolstoy
25 The Hitch Hiker’s Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams
27 Crime and Punishment - Fyodor Dostoyevsky X
28 Grapes of Wrath - John Steinbeck X
29 Alice in Wonderland - Lewis Carroll
30 The Wind in the Willows - Kenneth Grahame
31 Anna Karenina - Leo Tolstoy X
32 David Copperfield - Charles Dickens
33 Chronicles of Narnia - CS Lewis
34 Emma - Jane Austen
35 Persuasion - Jane Austen X
36 The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe - CS Lewis X
37 The Kite Runner - Khaled Hosseini X
38 Captain Corelli’s Mandolin - Louis De Bernieres
39 Memoirs of a Geisha - Arthur Golden X
40 Winnie the Pooh - AA Milne X
41 Animal Farm - George Orwell
42 The Da Vinci Code - Dan Brown X
43 One Hundred Years of Solitude - Gabriel Garcia Marquez
44 A Prayer for Owen Meaney - John Irving
45 The Woman in White - Wilkie Collins
46 Anne of Green Gables - LM Montgomery X
47 Far From The Madding Crowd - Thomas Hardy
48 The Handmaid’s Tale - Margaret Atwood
49 Lord of the Flies - William Golding X
50 Atonement - Ian McEwan
51 Life of Pi - Yann Martel
52 Dune - Frank Herbert
53 Cold Comfort Farm - Stella Gibbons
54 Sense and Sensibility - Jane Austen
55 A Suitable Boy - Vikram Seth
56 The Shadow of the Wind - Carlos Ruiz Zafon
57 A Tale Of Two Cities - Charles Dickens X
58 Brave New World - Aldous Huxley
59 The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night - Mark Haddon
60 Love In The Time Of Cholera - Gabriel Garcia Marquez
61 Of Mice and Men - John Steinbeck
62 Lolita - Vladimir Nabokov
63 The Secret History - Donna Tartt
64 The Lovely Bones - Alice Sebold X
65 Count of Monte Cristo - Alexandre Dumas
66 On The Road - Jack Kerouac
67 Jude the Obscure - Thomas Hardy
68 Bridget Jones’s Diary - Helen Fielding
69 Midnight’s Children - Salman Rushdie
70 Moby Dick - Herman Melville
71 Oliver Twist - Charles Dickens
72 Dracula - Bram Stoker
73 The Secret Garden - Frances Hodgson Burnett X
74 Notes From A Small Island - Bill Bryson
75 Ulysses - James Joyce X
76 The Inferno – Dante
77 Swallows and Amazons - Arthur Ransome
78 Germinal - Emile Zola
79 Vanity Fair - William Makepeace Thackeray
80 Possession - AS Byatt
81 A Christmas Carol - Charles Dickens X
82 Cloud Atlas - David Mitchell
83 The Color Purple - Alice Walker
84 The Remains of the Day - Kazuo Ishiguro
85 Madame Bovary - Gustave Flaubert
86 A Fine Balance - Rohinton Mistry
87 Charlotte’s Web - EB X
88 The Five People You Meet In Heaven - Mitch Albom X
89 Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Sir Arthur Conan Doyle - some, but not all
90 The Faraway Tree Collection - Enid Blyton
91 Heart of Darkness - Joseph Conrad X
92 The Little Prince - Antoine De Saint-Exupery X
93 The Wasp Factory - Iain Banks
94 Watership Down - Richard Adams
95 A Confederacy of Dunces - John Kennedy Toole
96 A Town Like Alice - Nevil Shute
97 The Three Musketeers - Alexandre Dumas
98 Hamlet - William Shakespeare X
99 Charlie and the Chocolate Factory- Roald Dahl X
100 Les Miserables — Victor Hugo
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LH
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Post by LH »

19 of them for me:

2 The Lord of the Rings X
4 Harry Potter series - JK Rowling X
5 To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee
6 The Bible (Old Testament only) X
10 Great Expectations - Charles Dickens X... See More
16 The Hobbit - JRR Tolkien X
25 The Hitch Hiker’s Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams
33 Chronicles of Narnia - CS Lewis X
36 The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe - CS Lewis X
41 Animal Farm - George Orwell
49 Lord of the Flies - William Golding
52 Dune - Frank Herbert
58 Brave New World - Aldous Huxley
61 Of Mice and Men - John Steinbeck X
70 Moby Dick - Herman Melville X
75 Ulysses - James Joyce X
89 Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Sir Arthur Conan Doyle X
91 Heart of Darkness - Joseph Conrad
98 Hamlet - William Shakespeare X

19. One caveat is that I read Brave new world at such a young age, that I am sure I never understood it really. Like I read about 40-80 pages of invisible man, and thought the guy was actually invisible in grade school or something. But then people could see him, yet he was invisible he was saying.... so I quit reading that one, as it made no sense : P Brave new world, I just kinda powered through, near the same time, with little understanding I am sure, but at least there was no guy "falsely" claiming he was invisible heheh. Everything else, I understood at some level : P
Complete Works of Shakespeare, I have read some but not all, so left it off the list.
Last edited by LH on Wed Dec 16, 2009 7:18 pm, edited 1 time in total.
chaz
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Post by chaz »

Complete Works of Shakespeare
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DonnaB
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Post by DonnaB »

this was fun - some of my favorites are on this list (Middlemarch, Great Gatsby, Prayer for Owen Meany, Possession) but I am astounded that Bridget Jones's Diary made the list - truly chick lit!

1 Pride and Prejudice
2 The Lord of the Rings
3 Jane Eyre - Charlotte Bronte
7 Wuthering Heights - Emily Bronte
8 Nineteen Eighty Four - George Orwell
10 Great Expectations - Charles Dickens
11 Little Women - Louisa M Alcott
12 Tess of the D’Urbervilles - Thomas Hardy
15 Rebecca - Daphne Du Maurie
16 The Hobbit - JRR Tolkien
18 Catcher in the Rye - JD Salinger
20 Middlemarch - George Eliot
21 Gone With The Wind - Margaet Mitchell
22 The Great Gatsby - F Scott Fitzgerald
25 The Hitch Hiker’s Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams
28 Grapes of Wrath - John Steinbeck
30 The Wind in the Willows - Kenneth Grahame
31 Anna Karenina - Leo Tolstoy
35 Persuasion - Jane Austen
36 The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe - CS Lewis
40 Winnie the Pooh - AA Milne
41 Animal Farm - George Orwell
44 A Prayer for Owen Meaney - John Irving
46 Anne of Green Gables - LM Montgomery
48 The Handmaid’s Tale - Margaret Atwood
49 Lord of the Flies - William Golding
50 Atonement - Ian McEwan
52 Dune - Frank Herbert
54 Sense and Sensibility - Jane Austen
57 A Tale Of Two Cities - Charles Dickens
58 Brave New World - Aldous Huxley
61 Of Mice and Men - John Steinbeck
68 Bridget Jones’s Diary - Helen Fielding
70 Moby Dick - Herman Melville
71 Oliver Twist - Charles Dickens
73 The Secret Garden - Frances Hodgson Burnett
80 Possession - AS Byatt
81 A Christmas Carol - Charles Dickens
84 The Remains of the Day - Kazuo Ishiguro
87 Charlotte’s Web - EB
88 The Five People You Meet In Heaven - Mitch Albom
91 Heart of Darkness - Joseph Conrad
92 The Little Prince - Antoine De Saint-Exupery
98 Hamlet - William Shakespeare
99 Charlie and the Chocolate Factory- Roald Dahl
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Post by White Coat Investor »

31, plus another 4 or 5 movies.
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Post by gkaplan »

1. Pride and Prejudice
3 Jane Eyre - Charlotte Bronte
5 To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee
7 Wuthering Heights - Emily Bronte
18 Catcher in the Rye - JD Salinger
20 Middlemarch - George Eliot
22 The Great Gatsby - F Scott Fitzgerald
24 War and Peace - Leo Tolstoy
28 Grapes of Wrath - John Steinbeck
31 Anna Karenina - Leo Tolstoy
34 Emma - Jane Austen
35 Persuasion - Jane Austen
41 Animal Farm - George Orwell
54 Sense and Sensibility - Jane Austen
61 Of Mice and Men - John Steinbeck
65 Count of Monte Cristo - Alexandre Dumas
85 Madame Bovary - Gustave Flaubert
98 Hamlet - William Shakespeare

Eighteen, if I count correctly. Some on the list I started but gave up after awhile. Some on the list I'd like to read eventually.

How was this list compiled? I see many Dickens and Austen books (but not Mansfield Park) but only one George Eliot novel. I notice no Hemingway books were on the list.
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Zelig

Post by diasurfer »

My greatest regret in life is that I never read Moby Dick.
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Re: BBC book dare

Post by metabasalt »

1 Pride and Prejudice X
2 The Lord of the Rings
3 Jane Eyre - Charlotte Bronte X
4 To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee X
5 The Bible - far too much as a youth
6 Wuthering Heights - Emily Bronte X
7 Nineteen Eighty Four - George Orwell
8 Great Expectations - Charles Dickens
9 Catch 22 - Joseph Heller
10 Complete Works of Shakespeare: half?
11 Catcher in the Rye - JD Salinger X
12 Middlemarch - George Eliot
13 The Great Gatsby - F Scott Fitzgerald X
14 War and Peace - Leo Tolstoy
15 Crime and Punishment - Fyodor Dostoyevsky X
16 Grapes of Wrath - John Steinbeck X
17 Anna Karenina - Leo Tolstoy X
18 Animal Farm - George Orwell
19 The Da Vinci Code - Dan Brown X
20 One Hundred Years of Solitude - Gabriel Garcia Marquez
21 The Woman in White - Wilkie Collins, listened to on tape
22 Lord of the Flies - William Golding X
23 Brave New World - Aldous Huxley
24 Love In The Time Of Cholera - Gabriel Garcia Marquez
25 Of Mice and Men - John Steinbeck
26 Lolita - Vladimir Nabokov
27 On The Road - Jack Kerouac
28 Moby Dick - Herman Melville
29 Ulysses - James Joyce X
39 The Inferno – Dante
31 Vanity Fair - William Makepeace Thackeray
32 Madame Bovary - Gustave Flaubert
33 Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Sir Arthur Conan Doyle - many
34 A Confederacy of Dunces - John Kennedy Toole
35 Hamlet - William Shakespeare X

35 I think, with one of them being an unabridged audiotape. I'd say most of these were required reading for classes -- high school, college and graduate school. Most I enjoyed. The worst by far was 'The DaVinci Code,' but it was also the most recent. The best were probably Ulysses and War and Peace, both read for pleasure about 30 years ago. Now I listen to many such classics on tape. We recently got 'Les Miserables' but haven't started listening yet. I love listening to books on tape, especially classics.
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Post by livesoft »

I started most of them and could not finish them.

In high school English the whole class rebelled and refused to read some of them.

I read Moby Dick in high school. Not recommended, but you still have time to see why.

Missing: Mark Twain, Jules Verne
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Post by cinghiale »

Isn't "The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe" (#36) the first in the Narnia series (#33)?

And, what an odd grouping and ordering of works. Harry Potter at #4? Sherlock Holmes at #89?? Life of Pi (which I really enjoyed) on the list but Atlas Shrugged is left off?

I would think that the list itself would be as intriguing as how many of the listed works one has read.
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Re: BBC book dare

Post by TheEternalVortex »

Apparently I've read 40 of them. Not bad, especially since some of the books I will never read. Also I doubt anyone has read all of the works of Shakespeare, since some of them just aren't that good.

1 Pride and Prejudice
2 The Lord of the Rings
3 Jane Eyre - Charlotte Bronte
4 Harry Potter series - JK Rowling
5 To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee
8 Nineteen Eighty Four - George Orwell
9 His Dark Materials - Philip Pullman
13 Catch 22 - Joseph Heller
16 The Hobbit - JRR Tolkien
18 Catcher in the Rye - JD Salinger
19 The Time Traveler’s Wife - Audrey Niffenegger
20 Middlemarch - George Eliot
22 The Great Gatsby - F Scott Fitzgerald
25 The Hitch Hiker’s Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams
28 Grapes of Wrath - John Steinbeck
29 Alice in Wonderland - Lewis Carroll
31 Anna Karenina - Leo Tolstoy
34 Emma - Jane Austen
35 Persuasion - Jane Austen
36 The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe - CS Lewis
43 One Hundred Years of Solitude - Gabriel Garcia Marquez
44 A Prayer for Owen Meaney - John Irving
48 The Handmaid’s Tale - Margaret Atwood
49 Lord of the Flies - William Golding
52 Dune - Frank Herbert
54 Sense and Sensibility - Jane Austen
57 A Tale Of Two Cities - Charles Dickens
58 Brave New World - Aldous Huxley
59 The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night - Mark Haddon
60 Love In The Time Of Cholera - Gabriel Garcia Marquez
61 Of Mice and Men - John Steinbeck
73 The Secret Garden - Frances Hodgson Burnett
84 The Remains of the Day - Kazuo Ishiguro
87 Charlotte’s Web - EB White
91 Heart of Darkness - Joseph Conrad
92 The Little Prince - Antoine De Saint-Exupery
95 A Confederacy of Dunces - John Kennedy Toole
97 The Three Musketeers - Alexandre Dumas
98 Hamlet - William Shakespeare
99 Charlie and the Chocolate Factory- Roald Dahl
Last edited by TheEternalVortex on Wed Dec 16, 2009 7:53 pm, edited 3 times in total.
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rob
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Post by rob »

As a sad reflection on my ability to read... 12 (although a few like LOTR and SH must count for more then some others) but I suspect I have seen more in movie form - mostly because I have watched the last 47 or however many Harry Potters there are with the kids..... Do I get partial points for at least hitting some of the harder ones like LOTR a few times :)
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SpecialK22
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Re: BBC book dare

Post by SpecialK22 »

What's strange is how many of these works I read in high school either because they were required or I was just interested.

1.Pride and Prejudice (high school)
2 The Lord of the Rings
5 To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee (high school)
6 The Bible (jr high and high school [Catholic schools])
8 Nineteen Eighty Four - George Orwell (high school)
10 Great Expectations - Charles Dickens (high school)
13 Catch 22 - Joseph Heller (high school)
16 The Hobbit - JRR Tolkien
18 Catcher in the Rye - JD Salinger (high school)
22 The Great Gatsby - F Scott Fitzgerald (high school)
25 The Hitch Hiker’s Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams (high school)
28 Grapes of Wrath - John Steinbeck (high school)
29 Alice in Wonderland - Lewis Carroll
30 The Wind in the Willows - Kenneth Grahame
32 David Copperfield - Charles Dickens (high school)
33 Chronicles of Narnia - CS Lewis (jr high)
36 The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe - CS Lewis (jr high)
37 The Kite Runner - Khaled Hosseini
40 Winnie the Pooh - AA Milne
41 Animal Farm - George Orwell (high school)
42 The Da Vinci Code - Dan Brown
46 Anne of Green Gables - LM Montgomery
49 Lord of the Flies - William Golding (high school)
52 Dune - Frank Herbert
57 A Tale Of Two Cities - Charles Dickens (high school)
58 Brave New World - Aldous Huxley (high school)
61 Of Mice and Men - John Steinbeck (high school)
62 Lolita - Vladimir Nabokov
65 Count of Monte Cristo - Alexandre Dumas
70 Moby Dick - Herman Melville
71 Oliver Twist - Charles Dickens
72 Dracula - Bram Stoker
76 The Inferno – Dante (high school)
81 A Christmas Carol - Charles Dickens
87 Charlotte’s Web - EB
92 The Little Prince - Antoine De Saint-Exupery
97 The Three Musketeers - Alexandre Dumas
98 Hamlet - William Shakespeare (high school)
99 Charlie and the Chocolate Factory- Roald Dahl
100 Les Miserables — Victor Hugo

I appear to slowly becoming more and more uncultured.
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Post by SpecialK22 »

cinghiale wrote:Isn't "The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe" (#36) the first in the Narnia series (#33)?
Yes
cinghiale wrote: And, what an odd grouping and ordering of works. Harry Potter at #4? Sherlock Holmes at #89?? Life of Pi (which I really enjoyed) on the list but Atlas Shrugged is left off?

I would think that the list itself would be as intriguing as how many of the listed works one has read.
I also felt that the order was fairly odd. I read a couple of the Harry Potter books, and while entertaining, I don't feel that they should be ranked so high. Has no one else here read Dracula?
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Post by richard »

SpecialK22 wrote:
cinghiale wrote:Isn't "The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe" (#36) the first in the Narnia series (#33)?
Yes
Also, Hamlet is part of the Complete Works of Shakespeare.

I've read about 75 of the list (mostly when I was much younger). I agree it's an odd ordering, but all such lists are odd.

Has anyone found the original source for this? The closest I've found is this BBC 100 book list
http://www.bbc.co.uk/arts/bigread/top100.shtml
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Post by Opponent Process »

Very few people have actually read through Ulysses. This includes reviewers for the Modern Library, who voted Ulysses the greatest novel of all time despite admitting they never read it.

Also I don't think the Bible is really designed for a methodical reading from Genesis to Revelation. I've spent, I don't know, hundreds of hours in Bible study in my lifetime. I can quote anyone under the table. I've read Philippians a hundred times. You can often randomly turn to a page in the Bible and find an inspiring passage. But I've never understood why people attempt to read it straight through.
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Post by Puakinekine »

Seventy-two

I was surprised not to see Huckleberry Finn.
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Re: Zelig

Post by diasurfer »

diasurfer wrote:My greatest regret in life is that I never read Moby Dick.
I assumed movie quotes for the parts of Zelig that deal with Moby Dick would be readily available at imdb.com for anyone wondering what the post above referred to.

All I could find online was a post on the website goodreads.com in response to the question:
Have you ever pretended that you'd read something you hadn't, just to impress someone? Apparently, the British do just that all the time to impress dates! [and referenced this http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/educ ... 776046.stm ]

Did you ever see the Woody Allen movie Zelig? In it, the main character has the ability to transform himself into difference classes/races/kinds of people. This ability was triggered when the character was with a group of very erudite people who were discussing Moby Dick, and he was embarrassed he had not read the book. So, he 'transformed' himself to be like those erudite people, copying how they spoke, moved, even how they looked.

Put Zelig on your Netflix list if you haven't seen it.
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Re: BBC book dare

Post by grok87 »

LH wrote:How many books have you read of the following 100?


http://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/183 ... -challenge
1 Pride and Prejudice X
2 The Lord of the Rings
3 Jane Eyre - Charlotte Bronte X
4 Harry Potter series - JK Rowling X
5 To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee X
6 The Bible -
7 Wuthering Heights - Emily Bronte X
8 Nineteen Eighty Four - George Orwell
9 His Dark Materials - Philip Pullman X (well finally reading the last one, but over half way through it)
10 Great Expectations - Charles Dickens
11 Little Women - Louisa M Alcott
12 Tess of the D’Urbervilles - Thomas Hardy
13 Catch 22 - Joseph Heller
14 Complete Works of Shakespeare: not all of it yet!
15 Rebecca - Daphne Du Maurie X
16 The Hobbit - JRR Tolkien
17 Birdsong - Sebastian Faulk
18 Catcher in the Rye - JD Salinger X
19 The Time Traveler’s Wife - Audrey Niffenegger
20 Middlemarch - George Eliot
21 Gone With The Wind - Margaet Mitchell X
22 The Great Gatsby - F Scott Fitzgerald X
23 Bleak House - Charles Dickens:
24 War and Peace - Leo Tolstoy
25 The Hitch Hiker’s Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams
27 Crime and Punishment - Fyodor Dostoyevsky X
28 Grapes of Wrath - John Steinbeck X
29 Alice in Wonderland - Lewis Carroll
30 The Wind in the Willows - Kenneth Grahame
31 Anna Karenina - Leo Tolstoy X
32 David Copperfield - Charles Dickens
33 Chronicles of Narnia - CS Lewis
34 Emma - Jane Austen
35 Persuasion - Jane Austen X
36 The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe - CS Lewis X
37 The Kite Runner - Khaled Hosseini X
38 Captain Corelli’s Mandolin - Louis De Bernieres
39 Memoirs of a Geisha - Arthur Golden X
40 Winnie the Pooh - AA Milne X
41 Animal Farm - George Orwell
42 The Da Vinci Code - Dan Brown X
43 One Hundred Years of Solitude - Gabriel Garcia Marquez
44 A Prayer for Owen Meaney - John Irving
45 The Woman in White - Wilkie Collins
46 Anne of Green Gables - LM Montgomery X
47 Far From The Madding Crowd - Thomas Hardy
48 The Handmaid’s Tale - Margaret Atwood
49 Lord of the Flies - William Golding X
50 Atonement - Ian McEwan
51 Life of Pi - Yann Martel
52 Dune - Frank Herbert
53 Cold Comfort Farm - Stella Gibbons
54 Sense and Sensibility - Jane Austen
55 A Suitable Boy - Vikram Seth
56 The Shadow of the Wind - Carlos Ruiz Zafon
57 A Tale Of Two Cities - Charles Dickens X
58 Brave New World - Aldous Huxley
59 The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night - Mark Haddon
60 Love In The Time Of Cholera - Gabriel Garcia Marquez
61 Of Mice and Men - John Steinbeck
62 Lolita - Vladimir Nabokov
63 The Secret History - Donna Tartt
64 The Lovely Bones - Alice Sebold X
65 Count of Monte Cristo - Alexandre Dumas
66 On The Road - Jack Kerouac
67 Jude the Obscure - Thomas Hardy
68 Bridget Jones’s Diary - Helen Fielding
69 Midnight’s Children - Salman Rushdie
70 Moby Dick - Herman Melville
71 Oliver Twist - Charles Dickens
72 Dracula - Bram Stoker
73 The Secret Garden - Frances Hodgson Burnett X
74 Notes From A Small Island - Bill Bryson
75 Ulysses - James Joyce X
76 The Inferno – Dante
77 Swallows and Amazons - Arthur Ransome
78 Germinal - Emile Zola
79 Vanity Fair - William Makepeace Thackeray
80 Possession - AS Byatt
81 A Christmas Carol - Charles Dickens X
82 Cloud Atlas - David Mitchell
83 The Color Purple - Alice Walker
84 The Remains of the Day - Kazuo Ishiguro
85 Madame Bovary - Gustave Flaubert
86 A Fine Balance - Rohinton Mistry
87 Charlotte’s Web - EB X
88 The Five People You Meet In Heaven - Mitch Albom X
89 Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Sir Arthur Conan Doyle - some, but not all
90 The Faraway Tree Collection - Enid Blyton
91 Heart of Darkness - Joseph Conrad X
92 The Little Prince - Antoine De Saint-Exupery X
93 The Wasp Factory - Iain Banks
94 Watership Down - Richard Adams
95 A Confederacy of Dunces - John Kennedy Toole
96 A Town Like Alice - Nevil Shute
97 The Three Musketeers - Alexandre Dumas
98 Hamlet - William Shakespeare X
99 Charlie and the Chocolate Factory- Roald Dahl X
100 Les Miserables — Victor Hugo
Good list thanks!
I too found the order a bit odd. But I agree with the first 2.
How could they have left off the Aubrey-Maturin series though...
cheers,
Last edited by grok87 on Wed Dec 16, 2009 11:18 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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diasurfer
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Post by diasurfer »

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn was one of the few classics of serious length in four years of AP English that I actually enjoyed reading, for the most part. I was permanently turned off long novels that bored me to tears in sophomore year by being forced through Jane Eyre in 3 weeks of nightly chapter assignments. [Did the girls feel the same way about Huck?] From that point on, I Cliff-noted everything that bored me.

I got about a third of the way through Moby Dick before switching to Cliff. I think the Cetology chapter did it for me. Although I love nautical fiction. Where is Captain Aubrey on this list?

My favorites where the shorter, more modern novels: Brave New World, Animal Farm, Heart of Darkness.

I've read/Cliffed about 25 on the list.
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Post by retiredjg »

What an odd assortment of books. I think I've read about 35 of them.
david99
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Post by david99 »

I've read about 12 of these books and half of Moby Dick.
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Re: BBC book dare

Post by Live Free or Diehard »

I've read 24 of them. Several more I've read parts of the series; or started and never completed the book.

1 Pride and Prejudice
2 The Lord of the Rings
6 The Bible
8 Nineteen Eighty Four - George Orwell
13 Catch 22 - Joseph Heller
14 Complete Works of Shakespeare
16 The Hobbit - JRR Tolkien
18 Catcher in the Rye - JD Salinger
19 The Time Traveler’s Wife - Audrey Niffenegger
22 The Great Gatsby - F Scott Fitzgerald
25 The Hitch Hiker’s Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams
41 Animal Farm - George Orwell
49 Lord of the Flies - William Golding
52 Dune - Frank Herbert
58 Brave New World - Aldous Huxley
62 Lolita - Vladimir Nabokov
66 On The Road - Jack Kerouac
70 Moby Dick - Herman Melville
72 Dracula - Bram Stoker
76 The Inferno – Dante
91 Heart of Darkness - Joseph Conrad
92 The Little Prince - Antoine De Saint-Exupery
94 Watership Down - Richard Adams
98 Hamlet - William Shakespeare
TheEternalVortex wrote:Also I doubt anyone has read all of the works of Shakespeare, since some of them just aren't that good.
There are actually people who have read all of Shakespeare. It took me several years to get through them all. When I told my Engish teacher friend that some of Shakespeare's plays (like some that he co-wrote with Johnson) weren't that good; his reply was, "Even at his worst he's still pretty darn good." Some of his really long poems were the hardest for me to get through.
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Re: Zelig

Post by ryuns »

diasurfer wrote:
diasurfer wrote:My greatest regret in life is that I never read Moby Dick.
I assumed movie quotes for the parts of Zelig that deal with Moby Dick would be readily available at imdb.com for anyone wondering what the post above referred to.
Hm, I still don't know what you're talking about because searching google for that quote only yields this thread. But I did add Zelig to my queue. It's at #133, but a sporadic Woody Allen craving might bump out of few others.
An inconvenience is only an adventure wrongly considered; an adventure is an inconvenience rightly considered. -- GK Chesterton
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Post by Dan Moroboshi »

1 Pride and Prejudice - Jane Austen
2 The Lord of the Rings - JRR Tolkien
5 To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee
6 The Bible - ***
8 Nineteen Eighty Four - George Orwell
9 His Dark Materials - Philip Pullman
10 Great Expectations - Charles Dickens
11 Little Women - Louisa M Alcott
13 Catch 22 - Joseph Heller
14 Complete Works of Shakespeare* - Most, but not all
15 Rebecca - Daphne Du Maurie
16 The Hobbit - JRR Tolkien
18 Catcher in the Rye - JD Salinger
19 The Time Traveler’s Wife - Audrey Niffenegger
22 The Great Gatsby - F Scott Fitzgerald
25 The Hitch Hiker’s Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams
27 Crime and Punishment - Fyodor Dostoyevsky
28 Grapes of Wrath - John Steinbeck
30 The Wind in the Willows - Kenneth Grahame
31 Anna Karenina - Leo Tolstoy
32 David Copperfield - Charles Dickens
33 Chronicles of Narnia - CS Lewis
36 The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe - CS Lewis
37 The Kite Runner - Khaled Hosseini
40 Winnie the Pooh - AA Milne
41 Animal Farm - George Orwell
42 The Da Vinci Code - Dan Brown
46 Anne of Green Gables - LM Montgomery
47 Far From The Madding Crowd - Thomas Hardy
48 The Handmaid’s Tale - Margaret Atwood
49 Lord of the Flies - William Golding
51 Life of Pi - Yann Martel
52 Dune - Frank Herbert
54 Sense and Sensibility - Jane Austen
57 A Tale Of Two Cities - Charles Dickens
58 Brave New World - Aldous Huxley
60 Love In The Time Of Cholera - Gabriel Garcia Marquez
61 Of Mice and Men - John Steinbeck
62 Lolita - Vladimir Nabokov
66 On The Road - Jack Kerouac
70 Moby Dick - Herman Melville
71 Oliver Twist - Charles Dickens
72 Dracula - Bram Stoker
76 The Inferno – Dante
81 A Christmas Carol - Charles Dickens
84 The Remains of the Day - Kazuo Ishiguro
85 Madame Bovary - Gustave Flaubert
87 Charlotte’s Web - EB
88 The Five People You Meet In Heaven - Mitch Albom
89 Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
91 Heart of Darkness - Joseph Conrad
92 The Little Prince - Antoine De Saint-Exupery
94 Watership Down - Richard Adams
97 The Three Musketeers - Alexandre Dumas
98 Hamlet - William Shakespeare
99 Charlie and the Chocolate Factory- Roald Dahl
100 Les Miserables — Victor Hugo


Last book read: "Price and Prejudice and Zombies"

The book before that: "World War Z"

Currently working on: "The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen". Pure mind candy, but it's soooo fun to play "spot the Victorian literary reference". It's quite odd to see the likes of Allan Quatermain, Dr Jekyll/Mister Hyde, and Captain Nemo given the contemporary comic-book superhero treatment.
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Post by ryuns »

diasurfer wrote:Adventures of Huckleberry Finn was one of the few classics of serious length in four years of AP English that I actually enjoyed reading, for the most part. I was permanently turned off long novels that bored me to tears in sophomore year by being forced through Jane Eyre in 3 weeks of nightly chapter assignments. [Did the girls feel the same way about Huck?] From that point on, I Cliff-noted everything that bored me.

I got about a third of the way through Moby Dick before switching to Cliff. I think the Cetology chapter did it for me. Although I love nautical fiction. Where is Captain Aubrey on this list?

My favorites where the shorter, more modern novels: Brave New World, Animal Farm, Heart of Darkness.

I've read/Cliffed about 25 on the list.
I felt the same way about Huck Finn. I'm sure guys are more likely to enjoy it, but it's one of my girlfriend's favorite books, but then again, she goes camping with me in my Civic for weeks at a time, so clearly, she ain't right. I don't remember most of the other books I read in high school.

I don't know about yours, but my AP English class was pretty worthless. I learned how to write from AP US History class, since most of that AP exam was writing. I thank my lucky stars for my high school's well-developed AP program.
An inconvenience is only an adventure wrongly considered; an adventure is an inconvenience rightly considered. -- GK Chesterton
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Post by matt »

Nine. Most recent was The Great Gatsby, which I found terribly boring. Have never been drawn to the classics as I usually favor non-fiction. No regrets for passing over the ones on this list over the hundreds of others I have read and hundreds more I will read.
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Post by metabasalt »

Opponent Process wrote:Very few people have actually read through Ulysses. This includes reviewers for the Modern Library, who voted Ulysses the greatest novel of all time despite admitting they never read it.
I read all of it once, on my own, just for my own pleasure. This was after college. I think I tried it once or twice in college and gave up. But at that time I was looking for a great meaning in it. When I just picked it up for fun I found that I really enjoyed being in Leopold Bloom's mind. I never worried about hidden meanings, the relation to the original Ulysses tale (The Iliad) or anything else other than the story at hand. I think that's what made it so enjoyable.

Once I retire I'll certainly try to read it again. I assume I'll enjoy it just as much but you never know.
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Post by runthetrails »

richard wrote:Has anyone found the original source for this? The closest I've found is this BBC 100 book list
http://www.bbc.co.uk/arts/bigread/top100.shtml

I also hunted for the original BBC article with no luck, but while searching, I found this blog post.
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Re: BBC book dare

Post by djorg »

First, thank you. I enjoy these sort of lists. However, while I've read a fair number for sure (33), what really depresses me is the number I'm not sure about.

These are the ones where I either know the story (possibly from other media) but I am not sure I read the book - or I know I started the book, or read pieces, but not sure I actually finished it / read the whole thing. There are 29 books on that list alone! I feel old and sad.

7 Wuthering Heights - Emily Bronte
11 Little Women - Louisa M Alcott
12 Tess of the D’Urbervilles - Thomas Hardy
20 Middlemarch - George Eliot
21 Gone With The Wind - Margaet Mitchell
28 Grapes of Wrath - John Steinbeck
29 Alice in Wonderland - Lewis Carroll
30 The Wind in the Willows - Kenneth Grahame
32 David Copperfield - Charles Dickens
34 Emma - Jane Austen
35 Persuasion - Jane Austen
40 Winnie the Pooh - AA Milne
46 Anne of Green Gables - LM Montgomery
47 Far From The Madding Crowd - Thomas Hardy
48 The Handmaid’s Tale - Margaret Atwood
52 Dune - Frank Herbert
54 Sense and Sensibility - Jane Austen
57 A Tale Of Two Cities - Charles Dickens
62 Lolita - Vladimir Nabokov
66 On The Road - Jack Kerouac
68 Bridget Jones’s Diary - Helen Fielding
72 Dracula - Bram Stoker
76 The Inferno – Dante
78 Germinal - Emile Zola
81 A Christmas Carol - Charles Dickens
83 The Color Purple - Alice Walker
85 Madame Bovary - Gustave Flaubert
92 The Little Prince - Antoine De Saint-Exupery
94 Watership Down - Richard Adams
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Post by MWCA »

Strange not one Stephen King. The Dark Tower series is one of my favorite. Ive only read about 20 on the list.
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Post by Puakinekine »

These are the ones where I either know the story (possibly from other media) but I am not sure I read the book - or I know I started the book, or read pieces, but not sure I actually finished it / read the whole thing. There are 29 books on that list alone! I feel old and sad.


Don't feel sad. It's a good thing. Think of all that you can read and re-read. One of the things that I am enjoying about getting older is that I don't remember the exact plotting of books I read a long time ago. I listen audio books while walking every morning. I have found that the best ones are the classics that I was required to read in high school and college, re-reading or re-listening to now and am finally getting the point as to why they were required reading to begin with. Listening to something like, let's say, Bridget Jones Diary, is tedious, as it is a piece of fun light fluff, meant to be read through and enjoyed quickly. But listening to War and Peace (many miles) or any Dickens, Austen, Hardy or even Ulysses was a revelation. ( I had a high school English class where 50% of the course was reading Ulysses..what a waste, we were way too young.) Surprisingly enough, the Harry Potter series and the Phillip Pullman Golden Compass series, are also delightful to listen to as an adult, even though they are quick reading children's books. The Narnia books (my favorite as a young child) are tedious.

I have to agree with other posters is thinking that the Patrick O'Brian series belong on the list. I always keep an Aubrey-Maturin book, along with a Jane Austen on my Nano in case of emergency.
Last edited by Puakinekine on Thu Dec 17, 2009 2:06 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Post by bpp »

Opponent Process wrote:Very few people have actually read through Ulysses.[...]
Also I don't think the Bible is really designed for a methodical reading from Genesis to Revelation.[...]But I've never understood why people attempt to read it straight through.
I've read through Ulysses. Like metabasalt, I found it more enjoyable once I let go of trying to understand every little allusion.

Couldn't make it though the Bible, though, perhaps because I made the mistake of trying to read it straight through.
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Post by metabasalt »

Puakinekine wrote:
One of the things that I am enjoying about getting older is that I don't remember the exact plotting of books I read a long time ago. I listen audio books while walking every morning. I have found that the best ones are the classics that I was required to read in high school and college, re-reading or re-listening to now and am finally getting the point as to why they were required reading to begin with. Listening to something like, let's say, Bridget Jones Diary, is tedious, as it is a piece of fun light fluff, meant to be read through and enjoyed quickly. But listening to War and Peace (many miles) or any Dickens, Austen, Hardy or even Ulysses was a revelation.
We've had exactly the same experience with audio books, especially classics. It's a revelation to be hearing them for the first or maybe second or third time. This first hit me years ago listening to a book by Nathaniel Hawthorne, possibly 'House of the Seven Gables.' I was bowled over by how good the writing was. When I read him in high school and college he seemed horribly dull and old-fashioned. Now I see why he, and many other authors, are considered classics.

Every once in awhile you get a narrator who just seems wrong for the book. But most of the ones we've listened to have been great. In fact we just got 'Les Miserables' because we enjoyed the narrator so much in some other books.
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Post by peter71 »

Opponent Process wrote:Very few people have actually read through Ulysses. This includes reviewers for the Modern Library, who voted Ulysses the greatest novel of all time despite admitting they never read it.

Also I don't think the Bible is really designed for a methodical reading from Genesis to Revelation. I've spent, I don't know, hundreds of hours in Bible study in my lifetime. I can quote anyone under the table. I've read Philippians a hundred times. You can often randomly turn to a page in the Bible and find an inspiring passage. But I've never understood why people attempt to read it straight through.
Of the two books I fought my way through just so I could one day post on an internet forum and say I read them :D (ULYSSES and WAR AND PEACE) I actually liked the former better, BUT, it was more like figuring out a puzzle than reading per se and I would have been lost without the below sort of high-end Cliff's Notes:

http://www.amazon.com/New-Bloomsday-Boo ... 540&sr=8-1

Now, if anyone's read FINNEGAN'S WAKE cover-to-cover, this is your moment to shine!

All best,
Pete
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Post by Alex Frakt »

42

The list came from a 2007 online poll by british newspaper, The Guardian. As with all online polls, the results are subject to multiple selection biases.
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Post by Christine_NM »

Total - I've read all except about 30 titles, the classics before college. Being an English major helped a little, but not much. Most of English lit is poetry and not even mentioned here. The poets are the heavy hitters.

1 Pride and Prejudice - several times
2 The Lord of the Rings - twice
3 Jane Eyre - Charlotte Bronte - many many times
4 Harry Potter series - JK Rowling - once
5 To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee - once, not counting the movie
6 The Bible - many times
7 Wuthering Heights - Emily Bronte - many times
8 Nineteen Eighty Four - George Orwell - once
9 His Dark Materials - Philip Pullman - never
10 Great Expectations - Charles Dickens - twice
11 Little Women - Louisa M Alcott - several times
12 Tess of the D’Urbervilles - Thomas Hardy - twice
13 Catch 22 - Joseph Heller - twice
14 Complete Works of Shakespeare: - most of it more than once
15 Rebecca - Daphne Du Maurie - many, many times
16 The Hobbit - JRR Tolkien - several times
17 Birdsong - Sebastian Faulk - never
18 Catcher in the Rye - JD Salinger - once
19 The Time Traveler’s Wife - Audrey Niffenegger - I think once
20 Middlemarch - George Eliot - once
21 Gone With The Wind - Margaet Mitchell - once, not counting movie
22 The Great Gatsby - F Scott Fitzgerald - several times
23 Bleak House - Charles Dickens - once
24 War and Peace - Leo Tolstoy -once
25 The Hitch Hiker’s Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams - never
27 Crime and Punishment - Fyodor Dostoyevsky - once
28 Grapes of Wrath - John Steinbeck - twice
29 Alice in Wonderland - Lewis Carroll - my first real book - several times
30 The Wind in the Willows - Kenneth Grahame - several times
31 Anna Karenina - Leo Tolstoy - once
32 David Copperfield - Charles Dickens - twice
33 Chronicles of Narnia - CS Lewis - never
34 Emma - Jane Austen - once
35 Persuasion - Jane Austen - once
36 The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe - CS Lewis - never
37 The Kite Runner - Khaled Hosseini - once
38 Captain Corelli’s Mandolin - Louis De Bernieres - what? never
39 Memoirs of a Geisha - Arthur Golden - never
40 Winnie the Pooh - AA Milne - several times, and in Latin
41 Animal Farm - George Orwell - never
42 The Da Vinci Code - Dan Brown - *groan* once
43 One Hundred Years of Solitude - Gabriel Garcia Marquez - once
44 A Prayer for Owen Meaney - John Irving - once
45 The Woman in White - Wilkie Collins - never
46 Anne of Green Gables - LM Montgomery - several times
47 Far From The Madding Crowd - Thomas Hardy - 3 times
48 The Handmaid’s Tale - Margaret Atwood - once
49 Lord of the Flies - William Golding - never got thru it
50 Atonement - Ian McEwan - never got thru it
51 Life of Pi - Yann Martel - once
52 Dune - Frank Herbert - once
53 Cold Comfort Farm - Stella Gibbons - never
54 Sense and Sensibility - Jane Austen - twice
55 A Suitable Boy - Vikram Seth - never
56 The Shadow of the Wind - Carlos Ruiz Zafon - never

57 A Tale Of Two Cities - Charles Dickens - once
58 Brave New World - Aldous Huxley - once
59 The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night - Mark Haddon - never
60 Love In The Time Of Cholera - Gabriel Garcia Marquez - once
61 Of Mice and Men - John Steinbeck - once
62 Lolita - Vladimir Nabokov - twice
63 The Secret History - Donna Tartt - once
64 The Lovely Bones - Alice Sebold - never
65 Count of Monte Cristo - Alexandre Dumas - never
66 On The Road - Jack Kerouac - 3 times
67 Jude the Obscure - Thomas Hardy - twice
68 Bridget Jones’s Diary - Helen Fielding - never, saw the movie
69 Midnight’s Children - Salman Rushdie - never

70 Moby Dick - Herman Melville - twice
71 Oliver Twist - Charles Dickens - twice
72 Dracula - Bram Stoker - never
73 The Secret Garden - Frances Hodgson Burnett - once
74 Notes From A Small Island - Bill Bryson - once

75 Ulysses - James Joyce - didn't finish it
76 The Inferno – Dante - once, did finish it
77 Swallows and Amazons - Arthur Ransome never
78 Germinal - Emile Zola - never
79 Vanity Fair - William Makepeace Thackeray - never
80 Possession - AS Byatt - never
81 A Christmas Carol - Charles Dickens X - many times
82 Cloud Atlas - David Mitchell - never
83 The Color Purple - Alice Walker - once
84 The Remains of the Day - Kazuo Ishiguro - once
85 Madame Bovary - Gustave Flaubert - never
86 A Fine Balance - Rohinton Mistry - never
87 Charlotte’s Web - EB - many times
88 The Five People You Meet In Heaven - Mitch Albom - never
89 Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Sir Arthur Conan Doyle - all
90 The Faraway Tree Collection - Enid Blyton - never
91 Heart of Darkness - Joseph Conrad - once
92 The Little Prince - Antoine De Saint-Exupery - once in French class
93 The Wasp Factory - Iain Banks - never
94 Watership Down - Richard Adams - once
95 A Confederacy of Dunces - John Kennedy Toole - once
96 A Town Like Alice - Nevil Shute - never, does On the Beach count?
97 The Three Musketeers - Alexandre Dumas - never
98 Hamlet - William Shakespeare - several times
99 Charlie and the Chocolate Factory- Roald Dahl - never
100 Les Miserables — Victor Hugo - never
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Post by Opponent Process »

Christine_NM wrote:The Bible - many times
Christine, so you've read the Bible, from cover to cover, many times?
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Post by Christine_NM »

Opp -

Yes, starting at age 5. I went to an unusual church and Sunday school.
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Post by cinghiale »

Alex wrote:
The list came from a 2007 online poll by british newspaper, The Guardian.
Ah, there it is. That explains the list, the peculiar ordering, and the "recency" influence on why certain titles made the list.

Now, a Bogleheads Book Dare... that I would like to see!
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Post by modal »

Quick run over them, I read ~18 of those in JHS and HS.
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Post by Alex Frakt »

cinghiale wrote:Now, a Bogleheads Book Dare... that I would like to see!
I compiled such a list from a (pre-bogleheads) listserv I was active in that was dedicated to the author Patrick O'Brian. It was a lot of work and the group was tiny compared to this one. Let me see if I can find it....

The internet archive preserved it: http://web.archive.org/web/199910130153 ... gr100.html

Here's the top books from that list:

Tolkien, JRR - The Lord of the Rings trilogy
Graves, Robert - I, Claudius
Heller, Joseph - Catch 22
Herbert, Frank - Dune (many specifically noted that only Dune and not
the other books in the series qualify)
Le Carre, John - The Quest for Karla Trilogy
Asimov, Isaac - Foundation Trilogy
Melville, Herman - Moby Dick
Austen, Jane - Pride & Prejudice
Orwell, George - 1984
Helprin, Mark - A Soldier Of The Great War
Salinger, J.D. - The Catcher in the Rye
Maclean, Norman - A River Runs Through It
Bester, Alfred - The Stars My Destination
Fraser, George MacDonald - The Flashman series
McMurtry, Larry - Lonesome Dove
Hemingway, E. - Farewell to Arms
Dickens, Charles - Bleak House
Tolstoy, Leo - War & Peace
Davies, Robertson - The Deptford Trilogy
Dostoyevsky, Fyodor - Crime And Punishment
Steinbeck, John - Cannery Row
Clavell, James - Shogun
Eco, Umberto - The Name of the Rose
Eliot, George - Middlemarch
White, T. H. - The Once and Future King
Doyle, Sir Arthur Conan - novels and stories about Sherlock Holmes
Fitzgerald, F. Scott - The Great Gatsby
Ishigura, Kazuo - The Remains of the Day
Ondaatje, Michael - The English Patient
Shaara, Michael - The Killer Angels
Solzhenitson, A - One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich

I've read 22 of the 31 on this list.
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Post by InvestingMom »

About 35 of the first list and 10 of the second list.
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Post by fishnskiguy »

Well, I must be the resident Neanderthal on the forum. Of the 100 BBC books, I read six. Five, because I had to in school, and I didn't like a one.

I did read Watership Down (not to be confused with Blackhawk Down) at the repeated insistence of my mother. I enjoyed it immensely once I realized it wasn't about some ship sinking tragedy.

Kind of like my wife and I cajoling my retired Rear Admiral father to sit down and watch The Great Santini. Once he realized it wasn't about some magician he got totally engrossed in the movie. At the end, he said with a smile, "I knew guys like that, I really did. And they were all Marines"

I never got past the first three pages of Moby Dick, but I did devour everything Patrick O'Brien wrote. Can't recommend enough A Sea Of Words if you chose to get into his stuff.

I also read everything Steinbeck wrote except Grapes of Wrath.

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Post by Jazztonight »

In trying to find out where this original list came from (I couldn't find a source, btw) I came across one writer who wrote:

"...Of course, there is only one problem - no matter how hard I look, I can't find the list anywhere at the BBC website. What I could find, was BBC's The Big Read, which is a list of the 100 most popular books. That list little resembles the list used in the BBC 100 books meme - in fact, only 57 on the original list made it to the new list used in the meme."

here is a link to an old BBC "Big Read:"

http://www.bbc.co.uk/arts/bigread/top100.shtml
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Post by nisiprius »

35 of them.

It's a pretty weird list, though. Why does The Lord of the Rings count as one, and The Hobbit as another?

Worse yet, The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe is one of the seven Chronicles of Narnia (yes, I've read all seven).

The title Catch-22 should have a hyphen in it.

The ones I've read. Yes, I've read all of the particular collection entitled The Adventures of Sherlock Homes, and all of The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes, and three of the novels (A Study in Scarlet, The Sign of Four, The Hound of the Baskervilles); but not all of the stories in The Return of Sherlock Holmes or His Last Bow or The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes.

I assume that I can count A Town Like Alice even if I read it under its American title, The Legacy. I've read almost all of Nevil Shute's novels; my favorite is probably The Trustee from the Toolroom,

2 The Lord of the Rings
4 Harry Potter series - JK Rowling
5 To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee
8 Nineteen Eighty Four - George Orwell
10 Great Expectations - Charles Dickens
13 Catch 22 - Joseph Heller
16 The Hobbit - JRR Tolkien
18 Catcher in the Rye - JD Salinger
22 The Great Gatsby - F Scott Fitzgerald
25 The Hitch Hiker’s Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams
28 Grapes of Wrath - John Steinbeck
29 Alice in Wonderland - Lewis Carroll
30 The Wind in the Willows - Kenneth Grahame
32 David Copperfield - Charles Dickens
33 Chronicles of Narnia - CS Lewis
36 The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe - CS Lewis
40 Winnie the Pooh - AA Milne
41 Animal Farm - George Orwell
42 The Da Vinci Code - Dan Brown
45 The Woman in White - Wilkie Collins
49 Lord of the Flies - William Golding
57 A Tale Of Two Cities - Charles Dickens
58 Brave New World - Aldous Huxley
59 The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night - Mark Haddon
61 Of Mice and Men - John Steinbeck
70 Moby Dick - Herman Melville
71 Oliver Twist - Charles Dickens
74 Notes From A Small Island - Bill Bryson
80 Possession - AS Byatt
87 Charlotte’s Web - EB
89 Adventures of Sherlock Holmes
92 The Little Prince - Antoine De Saint-Exupery
94 Watership Down - Richard Adams
96 A Town Like Alice - Nevil Shute
98 Hamlet - William Shakespeare
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Post by Puakinekine »

From the choice of books from the O'Brian forum, I am making the assumption that the majority of the group is male. :)

I scored the same as Alex from that list, 22 out of the 31.

It was interesting A Soldier of the Great War was mentioned as I used it as a sleep aid for a while. On the other hand, I re-read Helprin's Winter's Tale annually around this time of the year every year if I can. It is a book to get lost in.

Another book for this time of the year is Thomas Hardy's Under The Greenwood Tree. It's not your usual doom and gloom Hardy, but full of light.
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Post by epilnk »

I get 58, if I give myself credit for good incompletes like Shakespeare (I've read most of the major works), Harry Potter (several but not all yet), the Bible (skipped some of the later prophets and several epistles), etc.
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Post by LH »

Jazztonight wrote:In trying to find out where this original list came from (I couldn't find a source, btw) I came across one writer who wrote:

"...Of course, there is only one problem - no matter how hard I look, I can't find the list anywhere at the BBC website. What I could find, was BBC's The Big Read, which is a list of the 100 most popular books. That list little resembles the list used in the BBC 100 books meme - in fact, only 57 on the original list made it to the new list used in the meme."

here is a link to an old BBC "Big Read:"

http://www.bbc.co.uk/arts/bigread/top100.shtml
Ah thats sweet, maybe this is a viral "hoax", because I couldnt find the original BBC link either, but I admit I only looked for about 2 minutes, but found this list in multiple other places.
epilnk
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Joined: Wed Apr 18, 2007 7:05 pm

Post by epilnk »

gkaplan wrote:How was this list compiled? I see many Dickens and Austen books (but not Mansfield Park) but only one George Eliot novel. I notice no Hemingway books were on the list.
I find it telling that the more popular Austen books are on the list but Mansfield Park, considered her masterpiece by serious Austenophiles as well as Austen herself, is not. And yes there were some very curious inclusions as well. Bridget Jones? Really? Fun list, though; most of these are popular and not too taxing on the brain. In fact my score of 58 is just approximate - a couple of these made so little impression on me that I'm not entirely sure I read them.
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