How did you learn and play music, and what resources and teachers/coaching did you use; ukulele, guitar, piano, etc.?

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Sandtrap
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How did you learn and play music, and what resources and teachers/coaching did you use; ukulele, guitar, piano, etc.?

Post by Sandtrap »

Sharing:
1
How did you learn to play music?
2
What kind of music do you play?
3
What instruments do you play?
4
What resources did you and now use?
5
Did you have teachers, what do you play?
6
What suggestions do you have for others that are getting started or want to improve?

My musical background:

I took classical guitar lessons in high school. Not much guitar "tab: in those days. Just note reading. My lst song was a simple version of "Malaguena". I also took voice/singing at the Hawaii Theatre Arts for about 3 years.
Growing up as a Hawaiian Islander (mixed Hawaiian) in Hawaii, it was natural to be immersed in Hawaii's deep musical and musicianship culture which permeates into every generation and every family and every neighborhood in this internationally diverse state.
So, I grew up singing and playing hawaiian music, ukulele and guitar first. "Kanakapila" (group backyard jams was a daily/weekly gathering for all. There's no "sheet music", just watching and emulating and playing along like all kids do. Everyone's a former pro, and "kupuna" (elder).
I've sung and played Hawaiian and popular (waikiki) and jazz music on guitar my whole life, from solo to duo to trio's, jams and on stage and so forth. It is immensely rewarding and there is always so much to learn from others, some are just so so good at it.
I've kept up, until before I retired, ongoing coaching and private lessons for many decades. Wrote songs and arrangements.
I've also sang and played Hawaiian and popular music 1-2x/month as a duo and trio for nursing and care homes and senior centers in their main rooms/halls for many years before retiring.

***Example of one path of learning. Lot's of resources online.

This is a fairly simple arrangement of "Over the Rainbow" in a chord melody style. Good for beginner and interm/beginners to learn on. A lot of music is learned this way for string, etc. There are similar arrangements from simple to complex for guitar as well.
Image

Here's an audio file of a nice Hawaiian song on ukulele, chord melody style, called, "Poipu I Kaua'i" (not me playing).
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1nuoJoc ... share_link

This is my lst time with this type of post and using the "google drive thing" for audio files. Please let me know if it is not working so I can fix it. Huge thanks. Enjoy.
j :D
Last edited by Sandtrap on Wed Jul 03, 2024 7:59 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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SueG5123
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Re: How did you learn and play music, and what resources and teachers/coaching did you use; ukulele, guitar, piano, etc.

Post by SueG5123 »

1. I took guitar lessons as a kid but quit because I was forced to play “right handed,” which went contrary to my natural lefty orientation. Fortunately, I had seen The Beatles on the Ed Sullivan Show and I knew that left handed instruments were available so I waited… In my 20s, I took lessons again, but this time on a left handed guitar. Voila, 40 years later and I’m still playing!
2. I play the popular music of my youth (Beatles, Stones, Cat Stevens, Gordon Lightfoot), plus some newer stuff (Coldplay, Matchbox 20).
3. I play acoustic guitar and electric. I also play ukulele (baritone, tenor, concert), banjo, and cavaquinho.
4. Resources used: ukulele groups have a lot of free songbooks online, which has been helpful. YouTube videos showed me how to change ukulele strings.
5. My teacher generally tried to give me material that interested me, rather than sticking strictly to boring childhood songs. So instead of playing Kumbyah, I started off playing The Eagles.
6. Suggestions: adult learners tend to judge their efforts too harshly and give up to easily. I’d always advise, stick with it. Also, on the stringed instruments, there can be some discomfort on your fretting hand when you first starting out. Persevere, it will get better.
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Re: How did you learn and play music, and what resources and teachers/coaching did you use; ukulele, guitar, piano, etc.

Post by investingdad »

I’ve documented my journey on BH in a separate thread but don’t recall when I last updated it.

1) Started at age 43 (going on 8 years now)
2) mostly classical with some Irish stuff thrown in
3) Violin
4) weekly lessons, same teacher since I started, every week. I also play every day
5) aside from my teacher, I also spent the last year and a half doing an adult string ensemble class…I’m taking a leap and joining a community orchestra this Autumn…may pick the ensemble class back up at the same time


My observations are that there’s no reason an adult cannot learn the instrument of their choice. It simply requires persistence and commitment. At some point the early enthusiasm tapers off and then it comes down to how badly do you want to do it?

The struggle is that an adult learner must accept that they will sound childlike when starting and that can be off putting. Scratching out Twinkle Twinkle Little Star on a violin at age 43 and knowing it sounds like crap is humbling. Now imagine doing it with your teacher while her next student and his mom (who’s younger than you) come through the door and see and hear you.

But if you can get past that, you’re on the right track. :)
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Re: How did you learn and play music, and what resources and teachers/coaching did you use; ukulele, guitar, piano, etc.

Post by Chv396 »

Started at age 12, in middle school. Started with the clarinet, then switched to the alto & tenor saxophones. Loved big band & jazz music (still do.) My brother played the violin and guitar, my sister was a pianist. We all loved music.

I learned in middle school, as did my brother. My sister learned from a professional music teacher.
Last edited by Chv396 on Tue Jul 02, 2024 11:07 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: How did you learn and play music, and what resources and teachers/coaching did you use; ukulele, guitar, piano, etc.

Post by JPH »

If you like the ukulele Google "del rey ukulele player"
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Re: How did you learn and play music, and what resources and teachers/coaching did you use; ukulele, guitar, piano, etc.

Post by Michael Patrick »

1) I took lessons for a year or two when I was first starting out back in the dark ages, but otherwise I'm self taught.
2) Mostly blues-based rock, dabble in other styles.
3) Electric guitar, dabble in lap steel
4) Mostly watch YouTube videos for how to play specific songs
5) Private one-on-one lessons with a teacher
6) Start early, learn to read music, take advantage of all of the resources on the web
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Re: How did you learn and play music, and what resources and teachers/coaching did you use; ukulele, guitar, piano, etc.

Post by Sandtrap »

Chv396 wrote: Tue Jul 02, 2024 9:36 am Started at age 12, in middle school. Started with the clarinet, then switched to the alto & tenor saxophones. Loved big band & jazz music (still do.) My brother played the violin and guitar, my sister was a pianist. We all loved music.

I learned in middle school, as did my brother. My sister learned from a professional music teacher.
How wonderful that you were fortunate to grow up in a musical family.

Love Big Band and fell in love with the sounds of Benny Goodman and Glen Miller way back when. I used to borrow all the albums from the library.
Here's a wonderful clip of a Tenor Sax Ballad by Paul Baker in the style of the Ray Charles Band. Just gorgeous.

Enjoy the music.
Youtube:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P3wJzOcPPL8

Kenny G (youtube)
of course. . . .
"Songbird" (26 M views!)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QN2RnjFHmNY

If I tried to play sax at this point in life it would sound like my home filled with angry geese.
j :D
Last edited by Sandtrap on Wed Jul 03, 2024 6:16 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Buzzman
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Re: How did you learn and play music, and what resources and teachers/coaching did you use; ukulele, guitar, piano, etc.

Post by Buzzman »

1
How did you learn to play music?
I started with some group guitar lessons at a small town music store when I was about 9. My hands were so small I made a G chord with my thumb and 2nd finger around the guitar neck. I really couldn't make a barre chord very good back then. I have played off and on since then until now (I'm 64). I took a few months of piano lessons and played trumpet in middle school and HS. I can read treble clef okay and can play the piano ( a bit ) in the key of C.

2
What kind of music do you play?
Mainly acoustic guitar and country stuff but some Rock. I have a bunch of instruments, several amps and a small recording studio in my basement, complete with semi-sound proof booths. BTW, I found my original amp from when I was about 10 and rebuilt it a couple of years ago. That was fun.

3
What instruments do you play?
Main instrument is guitar but I can play a little bass just because it's like a 4 string guitar...:-) I also have a violin, mandolin, keyboard(s) and a snare drum.

4
What resources did you and now use?
Some lessons but a lot of playing along with records and with other players. In the old days you had to tune to every song ( by ear) because the pitch on the record wasn't consistent and varied with every song. I started out serious recording on a 4 channel cassette recorded, moved to Cakewalk and now I'm on to Reaper for a DAW.

6
What suggestions do you have for others that are getting started or want to improve?
Just play both by yourself and with others. It's all about having fun both for yourself and sharing with others. Play a lot.
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Re: How did you learn and play music, and what resources and teachers/coaching did you use; ukulele, guitar, piano, etc.

Post by Sandtrap »

Buzzman wrote: Tue Jul 02, 2024 9:24 pm 1
How did you learn to play music?
I started with some group guitar lessons at a small town music store when I was about 9. My hands were so small I made a G chord with my thumb and 2nd finger around the guitar neck. I really couldn't make a barre chord very good back then. I have played off and on since then until now (I'm 64). I took a few months of piano lessons and played trumpet in middle school and HS. I can read treble clef okay and can play the piano ( a bit ) in the key of C.

2
What kind of music do you play?
Mainly acoustic guitar and country stuff but some Rock. I have a bunch of instruments, several amps and a small recording studio in my basement, complete with semi-sound proof booths. BTW, I found my original amp from when I was about 10 and rebuilt it a couple of years ago. That was fun.

3
What instruments do you play?
Main instrument is guitar but I can play a little bass just because it's like a 4 string guitar...:-) I also have a violin, mandolin, keyboard(s) and a snare drum.

4
What resources did you and now use?
Some lessons but a lot of playing along with records and with other players. In the old days you had to tune to every song ( by ear) because the pitch on the record wasn't consistent and varied with every song. I started out serious recording on a 4 channel cassette recorded, moved to Cakewalk and now I'm on to Reaper for a DAW.

6
What suggestions do you have for others that are getting started or want to improve?
Just play both by yourself and with others. It's all about having fun both for yourself and sharing with others. Play a lot.
Great stories. Thanks for sharing.
You have a strong natural background in music and were able to grow with it enjoyably. Great!

I remember "Cakewalk".
I had long had a jazz guitar duo and a Hawaiian Trio, as well as played and sang solo, and wanted to put together a demo CD to give out to various places that asked for that from time to time. Recording studios were expensive and too formal for us. I had recordings from our "plugged" in and acoustic jams, sometimes large with pro's sitting in, but they were too noisy. So, I put together a small recording studio setup with soundproofing, etc. I quickly ran through all the cheap/budget rack units and tweaked it unitl recordings were the best I could do. It's amazing how terrible things sound when the mics pick up "everything". As much as it was discouraging (one fellow refused to sing after that), it did inspire us to improve because we were getting great feedback. (there's no feedback on stage or in public, everyone is getting entertained).

Do you still record, if not just for fun?
What is your setup?
Solo, duo, group jam, what?

You're right about having fun just playing with others. If they are awesome players and people, then great as well.
j
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Buzzman
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Re: How did you learn and play music, and what resources and teachers/coaching did you use; ukulele, guitar, piano, etc.

Post by Buzzman »

Do you still record, if not just for fun?
I haven't done much music recording lately. I have done some podcasting with my setup.

I did a lot of songwriting in the past and pitched songs in Nashville. I had a couple songs recorded by independent artists but nothing major. It really has to be for self satisfaction. It's a tough business and business is a generous term. I've watched very talented people sacrificing years of their life chasing their dreams as songwriters and artists to eventually pack it up and leave town.

My process was always to record a good enough demo to get decent feedback on songs and then use one of the demo services in Nashville and hire a demo singer. It used to cost about $600 to $1000 to do that and if you had a co-writer then you could split that. Then you had a good "Nashville sounding" track that you could pitch.

What is your setup?
When we built our current house we had a huge basement area so I built out a recording area with 3 small sound proof booths. I put in double sheet rock with Green Glue in between the layers. I wired in all of the booths back to a main panel in the mixing room. I had some multi-track firewire based computer interfaces but technology and computers moved on from that so now I'm down to a two track USB-C input.

Solo, duo, group jam, what?
Mainly solo or songwriter rounds. It's always fun to play with other folks but during adult working years its always hard to organize and coordinate schedules with others.
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Re: How did you learn and play music, and what resources and teachers/coaching did you use; ukulele, guitar, piano, etc.

Post by Sandtrap »

Buzzman wrote: Wed Jul 03, 2024 7:28 am Do you still record, if not just for fun?
I haven't done much music recording lately. I have done some podcasting with my setup.

I did a lot of songwriting in the past and pitched songs in Nashville. I had a couple songs recorded by independent artists but nothing major. It really has to be for self satisfaction. It's a tough business and business is a generous term. I've watched very talented people sacrificing years of their life chasing their dreams as songwriters and artists to eventually pack it up and leave town.

My process was always to record a good enough demo to get decent feedback on songs and then use one of the demo services in Nashville and hire a demo singer. It used to cost about $600 to $1000 to do that and if you had a co-writer then you could split that. Then you had a good "Nashville sounding" track that you could pitch.

What is your setup?
When we built our current house we had a huge basement area so I built out a recording area with 3 small sound proof booths. I put in double sheet rock with Green Glue in between the layers. I wired in all of the booths back to a main panel in the mixing room. I had some multi-track firewire based computer interfaces but technology and computers moved on from that so now I'm down to a two track USB-C input.

Solo, duo, group jam, what?
Mainly solo or songwriter rounds. It's always fun to play with other folks but during adult working years its always hard to organize and coordinate schedules with others.
wow
nashville songwriter
epic talent!!!!!!!

thanks for sharing.
aloha
j🌺
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Re: How did you learn and play music, and what resources and teachers/coaching did you use; ukulele, guitar, piano, etc.

Post by bondsr4me »

Sandtrap wrote: Tue Jul 02, 2024 8:25 am Sharing:
1
How did you learn to play music?
I learned introductory pedal steel. I was truly blessed to have a great "teacher"; he played professionally for many country artists (E.Tubb, F. Young, P. Cline, R. Rogers, R. Travis; others. I don't mess with with steel any more. In March '24, I started bass guitar. I use online lessons from BassBuzz. This guy is very good for us "dummies"...lots of fun.

2
What kind of music do you play?

I prefer Rock n Roll and old country music.
3
What instruments do you play?
pedal steel but don't play it now; bass is my current guitar.
4
What resources did you and now use?
online lessons from BassBuzz.
5
Did you have teachers, what do you play?
online instructor at BassBuzz.

6

j :D
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Re: How did you learn and play music, and what resources and teachers/coaching did you use; ukulele, guitar, piano, etc.

Post by Sandtrap »

bondsr4me wrote: Wed Jul 03, 2024 8:30 am
Sandtrap wrote: Tue Jul 02, 2024 8:25 am Sharing:
1
How did you learn to play music?
I learned introductory pedal steel. I was truly blessed to have a great "teacher"; he played professionally for many country artists (E.Tubb, F. Young, P. Cline, R. Rogers, R. Travis; others. I don't mess with with steel any more. In March '24, I started bass guitar. I use online lessons from BassBuzz. This guy is very good for us "dummies"...lots of fun.

2
What kind of music do you play?

I prefer Rock n Roll and old country music.
3
What instruments do you play?
pedal steel but don't play it now; bass is my current guitar.
4
What resources did you and now use?
online lessons from BassBuzz.
5
Did you have teachers, what do you play?
online instructor at BassBuzz.

6

j :D
wow.
Pedal steel. That takes "talent"!
While many say that the pedal and lap steel guitar began in Hawaii, the distinctive sound and personality of it, is "all classic country".
Here's "Ghost Riders" on pedal steel on Youtube.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5YdHqxTcBfI
A favorite, by George Jones, "he stopped lovin her today" on pedal steel. Really sweet version.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GH8TiWNx6Jw
Tammy Wynette: "Cryin Steel Guitar".
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mK5ROydJFTE

Thanks for sharing
Unbelievable amount of broad and deep talent on this forum. Yay!
j :D
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bondsr4me
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Re: How did you learn and play music, and what resources and teachers/coaching did you use; ukulele, guitar, piano, etc.

Post by bondsr4me »

^^

I've heard a lot great steel, but my all time favorite is Tom Brumley playing 'Together Again" for Buck Owens.
Man could he make that thing "CRY"!!
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Re: How did you learn and play music, and what resources and teachers/coaching did you use; ukulele, guitar, piano, etc.

Post by Chv396 »

Very much appreciate your comments! I am a fan of Benny Goodman and Glen Miller too, as was my late father, who grew up in that era. I will give these videos a view.

My nephew also is a musically inclined individual, he became a music producer in Los Angeles, California.

:sharebeer
Sandtrap wrote: Tue Jul 02, 2024 8:10 pm
Chv396 wrote: Tue Jul 02, 2024 9:36 am Started at age 12, in middle school. Started with the clarinet, then switched to the alto & tenor saxophones. Loved big band & jazz music (still do.) My brother played the violin and guitar, my sister was a pianist. We all loved music.

I learned in middle school, as did my brother. My sister learned from a professional music teacher.
How wonderful that you were fortunate to grow up in a musical family.

Love Big Band and fell in love with the sounds of Benny Goodman and Glen Miller way back when. I used to borrow all the albums from the library.
Here's a wonderful clip of a Tenor Sax Ballad by Paul Baker in the style of the Ray Charles Band. Just gorgeous.

Enjoy the music.
Youtube:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P3wJzOcPPL8

Kenny G (youtube)
of course. . . .
"Songbird" (26 M views!)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QN2RnjFHmNY

If I tried to play sax at this point in life it would sound like my home filled with angry geese.
j :D
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Re: How did you learn and play music, and what resources and teachers/coaching did you use; ukulele, guitar, piano, etc.

Post by yankees60 »

After reading all of these the Fantasy Is to have all of you Be part of the boglehead's band that entertains at the boglehead's conference!
Above provided by: Vinny, who always says: "I only regret that I have but one lap to give to my cats." AND "I'm a more-is-more person."
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Re: How did you learn and play music, and what resources and teachers/coaching did you use; ukulele, guitar, piano, etc.

Post by Sandtrap »

bondsr4me wrote: Wed Jul 03, 2024 9:36 am ^^

I've heard a lot great steel, but my all time favorite is Tom Brumley playing 'Together Again" for Buck Owens.
Man could he make that thing "CRY"!!
Here it is:
Youtube:
"Together Again" buck owens.
pedal steel
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cYKVb7T1n2I
wow, jus make that thing weep and cry, goosebumps.
Of course. thinking of "together again", can't help but play it by "emmylou harris".
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ipPS2iHg_3I
j
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Re: How did you learn and play music, and what resources and teachers/coaching did you use; ukulele, guitar, piano, etc.

Post by Allixi »

1) How did you learn to play music?
Accordion lessons as a very young child and played clarinet in middle/high school - can no longer play these. Piano lessons starting around 9, progress plateau'ed around 12 years old. Quit for many years, but I then I learned about electric pianos, bought myself one 10 years ago and have been learning on my own ever since.
I picked up ukulele during the pandemic and learned some basic chords.
My wife buys various instruments (see below) for herself or my toddler, but they never sustain interest in them for more than a few days. I end up messing around on them for fun

2) What kind of music do you play?
Classical on piano, pop on other instruments (at least the melodies which are easy)

3) What instruments do you play?
Piano
Ukulele (chords only)
Steel tongue drum, hang
Recorder, xun, xiao, hulusi.

4) What resources did you and now use?
Youtube, IMSLP (free sheet music - if I had to pay for music sheets I'd be a lot less interested), various websites for ukulele tabs

5) Did you have teachers, what do you play?
No. Most instruments have beginner's tutorials on YouTube that are quite sufficient

6) What suggestions do you have for others that are getting started or want to improve?
First learn to enjoy the music, then learn to enjoy the instrument
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Re: How did you learn and play music, and what resources and teachers/coaching did you use; ukulele, guitar, piano, etc.

Post by DetroitRick »

Interesting to hear everybody's path on this.

I primarily play classical guitar, dabble with steel string (still have a Gibson electric), and dabble with piano. My earliest guitar instruction was all live. Took lessons in late high school and through college. First pop, rock and older jazz on steel string. Later classical and flamenco. In mid 70's, I got a rare opportunity to briefly study with a very accomplished flamenco guitarist. Mid-life, took lessons again on classical guitar. Piano is all self-taught, and probably shows it. But I do love the learning resources available now online. So much easier to access global talent. But I did benefit from the structure of live lessons, at least initially.

Now I mainly play classical guitar (rarely flamenco - don't ask how bad my rasquedo is, it stinks). Learning now is primarily a combo of self-teaching and YouTube. My main go-to there is Per-Olov Kindgren (classical guitar, buy his arrangements online, then using his videos for fine tuning). I read both standard notation and tab. My flamenco stuff was tab, when it was written down at all. Nowadays I try to find inspiration on YouTube and then work backwards.

I love all kinds of music, really most everything, but my own playing is more concentrated. Frankly, hearing aids have detracted from my experience just a little. But I'm adjusting. There are more instruments I would love to play, but most have extensive learning curves. So I'm most motivated with classical guitar.
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Re: How did you learn and play music, and what resources and teachers/coaching did you use; ukulele, guitar, piano, etc.

Post by Dave55 »

Hi Jim.

1. Learned guitar and how to read music from 11-14 years young. I have been taking piano lessons for the past 2 years.

2. Currently playing piano, still learning the fundamentals but also playing blues, classical and rock (easy songs).

5. I have an absolutely fantastic piano teacher. She has been teaching music and playing professionally for the past 30 years.

6. Take lessons from a good teacher and practice daily.

My wife was after me for years to take up musical instrument. I finally did 2 years ago and just love it. Having a great teacher only makes the learning process that much fun.

Dave
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Re: How did you learn and play music, and what resources and teachers/coaching did you use; ukulele, guitar, piano, etc.

Post by Second Round »

If you cross a classical guitar with a ukulele, you get the Yamaha Guitalele - a very fun, inexpensive instrument for a classical guitarist on which to noodle. Gretch and Cordoba make similar instruments with different names. From what I understand, the tuning of the top 4 strings are the same as a uke - GCEA. But you have two others, so you can play your guitar repertoire on it as well, tuned up a perfect fourth. It gives it a pretty neat sound.

I got started (in middle age) with electric and steel-string guitar via in-person lessons, and after some fits and starts, at one point ended up - by accident - in a group class for classical guitar. The accident was ... I didn't know it was for classical, nylon-string guitar. Most of us didn't. But, most of us liked it! Later, I happened upon classicalguitardelcamp.com, and enrolled in the lessons there for a few years before plateauing out. I don't play much anymore, having other higher-priority goals now, but I enjoy it when I have time and place to do so. The only musical goals I have at this point would be to learn a couple specific pieces before I can no longer play.

edit: Thumbs up / seconding the recommendation for Per-Olov Kindren. Can't speak for his scores, I've not bought them, but he plays beautifully.
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Re: How did you learn and play music, and what resources and teachers/coaching did you use; ukulele, guitar, piano, etc.

Post by hfj »

1) Piano lessons from about 2nd grade through 9th grade, when I convinced my parents that there were too many conflicts between high school homework/activities and driving to piano lessons. We moved before high school so the teacher was further away, but honestly I didn't really like practicing. However, once I stopped formal lessons, I found that I was playing more. A lot of this is because I made a friends who were really good, and opened my eyes to more repertoire. I started picking up my own pieces to play, and found myself playing regularly.

2) Mostly classical, would like to dabble more in jazz. When my flute-playing daughter was younger, I was her accompanist.

3) Piano

4) I somewhat lament that there are far fewer music stores now versus when I was younger. There used to be a sheet music stores I loved to browse, with super knowledgeable staff that could order particular books for you. Now I primarily use IMSLP, an iPad with Forscore, and Youtube.

5) No teachers, I'm still hearing things I want to play (i.e. on Youtube, the classical station on the radio, etc) and seeking out the music. After seeing the wonderful and heartbreaking anime Your Lie in April, the Kreisler/Rachmaninoff Liebeslied and the Chopin Ballade 1 landed squarely on my practice list.

6) As with any new skill or new piece, it's probably going to be rough going at the beginning. I find for myself playing pretty much daily both helps improve quicker, but also has turned into something I do to relax and unwind.
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Re: How did you learn and play music, and what resources and teachers/coaching did you use; ukulele, guitar, piano, etc.

Post by bondsr4me »

Sandtrap wrote: Wed Jul 03, 2024 2:10 pm
bondsr4me wrote: Wed Jul 03, 2024 9:36 am ^^

I've heard a lot great steel, but my all time favorite is Tom Brumley playing 'Together Again" for Buck Owens.
Man could he make that thing "CRY"!!
Here it is:
Youtube:
"Together Again" buck owens.
pedal steel
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cYKVb7T1n2I
wow, jus make that thing weep and cry, goosebumps.
Of course. thinking of "together again", can't help but play it by "emmylou harris".
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ipPS2iHg_3I
j
+1….thanks for the link!
Brumley could make that thing cry!!

and yes, Emmylou did a great job with this too!!
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Re: How did you learn and play music, and what resources and teachers/coaching did you use; ukulele, guitar, piano, etc.

Post by Sandtrap »

hfj wrote: Wed Jul 03, 2024 5:07 pm 1) Piano lessons from about 2nd grade through 9th grade, when I convinced my parents that there were too many conflicts between high school homework/activities and driving to piano lessons. We moved before high school so the teacher was further away, but honestly I didn't really like practicing. However, once I stopped formal lessons, I found that I was playing more. A lot of this is because I made a friends who were really good, and opened my eyes to more repertoire. I started picking up my own pieces to play, and found myself playing regularly.

2) Mostly classical, would like to dabble more in jazz. When my flute-playing daughter was younger, I was her accompanist.

3) Piano

4) I somewhat lament that there are far fewer music stores now versus when I was younger. There used to be a sheet music stores I loved to browse, with super knowledgeable staff that could order particular books for you. Now I primarily use IMSLP, an iPad with Forscore, and Youtube.

5) No teachers, I'm still hearing things I want to play (i.e. on Youtube, the classical station on the radio, etc) and seeking out the music. After seeing the wonderful and heartbreaking anime Your Lie in April, the Kreisler/Rachmaninoff Liebeslied and the Chopin Ballade 1 landed squarely on my practice list.

6) As with any new skill or new piece, it's probably going to be rough going at the beginning. I find for myself playing pretty much daily both helps improve quicker, but also has turned into something I do to relax and unwind.
I used to spend all day in a music store going through the sheet music arrangements. Playing them in my head. Finding terrible arrangements of popular songs, or spending hard earned dollars on collections and then find out that maybe only one song played well and sounded okay.

Yes.
"Those were the days....my friend...we'd thought they'd never end...."

For some reason, I remember forever, most music, the songs still play in my mind, word for word, note for note...
Are we all like this with music?

Thanks for sharing.
Great stories.
Do you play piano daily right now?
Have you played in public, at care and nursing homes, etc?

j
Last edited by Sandtrap on Wed Jul 03, 2024 8:43 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: How did you learn and play music, and what resources and teachers/coaching did you use; ukulele, guitar, piano, etc.

Post by Sandtrap »

Image

In the lull, for your entertaiment, here's a wonderful rendition of "Over the Rainbow" and a personal story from legendary Ukulele player, "Jake Shimabukuro".
youtube:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NFaFxNNHvpI
I play a long scale tenor Kamaka, made in hawaii, similar to what Jake is playing.
The arrangement is deceptively simple at interm/adv level. It's Jakes incredible touch, timing, and perfect rhythm, "and feel" that carries all the meaning and emotion of this song into a solo instrumental ukulele piece as he's done. He does his own arrangements of course.
Here's a "google drive" link to just the audio for this ukulele song that I play along with to practice. I have a copy of Jake's arrangement but I cannot embellish like Jake.
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1xn4YC0 ... sp=sharing
And, though not the arrangement that is played here, here's a simple version to play on a ukulele.
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1xn4YC0 ... sp=sharing

enjoy
j
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Re: How did you learn and play music, and what resources and teachers/coaching did you use; ukulele, guitar, piano, etc.

Post by hfj »

Sandtrap wrote: Wed Jul 03, 2024 7:58 pm
<snip>

Thanks for sharing.
Great stories.
Do you play piano daily right now?
Have you played in public, at care and nursing homes, etc?

j
Yes, I usually play every day, roughly 30min-1hr or so. This is primarily for myself (my poor wife has to suffer the mistakes and repetitiveness), the only public playing I'll do is occasionally noodling around on a public piano, like at the train station in Manchester UK last summer. Having music on the iPad has been pretty great also, so when we go stay with my wife's parents, I can practice on their piano.
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Re: How did you learn and play music, and what resources and teachers/coaching did you use; ukulele, guitar, piano, etc.

Post by Michael Patrick »

Just to add to what I posted above...

My goal, from the very first time I picked up a guitar, was to play in a group in front of people. I wanted to be a rock star!

The lessons I took with an older gentleman taught me the basics, but I learned to play popular rock music by a combination of learning songs and licks from friends and figuring things out by ear. I was a pretty quick study, and I played my first gig about a year and a half after I got my first guitar. Since then I've played hundreds of gigs, from playing to two people in a dive bar at 2:00 am to playing to many thousands at Wrigley Field. It's been quite a ride...

I'm mostly retired from playing live now. I'll pick up an occasional gig, but I haven't been in a regular band since before the pandemic. Once I retire from my regular job in a year and a half, I'd like to go back and take lessons again. Being self taught there are a lot of holes in my knowledge (like being able to sight read), and there are styles and techniques I'd like to pursue.
Last edited by Michael Patrick on Thu Jul 04, 2024 6:40 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: How did you learn and play music, and what resources and teachers/coaching did you use; ukulele, guitar, piano, etc.

Post by A440 »

1
How did you learn to play music?
I started playing my older brother's piano pieces by ear when I was in kindergarten. He quit his lessons, and my parents enrolled me in a piano class :happy A few years later I started learning classical music. Around age 14 I started playing Billy Joel's music and other pop music. It was "cooler" to play this genre in high school. Eventually, I returned to classical so I could get a piano scholarship when auditioning for college as a music major.
2
What kind of music do you play?
Pop, Rock, Classical, Hymns/Praise songs, New Age and Jazz (to a lesser extent)
3
What instruments do you play?
piano, uke (in the style of slack key), organ (church variety)
4
What resources did you and now use?
Piano and organ teachers, fakebooks, uke books, large repertoire of printed music over the years
5
What suggestions do you have for others that are getting started or want to improve?
Unfortunately, I haven't found a substitute for good old-fashioned practice. You might be able to cram for an exam, but you can't cram for a performance and expect a good outcome.
I don't know what the future holds, but I know who holds my future.
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Re: How did you learn and play music, and what resources and teachers/coaching did you use; ukulele, guitar, piano, etc.

Post by Sandtrap »

Michael Patrick wrote: Thu Jul 04, 2024 5:26 am Just to add to what I posted above...

My goal, from the very first time I picked up a guitar, was to play in a group in front of people. I wanted to be a rock star!

The lessons I took with an older gentleman taught me the basics, but I learned to play popular rock music by a combination of learning songs and licks from friends and figuring things out by ear. I was a pretty quick study, and I played my first gig about a year and a half after I got my first guitar. Since then I've played hundreds of gigs, from playing to two people in a dive bar at 2:00 am to playing to many thousands at Wrigley Field. It's been quite a ride...

I'm mostly retired from playing live now. I'll pick up an occasional gig, but I haven't been in a regular band since before the pandemic. Once I retire from my regular job in a year and a half, I'd like to go back and take lessons again. Being self taught there are a lot of holes in my knowledge (like being able to sight read), and there are styles and techniques I'd like to pursue.
wow!
What an incredible musical history and background.
What do you play? (strat?)
In band, lead or rhythm?
What kinds of new styles and techniques are you going to work on more or new?

thanks for sharing
j :D
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Re: How did you learn and play music, and what resources and teachers/coaching did you use; ukulele, guitar, piano, etc.

Post by Michael Patrick »

Sandtrap wrote: Thu Jul 04, 2024 7:04 am
Michael Patrick wrote: Thu Jul 04, 2024 5:26 am Just to add to what I posted above...

My goal, from the very first time I picked up a guitar, was to play in a group in front of people. I wanted to be a rock star!

The lessons I took with an older gentleman taught me the basics, but I learned to play popular rock music by a combination of learning songs and licks from friends and figuring things out by ear. I was a pretty quick study, and I played my first gig about a year and a half after I got my first guitar. Since then I've played hundreds of gigs, from playing to two people in a dive bar at 2:00 am to playing to many thousands at Wrigley Field. It's been quite a ride...

I'm mostly retired from playing live now. I'll pick up an occasional gig, but I haven't been in a regular band since before the pandemic. Once I retire from my regular job in a year and a half, I'd like to go back and take lessons again. Being self taught there are a lot of holes in my knowledge (like being able to sight read), and there are styles and techniques I'd like to pursue.
wow!
What an incredible musical history and background.
What do you play? (strat?)
In band, lead or rhythm?
What kinds of new styles and techniques are you going to work on more or new?

thanks for sharing
j :D
I've managed to acquire a few nice guitars over the years - a couple of Les Pauls, a couple of Strats, a 335, a Tele. The usual suspects.

Lead guitar is my main thing. I learned to improvise very early, and while it can drive my bandmates nuts sometimes, I like to have at least a song or two in a set where I can just let inspirado strike during the solo section and see what happens.

Things I'd like to work on... I never learned to finger pick or hybrid pick or to do banjo rolls. I'd also like to work on being able to do long legato lines like Eric Johnson. I'm a decent enough slide player, but somehow that hasn't transferred as well as I thought it would to lap steel. I'd like to get into jazz more, which means learning more theory.
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Re: How did you learn and play music, and what resources and teachers/coaching did you use; ukulele, guitar, piano, etc.

Post by Sandtrap »

Michael Patrick wrote: Thu Jul 04, 2024 7:27 am
Sandtrap wrote: Thu Jul 04, 2024 7:04 am
Michael Patrick wrote: Thu Jul 04, 2024 5:26 am Just to add to what I posted above...

My goal, from the very first time I picked up a guitar, was to play in a group in front of people. I wanted to be a rock star!

The lessons I took with an older gentleman taught me the basics, but I learned to play popular rock music by a combination of learning songs and licks from friends and figuring things out by ear. I was a pretty quick study, and I played my first gig about a year and a half after I got my first guitar. Since then I've played hundreds of gigs, from playing to two people in a dive bar at 2:00 am to playing to many thousands at Wrigley Field. It's been quite a ride...

I'm mostly retired from playing live now. I'll pick up an occasional gig, but I haven't been in a regular band since before the pandemic. Once I retire from my regular job in a year and a half, I'd like to go back and take lessons again. Being self taught there are a lot of holes in my knowledge (like being able to sight read), and there are styles and techniques I'd like to pursue.
wow!
What an incredible musical history and background.
What do you play? (strat?)
In band, lead or rhythm?
What kinds of new styles and techniques are you going to work on more or new?

thanks for sharing
j :D
I've managed to acquire a few nice guitars over the years - a couple of Les Pauls, a couple of Strats, a 335, a Tele. The usual suspects.

Lead guitar is my main thing. I learned to improvise very early, and while it can drive my bandmates nuts sometimes, I like to have at least a song or two in a set where I can just let inspirado strike during the solo section and see what happens.

Things I'd like to work on... I never learned to finger pick or hybrid pick or to do banjo rolls. I'd also like to work on being able to do long legato lines like Eric Johnson. I'm a decent enough slide player, but somehow that hasn't transferred as well as I thought it would to lap steel. I'd like to get into jazz more, which means learning more theory.
If you can play anything like Eric Johnson you have epic talent and skills!

I have tried to play with a pick for all of my life and it does not sound good.
My lst guitar was classical nylon and classical guitar music. And fingerstyle Hawaiian. So, fingers n nails. Then, like James Taylor in the 60's, fingers. Then like Chet Atkins and Marc Knopfler. Fingers. Then Jazz guitar and bass. Fingers.
oh well.
j
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Re: How did you learn and play music, and what resources and teachers/coaching did you use; ukulele, guitar, piano, etc.

Post by Sandtrap »

Speaking of playing guitar with just fingers or hybrid with fingers and a pick or thumb pick, or only with a pick.

Here's a classic guitar duet with Mark Knopfler (only fingers) and Chet Atkins (thumb pick and fingers). Notice how Chet will sometimes hold the thumb pick or support it additionally so it is like playing with just a pick.

Enjoy
YouTube:
Chet Atkins and Mark Knopfler "I'll See You In My Dreams".
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5wTVLIZaxMk

These performance and lesson etc videos on YouTube are a great resource for learning to play music.

Couldn't resist at the mention of Mark Knopfler (dire straits) one of my guitar heroes.
By the way, he has written "all the words and all the notes" (as Chet Atkins said) for all of his music.
His epic solo in his song "Telegraph Road". (he's older here). Pure goosebumps!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JzsmeO7FZcs

j :D
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Re: How did you learn and play music, and what resources and teachers/coaching did you use; ukulele, guitar, piano, etc.

Post by Michael Patrick »

Sandtrap wrote: Fri Jul 05, 2024 7:16 pm If you can play anything like Eric Johnson you have epic talent and skills!

I have tried to play with a pick for all of my life and it does not sound good.
My lst guitar was classical nylon and classical guitar music. And fingerstyle Hawaiian. So, fingers n nails. Then, like James Taylor in the 60's, fingers. Then like Chet Atkins and Marc Knopfler. Fingers. Then Jazz guitar and bass. Fingers.
oh well.
j
I assure you, I am no Eric Johnson. The long legato lines is just one facet of his playing that I'd like to take a crack at. He does so much more that I'll never get close to mastering.
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Re: How did you learn and play music, and what resources and teachers/coaching did you use; ukulele, guitar, piano, etc.

Post by bad1bill »

thanks for asking and sharing. Please take my comments with large grain of salt ;)

Given a guitar at 14 and been playing ever since but all self-taught. Rock and a bit of jazz (love the classic Miles stuff). Was in a band in high school and another couple in college. Rock always...With kids, I wasn't able to play as much in their early years but always had a guitar around and played (though less frequently). Once they were older (15 years ago), I started playing and practicing lots.

I'm extremely lucky being retired (for 2 years) and 73 and in a "bar band". We play about 50 gigs a year. Mainly small venues and private gigs. Bluegrass/Americana/classic rock (Eagles, Dead, Dylan, etc.) and some originals. Check out Billy Strings as he's my current hero. All his "releases" are great. Truthfully, in live shows he's going much more jam-grass which I'm not as fond of but...I love Billy. Also Molly Tuttle, Sierra Ferrell, Steeldrivers...came to bluegrass only in the last 10 years ar so but now I'm a real Americana guy.

Also EXTREMELY lucky in that my main band mate is a woman bass player who is attractive and loves dancing around. We've been together for 7 years and have had a spate of different players. Mandolin, banjo, fiddle...all work. THey come, they go and we keep recruiting more. Current is 2 guitars, banjo and bass. Three of us sing and we have good harmonies. Our current guitar player is stunningly good and he'll probably move on past us but we love having him. I'm a rhythm player in the manner of (nowhere as good as) Bob Weir of the Dead but can carry a tune and not bashful...

I use Ultimate Guitar to get tabs on songs we want to learn. You Tube is also fabulous. Audacity is free and cross platform and great for slowing down songs (among many other things) . Since we play with lots of different players, I have fallen in love with LivePrompter, a teleprompter which is free with Windows and Android support. It makes it SO easy to ask players to sit in because they can follow the tunes at a gig easily.

My son (34) is a mandolin player in a bluegrass band and has taken lessons on both instrument and voice online and he highly recommends that. It's crazy how many stellar players give lessons for $50 (or so)an hour. I keep telling myself to do it.

Playing with other people is absolutely the best. It takes a bit to get used to.... listening and playing off their strengths and weaknesses but it is sooooo satisfying. Harmony is also wonderful and growing up in a church choir helped start me on that road.

One MUST practice and as much as possible. Instruments and voice. For harmony, I always sing along to the radio and try to harmonize. Record yourself with your phone for feedback. Get over (it's hard and I struggle with it all the time) the natural fear of embarrassment. There are a MILLION more talented people out there (see You TUbe) but they aren't at the neighborhood bar this Friday. YOUR BAND is! Be open to other players and genres.

I'm seeing replies from mainly men (I think) and I can't say enough about having a woman in the band. Diversity is great! Also so lucky that I have a very supportive wife!!
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Re: How did you learn and play music, and what resources and teachers/coaching did you use; ukulele, guitar, piano, etc.

Post by Sandtrap »

This is a wonderful live video recording of a Hawaiian Quartet of elders with "kupuna" dancing "hula" to the classic Hawaiian Island Song, "Noho Pai Pai". (like most all Hawaiian songs in Hawaiian, the language meaning is "layered". "Noho Pai Pai" is called the "Rocking Chair Song".
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-umWGJ91csg
How I learned:
Whether at weekend backyard "jams" or community "luau" gatherings, this is the music I grew up with and how I learned to sing and play Hawaiian music.
All of the elders were our teachers. We were taught simply and told "like this", "look" "listen" and "jus press" on the ukulele, then guitar, then bass, etc. As for singing, if you had a beautiful voice then you sang, if you did not, then don't sing.
Hawaiian music and musician and dance culture holds the traditions and history of the Islands. Every household has someone that plays and sings and dances, or the whole family. Classic Hawaiian songs are sung in the Hawaiian language and the meanings or "stories" in them are understood by all.
If there are hula dancers, there's no instrumental parts/solos played.

In Hawaiian songs, and other things, there is a line/saying called, "Ha'ina 'ia mai ana ka puana", which means, "let the story be told". So, the stories are in the songs and the "hula dance". I think this is why there's that "talk story" Island conversational style. (humor).

Here's the group, "Kapena" doing "Masese" on the outdoor lanai of Koolau Golf Club in Kaneohe, Hawaii. We lived a few miles down the road for many decades. "Masese" is a Fijian song that is popular in Hawaii.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UCBDQL5wlPI

Backyard musician "jams" are called "kanakapila". Here's Gabby in Waimanalo.
Image
"IZ" when he was young in "Makaha" not far from where I grew up.
Image
j :D
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Re: How did you learn and play music, and what resources and teachers/coaching did you use; ukulele, guitar, piano, etc.

Post by Sandtrap »

bad1bill wrote: Fri Jul 05, 2024 10:04 pm thanks for asking and sharing. Please take my comments with large grain of salt ;)

Given a guitar at 14 and been playing ever since but all self-taught. Rock and a bit of jazz (love the classic Miles stuff). Was in a band in high school and another couple in college. Rock always...With kids, I wasn't able to play as much in their early years but always had a guitar around and played (though less frequently). Once they were older (15 years ago), I started playing and practicing lots.

I'm extremely lucky being retired (for 2 years) and 73 and in a "bar band". We play about 50 gigs a year. Mainly small venues and private gigs. Bluegrass/Americana/classic rock (Eagles, Dead, Dylan, etc.) and some originals. Check out Billy Strings as he's my current hero. All his "releases" are great. Truthfully, in live shows he's going much more jam-grass which I'm not as fond of but...I love Billy. Also Molly Tuttle, Sierra Ferrell, Steeldrivers...came to bluegrass only in the last 10 years ar so but now I'm a real Americana guy.

Also EXTREMELY lucky in that my main band mate is a woman bass player who is attractive and loves dancing around. We've been together for 7 years and have had a spate of different players. Mandolin, banjo, fiddle...all work. THey come, they go and we keep recruiting more. Current is 2 guitars, banjo and bass. Three of us sing and we have good harmonies. Our current guitar player is stunningly good and he'll probably move on past us but we love having him. I'm a rhythm player in the manner of (nowhere as good as) Bob Weir of the Dead but can carry a tune and not bashful...

I use Ultimate Guitar to get tabs on songs we want to learn. You Tube is also fabulous. Audacity is free and cross platform and great for slowing down songs (among many other things) . Since we play with lots of different players, I have fallen in love with LivePrompter, a teleprompter which is free with Windows and Android support. It makes it SO easy to ask players to sit in because they can follow the tunes at a gig easily.

My son (34) is a mandolin player in a bluegrass band and has taken lessons on both instrument and voice online and he highly recommends that. It's crazy how many stellar players give lessons for $50 (or so)an hour. I keep telling myself to do it.

Playing with other people is absolutely the best. It takes a bit to get used to.... listening and playing off their strengths and weaknesses but it is sooooo satisfying. Harmony is also wonderful and growing up in a church choir helped start me on that road.

One MUST practice and as much as possible. Instruments and voice. For harmony, I always sing along to the radio and try to harmonize. Record yourself with your phone for feedback. Get over (it's hard and I struggle with it all the time) the natural fear of embarrassment. There are a MILLION more talented people out there (see You TUbe) but they aren't at the neighborhood bar this Friday. YOUR BAND is! Be open to other players and genres.

I'm seeing replies from mainly men (I think) and I can't say enough about having a woman in the band. Diversity is great! Also so lucky that I have a very supportive wife!!
What a great musical path. Congratulations!

Yes. I used to use a recording cassette tape player, then those Sony micro cassette players, still do, to record playing and especially singing. The feedback can be brutal but it is "honest". I've played back "singing" from others that jam and after that they stop singing. They always thought that they sounded wonderful, (maybe in the shower....humor). What's really brutal is singing through a realy nice sound system which can bring out one's voice if it is nice but worse if it is terrible. Honest feedback is good even when practicing.

Thanks for sharing.
Great that you are active playing in retirement. Awesome, seems not common unless praise music venue, etc.
j :D
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Re: How did you learn and play music, and what resources and teachers/coaching did you use; ukulele, guitar, piano, etc.

Post by Dottie57 »

Sandtrap wrote: Wed Jul 03, 2024 8:10 pm Image

In the lull, for your entertaiment, here's a wonderful rendition of "Over the Rainbow" and a personal story from legendary Ukulele player, "Jake Shimabukuro".
youtube:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NFaFxNNHvpI
I play a long scale tenor Kamaka, made in hawaii, similar to what Jake is playing.
The arrangement is deceptively simple at interm/adv level. It's Jakes incredible touch, timing, and perfect rhythm, "and feel" that carries all the meaning and emotion of this song into a solo instrumental ukulele piece as he's done. He does his own arrangements of course.
Here's a "google drive" link to just the audio for this ukulele song that I play along with to practice. I have a copy of Jake's arrangement but I cannot embellish like Jake.
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1xn4YC0 ... sp=sharing
And, though not the arrangement that is played here, here's a simple version to play on a ukulele.
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1xn4YC0 ... sp=sharing

enjoy
j
Thanks for Jake’s video. Lovely rendition.
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Re: How did you learn and play music, and what resources and teachers/coaching did you use; ukulele, guitar, piano, etc.

Post by bad1bill »

J, you sound like a talented player to play that song! We saw Jake at New Orleans Jazzfest a few years ago and were blown away. BTW, I HIGHLY recommend JazzFest for anyone who likes music. I don't really care about the headliners (Stones this year, etc) as much as the acts in the smaller tents. THe Gospel tent, for example, is always fun and inspirational (even though I'm not religious) and Fais Do Do stage always features zydeco and cajun acts that are virtually unknown outside of Louisiana and the Delta.

Jam sessions like you mention are a great way to hone your chops and meet players. I met my bass player at one.

Church choirs are almost always looking for new members and a great way to improve ones voice and be more comfortable in public.

And a good sound system, while exposing weaknesses, can also add reverb which helps flesh out and empower vocals.

Keep on playing!
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Re: How did you learn and play music, and what resources and teachers/coaching did you use; ukulele, guitar, piano, etc.

Post by Sandtrap »

Here's Jake Shimabukuro with his group ever since high school called, "Pure Heart" doing "BodySurfing" on his ukulele.
Everyone that has a ukulele in Hawaii is going to be asked, "Can you play "Bodysurfing".
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uEh_gmdtOSc
Koolau Golf Club in Kaneohe on the Island of Oahu on the Windward Side. Just breathtaking views of the Koolau Mountains.Every night, the clouds lower and soft rains fall over the mountains there. Waterfalls from way high cascade down between the ridges.

Here's "Pure Heart" again, doing a Hawaiian local favorite, "Molokai Sweet Home".
As I was primarily a singer/entertainer center in a Hawaiian Trio, this was one of the songs I liked to sing, played fingerstyle on a Martin.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tP-tboXC3zs

Tourists and elders always requested this older island classic song, "Going to Hana Maui". This has that country "paniolo" rhythm. In the old days I got tired of playing and singing it. Now it's just good memories.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GtP1dA_ux-g
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Enjoy
"Me Ke Aloha"
j :D
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Re: How did you learn and play music, and what resources and teachers/coaching did you use; ukulele, guitar, piano, etc.

Post by Sandtrap »

bad1bill wrote: Sat Jul 06, 2024 9:56 am J, you sound like a talented player to play that song! We saw Jake at New Orleans Jazzfest a few years ago and were blown away. BTW, I HIGHLY recommend JazzFest for anyone who likes music. I don't really care about the headliners (Stones this year, etc) as much as the acts in the smaller tents. THe Gospel tent, for example, is always fun and inspirational (even though I'm not religious) and Fais Do Do stage always features zydeco and cajun acts that are virtually unknown outside of Louisiana and the Delta.

Jam sessions like you mention are a great way to hone your chops and meet players. I met my bass player at one.

Church choirs are almost always looking for new members and a great way to improve ones voice and be more comfortable in public.

And a good sound system, while exposing weaknesses, can also add reverb which helps flesh out and empower vocals.

Keep on playing!
thanks!

aloha
j :D
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Re: How did you learn and play music, and what resources and teachers/coaching did you use; ukulele, guitar, piano, etc.

Post by Elsebet »

1 How did you learn to play music?

As a child I intermittently took piano lessons and had an electronic keyboard. I played flute, piccolo, and bells in high school band. I was never serious about it and it showed! As an younger adult I bought a bass guitar and took lessons until my teacher moved out of state. He encouraged me to just go on craigslist and try to get into a garage band, which I did. At one point I was in two different bands and practiced with them once a week each. We never really played anywhere but it was fun nonetheless. Currently I play the violin and have been taking lessons for a year.

2 What kind of music do you play?

In high school band we played the typical stuff marching/stage bands play. In the garage bands we mostly played rock covers. Now with my violin I play what is in my lesson books and easy classical pieces like "Ode to Joy".

3 What instruments do you play?
Currently only violin.

4. What resources did you and now use?

Books, youtube, teachers, friends.

5. Did you have teachers, what do you play?

For a typical rock band instrument (like bass guitar) I found taking some lessons for the fundamentals then joining beginner bands worked really well for me. For the violin I find staying with my teacher long term is more beneficial, it's an instrument that I feel will take me years to even get to a basic level of competency. Comparatively I found I could play along with a lot of common rock/pop songs on my bass guitar even at an early level. Obviously Rush songs were out of the question but that still left a huge field of material.

6. What suggestions do you have for others that are getting started or want to improve?

Make daily practice a habit, even if you only play briefly. Learn to mentally practice also by going over the music and how you play the instrument in your head. Practice developing your ear.
"...the man who adapts himself to his slender means and makes himself wealthy on a little sum, is the truly rich man..." ~Seneca
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Re: How did you learn and play music, and what resources and teachers/coaching did you use; ukulele, guitar, piano, etc.

Post by yankees60 »

Elsebet wrote: Mon Jul 08, 2024 4:35 pm 1 How did you learn to play music?

As a child I intermittently took piano lessons and had an electronic keyboard. I played flute, piccolo, and bells in high school band. I was never serious about it and it showed! As an younger adult I bought a bass guitar and took lessons until my teacher moved out of state. He encouraged me to just go on craigslist and try to get into a garage band, which I did. At one point I was in two different bands and practiced with them once a week each. We never really played anywhere but it was fun nonetheless. Currently I play the violin and have been taking lessons for a year.

2 What kind of music do you play?

In high school band we played the typical stuff marching/stage bands play. In the garage bands we mostly played rock covers. Now with my violin I play what is in my lesson books and easy classical pieces like "Ode to Joy".

3 What instruments do you play?
Currently only violin.

4. What resources did you and now use?

Books, youtube, teachers, friends.

5. Did you have teachers, what do you play?

For a typical rock band instrument (like bass guitar) I found taking some lessons for the fundamentals then joining beginner bands worked really well for me. For the violin I find staying with my teacher long term is more beneficial, it's an instrument that I feel will take me years to even get to a basic level of competency. Comparatively I found I could play along with a lot of common rock/pop songs on my bass guitar even at an early level. Obviously Rush songs were out of the question but that still left a huge field of material.

6. What suggestions do you have for others that are getting started or want to improve?

Make daily practice a habit, even if you only play briefly. Learn to mentally practice also by going over the music and how you play the instrument in your head. Practice developing your ear.
From your name I am assuming that you are a female?

If so were there any other females in those 2 rock bands you were in at the same time?
Above provided by: Vinny, who always says: "I only regret that I have but one lap to give to my cats." AND "I'm a more-is-more person."
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Re: How did you learn and play music, and what resources and teachers/coaching did you use; ukulele, guitar, piano, etc.

Post by Sandtrap »

Elsebet wrote: Mon Jul 08, 2024 4:35 pm 1 How did you learn to play music?

As a child I intermittently took piano lessons and had an electronic keyboard. I played flute, piccolo, and bells in high school band. I was never serious about it and it showed! As an younger adult I bought a bass guitar and took lessons until my teacher moved out of state. He encouraged me to just go on craigslist and try to get into a garage band, which I did. At one point I was in two different bands and practiced with them once a week each. We never really played anywhere but it was fun nonetheless. Currently I play the violin and have been taking lessons for a year.

2 What kind of music do you play?

In high school band we played the typical stuff marching/stage bands play. In the garage bands we mostly played rock covers. Now with my violin I play what is in my lesson books and easy classical pieces like "Ode to Joy".

3 What instruments do you play?
Currently only violin.

4. What resources did you and now use?

Books, youtube, teachers, friends.

5. Did you have teachers, what do you play?

For a typical rock band instrument (like bass guitar) I found taking some lessons for the fundamentals then joining beginner bands worked really well for me. For the violin I find staying with my teacher long term is more beneficial, it's an instrument that I feel will take me years to even get to a basic level of competency. Comparatively I found I could play along with a lot of common rock/pop songs on my bass guitar even at an early level. Obviously Rush songs were out of the question but that still left a huge field of material.

6. What suggestions do you have for others that are getting started or want to improve?

Make daily practice a habit, even if you only play briefly. Learn to mentally practice also by going over the music and how you play the instrument in your head. Practice developing your ear.
Thanks so much for your great input.
What an admirable musical path you've taken!
They seem so opposite, electric bass and violin. The concepts and roles are so different. Why did you pick bass?
What do you play? Fender bass? Short scale semi hollowbody Epiphone bass?

Yes. "ear training". I've met many muscians that were technically excellent but had not "ear" or sense of the music. And, then musicians who had terrific "ears" and sense of music, and played by ear amazingly.
For example: Tommy Emanuel, blazes on guitar, plays by ear and instinct, doesn't read music.
I have never had "ear training" but grew up in music so had an instinct for what sounds "right" and what sounds "off", and can sing in key, and read notes to sing if needed. But, do not do "ears for bass" very well at all. So, I rely on a strong music theory background and extensive lessons over time.

Thanks again for your great input.
What kind of music do you play on bass, on violin?

j
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Re: How did you learn and play music, and what resources and teachers/coaching did you use; ukulele, guitar, piano, etc.

Post by Sandtrap »

Image
Fender Bass setup for jazz with flatwound strings and adjusted action.
My "non skill level" on bass is low/interm at best. But, it's fun.

For fun, here's a bass guitar "cover" of "Time Won't Wait"
Exceptional skill level!!!!!
Youtube:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C_Xy_pD_Or8
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Re: How did you learn and play music, and what resources and teachers/coaching did you use; ukulele, guitar, piano, etc.

Post by yankees60 »

Sandtrap wrote: Mon Jul 08, 2024 8:03 pm Image
Fender Bass setup for jazz with flatwound strings and adjusted action.
My "non skill level" on bass is low/interm at best. But, it's fun.

For fun, here's a bass guitar "cover" of "Time Won't Wait"
Exceptional skill level!!!!!
Youtube:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C_Xy_pD_Or8
Don't like that song! Also don't know why it was titled a base cover since The rest of the sounds on it were sometimes so loud that you could barely hear the bass.

However, did it appear to you that she had Exceptionally long fingers?
Above provided by: Vinny, who always says: "I only regret that I have but one lap to give to my cats." AND "I'm a more-is-more person."
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Re: How did you learn and play music, and what resources and teachers/coaching did you use; ukulele, guitar, piano, etc.

Post by Sandtrap »

yankees60 wrote: Wed Jul 03, 2024 11:50 am After reading all of these the Fantasy Is to have all of you Be part of the boglehead's band that entertains at the boglehead's conference!
Great idea.
That would be fun.

What do you play?
j
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Re: How did you learn and play music, and what resources and teachers/coaching did you use; ukulele, guitar, piano, etc.

Post by yankees60 »

Sandtrap wrote: Tue Jul 09, 2024 2:14 pm
yankees60 wrote: Wed Jul 03, 2024 11:50 am After reading all of these the Fantasy Is to have all of you Be part of the boglehead's band that entertains at the boglehead's conference!
Great idea.
That would be fun.

What do you play?
j
I was referring to all of you, not me!

I took accordion lessons from ages 9-15 years old And have not played it or any other instrument since. I quit 2 weeks after I went to a competition in New York city and I felt totally Embarrassed humiliated by my performance. Also, this was 2 years after the Beatles came out and I really did not want to be playing All the classical music that I was learning. Playing the accordion was never ever my choice. If you were Italian at 9 years old you got brought down to the music studio to learn accordion. I was brought up in an era Where family was like the military. You obeyed orders And there was no discussion.
Above provided by: Vinny, who always says: "I only regret that I have but one lap to give to my cats." AND "I'm a more-is-more person."
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Re: How did you learn and play music, and what resources and teachers/coaching did you use; ukulele, guitar, piano, etc.

Post by Sandtrap »

Some memories:
Youtube:
1967 Live Performance: Beatles in their recording studio. "All You Need Is Love".
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bsYXDWvkjUQ
I remember a gathering of guys with girls and girlfriends hanging out.
Everyone had steel string acoustic guitars. Just basic chords and strum and sing.
I was the only one with a nylon string classical guitar. It was a good mix.
The girls sang along, too. Some had tambourines and bongo drums.
"All You Need Is Love". . . . .

j :D
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Re: How did you learn and play music, and what resources and teachers/coaching did you use; ukulele, guitar, piano, etc.

Post by Jazztonight »

I love to read about Bogleheads who are musicians!

My musical journey began when I was an infant, I suppose. My mother could play the piano quite well, and she read sheet music quite well. Mom had an extensive collection of music from Tin Pan Alley and Broadway, with selections from many of the songwriters who contributed to the Great American Songbook--Cole Porter, Gershwin, Rodgers & Hart, Duke Ellington, Irving Berlin, Frank Loesser, Jimmy Van Heusen, and others. (I've inherited that collection, btw.)

I started on piano lessons when I was a kid (Teaching Little Fingers to Play, John Thompson, etc.). We had a ukulele and a Sears/Silvertone guitar in the house and I'd play along with my Mom when she played the piano.

As a teenager I took up the guitar, and had a nice Gibson electric. I was an okay player, but found that my strength was in being a bandleader. I was the guy who formed the combos, put together the repertoire, and got the gigs. I continued to do that through adulthood, and was a wedding band leader for 15 years even while I practiced my health care profession. Along the way I went back to piano, worked on my jazz chops, and moved on to tenor saxophone in my 40s.

I played the sax for 15 years, including during the time when I semi-retired from my day job and attained a 4 year degree in music composition from nearby Cal State Univ. (I was always a songwriter, but wanted to compose and arrange at a higher level; that's exactly what I did.)

When I retired at 66 I took up the flute as a retirement project and wound up playing in a nearby community concert band. I continued to compose and play. One of my concert pieces was performed at Stanford and by a US Army concert band, as well as at other universities and high schools.

My composition career culminated in a Sabbath concert piece, performed by a choir and jazz quartet (with me on piano).

Now, I perform on piano along with a singer entertaining residents at several retirement facilities. (The pandemic interrupted that gig, but we're back.)

Finally, 5 years ago at age 72 I took up the trombone--my first brass instrument. I believe in personal challenges, and this has been a big one. (Wish I would have started the trombone when I was 15 y.o.) I've played trombone in a different community band after the first band I was playing flute in fell apart because of the pandemic. RIP.

I practice and play pretty much every day. On a very recent vacation cruise, I came across a jazz piano instruction method presented by a terrific teacher, and I'm looking forward to upping my solo jazz piano skills.

Other than daily exercise and Spanish study, I can't think of anything much better than I can do with my time or my life.
"What does not destroy me, makes me stronger." Nietzsche
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Re: How did you learn and play music, and what resources and teachers/coaching did you use; ukulele, guitar, piano, etc.

Post by Sandtrap »

Jazztonight wrote: Tue Jul 09, 2024 5:05 pm I love to read about Bogleheads who are musicians!

My musical journey began when I was an infant, I suppose. My mother could play the piano quite well, and she read sheet music quite well. Mom had an extensive collection of music from Tin Pan Alley and Broadway, with selections from many of the songwriters who contributed to the Great American Songbook--Cole Porter, Gershwin, Rodgers & Hart, Duke Ellington, Irving Berlin, Frank Loesser, Jimmy Van Heusen, and others. (I've inherited that collection, btw.)

I started on piano lessons when I was a kid (Teaching Little Fingers to Play, John Thompson, etc.). We had a ukulele and a Sears/Silvertone guitar in the house and I'd play along with my Mom when she played the piano.

As a teenager I took up the guitar, and had a nice Gibson electric. I was an okay player, but found that my strength was in being a bandleader. I was the guy who formed the combos, put together the repertoire, and got the gigs. I continued to do that through adulthood, and was a wedding band leader for 15 years even while I practiced my health care profession. Along the way I went back to piano, worked on my jazz chops, and moved on to tenor saxophone in my 40s.

I played the sax for 15 years, including during the time when I semi-retired from my day job and attained a 4 year degree in music composition from nearby Cal State Univ. (I was always a songwriter, but wanted to compose and arrange at a higher level; that's exactly what I did.)

When I retired at 66 I took up the flute as a retirement project and wound up playing in a nearby community concert band. I continued to compose and play. One of my concert pieces was performed at Stanford and by a US Army concert band, as well as at other universities and high schools.

My composition career culminated in a Sabbath concert piece, performed by a choir and jazz quartet (with me on piano).

Now, I perform on piano along with a singer entertaining residents at several retirement facilities. (The pandemic interrupted that gig, but we're back.)

Finally, 5 years ago at age 72 I took up the trombone--my first brass instrument. I believe in personal challenges, and this has been a big one. (Wish I would have started the trombone when I was 15 y.o.) I've played trombone in a different community band after the first band I was playing flute in fell apart because of the pandemic. RIP.

I practice and play pretty much every day. On a very recent vacation cruise, I came across a jazz piano instruction method presented by a terrific teacher, and I'm looking forward to upping my solo jazz piano skills.

Other than daily exercise and Spanish study, I can't think of anything much better than I can do with my time or my life.
Robert, you are the most quintessential gentlemen, consummate musician, and compassionate humble human, that I've ever known and spent time with.
Your musical journey is inspiring and that you continue to push the boundaries of self-improvement while sharing your love of music with others, is awesome. You forgot to mention; book author, and walking across America from Coast to Coast, though tangential to the topic here.

Thank you for sharing.
Your friend.
"Me Ke Aloha"
Jimmy

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