International travel and customs

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tc101
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International travel and customs

Post by tc101 »

I just returned from my first trip out of the country in many years. One of the things that surprised me is that there was no customs inspection. No one asked me if I had anything to declare. No one looked in my bags. Why is that? Someone told me they now have dogs that sniff the luggage for drugs, explosives or cash. Is that true? How does customs work now?
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Re: International travel and customs

Post by ResearchMed »

tc101 wrote: Mon Jun 10, 2024 8:56 am I just returned from my first trip out of the country in many years. One of the things that surprised me is that there was no customs inspection. No one asked me if I had anything to declare. No one looked in my bags. Why is that? Someone told me they now have dogs that sniff the luggage for drugs, explosives or cash. Is that true? How does customs work now?

Assuming you flew... the airport international arrivals area should have had two exits (could be more like hallways; don't need to be open and close "doors") marked
"Nothing to Declare"
and
[something to declare; not sure what it actually says]

The "nothing" usually has a green ("GO") marker.
The "something to declare" usually has a red ["STOP"] marker.

They can obviously stop someone who looks "suspicious" or just randomly/arbitrarily at the "Nothing to Declare" exit and ask questions or inspect.
This is more for Customs and taxes; I doubt they expect anyone to "declare" that they had drugs or explosives! Yes, there can be dogs sniffing around, including in the baggage area, before you'd get to these exits.

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Re: International travel and customs

Post by jebmke »

Have they stopped using the declaration sheet that is typically handed out on the plane? Has been a while since I last entered from outside the US but typically when I would arrive at JFK or O'Hare I simply handed that to someone sitting idly as I passed through.

I have never had anyone look in my bags in the US and I flew many, many times in from all over the world.
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Re: International travel and customs

Post by Prokofiev »

jebmke wrote: Mon Jun 10, 2024 9:10 am Have they stopped using the declaration sheet that is typically handed out on the plane? Has been a while since I last entered from outside the US but typically when I would arrive at JFK or O'Hare I simply handed that to someone sitting idly as I passed through.

I have never had anyone look in my bags in the US and I flew many, many times in from all over the world.
I have not seen that form in several years. Gone . . .
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Re: International travel and customs

Post by tc101 »

I have never had anyone look in my bags in the US and I flew many, many times in from all over the world.
When I was a long haired hippy flying in from Asian countries in the 70's they always inspected my bags very thoroughly. Once they took me in a back room and tried to scare me.

Yesterday coming into the Atlanta airport there was no form to fill out. No door that said anything to declare. I just got off the plane, walked down several very long hallways, got to a baggage claim area, got my checked luggage, and got in a line to go through customs. The customs guy didn't even look at my passport or ask me anything. He had some kind of facial recognition device and it recognized me and that was it. I guess the facial recognition thing was hooked into some huge data base somewhere that might have flagged me if it thought I met certain criteria. My girlfriend had to take off her glasses for the facial recognition to work. Then we walked to where a friend was parked waiting for us and we were on our way.
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Re: International travel and customs

Post by jebmke »

tc101 wrote: Mon Jun 10, 2024 10:20 am
I have never had anyone look in my bags in the US and I flew many, many times in from all over the world.
When I was a long haired hippy flying in from Asian countries in the 70's they always inspected my bags very thoroughly. Once they took me in a back room and tried to scare me.

Yesterday coming into the Atlanta airport there was no form to fill out. No door that said anything to declare. I just got off the plane, walked down several very long hallways, got to a baggage claim area, got my checked luggage, and got in a line to go through customs. The customs guy didn't even look at my passport or ask me anything. He had some kind of facial recognition device and it recognized me and that was it. I guess the facial recognition thing was hooked into some huge data base somewhere that might have flagged me if it thought I met certain criteria. My girlfriend had to take off her glasses for the facial recognition to work. Then we walked to where a friend was parked waiting for us and we were on our way.
Normally it is immigration control that inspects passports, not customs. By the time you get to customs they assume you have been screened for identity etc. Even in the early 2000s they were using cameras but facial recognition is new. There is an excellent book on it if you are interested --- it will raise your eyebrows a few cm.
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Re: International travel and customs

Post by livesoft »

You were photographed while you were leaving the airplane and in the jet bridge well before you got to customs and/or immigration.

Everybody already knew who was on the plane, too.
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Re: International travel and customs

Post by tc101 »

You were photographed while you were leaving the airplane and in the jet bridge well before you got to customs and/or immigration.
But how would they know if someone was bringing in a suitcase full of heroin or cocaine ? Dogs smelling it?
Last edited by tc101 on Mon Jun 10, 2024 12:12 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: International travel and customs

Post by bombcar »

tc101 wrote: Mon Jun 10, 2024 10:33 am But how would they know if I was bringing in a suitcase full of heroin or cocaine ? Dogs smelling it?
Yes, they have dogs on both ends of a flight (sometimes). The reality is they know that if you were doing it, you'd do it more than once, and eventually they'd get you.

As for other items to declare, it's on you to do so. They don't even bother asking because it's not worth it.
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Re: International travel and customs

Post by jebmke »

tc101 wrote: Mon Jun 10, 2024 10:33 am
You were photographed while you were leaving the airplane and in the jet bridge well before you got to customs and/or immigration.
But how would they know if I was bringing in a suitcase full of heroin or cocaine ? Dogs smelling it?
They used to use Beagles at JFK. Not sure what they use now. A friend of mine brought in a big slab of cheese double vacuum packed but the dog found it.
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Re: International travel and customs

Post by stan1 »

I'm sure they still do "random" inspections, and inspections triggered by some data in the record or observation.
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Re: International travel and customs

Post by cartophile »

I believe that every checked bag is inspected (at least by an automated scan) behind the scenes. After returning from a trip to Britain I found a note in my bag saying that it had been opened. My guess is that two particular items packed in close proximity triggered an alert of some sort:

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Re: International travel and customs

Post by Chuckles960 »

cartophile wrote: Mon Jun 10, 2024 4:41 pm I believe that every checked bag is inspected (at least by an automated scan) behind the scenes. After returning from a trip to Britain I found a note in my bag saying that it had been opened. My guess is that two particular items packed in close proximity triggered an alert of some sort:
TSA would not open your luggage for a flight TO the US.
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Re: International travel and customs

Post by whodidntante »

I've also been traveling a long time. I don't know that it's that different. Obviously, the EU has meant far fewer interactions with customs once within Europe. But even within the EU there are still certain restrictions in place.

You are required to know the rules, to avoid importing anything that is not allowed, and to declare if you have anything to declare. They have the right to pull you aside, ask questions, and inspect all of your belongings before letting you into their country. If you are walking through the "nothing to declare" lane when you have prohibited goods or goods that must be declared, you may be caught, and should not expect leniency.
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Re: International travel and customs

Post by lthenderson »

jebmke wrote: Mon Jun 10, 2024 9:10 am Have they stopped using the declaration sheet that is typically handed out on the plane? Has been a while since I last entered from outside the US but typically when I would arrive at JFK or O'Hare I simply handed that to someone sitting idly as I passed through.
When I flew back from Greece earlier this spring, they were handed out on the airplane ONLY if you had something to declare. Since we had nothing to declare, we didn't take one.
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Re: International travel and customs

Post by Nivek »

4 international trips in the past year and a half. At least one, we had to fill out the old school declaration form (I think the one flying back from Athens). Concerning passport control, sometimes flying into the States, we were asked questions (where we were, what did). Other times, look at the passport and stamped. Flying INTO Canada, they wanted to know the address of where we were staying so scrambled to find that. Same with flying INTO Japan.
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Re: International travel and customs

Post by Outer Marker »

Unless something triggers suspicion, very unusual these day to have luggage inspected. Which raises the important and long running frustration of why arriving US passengers must reclaim their luggage for connecting flights. Bags can be x-rayed and dog sniffed behind the scenes. This causes logistical problems for airlines and passengers and results in longer minimum connect times for international-to-domestic. Europe more sensibly does not require bag claim and recheck for connecting passengers.
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Re: International travel and customs

Post by ScubaHogg »

If you have something you need to declare, it’s on you to proactively do so
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Re: International travel and customs

Post by an_asker »

tc101 wrote: Mon Jun 10, 2024 8:56 am I just returned from my first trip out of the country in many years. One of the things that surprised me is that there was no customs inspection. No one asked me if I had anything to declare. No one looked in my bags. Why is that? Someone told me they now have dogs that sniff the luggage for drugs, explosives or cash. Is that true? How does customs work now?
How do you know no one looked in your bags? If you did not have anything objectionable, even if they check, you won't notice immediately. I know that they ran their grubby hands (god knows what else they touched with those gloves) through my clothes one time because snuck inside my bag was a small printed note that said that my baggage had been inspected by customs. Otherwise, I would have had no idea! :oops:
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Re: International travel and customs

Post by an_asker »

Chuckles960 wrote: Mon Jun 10, 2024 11:27 pm
cartophile wrote: Mon Jun 10, 2024 4:41 pm I believe that every checked bag is inspected (at least by an automated scan) behind the scenes. After returning from a trip to Britain I found a note in my bag saying that it had been opened. My guess is that two particular items packed in close proximity triggered an alert of some sort:
TSA would not open your luggage for a flight TO the US.
That is incorrect (maybe it wouldn't be TSA but some other authority). Please see above response from me.
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Re: International travel and customs

Post by Chuckles960 »

an_asker wrote: Tue Jun 11, 2024 10:03 am
Chuckles960 wrote: Mon Jun 10, 2024 11:27 pm TSA would not open your luggage for a flight TO the US.
That is incorrect (maybe it wouldn't be TSA but some other authority). Please see above response from me.
In other words "That is incorrect, but maybe it is correct?"

TSA is a US agency and does not operate in the UK.

The slips that are (sometimes) put in the luggage are from TSA, not from US Customs. Different things. TSA is concerned about bombs and such on departing flights, Customs is concerned about drugs and such on arriving flights.
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Re: International travel and customs

Post by Valuethinker »

tc101 wrote: Mon Jun 10, 2024 8:56 am I just returned from my first trip out of the country in many years. One of the things that surprised me is that there was no customs inspection. No one asked me if I had anything to declare. No one looked in my bags. Why is that? Someone told me they now have dogs that sniff the luggage for drugs, explosives or cash. Is that true? How does customs work now?
Before your bag got on that plane it was (in my limited technical understanding).

- scanned by a fluoroscope machine (so things like cash money would show up). Batteries will also show up and any unusual looking electronic device no doubt gets checked
- some kind of sniffer - a bombardment by radiation (of some form) that in turn leads to a detectible radioactive trace (very short half life) from the most common elements of explosives - I am unclear how this fits with depressurisation, extraction of a gas sample and a chemical analysis (whether it is the same process). The Czech explosive Semtex (used in a number of the most deadly bombings) was untraceable - I believe post the fall of the Iron Curtain in 1990, the manufacturer was prevailed upon to add a tracing element

The deadliest airline terrorist incidents in history (at least pre 9-11 and possibly pre Lockerbie) were 2 bombs placed on Air India jets in Canada by Sikh separatists during the mid 1980s. Disguised as radio cassette players (ghetto blasters), which were expensive items in those day,

One bomb detonated over the Irish Sea -- it took years to sort out what happened from the bits on the ocean floor. (Lockerbie would also have detonated over the ocean, but the plane was a bit late - so it fell on the village and killed some villagers, below, but left a forensic trail). Subsequent investigation showed the baggage screeners were insufficiently well trained, and the scanning equipment gave too many false positives (shades of the 9-11 hijackers at the security gates going into departure - surely one of the most difficult things to watch now).

(People were put on trial in Canada, or at least arrested, but there were no convictions. Later, the RCMP's** informant was murdered. I imagine Indian Intelligence (Research Action Wing/ RAW - Mrs Gandhi's specials) found its own conclusions).

The other killed 2 baggage handlers in Tokyo's Narita airport. Again, the plane was late. Apparently Narita has (or had) a problem with baggage theft, and the handlers were likely tampering with something they had seen on an X Ray (or so I read). Their loss, but others lived as a result.

One place I have been hand searched, repetitively, is Canada - Canadian allowances on alcohol and tobacco imports are highly restrictive (highly taxed in Canada). So they look for contraband. A country where you can buy MJ over the counter, but don't try to dodge liquor taxes ;-).

If you want impressive pre flight checking, fly El Al.

Customs have a profile of the sort of person and from where, who might be carrying hard drugs. Plus intelligence networks in the source countries.

** I can never, when I type Royal Canadian Mountain Police, not think of the cinematography in the Brian De Palma/ Kevin Costner flick, The Untouchables, when the bootleggers are in a border cabin, and the Mounties ride over the hill - the audience was in just exploded in cheers. (My spouse would no doubt recall Dudley Do-right of the Northwest Mounted Police (Bullwinkle & Rocky show).
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Re: International travel and customs

Post by Tycoon »

Outer Marker wrote: Tue Jun 11, 2024 8:42 am Europe more sensibly does not require bag claim and recheck for connecting passengers.
Amen to that!
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Re: International travel and customs

Post by Valuethinker »

Tycoon wrote: Tue Jun 11, 2024 11:54 am
Outer Marker wrote: Tue Jun 11, 2024 8:42 am Europe more sensibly does not require bag claim and recheck for connecting passengers.
Amen to that!
Not sure how it works in North America.

In Europe, flying into the Schengen Area, your bag is checked once (coming into the EU customs zone) and then I don't believe that it is when it is shipped to a connecting flight. You also go through immigration at that point of entry.

Having had a relative caught by North America-Frankfurt-London, ie back out of Schengen (and the EU), and the bag just not getting through, I don't think that is the case ie it gets checked again.
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Re: International travel and customs

Post by ResearchMed »

Valuethinker wrote: Tue Jun 11, 2024 11:30 am
** I can never, when I type Royal Canadian Mountain Police, not think of the cinematography in the Brian De Palma/ Kevin Costner flick, The Untouchables, when the bootleggers are in a border cabin, and the Mounties ride over the hill - the audience was in just exploded in cheers. (My spouse would no doubt recall Dudley Do-right of the Northwest Mounted Police (Bullwinkle & Rocky show).

Hi VT,

Just in case you *ever* want to "pass" as a native born USA citizen, it is
ROCKY and Bullwinkle, *NOT* Bullwinkle and Rocky! :D

I'm having trouble even saying it to myself in reverse!
Heh.

Many memories of watching with my younger brother, and also frequently trying to mimic the accent, including saying [forgive me for the attempt here!,] "Neh TASSSSHHHH a".
And of course, "Fearless Leader" became a thing forever! :wink:

Almost as much fun as Mad Magazine's "Spy vs. Spy".

Ah, memories from so long ago!

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Re: International travel and customs

Post by cartophile »

Chuckles960 wrote: Mon Jun 10, 2024 11:27 pm
cartophile wrote: Mon Jun 10, 2024 4:41 pm I believe that every checked bag is inspected (at least by an automated scan) behind the scenes. After returning from a trip to Britain I found a note in my bag saying that it had been opened. My guess is that two particular items packed in close proximity triggered an alert of some sort:
TSA would not open your luggage for a flight TO the US.
Good point. Since TSA did sign the note, it must have happened post-customs, *after* my connection in Atlanta.
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Re: International travel and customs

Post by ekid »

ResearchMed wrote: Tue Jun 11, 2024 12:04 pm
Valuethinker wrote: Tue Jun 11, 2024 11:30 am
** I can never, when I type Royal Canadian Mountain Police, not think of the cinematography in the Brian De Palma/ Kevin Costner flick, The Untouchables, when the bootleggers are in a border cabin, and the Mounties ride over the hill - the audience was in just exploded in cheers. (My spouse would no doubt recall Dudley Do-right of the Northwest Mounted Police (Bullwinkle & Rocky show).

Hi VT,

Just in case you *ever* want to "pass" as a native born USA citizen, it is
ROCKY and Bullwinkle, *NOT* Bullwinkle and Rocky! :D

I'm having trouble even saying it to myself in reverse!
Heh.
RM
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I don't even know Rocky/Bullwinkle
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Re: International travel and customs

Post by runningshoes »

Chuckles960 wrote: Tue Jun 11, 2024 11:05 am
an_asker wrote: Tue Jun 11, 2024 10:03 am
Chuckles960 wrote: Mon Jun 10, 2024 11:27 pm TSA would not open your luggage for a flight TO the US.
That is incorrect (maybe it wouldn't be TSA but some other authority). Please see above response from me.
In other words "That is incorrect, but maybe it is correct?"

TSA is a US agency and does not operate in the UK.

The slips that are (sometimes) put in the luggage are from TSA, not from US Customs. Different things. TSA is concerned about bombs and such on departing flights, Customs is concerned about drugs and such on arriving flights.
Just a side note that TSA operates approx. 15 pre-clearance sites outside the US, with 9 in Canada, 2 in Ireland already operating, and London scheduled to be added in the next year or so in addition to other key cities.
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Re: International travel and customs

Post by Chuckles960 »

runningshoes wrote: Tue Jun 11, 2024 3:48 pm Just a side note that TSA operates approx. 15 pre-clearance sites outside the US, with 9 in Canada, 2 in Ireland already operating, and London scheduled to be added in the next year or so in addition to other key cities.
False. The preclearance sites (there's also one in Abu Dhabi) are operated by US CBP (which is not TSA). Airplane security is still handled by the local authorities.

TSA is concerned about bombs and such on flights taking off in the US. Immigration (part of CBP) is concerned with people entering (and in principle, also leaving) the US. Customs (also part of CBP) is concerned with luggage entering (and in principle, also leaving) the US.
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Re: International travel and customs

Post by Joyful »

Hi - when we went to Australia and were waiting for our luggage they brought out the cute little beagle. The beagle didn't find anything in our carry on luggage, however, the guy standing in front to the left of us had the beagle sit down right beside his carry on. The Australian agent asked him if he had any food in his carry on and he said no and she then checked his declaration form and he said no on that too. She then asked him to take out everything in his carry on. He went thru his carry on and pulled out an avocado. The agent said come with me and off he went with her.
Fast Forward... Last year we were flying back to the states from Peru and outcomes the cute little beagle and the agent. This time the beagle sat down beside my carry on. The agent asked me if I had any food in my carry on, I said no. She asked me I had any food from yesterday in my carry on. I said no. She asked me to open up my carry on, I did and I discovered that I had 2 bananas which I had totally forgotten about and had gotten on the plane (we traveled business class on Delta and they had a basket of fruit - I had totally forgotten about taking 2 bananas to eat on our connecting flight). I looked up at the agent (knowing I was going to fined and delayed and miss our connecting flight) and she said that fruit from Peru can enter the US. I thanked her profusely. By the way, this is a story I love sharing at parties and get togethers it always generates a laugh. LOL!
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Re: International travel and customs

Post by runningshoes »

Chuckles960 wrote: Tue Jun 11, 2024 4:26 pm
runningshoes wrote: Tue Jun 11, 2024 3:48 pm Just a side note that TSA operates approx. 15 pre-clearance sites outside the US, with 9 in Canada, 2 in Ireland already operating, and London scheduled to be added in the next year or so in addition to other key cities.
False. The preclearance sites (there's also one in Abu Dhabi) are operated by US CBP (which is not TSA). Airplane security is still handled by the local authorities.

TSA is concerned about bombs and such on flights taking off in the US. Immigration (part of CBP) is concerned with people entering (and in principle, also leaving) the US. Customs (also part of CBP) is concerned with luggage entering (and in principle, also leaving) the US.
The sites are jointly run, and you are correct in that immigration is done as well and was the first part of the pre-clearance program originally.

https://www.tsa.gov/news/press/releases ... l-airports
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Re: International travel and customs

Post by exodusing »

ResearchMed wrote: Tue Jun 11, 2024 12:04 pm
Valuethinker wrote: Tue Jun 11, 2024 11:30 am
** I can never, when I type Royal Canadian Mountain Police, not think of the cinematography in the Brian De Palma/ Kevin Costner flick, The Untouchables, when the bootleggers are in a border cabin, and the Mounties ride over the hill - the audience was in just exploded in cheers. (My spouse would no doubt recall Dudley Do-right of the Northwest Mounted Police (Bullwinkle & Rocky show).

Hi VT,

Just in case you *ever* want to "pass" as a native born USA citizen, it is
ROCKY and Bullwinkle, *NOT* Bullwinkle and Rocky! :D

I'm having trouble even saying it to myself in reverse!
Heh.

Many memories of watching with my younger brother, and also frequently trying to mimic the accent, including saying [forgive me for the attempt here!,] "Neh TASSSSHHHH a".
And of course, "Fearless Leader" became a thing forever! :wink:

Almost as much fun as Mad Magazine's "Spy vs. Spy".

Ah, memories from so long ago!

RM
And isn't it the Royal Canadian Mounted Police?

I wore a Moose & Squirrel t-shirt to the gym earlier this week.
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