Hearing aids directional sensitivity

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RudyS
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Hearing aids directional sensitivity

Post by RudyS »

I have had hearing aids from a major company (Oticon) for a year. While they certainly improve my hearing, they are far from perfect in situations like dining rooms. They not only amplify the people at my table, but also much of the talking, noise, all around or behind me. Does anyone have experience with hearing aids that are more directionally sensitive, i.e., selectively amplify sound coming from people in my field of vision?

I have heard that this is a general problem with hearing aids, but wonder if there is newer technology that addresses this issue. Thanks in advance!
mhalley
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Re: Hearing aids directional sensitivity

Post by mhalley »

There is an available technology called Adaptive Directional Microphone with some hearing aids. You might check out the consumer reports buying guide.

https://www.consumerreports.org/health/ ... ing-guide/
Many modern hearing aids have a directional microphone, which helps you converse in noisy environments by making the audio signal in front of you louder than the noise from the rear or sides. This technology works best when you’re close to the sound source. Almost all hearing aids with this feature are able to automatically switch between directional and omnidirectional settings, depending on the environment. Advanced versions can focus behind the listener or on the listener’s side. A negative: It’s prone to picking up wind noise.
JayB
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Re: Hearing aids directional sensitivity

Post by JayB »

RudyS wrote: Sat Mar 30, 2024 8:42 pm I have had hearing aids from a major company (Oticon) for a year. While they certainly improve my hearing, they are far from perfect in situations like dining rooms. They not only amplify the people at my table, but also much of the talking, noise, all around or behind me. Does anyone have experience with hearing aids that are more directionally sensitive, i.e., selectively amplify sound coming from people in my field of vision?

I have heard that this is a general problem with hearing aids, but wonder if there is newer technology that addresses this issue. Thanks in advance!
It may be a matter of selecting a different program or having a different program added first. My wife has a user-selectable "speech in noise" program in her Oticon devices that specifically hones in on voices directly in front of her. She says it works quite well.
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Doom&Gloom
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Re: Hearing aids directional sensitivity

Post by Doom&Gloom »

Also, table and seat selection in restaurants is critical.
doobiedoo
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Re: Hearing aids directional sensitivity

Post by doobiedoo »

I use the "Noisy" program on my hearing aids for busy restaurants. It helps a lot.

Basically, the software directionally amplifies speech only from the direction you are facing.
So if you are talking to someone directly across the table, you hear them fine.
[Sounds from all other directions are reduced.]
When you talk to someone next to you, best results happen when you turn to speak to them.

Before this program I was basically incommunicado at a noisy restaurant.
I couldn't understand anyone unless they were shouting.
JPM
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Re: Hearing aids directional sensitivity

Post by JPM »

DW has had HAs with the directional feature for about 9 years. Her current one has worked well. Previous ones not so much. When the directional feature is turned on, she can hear a nearby conversation at about a 60-90 degree angle centered on her line of sight. Other ambient noise is mostly cancelled. When we attend concerts, the directional feature is turned off and she can hear the music well. At book club, she can hear nearby conversations well, but at the far end of a long table not well, as that's in the noise cancellation range. The technology has been evolving/improving over time.

There can be large differences in sound quality among brands of hearing aid. DW is on her fourth set, currently she has Phonak and she likes it well. Sound is clearer and without the tinniness that plagues many brands. The bluetooth works well for cellphone and apple car play. Like mama said, you better shop around.

There is a discrimination function that clarifies indistinct speech but that is an additional feature that comes at an extra cost. If you can hear speech but have difficulty making out what was said, this may help. DW hasn't needed that so far.

Most medicare advantage plans have a hearing aid allowance making the features more affordable.
DetroitRick
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Re: Hearing aids directional sensitivity

Post by DetroitRick »

My own observations, after upgrading my aids last year, was that this functionality is definitely improving. It is also better on some aids than others. Continued improvements seem likely as the capabilities of the hearing aid internal processors and firmware evolve and improve. I'm still relatively new to this, but I do see it getting better.

One of the first things I noticed during my trial of my newer aids (I had a loaner set for a month first) was an improvement in how the hearing aids adapted their directional sensitivy automatically. Much better than the set I had previously. Beyond this internal capability (again, a function of processor and firmware), I can directly adjust the directional sensitity from wide to narrow along a continuum via app. This can help a lot in certain challenging situations. But my greatest appreciation is for the internal adaptive capability of my aids. Mostly, it just works automatically.

I would say there are now only two situations that still require manual adjustment for me - certain types of restaurants and situations where two+ people are speaking simultaneously from multiple directions. For the first, I sometimes just use the "restaurant" setting in my hearing aid app (that was set and tweaked by my audiologist), and sometimes I use the slider in that app to further tweak directional sensitivity to the venue. But my manual intervention only seems necessary in certain types of restaurants (certain acoustics and crowd level). For the second situation, I typically just reposition myself.

This is an area where getting a trial version of a prospective hearing aid can really help. Everybody is different and it can help to work with a potential hearing aid prior to purchase. This capability is something you can really test for yourself pretty easily and judge results.
bradinsky
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Re: Hearing aids directional sensitivity

Post by bradinsky »

DetroitRick wrote: Sun Mar 31, 2024 9:44 am My own observations, after upgrading my aids last year, was that this functionality is definitely improving. It is also better on some aids than others. Continued improvements seem likely as the capabilities of the hearing aid internal processors and firmware evolve and improve. I'm still relatively new to this, but I do see it getting better.

One of the first things I noticed during my trial of my newer aids (I had a loaner set for a month first) was an improvement in how the hearing aids adapted their directional sensitivy automatically. Much better than the set I had previously. Beyond this internal capability (again, a function of processor and firmware), I can directly adjust the directional sensitity from wide to narrow along a continuum via app. This can help a lot in certain challenging situations. But my greatest appreciation is for the internal adaptive capability of my aids. Mostly, it just works automatically.

I would say there are now only two situations that still require manual adjustment for me - certain types of restaurants and situations where two+ people are speaking simultaneously from multiple directions. For the first, I sometimes just use the "restaurant" setting in my hearing aid app (that was set and tweaked by my audiologist), and sometimes I use the slider in that app to further tweak directional sensitivity to the venue. But my manual intervention only seems necessary in certain types of restaurants (certain acoustics and crowd level). For the second situation, I typically just reposition myself.

This is an area where getting a trial version of a prospective hearing aid can really help. Everybody is different and it can help to work with a potential hearing aid prior to purchase. This capability is something you can really test for yourself pretty easily and judge results.
Hi Rick!
What brand are you currently wearing? My current ones are about 3 years old, but I’m extremely hearing challenged & always interested in trying to improve.
Brad
DetroitRick
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Re: Hearing aids directional sensitivity

Post by DetroitRick »

bradinsky wrote: Sun Mar 31, 2024 9:52 am Hi Rick!
What brand are you currently wearing? My current ones are about 3 years old, but I’m extremely hearing challenged & always interested in trying to improve.
Brad
Hi Brad. My current brand/model: Phonak Audeo L90-RL (currently with software update 1.0.9.0). I'm challenged with hearing as well. So it was a big relief for me when this switch improved things. But as my audiologist cautioned, some of the model selection depends on the specifics of the user. This "upgrade" was roughly the same market price as my prior Unitron's but I noticed the difference on day 1. It greatly relieved my frustration.

Because I had a peculiar issue with my prior hearing aids (radio interference when outside in certain places), I was able to get a trial pair of the Phonak's for an entire month first. Not sure if that can typically otherwise be arranged, but it was really beneficial in making my choice. They also put together a special deal where I could keep my 1-year-old Unitrons, pay $250 total for the new Phonaks, and get a whole new warranty and service cycle. Needless to say, I love my audiologist after this. The audio quality improvement was just so dramatic for me that it made me appreciate how complex these devices really are. And nothing against my old Unitrons either - they sent a rep out to evaulate my rare issue and were also going to offer me a massive concession with an improved model too.

My plan is to consider state of improvements in new models every 3 to 5 years based on what I see happening in product development. But we shall see. Best of luck!
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cheese_breath
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Re: Hearing aids directional sensitivity

Post by cheese_breath »

My Costo hearing aids allow me to screen out sounds not coming from in front of me. Also have a different setting to reduce echos where needed.
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RudyS
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Re: Hearing aids directional sensitivity

Post by RudyS »

JayB wrote: Sat Mar 30, 2024 9:49 pm
RudyS wrote: Sat Mar 30, 2024 8:42 pm I have had hearing aids from a major company (Oticon) for a year. While they certainly improve my hearing, they are far from perfect in situations like dining rooms. They not only amplify the people at my table, but also much of the talking, noise, all around or behind me. Does anyone have experience with hearing aids that are more directionally sensitive, i.e., selectively amplify sound coming from people in my field of vision?

I have heard that this is a general problem with hearing aids, but wonder if there is newer technology that addresses this issue. Thanks in advance!
It may be a matter of selecting a different program or having a different program added first. My wife has a user-selectable "speech in noise" program in her Oticon devices that specifically hones in on voices directly in front of her. She says it works quite well.
I guess I'm off to the audiologist to see what he can accomplish. In my case, the "speech in noise" program did not help. Also tried a couple of other programs.

Thanks, everyone, for your responses.
bradinsky
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Re: Hearing aids directional sensitivity

Post by bradinsky »

FWIW, once you decide it’s time for hearing aids & purchase them, the reality is your hearing will never be 100%, or perfect. Sad but true. My DW believed that I had superpower hearing after I got my first pair. I’m on my 3rd currently & she still does.
GlennK
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Re: Hearing aids directional sensitivity

Post by GlennK »

I have been wearing hearing aids since age 35, so over 25 years now. I hated parties and restaurants for the majority of those years. But every pair I owned have improved reducing background noise. My latest pair actually does a fairly good job. I still prefer quiet restaurants, but can have a conversation even in loud restaurants if I look directly to the person.
LCX2000
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Re: Hearing aids directional sensitivity

Post by LCX2000 »

Can those of you who have hearing aids that you like post the brand and model, including the Costco model? (I wrote down the Phonic Audeo. Thank you!) I am on my first pair that I got just as the Pandemic happened. I had them on trial, but then everything shut down (NYC) including the hearing aid place. The ones I have never worked properly, but I had no recourse. I have since had them adjusted, but nothing has helped, and they are out of warranty at this point. (Though now that I type that I wonder. They are Signia.) I am having a terrible time with these.

Thanks so much.
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cheese_breath
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Re: Hearing aids directional sensitivity

Post by cheese_breath »

My Costco hearing aids...

Kirkland Signature 9.0 (KS 9.0)
Manufacturer... Sonova AG, Switzerland
Purchased March 2020, so definitely out of warranty
The surest way to know the future is when it becomes the past.
bradinsky
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Re: Hearing aids directional sensitivity

Post by bradinsky »

Mine are currently Philips Hear Link 9010 aids. They were purchased at Costco & are about 4 years old. For reference, Costco is the largest hearing aid retailer in the US. Their most expensive aids are about $2700, the least expensive are around $1600 & the money back guarantee of 180 days there was the best in that business at the time & probably still is. I believe the warranty offered was 3 years. Currently for mine they still offer free adjustments, cleaning, domes & filters. My only issue now is my hearing loss is so severe, I’m probably going to venture somewhere else looking for the Phonac Audeo mentioned by Detroit Rick above, or possibly the latest & greatest Oticon model. That said, if you’re fairly new to wearing aids, Costco is a good choice"
mrb09
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Re: Hearing aids directional sensitivity

Post by mrb09 »

LCX2000 wrote: Sun Mar 31, 2024 8:26 pm Can those of you who have hearing aids that you like post the brand and model
Very happy with my Oticon more 2’s. Previous ones were Costco branded resound (forgot the model), and phonak (also forgot the model).

The Oticon’s seem to pick up the voice that’s most likely directed at me. Works better than previous hearing aids in crowded environments. I have a “music mode” for natural sound that I use for live shows that disables the voice tracking feature, if I leave that on in a crowded room in that mode, it makes the voices sound like a complete cacophony — pretty much like my previous hearing aids.
LCX2000
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Re: Hearing aids directional sensitivity

Post by LCX2000 »

Thanks so much for the replies. I will look into these, as well as Costco's. I've gotten the name at a very good audiologist at Costco. I just need to join first, as I understand it.

Does anyone have any knowledge of Widex? I've heard it is different, but very good for certain types of hearing loss.
DetroitRick
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Re: Hearing aids directional sensitivity

Post by DetroitRick »

LCX2000 wrote: Mon Apr 01, 2024 7:45 am
Does anyone have any knowledge of Widex? I've heard it is different, but very good for certain types of hearing loss.
Since you haven't got any other responses yet, here's my general opinion on Widex based on limited research and discussions. They are a solid, well-regarded major brand with a variety of models. I know the place I go to carries this line along with the other majors. When I was researching, I learned that certain Widex models have a special regard among musicians too. For that segment, certain Widex models with extended frequency range and dynamic range seem to yield superior results for performers and audiophiles (just what I've read other musicians and audiologists saying). Without comprising normal speech performance they say. Widex has a solid reputation among general users as well.

Based on both quality, capability and the music thing, they are on my short list for consideration when I make my next upgrade. All hearing aids pose some challenges for music, mine included, which makes me extra willing to try a new brand at some point, assuming they live up to their reputation.
LCX2000
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Re: Hearing aids directional sensitivity

Post by LCX2000 »

DetroitRick wrote: Mon Apr 01, 2024 3:14 pm
LCX2000 wrote: Mon Apr 01, 2024 7:45 am
Does anyone have any knowledge of Widex? I've heard it is different, but very good for certain types of hearing loss.
Since you haven't got any other responses yet, here's my general opinion on Widex based on limited research and discussions. They are a solid, well-regarded major brand with a variety of models. I know the place I go to carries this line along with the other majors. When I was researching, I learned that certain Widex models have a special regard among musicians too. For that segment, certain Widex models with extended frequency range and dynamic range seem to yield superior results for performers and audiophiles (just what I've read other musicians and audiologists saying). Without comprising normal speech performance they say. Widex has a solid reputation among general users as well.

Based on both quality, capability and the music thing, they are on my short list for consideration when I make my next upgrade. All hearing aids pose some challenges for music, mine included, which makes me extra willing to try a new brand at some point, assuming they live up to their reputation.
Thanks for your thoughts. I went to 3 different audiologists when I was looking. I had read a lot about Widex, and I tried in the audiologist setting. They were definitely different than any others. But never having tried hearing aids before, I had no real good way to ascertain what was happening, if that makes sense. None were recreating a totally normal sense of hearing.

What I remember was that they were less glaring/sharp to my brain. But I couldn't tell how clearly I could actually hear, given that my issue is with consonants. I went with the Signias because the sales person convinced me they were the best. The price for either pair in 2020 was going to be the same, $4800, down from 6200, with an AARP discount.

The downside here since we've moved out of NYC is that no one carries Widex. My audiologist was trying to get certified to carry them, but is just so busy with handling what he currently carries.

Do you mind sharing your list of HA that you are considering for your next pair? HA are definitely something we have to budget for as we approach retirement, so I want to do a better job of it on this next pair.
DetroitRick
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Re: Hearing aids directional sensitivity

Post by DetroitRick »

LCX2000 wrote: Mon Apr 01, 2024 9:37 pm
Do you mind sharing your list of HA that you are considering for your next pair? HA are definitely something we have to budget for as we approach retirement, so I want to do a better job of it on this next pair.
Sure, but it's not much of real list yet, just brands I'm likely to consider. These products are changing fast enough that new models and capabilities will be likely by the time of my next purchase (I'm guessing in maybe 3 years or so, depending on improvements). Specifically, processors are getting more powerful and smaller, starting to incorporate AI, better aids have wider dynamic ranges, more advanced filtering, etc.

In no order at all:
Unitron (because they clearly stood behind their product for me - see above - in both technical and warranty support)
Phonak (same reason and I really like my current set in most respects)
Widex (because of their overwhelming reputation among musicians)
Oticon (very popular and well-regarded by friends and audiologist)

Other brands are omitted only because of my lack of research and familiarity. My list is not complete yet. So take it with a grain of salt!

Also, for what it's worth, Unitron and Phonak are separate divisions of same parent. Not identical products, and different processors I've been told, but similar.

Something that I also learned - it is common within the same general model of the same brand, to have different "sub-models". With different prices and capabilities. For example, as of late last year, my particular hearing aid (Phonak Audeo comes in 4 different sub models, L90 - L70 - L50 and L30. Each has distinguishing differences. I saw similar with other brands. Two things helped in my choice - audiologist guidance and applicablility/interest in certain features.

One thing that I now have going for me, and that I verified through use of all those loaners last year, is that I can put on a new hearing aid and judge it's capability very quickly. At the time of my first purchase, as you alluded to, everything sounded weird and I could not accurately judge and compare. But the first thing I noticed is that a few months after, even when changing brands, is that I can now put on a trial hearing aid and feel relatively comfortable right away (assuming my settings have been transferred, of course). So this will make future shopping infinitely easier for me to evaluate. I definitely could not have done that initially. But everybody is different.
Colorado Guy
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Re: Hearing aids directional sensitivity

Post by Colorado Guy »

I am in the trial period (first few weeks) of a new Jabra Enhance Pro 20, which I purchased at Costco. This was to replace my older HAs which were near end of life.

Anyhow, the JEP 20 have a number of programs available, including one called Hear in Noise, with an adjustable Speech focus for those in front of you. That is, you can make it wide for multiple people in front of you, down to one person. In addition to this, the noise cancellation improvements over my ancient HAs is pretty impressive.

FYI, If you are a Costco fan, and wait a little bit, Philips is supposedly going to introduce an updated 9050 HA. Timing is not clear, and this could just be an unsubstantiated rumor.
LCX2000
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Re: Hearing aids directional sensitivity

Post by LCX2000 »

Thanks so much, DetroitRick and ColoradoGuy,

I am taking notes. My dad is also looking for a new pair, so all of this is very helpful.

LCX
DetroitRick
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Re: Hearing aids directional sensitivity

Post by DetroitRick »

Since the original question was about directional sensitivity, I stumbled on another hearing technology option that claims to eliminate this problem. It looks like a hearing aid, but involves the use of a lens placed on the ear drum vs. conventional "speaker in ear" tech. Non-surgical, but placed by an ENT. Not cheap - $12k-ish. Purports to deliver a much more normal hearing experience than conventional aids in terms of frequency response, directional sensitivity and crowd noise issues. Still a device, not primarily a medical procedure.

I never heard of this before today, but the second generation product got FDA approval in 2019. It's intriguing enough to me to research further. Through my ENT, I'm doing a webinar later this month to check it out.

For anybody not gagging at the price tag, here are two references I found today that seem clear enough as to how itworks and what it improves:

#1 materials from one company offering this:
https://earlens.com/

#2 a technical paper on file with the National Library of Medicine with descriptions, explanations and test data:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2974567/
Topic Author
RudyS
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Re: Hearing aids directional sensitivity

Post by RudyS »

RudyS wrote: Sun Mar 31, 2024 12:15 pm
JayB wrote: Sat Mar 30, 2024 9:49 pm
RudyS wrote: Sat Mar 30, 2024 8:42 pm I have had hearing aids from a major company (Oticon) for a year. While they certainly improve my hearing, they are far from perfect in situations like dining rooms. They not only amplify the people at my table, but also much of the talking, noise, all around or behind me. Does anyone have experience with hearing aids that are more directionally sensitive, i.e., selectively amplify sound coming from people in my field of vision?

I have heard that this is a general problem with hearing aids, but wonder if there is newer technology that addresses this issue. Thanks in advance!
It may be a matter of selecting a different program or having a different program added first. My wife has a user-selectable "speech in noise" program in her Oticon devices that specifically hones in on voices directly in front of her. She says it works quite well.
I guess I'm off to the audiologist to see what he can accomplish. In my case, the "speech in noise" program did not help. Also tried a couple of other programs.

Thanks, everyone, for your responses.
Audiologist, in consultation via phone with Oticon, made a few changes. Now 2 weeks later. Very little, if any, improvement. Guess I'm waiting for newer technology. Thanks for all your comments.
bradinsky
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Re: Hearing aids directional sensitivity

Post by bradinsky »

RudyS wrote: Sat Apr 13, 2024 3:03 pm
RudyS wrote: Sun Mar 31, 2024 12:15 pm
JayB wrote: Sat Mar 30, 2024 9:49 pm
RudyS wrote: Sat Mar 30, 2024 8:42 pm I have had hearing aids from a major company (Oticon) for a year. While they certainly improve my hearing, they are far from perfect in situations like dining rooms. They not only amplify the people at my table, but also much of the talking, noise, all around or behind me. Does anyone have experience with hearing aids that are more directionally sensitive, i.e., selectively amplify sound coming from people in my field of vision?

I have heard that this is a general problem with hearing aids, but wonder if there is newer technology that addresses this issue. Thanks in advance!
It may be a matter of selecting a different program or having a different program added first. My wife has a user-selectable "speech in noise" program in her Oticon devices that specifically hones in on voices directly in front of her. She says it works quite well.
I guess I'm off to the audiologist to see what he can accomplish. In my case, the "speech in noise" program did not help. Also tried a couple of other programs.

Thanks, everyone, for your responses.
Audiologist, in consultation via phone with Oticon, made a few changes. Now 2 weeks later. Very little, if any, improvement. Guess I'm waiting for newer technology. Thanks for all your comments.
I’ve never found a hearing aid that worked very well in noisy restaurants. I find it next to impossible to have any type of conversation there. My solution is to frequent the quieter places.
LCX2000
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Re: Hearing aids directional sensitivity

Post by LCX2000 »

DetroitRick wrote: Thu Apr 04, 2024 1:51 pm Since the original question was about directional sensitivity, I stumbled on another hearing technology option that claims to eliminate this problem. It looks like a hearing aid, but involves the use of a lens placed on the ear drum vs. conventional "speaker in ear" tech. Non-surgical, but placed by an ENT. Not cheap - $12k-ish. Purports to deliver a much more normal hearing experience than conventional aids in terms of frequency response, directional sensitivity and crowd noise issues. Still a device, not primarily a medical procedure.

I never heard of this before today, but the second generation product got FDA approval in 2019. It's intriguing enough to me to research further. Through my ENT, I'm doing a webinar later this month to check it out.

For anybody not gagging at the price tag, here are two references I found today that seem clear enough as to how itworks and what it improves:

#1 materials from one company offering this:
https://earlens.com/

#2 a technical paper on file with the National Library of Medicine with descriptions, explanations and test data:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2974567/
Thank you for the links. I will keep my eye on this as well.

FWIW, my audiologist is profoundly hearing challenged and still in his early 50s. He keeps saying that in about 5 years there will be stem cell help. I don't know if this is wishful thinking or that it is truly possible.

Have you heard anything about this?
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RudyS
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Re: Hearing aids directional sensitivity

Post by RudyS »

bradinsky wrote: Sun Apr 14, 2024 1:04 pm
RudyS wrote: Sat Apr 13, 2024 3:03 pm
RudyS wrote: Sun Mar 31, 2024 12:15 pm
JayB wrote: Sat Mar 30, 2024 9:49 pm
RudyS wrote: Sat Mar 30, 2024 8:42 pm I have had hearing aids from a major company (Oticon) for a year. While they certainly improve my hearing, they are far from perfect in situations like dining rooms. They not only amplify the people at my table, but also much of the talking, noise, all around or behind me. Does anyone have experience with hearing aids that are more directionally sensitive, i.e., selectively amplify sound coming from people in my field of vision?

I have heard that this is a general problem with hearing aids, but wonder if there is newer technology that addresses this issue. Thanks in advance!
It may be a matter of selecting a different program or having a different program added first. My wife has a user-selectable "speech in noise" program in her Oticon devices that specifically hones in on voices directly in front of her. She says it works quite well.
I guess I'm off to the audiologist to see what he can accomplish. In my case, the "speech in noise" program did not help. Also tried a couple of other programs.

Thanks, everyone, for your responses.
Audiologist, in consultation via phone with Oticon, made a few changes. Now 2 weeks later. Very little, if any, improvement. Guess I'm waiting for newer technology. Thanks for all your comments.
I’ve never found a hearing aid that worked very well in noisy restaurants. I find it next to impossible to have any type of conversation there. My solution is to frequent the quieter places.
If only I could select the dining venue! I am in a CCRC and that's where I eat. Luckily, about 80% of the people speak loudly enough that conversations are no problem. Even without the hearing aids in most cases. But there are a few that are a struggle to hear. I try to have them seated on my "better side." All in all though, I'm happy here and so is DW. Just wish for some more help with hearing. Probably not coming very soon.
DetroitRick
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Re: Hearing aids directional sensitivity

Post by DetroitRick »

LCX2000 wrote: Sun Apr 14, 2024 1:25 pm
FWIW, my audiologist is profoundly hearing challenged and still in his early 50s. He keeps saying that in about 5 years there will be stem cell help. I don't know if this is wishful thinking or that it is truly possible.

Have you heard anything about this?
I've heard about it, and could easily get excited as these trials get further along. A quick Googling, admittedly not the best source for evaluating these things, made it appear that there are several possibilities soon to go to trial. It would be really something if the methods prove valid , are affordable, and actually regenerate damaged tissue. Either way, as rates of hearing loss increase, I can't help but think/hope that solutions will improve even more than they have recently.
Colorado Guy
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Re: Hearing aids directional sensitivity

Post by Colorado Guy »

RudyS wrote: Sun Apr 14, 2024 2:38 pm ....
If only I could select the dining venue! I am in a CCRC and that's where I eat. Luckily, about 80% of the people speak loudly enough that conversations are no problem. Even without the hearing aids in most cases. But there are a few that are a struggle to hear. I try to have them seated on my "better side." All in all though, I'm happy here and so is DW. Just wish for some more help with hearing. Probably not coming very soon.
Does Oticon have something like a Resound Multi Mic, which you can place on the table. Per their webpage, "it automatically switches to a mode optimized to pick up the voices of multiple speakers."
https://www.resound.com/en-us/hearing-a ... /multi-mic

I have no direct experience with these units, but have thought about trying one out.
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RudyS
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Joined: Tue Oct 27, 2015 10:11 am

Re: Hearing aids directional sensitivity

Post by RudyS »

Colorado Guy wrote: Sun Apr 14, 2024 6:22 pm
RudyS wrote: Sun Apr 14, 2024 2:38 pm ....
If only I could select the dining venue! I am in a CCRC and that's where I eat. Luckily, about 80% of the people speak loudly enough that conversations are no problem. Even without the hearing aids in most cases. But there are a few that are a struggle to hear. I try to have them seated on my "better side." All in all though, I'm happy here and so is DW. Just wish for some more help with hearing. Probably not coming very soon.
Does Oticon have something like a Resound Multi Mic, which you can place on the table. Per their webpage, "it automatically switches to a mode optimized to pick up the voices of multiple speakers."
https://www.resound.com/en-us/hearing-a ... /multi-mic

I have no direct experience with these units, but have thought about trying one out.
Thanks for the suggestion. We have a friend who uses such a device, but it is sort of disruptive. We still enjoy his company, but that's more hassle than it's worth for me.
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