going gluten-free

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familythriftmd
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going gluten-free

Post by familythriftmd »

My 12 year-old daughter likely has celiac. TTG was above highest detection limits for machine.

We also have 4 non-sensitive other kids. Anybody in that same boat? Curious what foods you commonly have as dishes that the other kids will like to eat.

NOTE: I AM NOT ASKING MEDICAL ADVICE, but consumer advice w.r.t. foods
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ResearchMed
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Re: going gluten-free

Post by ResearchMed »

familythriftmd wrote: Wed Feb 07, 2024 7:24 am My 12 year-old daughter likely has celiac. TTG was above highest detection limits for machine.

We also have 4 non-sensitive other kids. Anybody in that same boat? Curious what foods you commonly have as dishes that the other kids will like to eat.

NOTE: I AM NOT ASKING MEDICAL ADVICE, but consumer advice w.r.t. foods

There are *so* many GF products out there now; it really surprised us, a nice surprise, when DH was diagnosed with severe celiac disease (test results so high, they re-did them twice to be sure).

Use Google to find some, but also on your supermarket's website, search for "gluten free <whatever>".
There is great pasta these days (even served in almost all Italian restaurants... in Italy! :happy
They are made with different GF ingredients, ranging from things like rice flour to garbanzo bean flour, so favorites may vary.

There are breads (some terrific, some... "not so much"), but they can be pricy. Schar's 7 grain + seeds (name?) bread is amazing.

So just search for what they like, such as "gluten free waffles" or whatever.
If you haven't searched much yet, you'll probably be surprised.

There are quite a few GF "wheat flour substitutes" that are hard to detect taste-wise if you like to bake.

Speak with her physicians. We've wondered about things like Bob's Red Mill Steel Cut Oatmeal, for example. It comes "regular" and a GF version. Both packages show *only* oats, so we assume that the GF significance is for "no cross-contamination". For some people that cross-contamination is a problem, so food prep must be kept separate. For others, it's not at all a problem; a "trace" isn't worrisome.

And some old favorites have always been GF, but they never used to be labelled that way. Cheerios comes to mind in this category.

RM
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stan1
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Re: going gluten-free

Post by stan1 »

There are many, many resources on the internet. From what we've seen with friends in similar circumstances (GF but even Halal, Kosher, Vegan), it was sometimes difficult for the entire household to go GF and the solution ended up being separate GF food prep especially with teenagers in the house. Maybe you'll have good luck getting everyone onto a single food prep regimen and keeping them there but especially in large families I think its more likely that compromises end up being made. We live in the real world.
robphoto
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Re: going gluten-free

Post by robphoto »

Because celiac is generally about grains, you've still got a lot of options.

Rice is ok, potatoes are ok. So you can do stir-fries, beef stew, lots of standards.

Many things have wheat in them that you might not think of immediately, for instance, soy sauce generally has wheat in it, though you can get gluten-free versions.

Don't trust restaurants unless you know they're scrupulous about this; they don't necessarily understand the issue.

As someone mentioned, it's good to know the level of sensitivity one has; it ranges from try-to-avoid to maybe only eat what you have prepared to avoid even small amounts of gluten.
Nowizard
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Re: going gluten-free

Post by Nowizard »

Our grandson has celiac, and another grandson does not. Diagnosed at age three, and family has gone gluten free about 90%. Surprisingly, most foods are just as good. For example, had meatloaf this week that was possibly the best ever. A primary issue is bread for the family, and it is not as good in our experience. There are numerous recipes for sweets such as cakes, brownies, etc. that are excellent. Air fryer is helpful for dedicated GF cooking. Many resources, and numerous GF recipe books. After replacing pantry items, it becomes similar to any cooking. Those who are more sophisticated eaters may have more difficulty. Our son and DIL like upscale meals on occasion and eat them out. The grandson had significant issues from eating non-GF that have resolved, so it reinforces the change.

Tim
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SmileyFace
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Re: going gluten-free

Post by SmileyFace »

We raised a Celiac daughter and had to adjust all the foods in our household. You can now find everything in gluten free options (pastas, pizza crusts, cooking flour, etc.) in addition to focusing on foods that are naturally gluten-free. My spouse (who does all the cooking) bought gluten-free cook-books - started shopping at a grocery store with more gluten-free food options, and made the modifications. We continued to feed the kids meals similar to what they were already eating.
Regarding restaurants - find the ones in your area that understand celiac and have completely separate preparation, utensil, and cooking surfaces/ovens for those gluten free. We had a couple of go-to restaurants where we never had a problem. Some restaurants specialize in gluten-free and do an outstanding job at it. There is also one bakery and cafe near us that is 100% gluten free (so you know you are safe - there is nothing with gluten brought in at all). They exist in many areas. NEVER assume what sounds like a gluten free food out really is. For instance - if you order cooked ground beef somewhere - they may add flour to it (fast food places like Taco Bell do this) to stretch the beef.
I still eat gluten out myself but my wife, over time, developed a non-tolerance for it (since she started eating it so rarely it seems if she has gluten now she ends up with severe stomach issues - thus she has gone 100% gluten free). I don't know if this is "a thing" but something maybe to look into regarding your other kids - if you make your entire household gluten-free - will it cause issues for others in the household when they choose to eat gluten out.
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heartwood
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Re: going gluten-free

Post by heartwood »

Trader Joe's has several decent tasting breads, muffins and frozen foods.

https://www.traderjoes.com/home/search? ... global=yes

also:
heartwood wrote: Fri Oct 13, 2023 4:41 pm
heartwood wrote: Sat Jan 07, 2023 1:10 pm
ResearchMed wrote: Sun Jan 02, 2022 1:58 pm Any suggestions for the premium gluten free pasta?

Ingredient type doesn't matter... garbanzo beans or corn/rice, etc., but it would also be nice to know of "the best" for each type (garbanzo bean/lentil/etc., vs corn/rice/etc.)

We've been using Banza, which is fine, but it would be nice to know if there are now better (texture? flavor? or?) available.
The query about rice/corn is for a lower-fiber gluten free pasta.

We are dealing with definitely gluten free, and now also a preference for lower fiber.

Thanks.

RM
We find Barilla (corn + rice) to be a great GF pasta. They have spaghetti, rotini, macaroni, lasagna noodles, penne.

We used Jovial for years for their fettuccini, but it's too gummy. I won't use it any more if there's an alternative.
We tried Carlo Crivellin (corn + rice) tagliatelli on Amazon. It was inedible.

Then we found Le Veneziane (corn). Great selection of shapes, esp Fettucce, but also others. We have one store that carries it, but also available on Amazon.

Last year we "discovered" La Rosa (corn + rice). They have buccatini, spaghetti and other shapes. All excellent.

Most of the above are worth a try even if you don't need GF.
Trader Joes now sells an excellent dried Gluten Free Tagliatelle Pasta. Product of Italy; made with corn and rice flour.
https://www.traderjoes.com/home/product ... sta-075961
SmallSaver
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Re: going gluten-free

Post by SmallSaver »

My partner is GF. It hasn't really been a big deal at all. I don't have specific foods or meals advice, because I've found we just sort of accommodate as we go. What makes that work, though, is that we cook most of our own food and generally eat pretty healthily - there wasn't that much gluten around to begin with.

That said, a few specific things I've found:
  • There are GF flour alternatives that are "good enough" to get things done. It's not quite the same as regular flour. The best we've found is cup4cup. Serious GF baking is it's own beast.
  • I've never really found GF pasta that was very good. Some of them are ok and will work under a heavy sauce, but I've pretty much given up on classic italian pasta dishes (which I love).
  • GF Chinese cooking is also pretty hard
ETA: One bright spot is pretzels. GF pretzels, esp. Glutinos, are a significant evolution in snacks.
Last edited by SmallSaver on Wed Feb 07, 2024 12:48 pm, edited 3 times in total.
barnaclebob
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Re: going gluten-free

Post by barnaclebob »

Enjoy figuring out new ways to make things and adding new dishes to the repertoire. Sushi Friday instead of pizza Friday.

Yeah there are lots of things beaming with GF at the grocery store but anything that comes in a box, gluten free or not, is junk food.

Using rice flour for breading baked fish (haven't tried chicken) is superior to wheat flour IMO.

Most healthy diets are already low in carbs and many of the big gluten foods are carb heavy too so there shouldn't be too much to replace in an ideal diet.
PoppyA
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Re: going gluten-free

Post by PoppyA »

Anything without a label: roasted veg, meat, fish, fruit, salads with vinegar & oil

Also: Cado ice cream
Steven28
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Re: going gluten-free

Post by Steven28 »

Read all ingredient levels carefully - looking for wheat and other offending grains. For example - licorice and soy sauce - both made with wheat.
Steven28
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Re: going gluten-free

Post by Steven28 »

Read all ingredient levels carefully - looking for wheat and other offending grains. For example - licorice and soy sauce - both made with wheat.
ETK517
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Re: going gluten-free

Post by ETK517 »

I went gluten free for a while, and it really was not as hard as I imagined it would be. I avoided gluten-free products which tend to be highly processed with ingredient lists longer than a CVS receipt. My favorite foods to eat at the time were marinated grilled shrimp, big chopped salads, all types of mexican food prepared with corn tortillas, caprese salads, risotto, omelettes...on and on. I find most gluten-free baked goods gross, so would stick to ice cream/gelato, fruit with whipped cream, meringues, and other desserts that are naturally gluten-free when I wanted something sweet.
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SmileyFace
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Re: going gluten-free

Post by SmileyFace »

Steven28 wrote: Wed Feb 07, 2024 11:39 am Read all ingredient levels carefully - looking for wheat and other offending grains. For example - licorice and soy sauce - both made with wheat.
With Celiac you should do the opposite - if its a processed food (e.g. not fresh meats, produce, and fruits) and doesn't say "Gluten Free" on it - don't buy it.
Last edited by SmileyFace on Wed Feb 07, 2024 12:32 pm, edited 1 time in total.
BatBuckeye
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Re: going gluten-free

Post by BatBuckeye »

Your GF 12 yo and your family will most likely enjoy GF Oreos!
sls239
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Re: going gluten-free

Post by sls239 »

My teenage son has celiac. So volume matters! Also, I’m trying to get him ready to fend for himself - first in a college dorm, then in real life. So I’ve taught him how to make baked potatoes in the microwave which you can top with anything. And he can make guacamole. And then we do chicken with pan sauces - sometimes if I need a thickener I’ll use just a bit of cornstarch. We cook fish wrapped in foil with seasoning. And chili.

The trickiest part has been overnight school trips. It is expensive, but there are pouches of gluten free food that don’t need to be refrigerated - Somos makes some Mexican ones.

Mexican cuisine and Native American cuisine are great go-to because wheat is not native to the Americas. Also BBQ as long as there is no gluten in their sauce and steakhouses because they are meat centric and well teenage boy.

As for gluten free baking - well - it isn’t the same. But the trick is to treat everything kinda like you would brownies - you want a thick wet batter and spread pretty thin, double the baking powder and salt.

As for fast food - Chick-Fil-A because they use a different oil for their fries than the chicken - can offer a pretty safe meal. As can Five Guys because the only gluten there is the buns.

And that is our strategy in general - the less gluten around, the better.
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bt365
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Re: going gluten-free

Post by bt365 »

A nutritionist suggested many of the foods within the Fodmap diet.
I found a Harvard Medical Fodmap recipe collection and tried it for several months.
About four years later and still eating foods within that diet.
Eliminated dairy along with gluten.
My Internist was astounded how much better my cholesterol numbers were after my changes to diet.
No-gluten and other specialty foods at grocers are for most part not good.
Jovial gluten-free penne made with brown rice flour is one of the exceptions.
To start off, much to much sodium in most prepackaged foods in grocers.
Perfect a core of 12-15 entrees with healthy foods.
Adios to red meat. Yes to fish and lean poultry, and
vegans and vegetarians have protein alternatives to fish and poultry.
Last edited by bt365 on Wed Feb 07, 2024 1:22 pm, edited 1 time in total.
tunafish
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Re: going gluten-free

Post by tunafish »

I haven't read everything. Amy's has a number of products labeled gluten-free. Searching just now below I was surprised some are my favorites I had not noticed were. Pulling up a photo of one box, it is labeled but unobtrusively:

https://www.amys.com/our-foods?search=Gluten+free+
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retiredjg
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Re: going gluten-free

Post by retiredjg »

There are lots and lots of gluten free foods. Many are good and you just have to try them to see which suit your taste/mouth feel.

It is somewhat easy, with some research and determination, to just eat mostly gluten free...but much harder to avoid exposure to gluten at all. A person with true celiac may need the latter. You should expect your medical professionals will give the appropriate advice if/when there is a diagnosis.
KESP
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Re: going gluten-free

Post by KESP »

If your family eats pretty healthy, no a big deal. It’s only when you bring in processed foods that you run into trouble. I would recommend this app, https://glutendude.app. I find it helpful. I’d also recommend Canyon Bakehouse bread products. Best bread I have found. The problem with GF products is they are expensive. If your family isn’t all going GF, get a separate toaster for your daughter in a can’t miss color like red. Same with dishes and things like pasta strainer. GF pasta tends to be mushy. I love Andean Dream pasta, but if you can’t buy it where you are, you’ll have to experiment.
Instead of regular soy sauce, get something like San-J tamari that’s labeled GF.
I personally would not buy Cheerios. I know the Celiac Association in Canada recommends against it because of the amount of gluten that has been found in it. Oreos are also suspect.
Final thought. Just because your daughter doesn’t react strongly to gluten doesn’t mean it’s not causing damage. Some people think they can be less careful just because they don’t react strongly. Not true. Wondering if the doctor recommended an endoscopy? Tough call because it involves anesthesia etc. but I’m glad I had it done to confirm. For whatever reason, people sometimes belittle the diagnosis like we diagnosed it ourselves,
but having it absolutely confirmed helps get it in the medical record and not questioned.
littlebird
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Re: going gluten-free

Post by littlebird »

tunafish wrote: Wed Feb 07, 2024 1:21 pm I haven't read everything. Amy's has a number of products labeled gluten-free. Searching just now below I was surprised some are my favorites I had not noticed were. Pulling up a photo of one box, it is labeled but unobtrusively:

https://www.amys.com/our-foods?search=Gluten+free+
As a long time celiac I avoid Amy’s as their “gluten free” foods are made on shared lines with wheat foods and they do not submit their products to third party testing and gluten free certification. They are now open about this, but before they were, I tried some of their products and reacted to them.

Stick as much as possible to unprocessed foods and if not naturally gluten free and factory-made, as much as possible to foods that carry the third party certification, The company that does the certification is one of the companies with long experience in kosher certification and are partnered with a large gluten free non-profit organization.
littlebird
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Re: going gluten-free

Post by littlebird »

KESP wrote: Wed Feb 07, 2024 1:43 pm If your family eats pretty healthy, no a big deal. It’s only when you bring in processed foods that you run into trouble. I would recommend this app, https://glutendude.app. I find it helpful. I’d also recommend Canyon Bakehouse bread products. Best bread I have found. The problem with GF products is they are expensive. If your family isn’t all going GF, get a separate toaster for your daughter in a can’t miss color like red. Same with dishes and things like pasta strainer. GF pasta tends to be mushy. I love Andean Dream pasta, but if you can’t buy it where you are, you’ll have to experiment.
Instead of regular soy sauce, get something like San-J tamari that’s labeled GF.
I personally would not buy Cheerios. I know the Celiac Association in Canada recommends against it because of the amount of gluten that has been found in it. Oreos are also suspect.
Final thought. Just because your daughter doesn’t react strongly to gluten doesn’t mean it’s not causing damage. Some people think they can be less careful just because they don’t react strongly. Not true. Wondering if the doctor recommended an endoscopy? Tough call because it involves anesthesia etc. but I’m glad I had it done to confirm. For whatever reason, people sometimes belittle the diagnosis like we diagnosed it ourselves,
but having it absolutely confirmed helps get it in the medical record and not questioned.
Agree with each and every one of your points (except I love most gf pastas)
Big Dog
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Re: going gluten-free

Post by Big Dog »

wife has celiac. I'll avoid suggestions, as she can't stand some of the things mentioned up thread. It's trial and error for taste/quality/texture, and what's available in your community (or on Amazon).

Note, be careful bcos even some things like vitamins may have a wheat filler/binder. So, definitely look for items marked at Gluten Free. That said, we've found several 'safe' items even tho they are processed in a plant with wheat on different production lines.
kalaKeiki
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Re: going gluten-free

Post by kalaKeiki »

My wife and youngest child (family of 5) are celiac. One thing that I wish someone had told me about earlier was the potential for more exposure to arsenic for celiacs since many gluten free options are made with rice, which has higher arsenic levels than other grains.

https://sites.dartmouth.edu/arsenicandy ... -products/
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familythriftmd
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Re: going gluten-free

Post by familythriftmd »

KESP wrote: Wed Feb 07, 2024 1:43 pm If your family eats pretty healthy, no a big deal. It’s only when you bring in processed foods that you run into trouble. I would recommend this app, https://glutendude.app. I find it helpful. I’d also recommend Canyon Bakehouse bread products. Best bread I have found. The problem with GF products is they are expensive. If your family isn’t all going GF, get a separate toaster for your daughter in a can’t miss color like red. Same with dishes and things like pasta strainer. GF pasta tends to be mushy. I love Andean Dream pasta, but if you can’t buy it where you are, you’ll have to experiment.
Instead of regular soy sauce, get something like San-J tamari that’s labeled GF.
I personally would not buy Cheerios. I know the Celiac Association in Canada recommends against it because of the amount of gluten that has been found in it. Oreos are also suspect.
Final thought. Just because your daughter doesn’t react strongly to gluten doesn’t mean it’s not causing damage. Some people think they can be less careful just because they don’t react strongly. Not true. Wondering if the doctor recommended an endoscopy? Tough call because it involves anesthesia etc. but I’m glad I had it done to confirm. For whatever reason, people sometimes belittle the diagnosis like we diagnosed it ourselves,
but having it absolutely confirmed helps get it in the medical record and not questioned.
Yeah we eat pretty healthy.

I saw on the ALDI version of Cheerios this morning that they include wheat flour. So that's a bummer; even the cereal that brags about being oats is made with wheat flour, too.

but I think taking steel cut oats and making porridge out of that would be gluten-free and we do that often, anyway
rule of law guy
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Re: going gluten-free

Post by rule of law guy »

not our situation, but I could see the family going all gluten free in solidarity for the one with celiac. what I dont understand is going gluten free without celiac issues, but that is another thread.
Never wrong, unless my wife tells me that I am.
fogalog
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Re: going gluten-free

Post by fogalog »

familythriftmd wrote: Wed Feb 07, 2024 7:24 am My 12 year-old daughter likely has celiac. TTG was above highest detection limits for machine.

We also have 4 non-sensitive other kids. Anybody in that same boat? Curious what foods you commonly have as dishes that the other kids will like to eat.

NOTE: I AM NOT ASKING MEDICAL ADVICE, but consumer advice w.r.t. foods
Since no-one else has mentioned take-out: Indian food is generally pretty good for GF... but I am assuming cross-contamination is not an issue (it is not for me or my wife but may be for your child). Sushi also, (with the soy sauce caveat already mentioned). Two things that have gluten that I didn't expect: salad dressings and gravy both often use wheat flour as a thickener in the US - even oil-and-vinegar types. So don't assume that the healthy salad or meat-&-potatoes are GF - sauce and dressing on the side.

GF bread in general sucks in the US. GF pizza is hit and miss; at best its just ok.

My kids are now pretty good GF bakers - cake-type stuff works very well - pretty much indistinguishable; bread-type less so.

Good luck!
Caligal
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Re: going gluten-free

Post by Caligal »

Hello

I was on a gluten free/low Fodmap diet last year. Like others have posted, I found that it was just a matter of taste and trying different products to find the ones I liked. I found the Jovial products (pastas) to be very good substitutes for the wheat versions. Cook GF pastas al dente or they get a bit mushy.

Your 12 year old (as well as others in the household!) may enjoy these - I have made them for non vegans and gluten eaters and everyone seems to love them!
https://www.displacedhousewife.com/gf-v ... ge_id=7593
And another for GF and dairy free!
https://oven.ly/blogs/recipes/salted-pe ... er-cookies

Depending where you live, you might find restaurants/bakeries that are gluten free and are owned by chefs that are celiac. They usually have a different level of expertise in creating everything without gluten and understand cross contamination. Wishing you and your daughter well!
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ResearchMed
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Re: going gluten-free

Post by ResearchMed »

KESP wrote: Wed Feb 07, 2024 1:43 pm ...
Final thought. Just because your daughter doesn’t react strongly to gluten doesn’t mean it’s not causing damage. Some people think they can be less careful just because they don’t react strongly. Not true. Wondering if the doctor recommended an endoscopy? Tough call because it involves anesthesia etc. but I’m glad I had it done to confirm. For whatever reason, people sometimes belittle the diagnosis like we diagnosed it ourselves,
but having it absolutely confirmed helps get it in the medical record and not questioned.
[emphasis added]


This is important.

DH was diagnosed very late in life (70's) with true celiac disease.
Unfortunately, he had no overt symptoms, so we never knew.
He had a procedure (yes, under anesthesia) for something totally different, and the surgeon makes it a practice to look a bit further as long as it's being done, and he found very significant damage.

"Who knew!?' is an understatement.
The celiac blood tests aren't typically done absent some symptoms or other "reason" to consider doing that.

He feels much better in general, and some other less noticeable allergy symptoms have disappeared or gotten much less troublesome.

Ask the physician to double check the bloodwork once it seems there are no symptoms to be sure there is no further damage. The overt symptoms, or more importantly, the lack thereof, may not be accurate.

RM
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Tdubs
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Re: going gluten-free

Post by Tdubs »

If you are willing to spend anything, GF isn't hard. Buying decent processed GF foods that don't break the bank is harder.

My best buys are:

Macaroons at Aldis--get the chocolate covered.
Walmart brand GF oreo style cookies--much cheaper than Glutino
Krusteaz GF chocolate chip cookie mix is terrific but add more chips.
Sam's Choice GF bread at Walmart is much moister than any other bread I have purchased.
Costco's frozen GF pizzas are a good buy with three per box.
For pasta, Tinkyada is best, especially their Fettuccine.

Best fast food for GF person. McDonalds--fries are cooked in fryers dedicated only to fries. So, no cross contamination. Burger patties separate easily from buns without bread sticking to them.
bluelight
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Re: going gluten-free

Post by bluelight »

My husband was diagnosed with Celiac 40 years ago (when they called it sprue). We've been together 30 years. Dealing with Celiac isn't that difficult anymore but you still must always be aware.

For the most part, we eat simply. A meat or fish baked or grilled, rice or potato, and veggie. It just makes life easier if you all adopt a GF type of diet in the beginning.
Costco has a number of very good gluten free items. My husband is a fan of the GF frozen pizza.
GF Oreos taste just like the real thing.
Most supermarkets have a Gluten Free section. Schar has many very good GF breads and rolls.
Find Me Gluten Free app is very good for finding restaurants. If you are in a more metropolitan area you may find GF dedicated bakeries and restaurants. Many Fast food places do not have dedicated fryers.
Many Italian, Greek and Thai restaurants can make very good GF food.
Check food labels carefully and make yourself aware of items that have hidden gluten. Who would have guessed that some companies have gluten in ice cream.
You don't have to go nuts with different dishes / pots and pans for GF and non GF (which I have heard of people doing), but have separate spreads, peanut butter, butter that someone in your house won't cross contaminate.
For toast, if you still have regular bread in the house there are toasting wraps that you can use to put GF bread in a shared toast. With a large family you may want a dedicated toaster.
If you are on social media (FB) I have found a local Gluten Free FB page in my area where people are always giving tips on new GF food they have found or new safe restaurants.
Good luck.
The good news. Travel to Europe (Italy, Greece and a number of other counties) is a breeze with Celiac. Cruise lines are also getting to be quite good. Royal Caribbean has partnered with a company to do a couple of Gluten Free cruises.
SurferLife
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Re: going gluten-free

Post by SurferLife »

I guess you have to decide if you are going to make the entire family GF or are you only going to do it for one person. We are a GF family due to medical issues, but it wasn't always that way. Before we all switched, we'd get a few products that had wheat like bread, but the main meal we fixed did not have gluten so that made it easy in preparing meals, but if they wanted their glutenous bread, they could fix it, themselves. At some point, we all just started to eat the gluten free bread by Costco, it's good, for GF anyway. We also had a concern for cross-contamination, so it was really good to eliminate gluten from the house entirely. It only takes a little gluten to sky rocket your thyroid antibodies for some folks, so we went that route and it was the right call.

For meals, we use a lot of chicken, rice and potato, and for pasta, we don't do much. There is a new Barilla GF spaghetti pasta that is very good, and a handful of macoroni's, but there's not much else, so if you are pasta family, that might be tough. Overall, GF pasta is not good and they can be very tricky to cook, but there are a few that are good so you just have to test them out. If you are cooking from scratch going GF is not so hard, but it gets exponentially more difficult once you start doing prepared foods or "food products", and they almost all have gluten. What's also hard is the hidden gluten in things like soy sauce and some hot sauces, just to name 2. Tamari is better than soy sauce by the way, one of the few if not only products where the GF is better than the common product. We do a pizza night and make pizza from an italian GF flour, and it's absolutely the best GF flour I've EVER had; you would not be able to tell the difference between it and regular flour, but it takes more time to prepare. Link is below. Also, there's a good number of GF frozen pizzas that we'd buy and then put our own toppings on. You're not going to find a GF deep dish chicago pizza, but that flour below will give you a great new york pizza that is GF. :sharebeer (that's GF beer we're drinking there)

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00FX ... UTF8&psc=1

We do a lot of oats but it needs to be GF oats, that's super important. Oats themselves are GF, but it's the processing that can mess that up. Soups and stews are big for us, and we also do a lot of vegetarian dishes because they do not have gluten. Mexican dishes without flour tortillas is good for being GF, so a good taco night.

We hardly eat out as it's just so so difficult, but we'll go to places that have GF menu's. Most servers do not understand GF unfortunately, but the managers almost always do. We had Dominoes today and they have a GF crust.
Last edited by SurferLife on Thu Feb 08, 2024 2:28 am, edited 1 time in total.
SurferLife
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Re: going gluten-free

Post by SurferLife »

rule of law guy wrote: Wed Feb 07, 2024 3:50 pm not our situation, but I could see the family going all gluten free in solidarity for the one with celiac. what I dont understand is going gluten free without celiac issues, but that is another thread.
Celiac disease is just one reason to go GF, but there are a host of other auto-immune diseases that respond well to a GF lifestyle like Hashimotos. Some kids with special needs also show improved behavior when put on a GF lifestyle. I know that for myself, I had migraines every week for 15 years like clockwork, but once I went GF, they stopped pretty much immediately and I haven't had one in years. If only I had known!!!
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familythriftmd
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Re: going gluten-free

Post by familythriftmd »

SurferLife wrote: Thu Feb 08, 2024 2:13 am I guess you have to decide if you are going to make the entire family GF or are you only going to do it for one person. We are a GF family due to medical issues, but it wasn't always that way. Before we all switched, we'd get a few products that had wheat like bread, but the main meal we fixed did not have gluten so that made it easy in preparing meals, but if they wanted their glutenous bread, they could fix it, themselves. At some point, we all just started to eat the gluten free bread by Costco, it's good, for GF anyway. We also had a concern for cross-contamination, so it was really good to eliminate gluten from the house entirely. It only takes a little gluten to sky rocket your thyroid antibodies for some folks, so we went that route and it was the right call.

For meals, we use a lot of chicken, rice and potato, and for pasta, we don't do much. There is a new Barilla GF spaghetti pasta that is very good, and a handful of macoroni's, but there's not much else, so if you are pasta family, that might be tough. Overall, GF pasta is not good and they can be very tricky to cook, but there are a few that are good so you just have to test them out. If you are cooking from scratch going GF is not so hard, but it gets exponentially more difficult once you start doing prepared foods or "food products", and they almost all have gluten. What's also hard is the hidden gluten in things like soy sauce and some hot sauces, just to name 2. Tamari is better than soy sauce by the way, one of the few if not only products where the GF is better than the common product. We do a pizza night and make pizza from an italian GF flour, and it's absolutely the best GF flour I've EVER had; you would not be able to tell the difference between it and regular flour, but it takes more time to prepare. Link is below. Also, there's a good number of GF frozen pizzas that we'd buy and then put our own toppings on. You're not going to find a GF deep dish chicago pizza, but that flour below will give you a great new york pizza that is GF. :sharebeer (that's GF beer we're drinking there)

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00FX ... UTF8&psc=1

We do a lot of oats but it needs to be GF oats, that's super important. Oats themselves are GF, but it's the processing that can mess that up. Soups and stews are big for us, and we also do a lot of vegetarian dishes because they do not have gluten. Mexican dishes without flour tortillas is good for being GF, so a good taco night.

We hardly eat out as it's just so so difficult, but we'll go to places that have GF menu's. Most servers do not understand GF unfortunately, but the managers almost always do. We had Dominoes today and they have a GF crust.
Thanks! I didn't think to look for "gluten-free oats". Funny how 100% oats would still be contaminated with gluten.

Lucky for us we're already used to rarely going out to eat.
BenMcCool
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Re: going gluten-free

Post by BenMcCool »

Ben McCool's wife here. I have been celiac for over 20 years.
1. The longer you are GF, the more sensitive you become, and the more drastic your reactions will be. Gluten will still damage you, even if you are asymptomatic, so don't take the risk!
2. Be VERY careful of prescription drugs, especially generics. Many contain wheat as a binder, and even if they don't, cross contamination is an issue with generics as many are not produced in protected areas. 3. I like Barilla and DiLallo gf pastas, and really dislike Tinkyada, which was recommended by someone else as the best! Trader Joe GF stuffing and chocolate chip cookies are super!
3. If it is processed/ manufactured in any way, don't buy it unless it is labelled gluten free. You can check the product's website, as some things are GF but not labelled as such. M & M's regular is one example, but they say their Mint M & M's are NOT GF. I have just found out via the website that Andes mints are GF!
4. Skin care products, hair care products and make-up should also be gluten free. If a product touches a cut, scratch etc. it could enter your bloodstream and cause problems. If you are very sensitive, as I am, and as any severe level celiac is, topical applications will be a problem anyway.
5. OATS - No oats for the newly diagnosed for a full year. Then you can try oats labelled GF only. Oats and wheat are often grown in adjacent fields and there can be cross contamination even before the harvest. If one is clear of gluten when you try oats, you will know that the reaction, if you have one, is an oats sensitivity. If there is no reaction, you can add gf oats to the diet.
6. Other products to watch out for are ice cream - many contain wheat. Pet foods often contain wheat.
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Re: going gluten-free

Post by BenMcCool »

DW just posted a few thoughts about GF. I would like to mention some lifestyle implications of celiac disease.

We live in a mid-size city and there are adequate GF foods available. Larger cities have many more options.

Not being able to eat the same food as others drastically limits your social life because so much is food related - entertaining, restaurants with friends, etc. People are uncomfortable if you sit with them during a meal without eating.

We are aging in place because there is no suitable CCRC or retirement facility that can provide GF food.

If your church gives communion, you can only take consecrated wine, never a wheat host.

Travel is pretty much restricted to the GF food you can take with you…

When DW was in the hospital overnight, the dietician called and asked me to bring her food from home. The kitchen couldn't provide GF meals.
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retiredjg
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Re: going gluten-free

Post by retiredjg »

familythriftmd wrote: Thu Feb 08, 2024 10:54 am Funny how 100% oats would still be contaminated with gluten.
As you get further into this, I think you will be shocked at the things that may contain gluten. Soy sauce, corn flakes, or salad dressing for example. Who woulda thunk it.
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Re: going gluten-free

Post by mikejuss »

ETK517 wrote: Wed Feb 07, 2024 12:09 pm I avoided gluten-free products which tend to be highly processed with ingredient lists longer than a CVS receipt.
+1 Bear this in mind, OP.
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bluelight
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Re: going gluten-free

Post by bluelight »

BenMcCool wrote: Thu Feb 08, 2024 11:12 am
Travel is pretty much restricted to the GF food you can take with you…

When DW was in the hospital overnight, the dietician called and asked me to bring her food from home. The kitchen couldn't provide GF meals.
Travel in Europe is pretty easy. Senza Gluten is all you need to say in Italy. They get it there as well as cross contamination.

Hospitals are notoriously horrible when it comes to GF. I don't understand why. At least the dietician told you they couldn't provide food. When my husband was in the hospital for a planned procedure they gave him a meal that contained gluten. Celiac was noted on his chart and they were also were notified in advance. Yet they still gave him a 'normal' meal.
SurferLife
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Re: going gluten-free

Post by SurferLife »

BenMcCool wrote: Thu Feb 08, 2024 11:12 am DW just posted a few thoughts about GF. I would like to mention some lifestyle implications of celiac disease.

Not being able to eat the same food as others drastically limits your social life because so much is food related - entertaining, restaurants with friends, etc. People are uncomfortable if you sit with them during a meal without eating.

We are aging in place because there is no suitable CCRC or retirement facility that can provide GF food.

If your church gives communion, you can only take consecrated wine, never a wheat host.

Travel is pretty much restricted to the GF food you can take with you…

When DW was in the hospital overnight, the dietician called and asked me to bring her food from home. The kitchen couldn't provide GF meals.
We spoke to our church and they started to provide GF communion options. We would also take our own on occasion before we found a home church that had these choices. We also offered to pay for this for the entire church. When our kids do Sunday School we would also provide them their own snack and had to talk to the teachers. You can't rely on someone else providing a gluten-free option because people have no idea where gluten is hidden. I remember when our daughter helped out at the church and they provided pizza for the folks. She asked if it was gluten-free and they said yes. Well, I knew that was obviously not true because that's not an option in our area, so we had to deal with the after-effects of that.

I have also taken GF meals to my wife in the hospital.

Other than perhaps a bar-like business, you can almost always get a salad when eating out. I know that isn't always desirable, but it's usually an option, so long as they don't dump croutons on it, which happens a lot even when you ask them not to. When we attend functions with our kids or potlucks, we ALWAYS take food that we/they can eat because nobody is prepared for that, and even if you ask them if what they made is gluten free, they might say yes when it is in fact not. It's not that people don't care, it's that they don't really understand the scope of the problem and where gluten is hidden. Many people think it's just a fad thing, so that's annoying when your issues are medical.
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Re: going gluten-free

Post by SurferLife »

bluelight wrote: Thu Feb 08, 2024 11:43 am
BenMcCool wrote: Thu Feb 08, 2024 11:12 am
Travel is pretty much restricted to the GF food you can take with you…

When DW was in the hospital overnight, the dietician called and asked me to bring her food from home. The kitchen couldn't provide GF meals.
Travel in Europe is pretty easy. Senza Gluten is all you need to say in Italy. They get it there as well as cross contamination.

Hospitals are notoriously horrible when it comes to GF. I don't understand why. At least the dietician told you they couldn't provide food. When my husband was in the hospital for a planned procedure they gave him a meal that contained gluten. Celiac was noted on his chart and they were also were notified in advance. Yet they still gave him a 'normal' meal.
I lived in Italy for 3 years and it was amazing for GF. Also, if you need to buy GF food products in Italy, you can find them at the Pharmacy if not in the local grocery store.
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Re: going gluten-free

Post by littlebird »

SurferLife wrote: Thu Feb 08, 2024 2:23 am
rule of law guy wrote: Wed Feb 07, 2024 3:50 pm not our situation, but I could see the family going all gluten free in solidarity for the one with celiac. what I dont understand is going gluten free without celiac issues, but that is another thread.
Celiac disease is just one reason to go GF, but there are a host of other auto-immune diseases that respond well to a GF lifestyle like Hashimotos. Some kids with special needs also show improved behavior when put on a GF lifestyle. I know that for myself, I had migraines every week for 15 years like clockwork, but once I went GF, they stopped pretty much immediately and I haven't had one in years. If only I had known!!!
When my late spouse could no longer prepare his own breakfasts and I had to prepare them, they were of necessity gluten free. His 40 years of chronic throat-clearing -later shown to be an atypical symptom of otherwise symptomless reflux disease- completely stopped cold. Later when in hospice, his nurse told us that both she and her husband tried going gluten free for digestive issues and found that both of their asthmas improved by about 70% on the diet.
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Re: going gluten-free

Post by Tdubs »

SurferLife wrote: Thu Feb 08, 2024 11:48 am
BenMcCool wrote: Thu Feb 08, 2024 11:12 am DW just posted a few thoughts about GF. I would like to mention some lifestyle implications of celiac disease.

Not being able to eat the same food as others drastically limits your social life because so much is food related - entertaining, restaurants with friends, etc. People are uncomfortable if you sit with them during a meal without eating.

We are aging in place because there is no suitable CCRC or retirement facility that can provide GF food.

If your church gives communion, you can only take consecrated wine, never a wheat host.

Travel is pretty much restricted to the GF food you can take with you…

When DW was in the hospital overnight, the dietician called and asked me to bring her food from home. The kitchen couldn't provide GF meals.
We spoke to our church and they started to provide GF communion options. We would also take our own on occasion before we found a home church that had these choices. We also offered to pay for this for the entire church. When our kids do Sunday School we would also provide them their own snack and had to talk to the teachers. You can't rely on someone else providing a gluten-free option because people have no idea where gluten is hidden. I remember when our daughter helped out at the church and they provided pizza for the folks. She asked if it was gluten-free and they said yes. Well, I knew that was obviously not true because that's not an option in our area, so we had to deal with the after-effects of that.

I have also taken GF meals to my wife in the hospital.

Other than perhaps a bar-like business, you can almost always get a salad when eating out. I know that isn't always desirable, but it's usually an option, so long as they don't dump croutons on it, which happens a lot even when you ask them not to. When we attend functions with our kids or potlucks, we ALWAYS take food that we/they can eat because nobody is prepared for that, and even if you ask them if what they made is gluten free, they might say yes when it is in fact not. It's not that people don't care, it's that they don't really understand the scope of the problem and where gluten is hidden. Many people think it's just a fad thing, so that's annoying when your issues are medical.
Important to know that the GF host provided by the Catholic Church is not completely GF. It is required to have at least traces of gluten and is usually described as low gluten. I've received them for years without biopsies showing damage to my small intestine villi.
rene
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Re: going gluten-free

Post by rene »

My daughter is celiac.

Your kid will get a endoscopy scope to confirm the blood test celiac diagnosis. You will want this to a) assess the damage of intestines and b) to get official diagnosis from doctor. This last one is important with regards to getting a 504 or health plan at school.

Research 504 celiac. This can be a battle and can f you can’t get one a good relationship with your school is vital to keep the kid safe.

For the household it is MUCH easier to just go 100% gluten free. The cross contamination is a huge issue for celiac patients and the idea of doing separate dishes and cooking areas is too much for most. Just go 100% gf. I threw out / donated hundreds of dollars of food, replaced cutting boards, toasters etc.

There was a comment upstream about how ‘sensitive’ one can be towards gluten and adjust lifestyle based on that. NO NO NO. You go 100% gf when you have a celiac diagnosis. While one person might puke violently after ingesting a crumb of gluten, others barely react but internally damage in the intestines still occurs. Just don’t.

Everyone approaches this different. We do not consider gluten to radioactive. We do not exclusively buy certified gluten free labeled foods. For example canned peaches are fine with me. We also are fine with processed foods but obviously study the ingredients. Certification costs money and not every company is willing to do that. We eat plain and peanut m&m’s for example but avoid the varieties that are know to contain gluten.

In the beginning you get a 6 month check up blood draw to monitor. Then annual and after a while after you’ve shown that the family can sustain the test scores it might be every other year or so.

A celiac lifestyle is not that difficult but it sucks nonetheless. I am dreading my DD’s teenage years because they will all want to go for pizza and she will be an outsider. It sucks for the rest of the family because we no longer go out to 99% of the restaurants here.

Gluten free cooking is extremely easy. Mexican food, just replace the flour tortilla with corn. Steak, veggie, potato dinner. Replace any Asian dish that asks for soy sauce with tamari. Easy at home. In a restaurant setting it’s near impossible to find.

In&Out, Chick-fil-A, PF Chang are some chains. Most of the Indian and Thai restaurants can offer plenty of curries that are gf. Build a relationship with your chef, owner, waiter to make sure they understand what is needed. Cross contamination is real. Ask about that fryer… if it’s not dedicated to fries only (like In&Out) then don’t. We go often to a local Indian restaurant and my DD can eat all the curries and their gluten free naan but only our DS and I will eat the pakora since it’s from a shared fryer (samosas have wheat).

GF substitutes usually suck. Pizzas are dreadful, Barillo GF pastas are decent. But you’ll get used to it. One benefit is that you will become intimately aware and involved with the stuff that goes into your body. Not a bad thing at all. You will usually end up eating healthier because you work with less processed foods.

A lot of this becomes easier over time. The biggest negative for me is that I can no longer drag my family into restaurants anywhere we please. It takes a lot of research and questions. (Use the Find Me GF app). Note though that in a lot of European countries they handle this so much better and you will have no problems in Holland, Italy to find a good gf meal. America really is backwater when it comes to that. Luckily we live in an affluent part of California and options are better than most other places.

Educate your family and friends (for sleepovers etc). The horror when you tell grandma that her home made soup is not GF due to some bouillon she used. The bday parties where you send your kid with a slice of gf pizza or other snack.. it’s work but it’s needed.

Watch out for neurological effects of gluten poisoning. My daughter gets anxiety and OCD attacks when gluten enters her system. Be aware that neuro and celiac are connected.

The medical system you are part of hopefully has good support systems. Our UCSF system has a good celiac program.

At the end of the day celiac is simple. Don’t eat gluten. The biggest negative is traveling and social dining. It beats having you gut being systemically destroyed though :).

My daughter flatlined on her growth curve. We then found out she had celiac. Once she went GF she grew 1.6” in like 5 weeks. Her body picked up the slack and was back on her normal curve. It’s quite amazing how the body reacts. It did wonders for her mood and neuro issues that we were experiencing before the celiac diagnosis.

Don’t underestimate celiac but at the same know that you don’t have to focus only on certified gluten free labels only. There is a middle ground but everyone has a different approach. Ours is validated by the frequent blood test results that were done at the beginning of our journey. We are comfortable in our handling of this disease. We thank Chipotle for their awesome burrito bowls and gf chips and we cry a little sad teardrop inside for the 5 star restaurant we no longer frequent as well as fried chicken down the street. It’s all good.

But oh boy, get ready for that teenage angst about not being able to order anything except a green salad at that hipster beer joint that all her friends go to.
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Re: going gluten-free

Post by LittleMaggieMae »

Just some thoughts:

Be sure to check the labels if you are buying ready made polenta (and anything made with lentils or buckwheat). The assumption for my thoughts are that you are most likely cooking from scratch (a bag of course corn meal, a bag of lentils) OR are buying some 'basic' buckwheat noodles.

Polenta - easy to make, can be made a variety of ways plain or fancy, using only water or using milk with or without butter. different kinds of seasonings (my favorite is rosemary garlic when I use it as a "sidedish").

You can put your favorite pasta sauce, a protein and some veggies over polenta. You can use it as the base for a pizza. You can use it as side dish with a meal (instead of mashed potatoes or rice). You can make appetizers with it.

Lentils. easy to make and come in a bunch of different versions. Red are the most mild tasting. Green are middle and brown have a stronger flavor.
Make soups, stews, and salads with them.

Try Buckwheat noodles (Japan/Korean/Chinese section of your supermarket). I make them with Miso soup but I don't see any reason why you can't substitute them in other recipes.

It will probably take a bit of time, trying new tastes and textures of foods, but I bet you'll discover there are lots of tasty options.
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ResearchMed
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Re: going gluten-free

Post by ResearchMed »

rene wrote: Thu Feb 08, 2024 12:45 pm There was a comment upstream about how ‘sensitive’ one can be towards gluten and adjust lifestyle based on that. NO NO NO. You go 100% gf when you have a celiac diagnosis. While one person might puke violently after ingesting a crumb of gluten, others barely react but internally damage in the intestines still occurs. Just don’t.

I'm not aware that there is damage from cross contamination for everyone.
IF the blood levels are low/normal, rather than sky-high "off the charts", our physicians at our major teaching hospital and medical school seem to think DH is doing fine now, as long as his bloodwork remains so low. We'll continue to work with them.

I'm not sure it's a good idea to tell others - strangers -"NO NO NO" or "Just don't" and making alarming statements about how "damage ... still occurs."
Much better for everyone to work with their own medical team to make their own decisions.

And what is "504 celiac"?

RM
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rene
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Re: going gluten-free

Post by rene »

ResearchMed wrote: Thu Feb 08, 2024 2:39 pm
rene wrote: Thu Feb 08, 2024 12:45 pm There was a comment upstream about how ‘sensitive’ one can be towards gluten and adjust lifestyle based on that. NO NO NO. You go 100% gf when you have a celiac diagnosis. While one person might puke violently after ingesting a crumb of gluten, others barely react but internally damage in the intestines still occurs. Just don’t.

I'm not aware that there is damage from cross contamination for everyone.
IF the blood levels are low/normal, rather than sky-high "off the charts", our physicians at our major teaching hospital and medical school seem to think DH is doing fine now, as long as his bloodwork remains so low. We'll continue to work with them.

I'm not sure it's a good idea to tell others - strangers -"NO NO NO" or "Just don't" and making alarming statements about how "damage ... still occurs."
Much better for everyone to work with their own medical team to make their own decisions.

And what is "504 celiac"?

RM
Just telling you what our doctors told us.. to not think that there is no internal damage when a child does not show immediate and aggressive symptoms. With celiac there is no 95% gluten free... sure some have worse effects than others when they take that gluten but damage occurs even if it doesn't show 'externally'. But the ONLY thing that works is 100% GF

I don't disagree with you... we just talk different things.

I agree that the standard to go by is the blood test values... every 6 months at the start, then annually you will get results and you will basically get an idea how successful you have been keeping gluten out of the system of you child.

I think we are talking different things here... when it comes to cross contamination I said already that I don't treat gluten as radioactive. I don't limit my purchases to only certified gf labels, plain gf labels etc... I use common sense and a bit of experience from how my girl reacts and that together with years of blood test results has made me comfortable in my approach. That said... i am talking about this idea that you can have a little bit of gluten because the reactions are not extreme. That is where we differ. There is only 100% gluten free for celiac patients. Btw, my wife is celiac and only found out after DD diagnosis... decades she lived with it and showed no signs of vomiting etc. Silent celiac... but the damage internally is there and continues until you go 100% GF. Now for cross contamination you can indeed (and I am) have different attitudes... I do eat with my DD at Chipotles and In&Out and don't use the Allergy Flag to make them change their gloves etc... we are good, there has been no issues with reactions and the blood test confirm we are doing good.

Thats all

As for the 504... its like an IEP at school that travels with this child during school years. You can stipulate things like "48 hours notice before field trip, providing home made lunch for those trips, no gluten food in class or cooking class, separate table for eating lunch, permission to go to toilet anytime etc etc

https://celiac.org/main/wp-content/uplo ... AL-pdf.pdf

It is not necessarily easy to get one. My school was difficult in doing this but at the same time we have an excellent relationship with DD's teachers and staff and they are doing all the right things for her
rule of law guy
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Re: going gluten-free

Post by rule of law guy »

SurferLife wrote: Thu Feb 08, 2024 2:23 am
rule of law guy wrote: Wed Feb 07, 2024 3:50 pm not our situation, but I could see the family going all gluten free in solidarity for the one with celiac. what I dont understand is going gluten free without celiac issues, but that is another thread.
Celiac disease is just one reason to go GF, but there are a host of other auto-immune diseases that respond well to a GF lifestyle like Hashimotos. Some kids with special needs also show improved behavior when put on a GF lifestyle. I know that for myself, I had migraines every week for 15 years like clockwork, but once I went GF, they stopped pretty much immediately and I haven't had one in years. If only I had known!!!
interesting, and good to hear
Never wrong, unless my wife tells me that I am.
SurferLife
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Re: going gluten-free

Post by SurferLife »

With celiac there is no 95% gluten free... sure some have worse effects than others when they take that gluten but damage occurs even if it doesn't show 'externally'. But the ONLY thing that works is 100% GF
This is absolutely true.
rene
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Re: going gluten-free

Post by rene »

Also... don't feel bad scarfing down cheeseburgers and cookies in your car in the driveway... we understand :wink:
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