Affordable "daily moisturizer with SPF 15 +" --for

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aerofreaky11
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Affordable "daily moisturizer with SPF 15 +" --for

Post by aerofreaky11 »

So, I have been thinking more and more of sun damage. For years--my entire life, I have just accepted my (from sun silly) red neck and forehead. I can't deny that it isn't good for me to ignore the sun--32 now. I know way too many people with skin cancer issues..

I have used a few things. First, was an Neutrogena Men's daily lotion. It was OK,but smelled a little funny. I can't find it now--perhaps discontinued.

I "borrowed" a bottle of my mom's Oil of Olay..with SPF 15. It is OK, but it has a "whitening" effect--the SPF is from good old fashioned zinc oxide!

I see that I have some Lubriderm with SPF 15. Once again, it smells funny and well...it seems to contain a lot of oil. Not sure I would feel good placing it on my face!

So, can anyone suggest an affordable product that I can use daily...I don't want to break out from applying it to my face. The scent is an issue, but only secondary. I really just need something that will work. Any suggestions?

I am posting here...because the products I am seeing vary in price, but the per ounce price is often more that $10-- It isn't gold...

Thanks
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amp
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Post by amp »

Cetaphil's Daily Facial Moisturizer is SPF 15 and runs about $11 to $12 for four ounces. It's unscented too.

It works well for me.
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fishnskiguy
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Post by fishnskiguy »

Hi aero,

I feel your pain. I'm a sixty six year old red head.

When I was a teenager, we lived in Hawaii for a couple years. Zinc oxide was the only relief. Apply to lips nose and ears. Even then, I was a prisoner for six days out of seven indoors.

Now, with the miracle of sun block, I can live at 6000 ft. elevation, ski at 10,000 ft plus all winter, and fish and bike all summer.

For me, the secret is "No Ad" SPF 45 or 50 available at Walmart by the quart.

I go through two quarts a year.

Good luck.

Chris
Trident D-5 SLBM- "When you care enough to send the very best."
maywood
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Post by maywood »

Try Wal-mart's Equate Complete Beauty Lotion SPF 15 sensitive skin.

It's a knock-off of Oil of Olay but it rubs in and does not have a whitening effect. No scent if you get the "sensitive skin" formula. Non-greasy.

Less than $1 per ounce.

You can find it at Wal-mart near the Oil of Olay.

Maywood
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tarnation
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Re: Affordable "daily moisturizer with SPF 15 +" -

Post by tarnation »

aerofreaky11 wrote: So, can anyone suggest an affordable product that I can use daily...I don't want to break out from applying it to my face. The scent is an issue, but only secondary. I really just need something that will work. Any suggestions?
You might try "Clinique M Protect SPF 21"
Not stinky. Won't mess up skin.
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biasion
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Post by biasion »

As a physician who posts, please read the post at your own risk. The first and foremost piece of advice I have to give you is: call and see your doctor about this. If you ignore it and a metastatic melanoma obstructs your intestine, chops your spinal cord in half, and makes you die of popping your brain through its coverings, it was because of your failure to do due diligence to SEEING YOUR DOCTOR about this.

OK.

I grew up in Italy totally blaze` about the sun's effects. I have pictures from as little as just before med school (which was less than 10 years ago) of my buck naked, sexy self in an itsy bitsy teeny weeny bikini and dark as a "nero com'il carbon' " (traditional 1960's Italian beachgoing song you hear overplayed every summer, brings back so many memories that songs like it are overplayed all year long at my house).
(listen here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mi0xk6ihf4g )

That was a bad idea. As soon as I learned about skin cancer in med school, realizing that the greatest risk factor for this is cumulative sun exposure, I became a vampire. You see, burns before 18 is the worst one, because every second you are in the sun is a ticking time bomb. If you get burned in a later age, the damage is less, but exposure as a youngin... bad. Every ray you get, every burn is NOT self limited. It compounds like a zero coupon bond deranging your DNA. So imagine getting nuked like me and then having all the compound cancer interest bearing down on you. Lucky I am one of the "dark people" with more pigment genes (out of a total of 36). My wife probably has only 2-3, she has to be careful, but me, I could pass for Arab or something like that in my old days of indiscretion.

The cancer risk is real, and you should take heed and be careful to screen yourself, or even go to a dermatologist from time to time if you have a family history of skin cancer. Here is an excellent picture to compare your moles to. I keep it on all my computers in my office's exam rooms and use this very picture to drill it into ALL of my patients. Learn the ABCD's of melanoma for life and look at yourself or have your significant other look at you from time to time even in the hard to see places like your back, and your inside thighs (which are statistically the most common places for men and women to get melanoma, respectively):
http://skintypesolutions.com/blogs/mexi ... lanoma.jpg

With regards to sun block, just like sex the best protection is to not do it at all. But if you must go out, stay out of the sun during peak hours (10am-5pm), keep in the shade, wear a wide rimmed hat like Indiana Jones as well as protective clothes. The average T-shirt only has an SPF of 4, so get special SPF clothes. Let me explain SPF.

SPF 15 is probably fine. What SPF stands for is the Sun Protection Factor. What it means is it multiplies your burn time by that number to get how long it can protect you. Burn time is the amount of time you can lie in the sun until you first start to turn a little red. For most people it is 5-20 minutes, longer for darker skinned individuals.

Since that burn time is 5-20 minutes, but most sun block will honestly stop working or get sweated off your skin no matter how waterproof it is within 2-3 hours at most, any level above 15-30 is probably a waste of money (just multiply 5-20 by 15-30 and you will get more than 2 hours). Just take all the precautions and if you really must be out, re-apply every 1-2 hours on your exposed skin and you will probably be safe.

To this I will add that a LITTLE sun is probably good because it helps you make vitamin D. Benito Mussolini's fascist government in Italy vanquished Rickett's disease (vitamin D deficiency in kids leading to weakened, brittle bones and bow legs) by essentially opening up these subsidized "play camps" along the coasts for working class kids living in dark, sunless industrial slums to get "neri" (black!) like coal as the song I posted above goes. So it's give and take.... too much sun you get a melanoma and age your skin prematurely, not enough and you risk not getting your vitamin D. Notice that all you REALLY need is probably 1-2 weeks vacation in the outdoors without even taking your shirt off (which is a no-no).

One thing that did happen as a result of my neurosis is that I almost managed to freeze my face as if I were still 24. So even though I am in my early 30's, people still mistake me for 24. Some patients like it, others don't. When I was 24, I looked 16. The older I get, the more I think this is a good thing. Hopefully when I am 45 I will look the age I am now, but by then white hair will catch up with me and I don't plan on coloring it.

Regarding products, they are mostly the same. Neutrogena good for face as it is less greasy and won't give you so many zits. Ad-aware or the job-lot generic (waterproof always slightly, but only slightly better) SPF 30 is good for the rest of the bod ex-face (as in FTSE ex-US). Don't forget to apply to your ears. Seen old people with squamous cell cancers there get their ears lopped off for it. Yuk, protect those ears!

Enjoy the summer!
p14175
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Post by p14175 »

I used to use a lot of sunblock believing the propaganda that it really worked, but I would end up with a good sunburn. Now If I plan on being out in the sun for a long time I wear a wide brimmed hat (not a baseball cap), long sleeve shirt and pants. If I use sunblock I get the stuff made for kids.

Here in the desert southwest it's interesting how a long sleeve shirt can feel cooler than a tank top in the summer!
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ryuns
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Post by ryuns »

There are a ton of daily moisturizers with SPF and, for most people, they're just extra chemicals. For a lot of people, they're in the sun, or they ain't. I can plop on SPF 15 after the shower in the morning, but by the time I go outside after work, it's long since worn off. Point is, worry about sun when you're out in it, not just all the time.

In which case, you might need something burlier than a daily moisturizer with SPF 15 (since a lot of those aren't sweat/waterproof and some don't have UVA protection from ZnO2, TiO2, avobenzone, etc). I use Neutrogena Ultra Sheer (total overkill at SPF 70) for my face when I'm out a long time. Better than most, but still greasier than it could be. I believe they make a "for the face" variety. When I'm out for a long time performing an activity that allows it like hiking or backpacking but not, eg, soccer, I supplement with a wide brimmed hat. Find one you like. Mine's a cheapy fly fishing hat, but I think it looks pretty good, in a rugged sort of way.

Ryan
An inconvenience is only an adventure wrongly considered; an adventure is an inconvenience rightly considered. -- GK Chesterton
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ryuns
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Post by ryuns »

biasion wrote: I grew up in Italy totally blaze` about the sun's effects. <snip>
Hm, I've actually wondered if that "Mediterrenean" skin (skin type 3 or so...?) is a bit of a disadvantage for some people. For me, I don't tan darkly (usually end up burning somewhat before acquiring one too), so I swore off "trying" to get sun (though I wish I'd done it sooner). It seemed vain and dangerous. But most white people I know who tan from pale to brown are OBSESSED with it. They lay out like reptiles on a rock, chasing tan lines, and apparently ignoring all the middle age people around here who clearly show the effects of too much sun (not to mention the warnings and horror stories of cancers).

Granted, I wish my skin was darker just so I could worry slightly less about it, but I fancy that if it were, I still wouldn't spend my weekends mutating my epidermal DNA. :)

Ryan
An inconvenience is only an adventure wrongly considered; an adventure is an inconvenience rightly considered. -- GK Chesterton
strcmp
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Post by strcmp »

I use a CVS sunblock one.. SPF 95+
it is a facial one too and does not block your pores so you're less likely to get breakouts. It is the highest SPF i've ever seen/used.

It was a squeezetube one that is about $9 or so.

The only thing that worries me about super high SPF sunblocks is that it could possibly contain stronger chemicals (to get the higher SPF rating) that could damage your skin?? I've used it w/o any issues, but not sure about long term usage? So far no problems though.

I think that logic may have only applied to older sunblocks possibly. Since this is made especially for the face it must be better for your skin than other higher SPF sunblocks since the skin around the face is pretty sensitive.
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englishgirl
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Post by englishgirl »

Well, as far as the good old zinc oxide goes, it might not be a bad thing. I had a facialist tell me that the sunscreens containing chemicals were what was causing my skin to break out. So if you're having break out problems when using them, maybe you should try the old physical barrier (whitening) ones. They do sink in after a while and don't leave a whitening effect on the skin for too long.

And try to use one that is designed for the face, as the regular sunscreens tend to cause more breakouts. Also, if there's one for sensitive skin available, that is likely to have fewer chemicals as it won't be perfumed to smell nice.

I use Burt's Bees Chemical Free sunscreen with SPF 15 on my hands and arms. It does cause a bit of whitening to start with as it's a physical block but then sinks in. It's about $14 for 3.5 fl oz so it's not the cheapest out there but it works for me. They also have an SPF 30 but it takes longer to sink in and smells more so I don't like it as much.

I've used Olay, Neutrogena, Aveeno, the CVS copy of Olay (didn't like that one so much as it seemed too thin), pretty much everything. I currently use a more expensive product on my face, so I won't recommend that one for you as it's not very Boglehead of me! Anyway, I think the Equate (Walmart) copy of Olay might be a good one to try to start with.
Sarah
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gunn_show
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Post by gunn_show »

I use two similar products, about $8-10 each depending where you get it, Target or wallymart

NIVEA FOR MEN Revitalizing Lotion Q10 with 15spf, feels really smooth, works well. Usually find it in the aftershave lotions area, in a small blue bottle, in a blue box.
http://www.niveausa.com/products/show/R ... tion%20Q10

I forget the other one, I think made by L'Oreal, it was on sale, looks the same, same bottle shape and size, same idea with the Q10. I think it is an orange package. Lotion feels the same too, so really a matter of which is on sale or generally cheaper when I run out.
this might be it:
http://www.lorealparisusa.com/_us/_en/d ... ata//d+d//}
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nonnie
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Post by nonnie »

I use Aveeno Baby Continuous Protection Sunblock SPF 45-- it's fragrance-free and water-resistant. I think they've may have raised it to 55 SPF now. To check on safety of sunblock products:

http://www.cosmeticsdatabase.com/produc ... nothanks=1
Vermonster
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Post by Vermonster »

For those wishing more information, eMedicine has a good review authored by Stan Levy entitled "Sunscreens and Photoprotection" (Sorry, can't post link.)

To the OP's original question, I would caution that no current product is likely to provide a full day's protection from a single application. This is for a variety of reasons, not the least of which is the known propensity of a number of sunscreen ingredients to degrade over time (especially in the sun). The FDA has not yet sanctioned a method of evaluating sunscreen stability--so I would advise caution in evaluating these claims when made by manufacturers.

Errol
nonnie
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Post by nonnie »

Vermonster wrote:For those wishing more information, eMedicine has a good review authored by Stan Levy entitled "Sunscreens and Photoprotection" (Sorry, can't post link.)

Errol
Great article, thanks for posting it Erroll. Here's the link :
http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1119992-overview


Consumer Reports also has an article on sunscreen in the July 2009 issue:

http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/maga ... =sunscreen

Nonnie

edited to add Consumer Reports
Last edited by nonnie on Fri Jul 24, 2009 10:57 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Blue
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Post by Blue »

As a dermatologist, a topic near and dear to my heart.

SPF measures UVB protection. The recommendation for years was SPF >15, now most recommend >30 but the difference between these two SPF's is very small in terms of UVB protection. Beyond an SPF of 30, very little is gained by going with higher SPF's but no reason to necessarily avoid the higher SPF's other than cost.

There currently is no quantifiable rating criteria for UVA protection of sunscreens but the FDA is working on a star rating system (in the near future, sunscreens will likely have both an SPF and a star rating for consumers to compare).

The best UVA blockers are helioplex/mexoryl derivatives and this is why many dermatologists recommend Neutrogena's helioplex sunscreens. This is what I recommend to my patients as a first consideration. Parsol 1789, titanium and zinc oxides are also very good UVA blockers. General recommendation is to be liberal with sunscreen and reapply every 2-3 hours.

The cetaphil line of moisturizers with sunscreen previously recommended is also an excellent choice.

Broad brimmed hat and high UPF clothing is a good idea. Remember a typical t-shirt has limited SPF (probably ~7) and so a person can get tremendous sun exposure through much of the summerware. Solumbra for years carried the best line of high UPF clothing, but now most sporting goods stores carry these products.

Skin cancer is on the rise with a lifetime incidence of 1 in 5. Most are basal cell and squamous cell carcinomas, which are usually very treatable. Melanoma, which can be fatal, has a lifetime incidence of 1 in 70 approaching 1 in 50. Just today, a patient told me of their family member who lost their life to melanoma at age 30 leaving a 2 year old child without a mother.

Melanoma is more common in sun exposed areas, but it can happen anywhere. New lesions, changing or symptomatic (itching, burning, bleeding) lesions warrant medical evaluation. Just this week, my partner diagnosed a 25 year old father of 2 with a 2.5 mm deep melanoma that has ~ 50% 5 year survival rate. Sadly, he and his wife had watched it grow for a year before seeking evaluation. A year ago, it would have had a much better prognosis.

Be smart about sun exposure and if there is any question get a full body skin exam.
SteveB3005
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Post by SteveB3005 »

Blue,
Be smart about sun exposure and if there is any question get a full body skin exam.
Five years ago I had a pea sized, slighty red scaly patch on my upper chest that would not go away and I mentioned it to my primary care Doc in my yearly physical. He wrote a script for some cream and said if it didn't go away in a month come back, well it didn't go away. He sent me to a dermatologist who thought it looked suspect and sure enough a biopsy came back as a basal cell. Got it carved out of my hide and 5 more over the next 3 years, with scheduled re-exams every 6 months. Two years ago I'm in for my 6 month full body exam and he notices a small patch on the crown of my head, biopsied as melanoma .28mm deep. Survival rate is 90%/5 year and 80%10year, because it was caught early it's probably going to be something else that gets me and not the melanoma. Being under a full head of hair if I had not been getting a full body exam, it probably would not have been caught till it had advanced to a less treatable stage.

Spend the time to learn what the skin cancers look like and get those exams if you have any doubts.
Gekko
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Post by Gekko »

not cheap but great products -

eye doctor

blade runner

http://www.origins.com/
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Post by tfb »

Daily moisturizer with SPF 15 is not substitute for sunblock. When you have extended sun exposure, get sunblock. I like a Walgreen brand sunblock that comes in a jar, $5 for 2 oz., I think. It has Zinc Oxide for UVA and other ingredients for UVB.
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travelfar
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Post by travelfar »

I am looking into sun blocks for a trip, and I came across a website called Good Guide. It reviews the ingredients of many products, and you may find it informative. I am still deciding for myself if I want to take its ratings into account or just go by SPF and price. The OP may want to checkout the site.

If any dermatologist has an opinion on the active ingredients in sun blocks, I would be interested in hearing.
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preserve
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Post by preserve »

amp wrote:Cetaphil's Daily Facial Moisturizer is SPF 15 and runs about $11 to $12 for four ounces. It's unscented too.

It works well for me.
+1.
Sidney
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Post by Sidney »

Blue wrote:As a dermatologist, a topic near and dear to my heart.

SPF measures UVB protection. The recommendation for years was SPF >15, now most recommend >30 but the difference between these two SPF's is very small in terms of UVB protection. Beyond an SPF of 30, very little is gained by going with higher SPF's but no reason to necessarily avoid the higher SPF's other than cost.

There currently is no quantifiable rating criteria for UVA protection of sunscreens but the FDA is working on a star rating system (in the near future, sunscreens will likely have both an SPF and a star rating for consumers to compare).

The best UVA blockers are helioplex/mexoryl derivatives and this is why many dermatologists recommend Neutrogena's helioplex sunscreens. This is what I recommend to my patients as a first consideration. Parsol 1789, titanium and zinc oxides are also very good UVA blockers. General recommendation is to be liberal with sunscreen and reapply every 2-3 hours.

The cetaphil line of moisturizers with sunscreen previously recommended is also an excellent choice.

Broad brimmed hat and high UPF clothing is a good idea. Remember a typical t-shirt has limited SPF (probably ~7) and so a person can get tremendous sun exposure through much of the summerware. Solumbra for years carried the best line of high UPF clothing, but now most sporting goods stores carry these products.

Skin cancer is on the rise with a lifetime incidence of 1 in 5. Most are basal cell and squamous cell carcinomas, which are usually very treatable. Melanoma, which can be fatal, has a lifetime incidence of 1 in 70 approaching 1 in 50. Just today, a patient told me of their family member who lost their life to melanoma at age 30 leaving a 2 year old child without a mother.

Melanoma is more common in sun exposed areas, but it can happen anywhere. New lesions, changing or symptomatic (itching, burning, bleeding) lesions warrant medical evaluation. Just this week, my partner diagnosed a 25 year old father of 2 with a 2.5 mm deep melanoma that has ~ 50% 5 year survival rate. Sadly, he and his wife had watched it grow for a year before seeking evaluation. A year ago, it would have had a much better prognosis.

Be smart about sun exposure and if there is any question get a full body skin exam.
My dermo recommended Blue Lizard. I think it has ZO and TiO2. Not available in stores near me - I think I need to check online. Have been suing Neutrogena.
I always wanted to be a procrastinator.
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Blue
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Post by Blue »

The Environmental Working Group from DC recently released their 2009 study of sunscreens and is relevant to this thread.

Summary of Findings
Summer 2009 sees dramatic shift in sunscreen industry
In a sudden market shift, the number of sunscreens that block harmful UVA radiation more than doubled between summer 2008 and 2009, according to EWG’s analysis of 2,073 brand-name products.*

FDA does not require UVA filters in sunscreens, and most manufacturers have never included them in their formulations. Since the publication of our first sunscreen guide in 2007, EWG has pressured sunscreen manufacturers to provide products that protect the public from UVA radiation.

•In summer 2008 just 29% of sunscreens on the market contained any of the 4 strong UVA filters FDA has approved for use in sunscreens (avobenzone, Mexoryl, titanium dioxide, and zinc), according to EWG’s analysis of product ingredient labels.
•By summer 2009 this number had risen to 70%, a 2.4-fold increase. Many manufacturers reformulated products to include UVA filters, and others introduced new UVA-blocking products to the market. In EWG's database of more than 3,000 sunscreens, brands with at least 35% more products containing strong UVA filters in 2009 compared to 2008 include Solbar, Zia Natural Skincare, Nivea, L'Oreal, Hawaiian Tropic, and No-Ad.

...............

Less dramatic but still significant, a 19% drop in the use of oxybenzone, a hormone disruptor approved as an active ingredient in sunscreens, signals the industry's shift to safer ingredients. U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has found detectable levels of oxybenzone in the urine of 97% of Americans over the age of six. In laboratory tests, oxybenzone been shown to disrupt the endocrine system and release reactive oxygen species that could contribute to skin cancer. Up to 9% of oxybenzone applied to the skin absorbs into living tissues and blood vessels below the surface.
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woof755
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Post by woof755 »

I use the Lubriderm spf 15 on my face and the back of my neck every day. I don't find it too greasy or stinky.

8 bucks, lasts me months.
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