Why I retired -- 2 1/2 months on the road

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Raybo
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Why I retired -- 2 1/2 months on the road

Post by Raybo » Wed Jul 01, 2009 9:13 pm

I leave tomorrow for the kind of travel that is only available to those who are retired.

My wife and I are driving up to Oregon (from SF) to visit friends for the Fourth of July. On the following Monday, I get on my bike and ride for the rest of July from near Portland across Oregon and Idaho to Jackson Hole, WY. My wife flies out for 10 days visiting the Tetons and Yellowstone.

Then, we fly to England for my mother-in-law's 80th birthday party. After that, we fly to Vienna on our way to northern Italy to help some friends celebrate their recent wedding. When that is done, I will ride a bike around Switzerland for 2 weeks.

I come home in mid-September.

Regardless of what the market does, the only ups and downs I'll be worried about will be on the road.

If you are interested in following the ride from Oregon to Jackson Hole, WY, I hope to keep a journal of occasional updates here: http://www.biketouringtips.com/showJour ... php?jid=29

Have a great summer.

Ray
No matter how long the hill, if you keep pedaling you'll eventually get up to the top.

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Rick Ferri
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Post by Rick Ferri » Wed Jul 01, 2009 9:20 pm

Sounds great! Safe travels.

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AThiker
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Post by AThiker » Wed Jul 01, 2009 9:25 pm

Happy trails, pardner!

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Rob5TCP
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Post by Rob5TCP » Wed Jul 01, 2009 9:32 pm

Wow - I was hoping to bike the Oregon coast this summer - work load kept me from proper conditioning. I will be starting for next year NOW !!

I have friends in Eugene - too bad it's not happening this year-

YOUR TRIP SOUNDS GREAT - TAKE ME WITH YOU !!!!

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black jack
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Re: Why I retired -- 2 1/2 months on the road

Post by black jack » Wed Jul 01, 2009 10:01 pm

Raybo wrote:I leave tomorrow for the kind of travel that is only available to those who are retired.
For those not yet retired but interested in that kind of travel: years ago, in a coffee shop in a London Underground station, I met an American couple in their 50s who were on their way to spend six months hanging out somewhere in Europe (I now forget where). She was a nurse, he was an accountant; their kids were grown; and they were living a life of six months working in the States, six months traveling/living abroad.

That aside, congratulations, and may your tubes be unpunctured!
We cannot absolutely prove [that they are wrong who say] that we have seen our best days. But so said all who came before us, and with just as much apparent reason. | -T. B. Macaulay (1800-1859)

yobria
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Post by yobria » Wed Jul 01, 2009 10:59 pm

Sounds great Ray, I look forward to the pictures on your website. Btw which type of touring bike would you recommend?

Thanks,

Nick

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Raybo
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Post by Raybo » Thu Jul 02, 2009 8:05 am

Nick,

What kind of bike to use for touring is probably the most asked question on all the bike touring forums. The short answer is that any bike will do.

Primarily, it depends on two things. First, how much gear you intend to take and how you are going to carry it. Second, what kind of touring will you be doing.

There are a few ways to carry gear but the main two are panniers and trailers. If you are using panniers (which I do) then you need a bike specifically built to handle the weight. Generally this means a steel frame and different geometry both to handle panniers (prevent you from hitting your heels on them) and for a more relaxed ride.

If you want to use an existing road/mountain bike that isn't specifically designed for touring, you can pull a trailer. I've never done this but many tourists prefer them to panniers.

If you are going to be doing off road routes, mountain bikes might be a better choice as they are designed to handle dirt. For serious off-road stuff, people usually pull trailers.

The two least expensive touring bikes are made by Surly (the LHT) and Trek (I don't know the model). I use a custom built bike from Waterford that was expensive but rides like a dream.

There are lots of pages devoted to just this discussion. Here are 25 links to more information about touring bikes.

Ray
No matter how long the hill, if you keep pedaling you'll eventually get up to the top.

zeusrock1
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Post by zeusrock1 » Thu Jul 02, 2009 8:19 am

Really cool. I'm totally jealous. My dad and I took a nice road trip last year down the Oregon coast into California, then back up through central Oregon. We saw many people touring on bikes along the coast. I'm in NJ, not too many people traveling on bikes here.

I bookmarked your journal, looking forward to reading it. Have a safe trip.

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Roverdog
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Post by Roverdog » Thu Jul 02, 2009 10:03 am

Raybo wrote: There are lots of pages devoted to just this discussion. Here are 25 links to more information about touring bikes.

Ray
Ray, I usually avoid "me too" posts, but I'm looking for bikes as well (purchasing this weekend) and this really helped.

So, thanks!

Bob

yobria
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Post by yobria » Thu Jul 02, 2009 11:15 pm

Yes thanks Ray, great links.

Nick

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