Rock and Roll influence...here we go again.

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What early rock and roller has had the most influence on future rock and roll artists?

Elvis Presley...
9
31%
Chuck Berry...
7
24%
Bo Diddley...
2
7%
Bo Diddley...
2
7%
Bill Haley...
0
No votes
Jerry Lee Lewis...
2
7%
Other...please elaborate with a post.
7
24%
 
Total votes: 29

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Tall Grass
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Rock and Roll influence...here we go again.

Post by Tall Grass » Sun Jun 28, 2009 6:40 pm

I have included MY picks in the poll above, forgive me if yours is not included. You have your chance to name your own, and why, in a post reply...
"A wise man should have money in his head, but not in his heart." - Jonathan Swift

Triple digit golfer
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Post by Triple digit golfer » Sun Jun 28, 2009 6:41 pm

The Beatles.

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Tall Grass
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Post by Tall Grass » Sun Jun 28, 2009 6:49 pm

Triple digit golfer wrote:The Beatles.
I would agree that they probably have the largest place in the history of R&R; but as far as future influence I'm not as certain. They, of course, gave much credit to the REALLY early rock and rollers; including Chuck Berry, Fats Domino, Carl Perkins, Roy Orbison, etc.

I guess what I'm saying is, that because THEY were influenced by the pioneers mentioned, that any influence they had on future music was, by proxy, a result of those that influenced them...
"A wise man should have money in his head, but not in his heart." - Jonathan Swift

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Post by Rodc » Sun Jun 28, 2009 7:03 pm

That is one hell of a list, can I choose them all?

Every one of them had a staggering influence.
We live a world with knowledge of the future markets has less than one significant figure. And people will still and always demand answers to three significant digits.

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Post by Tall Grass » Sun Jun 28, 2009 7:11 pm

Rodc wrote:That is one hell of a list, can I choose them all?

Every one of them had a staggering influence.
That would probably be much more correct than picking one; but you only get one choice in my poll... 8)
"A wise man should have money in his head, but not in his heart." - Jonathan Swift

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Quasimodo
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Post by Quasimodo » Sun Jun 28, 2009 7:14 pm

Although Bill Haley and the Comets was the first rock group I remember from 1954, I'd vote for Sam Phillips, the founder of Sun Records as most influential.

http://www.sunrecords.com/

John
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Post by simplesimon » Sun Jun 28, 2009 7:22 pm

Rock and Roll is for old people.

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Tall Grass
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Post by Tall Grass » Sun Jun 28, 2009 7:23 pm

Quasimodo wrote:Although Bill Haley and the Comets was the first rock group I remember from 1954, I'd vote for Sam Phillips, the founder of Sun Records as most influential.

http://www.sunrecords.com/

John
Great choice...thinking outside the box!
"A wise man should have money in his head, but not in his heart." - Jonathan Swift

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Tall Grass
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Post by Tall Grass » Sun Jun 28, 2009 7:28 pm

simplesimon wrote:Rock and Roll is for old people.
Your statement is intuitively obvious even to the casual observer, it has a large appeal to all age groups.

Was there a point to your post somewhere? :roll:
"A wise man should have money in his head, but not in his heart." - Jonathan Swift

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Robert Johnson

Post by AerialP » Sun Jun 28, 2009 7:42 pm

Blues legend Robert Johnson, I think, sowed some of the very first seeds of rock & roll...not only did his sound propagate through to the rockers of the 50s-70s, but if one is to believe the whole 'sold his soul to the devil' legend then you've got one of the first instances of the whole rock connection to evil influences. Also sorta set the standard for influential rock musicians dying young.

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Post by LadyGeek » Sun Jun 28, 2009 7:57 pm

You forget the significance of Muddy Waters on all the early rock-n-rollers mentioned so far. Robert Johnson also, but Muddy Waters started it all.
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Post by Rodc » Sun Jun 28, 2009 8:03 pm

simplesimon wrote:Rock and Roll is for old people.
That's ok, I'm old. :)
We live a world with knowledge of the future markets has less than one significant figure. And people will still and always demand answers to three significant digits.

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Post by Boglenaut » Sun Jun 28, 2009 8:09 pm

Little group out of Liverpool....

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Post by Hawk » Sun Jun 28, 2009 8:23 pm

Bill Haley and the Comets really started things jumping with "Crazy man, Crazy" in 1953. Little Richard, Jerry Lee Lewis, Fats Domino all exploded onto the scene shortly after. Elvis was in a class by himself, an instant sensation.

As for DooWop the older groups like the Five Keys, the Orioles, and the Clovers laid the foundation for the next generation of groups like Frankie Lymon and the Teenagers (Why do fools fall in love) and the Penguins (Earth Angel).

A lot of credit has to go to disc jockey Alan Freed for promoting so many young minority singing groups and Rock and Roll.

Hawk

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Post by Tall Grass » Sun Jun 28, 2009 8:36 pm

Hawk wrote:Bill Haley and the Comets really started things jumping with "Crazy man, Crazy" in 1953. Little Richard, Jerry Lee Lewis, Fats Domino all exploded onto the scene shortly after. Elvis was in a class by himself, an instant sensation.

As for DooWop the older groups like the Five Keys, the Orioles, and the Clovers laid the foundation for the next generation of groups like Frankie Lymon and the Teenagers (Why do fools fall in love) and the Penguins (Earth Angel).

A lot of credit has to go to disc jockey Alan Freed for promoting so many young minority singing groups and Rock and Roll.

Hawk
True enough...and he was after all, the one that coined the term "Rock and Roll".
"A wise man should have money in his head, but not in his heart." - Jonathan Swift

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Post by Tall Grass » Sun Jun 28, 2009 8:38 pm

Rodc wrote:
simplesimon wrote:Rock and Roll is for old people.
That's ok, I'm old. :)
Rock on old timers (me included)!

Here are the ages (or would have been ages), of a few pioneers of rock:

Elvis...74...Chuck Berry...83...Bo Diddley...80...Bill Haley...83...Little Richard...77...Keith Richards...106 (just kidding on this one).

It is generally accepted that 1954's "Rock Around the Clock" by Bill Haley and the Comets was the first rock and roll record (oddly enough, it was labelled on the 45 as a fox trot). It sold 75,000 copies when first released, but went on to sell over 25 million copies worldwide.
"A wise man should have money in his head, but not in his heart." - Jonathan Swift

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Post by gkaplan » Sun Jun 28, 2009 9:28 pm

I voted for Bo Diddley, since the Archies wasn't one of the choices.
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Post by joe8d » Sun Jun 28, 2009 9:34 pm

It is generally accepted that 1954's "Rock Around the Clock" by Bill Haley and the Comets was the first rock and roll record (oddly enough, it was labelled on the 45 as a fox trot). It sold 75,000 copies when first released, but went on to sell over 25 million copies worldwide.
Yes and if my memory serves me correctly,"Rock Around the Clock" was used as the soundtrack in the movie "Blackboard Jungle" which I'm sure contributed to it's success.
All the Best, | Joe

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Post by Opponent Process » Sun Jun 28, 2009 9:39 pm

worth considering Hank Williams Sr. (1923-1953), although his influence drifted more into southern rock and country, but in his time, a veritable rock star. including a drug-related death at age 29.
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Post by yobria » Sun Jun 28, 2009 10:22 pm

Certainly Buddy Holly, who described himself at the time as a "Rock and Roll specialist", would be near the top of my list.

Nick

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Post by Tall Grass » Sun Jun 28, 2009 10:38 pm

joe8d wrote:
It is generally accepted that 1954's "Rock Around the Clock" by Bill Haley and the Comets was the first rock and roll record (oddly enough, it was labelled on the 45 as a fox trot). It sold 75,000 copies when first released, but went on to sell over 25 million copies worldwide.
Yes and if my memory serves me correctly,"Rock Around the Clock" was used as the soundtrack in the movie "Blackboard Jungle" which I'm sure contributed to it's success.
I remember seeing that as a kid; Sidney Poitier, Vic Morrow, and Jamie Farr (cross-dressing Corporal Klinger) as students in Glenn Ford's classroom. Very daring for its day...
"A wise man should have money in his head, but not in his heart." - Jonathan Swift

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Post by Tall Grass » Sun Jun 28, 2009 10:43 pm

yobria wrote:Certainly Buddy Holly, who described himself at the time as a "Rock and Roll specialist", would be near the top of my list.

Nick
One of my all-time favorite songs..."Not Fade Away" by Mr. Holly, from Lubbock, Texas if memory serves...
"A wise man should have money in his head, but not in his heart." - Jonathan Swift

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Post by four7s » Sun Jun 28, 2009 11:45 pm

I am so glad to BE OLD. The songs we grew up with and were influenced by in the 50's and 60's will never be matched. What we put into our minds when we were young has a whole lot to do with our outlook as we grew older. The songs and the sentiments of those four lads from Liverpool influenced millions around the world.

The Beatle songs that we grew up with were about love and holding hands and finding out that 'she loves you' and we did want to know a secret. Their music and the sentiment (written by 20 year old guys BTW,)were positve and have stood the test of time. As Paul sang later, with Wings, "Some people say the world has had enough of silly love songs, what's wrong with that, I need to know."

I was once lucky enough to have a long conversation with a photographer who knew them from the beginning and is credited with some of their famous photos. I asked him how The Beatles could be so young, and yet so charismatic. I said they were working class guys, yet the world fell in love with them. He answered that "the camera doesn't lie. If you knew them you knew that they were the most honest and down to earth guys you'd ever want to meet.
My vote is for The Beatles.

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Post by tetractys » Mon Jun 29, 2009 12:04 am

No way it could have been Benny Goodman, or Erline "Rock and Roll" Harris. -- Tet
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Post by bmb » Mon Jun 29, 2009 10:26 am

Both Elvis and the Beatles have sold more than 1 billion albums, far more than anyone else. They were the pioneers of their era. No one else on the voting list is anywhere close. So i would say Elvis was the revolutionary RR pioneer, at least among whites. RR reached a dead end until the Beatles sent it beyond pure pop, perhaps into the realm of serious art. For that reason, and to a lesser extent, Dylan belongs on the list.

PS: Chuck Berry, age 82, is still on tour.

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