Cordless Lawn Mowers

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paulsiu
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Joined: Sun Nov 16, 2008 7:46 pm

Cordless Lawn Mowers

Post by paulsiu »

Since I will be a new home owner, I will once again have to mow the lawn. I haven't mow the lawn in 20 years, but I recall that I didn't mind it at all (even though my mom's lawn is at a 60% incline). I however, dislike how messy and smelly gas lawn mower is.

My thought was to get a electronic lawn mower. Since I am a total klutz, it's only a matter of time before I run over the power cord. I was thinking of getting a cordless mower. There appears only to be 3 models:

Black & Decker CMM1200 $359 19"
Neuton 5.2 $400 14"
Neuton 6.2 $500 19"

Of the three, the Black and Decker is the heaviest at 76 lbs, but has the most power. The Neuton 5.2 is only 48 lbs. With a 14" blade, it may take me longer to cut. I have less than 1/4 of an acre with a very slight slope, so I should be able to complete the mowing on one charge.

Has anyone have experience with cordless mowers? Please chime in.


Paul
donmichael
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Post by donmichael »

I own the Neuton 14" battery powered mower. I love it - no messing with gas or oil. I have no problem cutting about the same size lot you have - on one charge. The only thing you must be careful about is not to let the grass get too high - you may have to cut it twice. It also has a bunch of attachments - trimmer, extra battery - I would recommend the trimmer.

The 19" would let you cut your lawn faster, but is much heavier.
Don
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tarnation
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Re: Cordless Lawn Mowers

Post by tarnation »

paulsiu wrote: Has anyone have experience with cordless mowers? Please chime in.
Paul
My cordless was a Scotts like the one on this site for a while ( I got my at Home Depot). It was nice not loud, you could talk on the phone or listen to the birds whilst you mowed. They have a couple of electrics for lazy people. :D
http://www.peoplepoweredmachines.com/index.php
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Topic Author
paulsiu
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Post by paulsiu »

I suggested a manual as well, but my wife said she will not help me with mowing if I got the manual version.


Paul
tibbitts
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corded electric

Post by tibbitts »

I have a corded electric. You're unlikely to run over the cord, but even if you do, it isn't all that likely you'll cut it.

Paul
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teacher
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Post by teacher »

Doesn't the battery eventually wear out like the battery on a laptop or cell phone? Aren't the replacement batteries very expensive? I got an electric mower with a cord for my mom's tiny yard. It's great, quiet and powerful, and the cord isn't too much of an issue since the yard is so small.

Teacher
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Sheepdog
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Post by Sheepdog »

Go to your library to check the May 2008 issue of Consumer Reports on the top lawn mowers, including cordless.
Among the comments were:
The $400 Craftsman 37048 cordless mower packs 48 volts instead of the usual 24, while the $450 Remington MPS6017A touts a sizzling 60 volts. Yet the top scoring Black & Decker electric outcut both models, despite its humble 24 volts.

They state that electric push mowers should be for small lawns. It doesn't say what a small lawn is.
Ratings in order for cordless electric are,

Black & Decker CMM1200
Craftsman 37048
Homelite UT13122
Remington MPS6017A (can be used with or without cord)
Neuton EM5.1

Check for online purchasing, including eBay. Perhaps you will find lower costs.

Jim
Time is the school in which we learn, time is the fire in which we burn.~ Delmore Schwartz
Sotol
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why do you have a lawn?

Post by Sotol »

My suggestion is to look into replacing your lawn with natural plantings, with low (er) water and no pesticide/herbicide use. If you have a home owner's association that requires a lawn, you can simply keep a small strip behind which would be a lovely and interesting scene you wouldn't have to mow at all! There are lots of good books discussing natural l.ocally adapted landscaping, appropriate to many different environments. Large front lawns are a labor-intensive, historical anachronism that are gradually being eliminated from many parts of the US.
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englishgirl
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Re: why do you have a lawn?

Post by englishgirl »

Sotol wrote:My suggestion is to look into replacing your lawn with natural plantings, with low (er) water and no pesticide/herbicide use. If you have a home owner's association that requires a lawn, you can simply keep a small strip behind which would be a lovely and interesting scene you wouldn't have to mow at all! There are lots of good books discussing natural l.ocally adapted landscaping, appropriate to many different environments. Large front lawns are a labor-intensive, historical anachronism that are gradually being eliminated from many parts of the US.
I am trying to do this, although because I am cheap I am just letting the lawn die in patches and am replanting it slowly. I think my neighbors hate me because of it, but at least I am saving water and time. :wink:

Anyway, I have a 20" manual reel mower, and I love it! It is so lightweight and easy to use - not like the old heavy ones that you may have tried before.
Sarah
swyck
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Re: why do you have a lawn?

Post by swyck »

Sotol wrote:My suggestion is to look into replacing your lawn with natural plantings, with low (er) water and no pesticide/herbicide use. If you have a home owner's association that requires a lawn, you can simply keep a small strip behind which would be a lovely and interesting scene you wouldn't have to mow at all! There are lots of good books discussing natural l.ocally adapted landscaping, appropriate to many different environments. Large front lawns are a labor-intensive, historical anachronism that are gradually being eliminated from many parts of the US.
Front lawns may be labor-intensive, but IMO they are not as labor-intensive as many of the alternatives. These take a lot of work and planning if you don't want them to turn into weed filled lots instead of pristine wildflower meadows. Not anywhere near as easy as its made out to be.

Much of the work of maintaining a lawn is overstated by lawn haters.
Eric White
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Black & Decker is a great machine

Post by Eric White »

I've had the Black & Decker cordless battery electric mower now for the second season. I have a 0.5 acre lot with significant grass and thus dove in for the B&D over the Neuton due to the larger cutting swath. My parents have a Neuton and love it for their smaller lot (<0.25 acres).

If I mow weekly, I can do it all in one pass. However, if it goes much more than 8 days, it requires multiple attempts because the battery doesn't last long enough. The only other problem is mulching in the fall, which usually takes 2 attempts.

Overall, however, there are MANY benefits to using battery over gas:
- Maintenance hassles are a lot less (oil changes, spark plug checks)
- Don't breathe in fumes
- Avoid trips to fill up gas
- Avoid trips to the hardware store for maintenance supplies
- Don't have to worry about my son breathing in pollutants
- Flexibility in mowing timing due to less noise (can mow earlier & later)
- Can hear music while mowing (still use hearing protection, however)
- Reduce emissions

Overall, I'd suggest the following based on your lot size:
<0.25 acress --> Neuton
0.25 to 0.5 acres --> Black & Decker
>0.5 acres --> new ride-on battery mowers (saw one in a Home Depot ad the other weekend)

Hope this helps!

Cheers,
Eric
GeekedOut
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Re: why do you have a lawn?

Post by GeekedOut »

Sotol wrote:My suggestion is to look into replacing your lawn with natural plantings, with low (er) water and no pesticide/herbicide use. If you have a home owner's association that requires a lawn, you can simply keep a small strip behind which would be a lovely and interesting scene you wouldn't have to mow at all! There are lots of good books discussing natural l.ocally adapted landscaping, appropriate to many different environments. Large front lawns are a labor-intensive, historical anachronism that are gradually being eliminated from many parts of the US.
If you must use grass, consider the following: Eco-Lawn

I'm wary of the hype, but if the city of Santa Barbara is using it in parks I'm inclined to give it a chance.

As far as the OP's wife not helping with a manual, don't expect her to mow the lawn anyways. I've noticed that taking out the garbage and mowing the lawn seem to require testes in order to be accomplished.
Dagwood
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Post by Dagwood »

It's hard to give you good advice without seeing how much grass you have to cut. 1/4 acre can actually be more grass than you would think. That being said, I don't want to dissuade you from an electric if that's what you really want, but you should know that for the prices of some of these electric mowers you can buy an excellent quality gas mower that will do the job much faster. Moreover, some of the newer models, especially Hondas, are CARB certified and they run very clean if you take a few minutes to change the spark plug, air filter, etc. the 1x a season or so that it needs to be done.

I've seen too many friends and neighbors buy these electric machines and then throw their hands up in disgust 6 months later and buy a good gas mower. Buy a good gas mower once, service it annually, and you will find you will save a great deal of time and aggravation. The smokey dirty mowers you see are owned by pigs who don't understand that all equipment needs to be maintained.
Paul Puckett
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Re: why do you have a lawn?

Post by Paul Puckett »

Sotol wrote:My suggestion is to look into replacing your lawn with natural plantings, with low (er) water and no pesticide/herbicide use. If you have a home owner's association that requires a lawn, you can simply keep a small strip behind which would be a lovely and interesting scene you wouldn't have to mow at all! There are lots of good books discussing natural l.ocally adapted landscaping, appropriate to many different environments. Large front lawns are a labor-intensive, historical anachronism that are gradually being eliminated from many parts of the US.
I just did this and it takes only thirty minutes to mow whats left of the lawn. America's addiction to grass isn't smoked, it's what's in front of the house :lol: .

I have the Black and Decker on a 1/3 acre with about 1/2 of that naturally landscaped. Mower cuts St. Augustine easily. Before the lawn reduction, if the grass was high I had to charge it after the front lawn. But it's a quiet mower, the neighbors rarely know I'm mowing the lawn. Sounds more like a vacuum cleaner.....

Sotol - I hope lawn elimination becomes very fashionable. My mom used to say that I would pave my yard and paint it green, but natural landscaping looks better and is a lot cooler than pavement. Rain barrels allow watering of most of the plants without city water. We have them on all downspouts.

Best, Paul
Money is not your life. It is simply the means to the life that you want.
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