That Extravagant Thing You Do

Questions on how we spend our money and our time - consumer goods and services, home and vehicle, leisure and recreational activities
metabasalt
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Post by metabasalt » Sun Sep 06, 2009 9:46 pm

Lana wrote:We purchased contemporary art from galleries where we usually met the artists. We have 4 pieces of Stanislav Libensky and Jarslava Brychtova glass, as well as several William Morris glass pieces (numerous others). Paintings by regional artists such as Peter Marcus, Fred Stonehouse and Matthew Strauss (if you look him up, the one from the Great Rivers Biennial). Edgy pieces by Janis Mars Wunderlich, Jenny Mendes and Betsy Youngquist. Bought directly from Muys & Muylaert in Belgium.
Lana,

I must say that you have eclectic tastes! I had not heard of any of these artists(excepting Morris), though that's my fault not theirs as I haven't kept up with contemporary art over the last 20 years or so. In any case I just did some searching for them and found it interesting. You really have quite a varied collection.

I know the difficulties of being an artist so I'm always happy to see people that buy art and support it! Thanks for including your list of artists here.

All in all it's quite a varied list, just as you would expect from the Bogleheads.

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TxAg
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Post by TxAg » Wed Mar 03, 2010 1:43 am

I went with Throwin' Darts on a bowhunting trip to South Africa. We bought at a steep discount, but it was still my splurge for the decade. Worth every penny and we managed some great pics and video.

Analystic
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Post by Analystic » Wed Mar 03, 2010 6:27 am

Good tickets.
Last edited by Analystic on Wed Mar 17, 2010 7:08 am, edited 1 time in total.
Disclaimer: I am making all of this up.

metacritic
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Re: Trips

Post by metacritic » Wed Mar 03, 2010 8:39 am

aerofreaky11 wrote:I have flown to Central America twice, South America once, and Europe once--all for pleasure in the past 12 months. I have a trip for Memorial day weekend to South America planned and one to Brazil in August. long weekends in South America...kind of nuts. However, a night in NYC can cost you a lot!
Yes, my great pleasure is travel on a similar scale - escape from the city. That means two big vacations abroad each year and scattered occasional international travel between. I also spend way too much on clothes and cooking. Something will have to give - at least temporarily - if we buy a place.

GammaPoint
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Post by GammaPoint » Wed Mar 03, 2010 12:13 pm

My bike (as in cycling) retails for about $5k with all the electronics and stuff that's on it. Pretty expensive for a graduate student, but at the same time I do ride it 200 miles per week! (also typical for a graduate student)

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TMann
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Post by TMann » Wed Mar 03, 2010 1:19 pm

We live pretty frugally relative to our income. But I have a thing for small electronic gizmos, (Macbook, iPhone, Barnes and Noble Nook, two digital cameras, etc.) and nice pens (Parkers, Sheaffers and Pelikans, both modern and vintage, ballpoint and fountain pens.)

I try to keep my hobby expenditures reasonable, and my wife agrees not to ask about all of the miscellaneous expenses on our Mastercard bill. :)

We put a good amount of our income into charitable causes, but I don't view that money as an extravagence as much as an investment in other people's lives. :)

TMann

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Padlin
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Post by Padlin » Wed Mar 03, 2010 1:55 pm

I seem to be out of my league here, the only things I can think of other then my wife are St. Croix rods and Padron 1926 #9's.
Regards | Bob

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Random Musings
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Post by Random Musings » Wed Mar 03, 2010 2:25 pm

Travel - three times a year. Used to range from the 3-day affairs to the full 2-wk ones. Now, with littler ones, our max trip is around 9 days.

Plus, we do a lot of one day jaunts which can be in the four-hr drive range in one direction. Start out early and get home very late.

Plus ice cream. :lol:

RM

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Post by Faith20879 » Thu Mar 04, 2010 9:56 am

I throw my money away by going to stamp shows and buying WW stamps that look pleasing to my eyes. I then spend hundreds of dollars on stamp albums to display them. My friend who is a professional stamp dealer once told me that I should stick to a topic and that these all-over-the-map stamps I paid big money for really have no re-sell value. He calls my collection the most expensive wallpaper there was. I know he is probably right. But, I like looking through them and enjoy the stories they tell. What can I say.

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Faith

mcblum
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boots!

Post by mcblum » Thu Mar 04, 2010 4:50 pm

A nice pair of tony lama ropers

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Post by Curlyq » Fri Mar 05, 2010 7:03 pm

.....
Last edited by Curlyq on Wed Apr 18, 2012 12:04 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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CassiusKing
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Post by CassiusKing » Wed Mar 24, 2010 8:34 am

I'm a devout craft beer drinker. I love travelling and visiting beery destinations.
I have an assortment of craft beer in my house that is going on 1000 bottles. I love to try everything new and enjoy obtaining and drinking beers from Belgium.
What's left over from my beer fanaticism, I spend on golf.

Cheers!
"Who cares how time advances? I'm drinking ale today." -Edgar Allan Poe

Dad
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Post by Dad » Wed Mar 24, 2010 8:54 am

Allen Edmonds shoes

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ryuns
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Post by ryuns » Wed Mar 24, 2010 11:44 am

CassiusKing wrote:I'm a devout craft beer drinker. I love travelling and visiting beery destinations.
I have an assortment of craft beer in my house that is going on 1000 bottles. I love to try everything new and enjoy obtaining and drinking beers from Belgium.
What's left over from my beer fanaticism, I spend on golf.

Cheers!
Wow. You must have a cellar? Are they mostly the 12 oz variety? Truly impressive. Any special points of pride? I LOVE beer, but I can't imagine keeping them around for that long. A buddy has a couple of fridges JUST to keep beer at the right temperature. I can't imagine spending that much money just to make sure my beer ages well, unless of course, I'm making it myself with the intention of drinking it.
An inconvenience is only an adventure wrongly considered; an adventure is an inconvenience rightly considered. -- GK Chesterton

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CassiusKing
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Post by CassiusKing » Wed Mar 24, 2010 11:48 am

ryuns wrote:
CassiusKing wrote:I'm a devout craft beer drinker. I love travelling and visiting beery destinations.
I have an assortment of craft beer in my house that is going on 1000 bottles. I love to try everything new and enjoy obtaining and drinking beers from Belgium.
What's left over from my beer fanaticism, I spend on golf.

Cheers!
Wow. You must have a cellar? Are they mostly the 12 oz variety? Truly impressive. Any special points of pride? I LOVE beer, but I can't imagine keeping them around for that long. A buddy has a couple of fridges JUST to keep beer at the right temperature. I can't imagine spending that much money just to make sure my beer ages well, unless of course, I'm making it myself with the intention of drinking it.
They're split between bombers/750's and 12oz varieties. The majority of my time and money is spent tracking down beers from California. Mostly Russian River Brewing, Firestone Walker and Lost Abbey/Pizza Port. I also love drinking anything Cantillon from Belgium.
"Who cares how time advances? I'm drinking ale today." -Edgar Allan Poe

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Post by chaz » Wed Mar 24, 2010 12:41 pm

my wife
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Alex Frakt
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Post by Alex Frakt » Wed Mar 24, 2010 9:08 pm

Right now, it seems like my biggest extravagance is buying the good sardines - King Oscar Brisling 2-layer in olive oil.

It was international travel, including an annual dive trip. That's been on hold for 1.5 years now between the difficulty of travelling with a baby (he's 16-months old now) and a large drop in our disposable income due to the effects of the recession and the costs of the aforesaid baby. He does try to pay me back though with heart-rendingly adorable smiles and happy shouts of "dada" a couple of dozen times a day.

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rustymutt
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Post by rustymutt » Wed Mar 24, 2010 9:25 pm

I retired in 2009 at age 53. Started my own company and doing well. We love to eat good foods. We travel yearly, or when needed. We don't owe anyone money. We love wine and family. I like dogs, and we have a good dog. My wife teaches early childhood special ed, and doesn't want to retire yet. She love her kids. Reading is fun. I've got a degree in computer information systems and enjoy working on high tech stuff.
We still have an age 15 son living at home with us. Life is good.

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rustymutt
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Post by rustymutt » Wed Mar 24, 2010 9:27 pm

Alex Frakt wrote:Right now, it seems like my biggest extravagance is buying the good sardines - King Oscar Brisling 2-layer in olive oil.

It was international travel, including an annual dive trip. That's been on hold for 1.5 years now between the difficulty of travelling with a baby (he's 16-months old now) and a large drop in our disposable income due to the effects of the recession and the costs of the aforesaid baby. He does try to pay me back though with heart-rendingly adorable smiles and happy shouts of "dada" a couple of dozen times a day.
Had a can of those exact sardines for lunch today Alex. You've got good taste in sardines my friend.

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Monk
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Post by Monk » Wed Mar 24, 2010 9:57 pm

CassiusKing wrote:I'm a devout craft beer drinker. I love travelling and visiting beery destinations.
I have an assortment of craft beer in my house that is going on 1000 bottles. I love to try everything new and enjoy obtaining and drinking beers from Belgium.
What's left over from my beer fanaticism, I spend on golf.

Cheers!
Sir, you leave me in awe. You say you have 1000 bottles, but are they still filled with beer? :lol:

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Driver
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Post by Driver » Thu Mar 25, 2010 12:03 am

Dad wrote:Allen Edmonds shoes
Just bought my first pair. Quite comfortable!

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cinghiale
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Post by cinghiale » Mon May 23, 2011 8:48 am

Bump.

Since Boglenaut's "That Frugal Thing You Do" has been revived of late, I thought that our expressions and practices of frugality should be balanced with our enjoyment of life's extravagances (however you care to define them). If you haven't dropped in on this thread over the last year, see the first posting. The question is:
So, what keeps you in balance between frugality and the core enjoyment of life? What's worth the nickel?
"We don't see things as they are; we see them as we are." Anais Nin | | "Sometimes the first duty of intelligent men is the restatement of the obvious." George Orwell

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VictoriaF
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My extravagant thing is NOT a "thing"

Post by VictoriaF » Mon May 23, 2011 4:42 pm

I have just attended a (non-work-related) conference on creativity and enhanced learning. I cannot objectively judge any changes in my own creativity or learning ability -- and even an attempt to measure or compare would affect whatever I am measuring or comparing -- but I do feel more satisfied with my life and hope the feeling will persist.

It is a widely accepted fact that our experiences make us happier than our possessions. And still most people associate happiness with having things, or at least they are more easily spending money on things than on experiences. I was thinking about this on my way home from the conference. Things are produced in a scalable fashion. There is a production line, there are economies of scale where the incremental cost of another unit of the thing is negligible and each thing sold brings considerable profit.

Experiences are different in that they are difficult to scale. Sure, many people can watch the same film, read the same book, or play the same video game, but these are not personal (as in human-to-human) experiences that are the most conductive for one's satisfaction and happiness. And if experiences are not scalable they are not advertised, not marketed, not promoted -- and ultimately not appreciated as much as they deserve. Thus, the lack of scalability has two effects: (a) it makes experiences more expensive than things and (b) it does not produce reminders about the value of experiences. And so people naturally fall into the things-based pursuit of happiness.

Where I am going with this is as follows. My "extravagant" expenses are increasingly shifting towards enriching experiences, and I think I have just discovered why it takes some effort to do the right thing.

Victoria
WINNER of the 2015 Boglehead Contest. | Every joke has a bit of a joke. ... The rest is the truth. (Marat F)

tepper
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Post by tepper » Mon May 23, 2011 5:14 pm

cinghiale wrote:
Hi Cinghiale, what do you mean by house-cleaning being extravagant? Just curious.
Every two weeks we have a cleaning service clean the house. Floors get cleaned, carpets get vacuumed, linens get changed. We are perfectly capable of doing those things, but find housekeeping rather pointless. So, for us, it is a luxury to have it done. It redefines our time at home, and allows us to concentrate on cooking, conversing, and wine bibbing instead of doing cleaning chores.

-- Cinghiale
+1. with two small children and a dog, housecleaning once a week ($50/week) is one luxury I'd rather not give up.

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Post by interplanetjanet » Mon May 23, 2011 5:31 pm

rustymutt wrote:
Alex Frakt wrote:Right now, it seems like my biggest extravagance is buying the good sardines - King Oscar Brisling 2-layer in olive oil.
Had a can of those exact sardines for lunch today Alex. You've got good taste in sardines my friend.
Those are my 10yo daughter's favorite! Her close runner-up is Cole's sardines, either in straight olive oil or piripiri sauce.

Most of my extravagances are food-related. There are probably 10-15 cheeses in various states of aging at any given time in the house, with a wonderfully gooey goat Valencay (Jacquin) being the star of the year so far. On my last trip to Baltimore I stayed very near a Wegmans with a truly amazing selection, and came back with half my suitcase filled with various cheese, duck and pork products.

My daughter has a love affair with tinned fish. Sardines, smoked herring, Latvian sprats...it's all good. She's managed to turn me on to a lot of it as well, much to my surprise.

Food is a sensual pleasure. I laugh a bit and tell my family that at least it's healthier and cheaper than drugs. Up to a point.

-Janet

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Post by Jacotus » Mon May 23, 2011 5:42 pm

interplanetjanet wrote:On my last trip to Baltimore I stayed very near a Wegmans with a truly amazing selection, and came back with half my suitcase filled with various cheese, duck and pork products.
Gotta love Wegmans!

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Post by cheesepep » Mon May 23, 2011 6:46 pm

I like to eat good food, but not expensive food. In my opinion, expensive food is way too distant from what makes food food. Too many decorations, silly sauces, and stuff. Just back to the basics, wholesome good food, and that is what I like to buy.

I also take the taxi here instead of the bus when it is raining.

Every so often, I splurge on some new electronics and an overseas trip somewhere.

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Re: My extravagant thing is NOT a "thing"

Post by tnhooper45 » Mon May 23, 2011 7:39 pm

[quote="VictoriaF"]I have just attended a (non-work-related) conference on creativity and enhanced learning. I cannot objectively judge any changes in my own creativity or learning ability -- and even an attempt to measure or compare would affect whatever I am measuring or comparing -- but I do feel more satisfied with my life and hope the feeling will persist.

It is a widely accepted fact that our experiences make us happier than our possessions. And still most people associate happiness with having things, or at least they are more easily spending money on things than on experiences. I was thinking about this on my way home from the conference. [i]Things[/i] are produced in a scalable fashion. There is a production line, there are economies of scale where the incremental cost of another unit of [i]the thing[/i] is negligible and each thing sold brings considerable profit.

[i]Experiences[/i] are different in that they are difficult to scale. Sure, many people can watch the same film, read the same book, or play the same video game, but these are not personal (as in [i]human-to-human[/i]) experiences that are the most conductive for one's satisfaction and happiness. And if experiences are not scalable they are not advertised, not marketed, not promoted -- and ultimately not appreciated as much as they deserve. Thus, the lack of scalability has two effects: (a) it makes experiences more expensive than things and (b) it does not produce reminders about the value of experiences. And so people naturally fall into the things-based pursuit of happiness.

Where I am going with this is as follows. My "extravagant" expenses are increasingly shifting towards enriching experiences, and I think I have just discovered why it takes some effort to do the right thing.

Victoria[/quote]

+1, good post.

Out of my league
-Crown Royal
-Lots of books
-Massages

Nice thread.

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Post by ataloss » Tue May 24, 2011 7:18 am

Finishing up final arrangements for our trip "down under" in June.
I have resisted the prepaid final arrangements packages but I guess if you know that date why not?

http://www.finalarrangementsnetwork.com/

Snowjob
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Post by Snowjob » Tue May 24, 2011 11:08 am

Wealth effect has a lot to do with it but I've upgraded from PBJ's to lunch at whole foods daily. I seriously doubt I could go back.

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touchdowntodd
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Post by touchdowntodd » Tue May 24, 2011 11:17 am

honestly im still in the saving and payin the mortgage off early stage..

but... i do have a few guilty pleasures all being somewhat cheap

- 1 classic car always, recently down graded from a 63 impala to a 65 VW and put a large chunk of cash away so its a win win
- dinner with the wife 1 time a week or so at a lower cost restaurant
- baseball games, movies, etc when the tickets are cheap

ps - i love my allen edmonds, im wearin em now at work.. tent sale this year i might get a 2nd pair so i can send these in for renovation!
tryin to do this right... thanks guys

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Post by dickenjb » Wed May 25, 2011 9:06 am

A very interesting thread. I was beginning to think none of the Bogleheads splurged on anything.

For us:

My Lexus LS460
DW's show horse
biweekly house cleaning
lawn service
nice vacations (Hawaii, dude ranch, rafting the Grand Canyon, skiing in Vail)

Have never owned a lawn mower but mowed lawns for cash in high school and didn't enjoy it. Why do what you don't enjoy?

Beantown85
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Post by Beantown85 » Wed May 25, 2011 10:21 am

Keep my emergency fund in taxable checking/savings account.

And travel.

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Post by chdavis » Thu May 26, 2011 11:31 pm

I've been enthused by cars since an extremely young age, and, as such, most of my "splurging" relates directly to the car stable. It's not so much the initial investment, but rather the accumulated depreciation expense over the years that would make some of you sick.

Right now I have two BMWs, an older Pathfinder for chores, and my better half's car.

Oh well, at least I've consolidated my hobby and transportation expenses. :roll:

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Post by thatch » Fri May 27, 2011 1:32 am

Intl travel, grass-fed beef, expensive dates, and good gear/clothes.

This thread could have been inane and sad in any other forum, but is somehow refreshing in this one. Love it.

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cinghiale
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Re: That Extravagant Thing You Do

Post by cinghiale » Tue Jan 15, 2013 12:10 pm

Boglenaut has just updated and revived the "That Frugal Thing You Do" thread, which has scores of great postings on it. I thought a quick bump of this related thread would both provide balance and keep us reminded of why we plan, save, allocate, and stay the course.

My Boglenaut-like update: A year after beginning this thread in the spring of 2009, we bought a lovely condominium and moved into the city. Real estate prices were still pretty depressed in 2010, so we bought low (the condo) and sold low (our semi-rural house)... it's awfully hard to have it both ways. With much higher property taxes and monthly association dues, our living expenses took a nice little pop. But, we have loved every moment of urban life: walking to good restaurants, proximity to the downtown amenities, and the pleasure of living in a city that has done nothing but improve over the last decade.

Compared to previous living situations: a wee bit extravagant. On the happiness scale: a great decision.
"We don't see things as they are; we see them as we are." Anais Nin | | "Sometimes the first duty of intelligent men is the restatement of the obvious." George Orwell

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Re:

Post by Sam I Am » Tue Jan 15, 2013 2:44 pm

Message deleted.
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Re: That Extravagant Thing You Do

Post by gatorman » Tue Jan 15, 2013 7:08 pm

Spent $5k+ on camera gear over the last couple years.
gatorman

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Re: That Extravagant Thing You Do

Post by reggiesimpson » Tue Jan 15, 2013 7:22 pm

Off road racing in Baja. Expensive but the wildest experience i have ever had and worth every dime.

AnesBH
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Re: That Extravagant Thing You Do

Post by AnesBH » Tue Jan 15, 2013 8:26 pm

It was foolish in hindsite but we love traveling and mountain biking so it's a perfect fit...

Image

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Re:

Post by ofcmetz » Wed Jan 16, 2013 12:50 am

Alex Frakt wrote:Right now, it seems like my biggest extravagance is buying the good sardines - King Oscar Brisling 2-layer in olive oil.

Wow, I get to quote something for a few years ago and say ditto. Those are some good sardines. Definitely the best.

For me it's definitely vacations, cigars, and revolvers.

We take usually two nice trips a year and a few smaller ones. Made it to Omaha, NE for the College World Series in 2012.

I like Arturo Fuente and Macanudo Maduro's.

Big Smith & Wesson fan here. Mostly .357 mag and .38 special wheel guns. I'm old school.
Never underestimate the power of the force of low cost index funds.

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Re: That Extravagant Thing You Do

Post by VictoriaF » Wed Jan 16, 2013 8:24 pm

cinghiale wrote:Boglenaut has just updated and revived the "That Frugal Thing You Do" thread, which has scores of great postings on it. I thought a quick bump of this related thread would both provide balance and keep us reminded of why we plan, save, allocate, and stay the course.
Hi cinghiale,

Thank you for reviving the thread; some of us need reminders :-),

Victoria
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Re: That Extravagant Thing You Do

Post by Dopey » Wed Jan 16, 2013 9:08 pm

Wow, I also feel out of my league reading this thread. I guess it gives me motivation for being a saver in my 20's. I need to close this one down and get to the frugal thread so I don't feed any temptations!!

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TxAg
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Re: That Extravagant Thing You Do

Post by TxAg » Wed Jan 16, 2013 10:32 pm

I bought and sold (and traded) many high end custom traditional longbows and recurvesover the last couple years. Montana Bows by Dan Toelke are worth their weight in gold as far as I'm concerned.

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Re: That Extravagant Thing You Do

Post by czeckers » Thu Jan 17, 2013 8:30 am

Having a large family. As far as I can tell, by far the most extravagant thing of all the extravagant things mentioned so far.

-K
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Re: That Extravagant Thing You Do

Post by jasc15 » Thu Jan 17, 2013 3:35 pm

Flying.

I earned my private pilot certificate in 2010, after beginning training about 15 months before then. It's about the only thing I spend discretionary money on. The first question I get when I tell people I am a pilot is "isn't that expensive?" It sure can be, especially when fuel is $6.50/gallon and a landing light that only lasts about 25 hours costs aobut $70. Although some folks in this thread have exceeded what I spend in a year on more terrestrial pursuits which don't inspire that question from others. I am a member of a flying club, so my costs are much less than owning or renting, and I budget about $3000 a year to fly.

I didnt plan on this to be my first post (I am currently drafting a "Help Me With My Investments" post), but I thought this was an interesting topic since I sometimes feel like a hypocrite preaching frugality when I participate in one of the more expensive hobbies.

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cinghiale
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Re: That Extravagant Thing You Do

Post by cinghiale » Sat Jan 19, 2013 1:51 pm

Victoria wrote,
Thank you for reviving the thread; some of us need reminders
Thanks. And, well, since you I agree with you, I'll pop this thread back into action...

... just this one final time.

Cheers. :sharebeer
"We don't see things as they are; we see them as we are." Anais Nin | | "Sometimes the first duty of intelligent men is the restatement of the obvious." George Orwell

Satin
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Re: That Extravagant Thing You Do

Post by Satin » Sun Dec 10, 2017 10:03 pm

This was fun to read! Lots of interesting recommendations.

Right now our splurges are better food, and travel to see family. I think I'm inspired to visit our local butcher this week, instead of buying meat from our usual supermarket.

ADower
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Re: That Extravagant Thing You Do

Post by ADower » Tue Dec 12, 2017 4:32 pm

Kitchen Remodel
Bought several pieces of Dr. Suess Art
Bought my dream car - Notchback foxbody mustang
Sac Kings Season tickets yearly

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praxis
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Re: That Extravagant Thing You Do

Post by praxis » Wed Dec 13, 2017 12:18 pm

A daughter's wedding.

At the health club this morning, one of my fellow exercisers described the pending wedding of the first of her three daughters. Her eyes got wide as she told me about the destination event being planned by the couple. Before travel and lodging, the resort had quoted them $275 per person for the 300 guests invited. Although the couple expect only 200 to actually attend, the point she made to me was that she and her DH accept that this is their responsibility to cover wedding costs for all their daughters.

Practical reasons often go out the window (eg: "if you have a modest wedding, we'll gift you X amount for your down payment, honeymoon, college loan, etc) when the topic is a Cindrella wedding.

We have sons, but agreed to help with the first son's wedding, and set a budget and contributed it in portions, not all at once. It still went way over the original plans and we still contributed to the down payment on their house. Second son asked to use his grandmother's ring for his proposal coming up this holiday. And is planning a mountain wedding for close family. Of course we wish them all well, but after other expenses, my friend's bill might reach $75,000! https://www.daveramsey.com/blog/6-extra ... ding-costs

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