That Extravagant Thing You Do

Questions on how we spend our money and our time - consumer goods and services, home and vehicle, leisure and recreational activities
ResearchMed
Posts: 7413
Joined: Fri Dec 26, 2008 11:25 pm

Re: What is your luxury good?

Post by ResearchMed » Mon Sep 17, 2018 2:09 pm

stoptothink wrote:
Mon Sep 17, 2018 2:00 pm
daveydoo wrote:
Mon Sep 17, 2018 12:57 pm
stoptothink wrote:
Sun Sep 16, 2018 7:49 pm
At this point in my life, I think my luxury good is actually being able to provide nice things to those I love my wife as they actually enjoy them.
Not to be superficial, but it may not be terrible to have a few nice things that your close family associates with you. Wait, hear me out!

My low-maintenance non-acquisitive spouse recently said, "Not to be mean, but you really have nothing *nice* from your father." It's true. We got some money and that's nice, but it does not affect our current or future lifestyle. He bought nice jewelry for my (late) mother that we kids and/or our spouses wear and cherish and think of her. But for himself he had K-Mart-type clothes, shoes, watches for the most part. So I miss having something tangible. I know that sounds silly and I never would have expected it. He was anti-materialistic but did enjoy the finer things -- nice meals and nice vacations. And no, I would not trade happy memories for a material thing, but would it be so hard to have both? :D

So I bought a nice but wearable watch and plan to make a nice ring or two. No, I don't believe the Patek ads that I'm buying for the next generation. And I know that memories are more important than things. And I'm not super-sentimental on the spectrum and I do not feel that things hold any magical or spiritual connection to the deceased (meaning I think I'm pretty much like the rest of us). But we did "waste" money shipping some beloved pieces of furniture to many different corners of the country just to hold onto them. And I do wish I had a tangible daily reminder in the form of a ring or a watch or a...something.
We have this conversation quite often. My wife always wants to buy me something for my birthday or Christmas. For the past year it has been a nice watch. I always manage to talk her out of it, and instead convince her to buy something for herself or the kids or plan a nice date night. One thing that I have been thinking about is an electric assisted fat bike, and we have set a plan that I'll get one when we have the house paid off. The house will be paid off in ~3yrs, but I suspect by then that I will have talked myself out of that one too.
Assuming you can afford it, you might want to consider that something nice to do for your wife would be to "let" her buy you something really special.
Then you thank her a lot, and tell her how much you like it, and that you'll think of her whenever you use it / look at it, etc.

And who knows... you might actually really enjoy using or looking at it :happy

RM
This signature is a placebo. You are in the control group.

User avatar
ruralavalon
Posts: 14063
Joined: Sat Feb 02, 2008 10:29 am
Location: Illinois

Re: That Extravagant Thing You Do

Post by ruralavalon » Wed Sep 19, 2018 8:43 am

MY old car has died. I bought a nice used Cadillac CTS .

We dine out frequently.
"Everything should be as simple as it is, but not simpler." - Albert Einstein | Wiki article link:Getting Started

neilpilot
Posts: 1876
Joined: Fri Dec 04, 2015 1:46 pm
Location: Memphis area

Re: That Extravagant Thing You Do

Post by neilpilot » Wed Sep 19, 2018 8:55 am

We travel often, but rarely drive over an hour. Use our own airplane for most trips except international or transcontinental. It sometimes costs more than the airlines, but it's often faster. We can fly on our own schedule.

BBQ Nut
Posts: 69
Joined: Sun Jun 22, 2014 9:19 am

Re: That Extravagant Thing You Do

Post by BBQ Nut » Wed Sep 19, 2018 10:20 am

* Swords (katana)
* Craft Beer :sharebeer
* Audio gear & LPs, SACDs
* Quality meats from my specialty butcher

But with the kids in college, I can see us upping our travel budget quite a bit. :happy

trueson1
Posts: 94
Joined: Mon Mar 13, 2017 11:40 am

Re: That Extravagant Thing You Do

Post by trueson1 » Wed Sep 19, 2018 11:00 am

Good aged single malt Scotch and smooth bourbon!

Nice Vacations

arrieros81
Posts: 5
Joined: Thu Jul 21, 2016 1:31 pm

Re: What is your luxury good?

Post by arrieros81 » Wed Oct 24, 2018 2:02 pm

SuperGrafx wrote:
Mon Sep 17, 2018 11:39 am
arrieros81 wrote:
Sat Sep 15, 2018 8:08 pm

Clothing and accessories with real fur.
What kind of real fur??
Well, not dog or cat fur I guess. I saw cat skins for sale in Asia once.

quantAndHold
Posts: 1864
Joined: Thu Sep 17, 2015 10:39 pm

Re: That Extravagant Thing You Do

Post by quantAndHold » Wed Oct 24, 2018 3:53 pm

Declaring myself financially independent in my early 50’s and quitting my job. Like someone else upthread said, I definitely left at least $1M on the table.

Travel. Lots of it, now that we’re not bound by work schedules.

Dottie57
Posts: 4626
Joined: Thu May 19, 2016 5:43 pm

Re: What is your luxury good?

Post by Dottie57 » Wed Oct 24, 2018 5:46 pm

daveydoo wrote:
Mon Sep 17, 2018 12:57 pm
stoptothink wrote:
Sun Sep 16, 2018 7:49 pm
At this point in my life, I think my luxury good is actually being able to provide nice things to those I love my wife as they actually enjoy them.
Not to be superficial, but it may not be terrible to have a few nice things that your close family associates with you. Wait, hear me out!

My low-maintenance non-acquisitive spouse recently said, "Not to be mean, but you really have nothing *nice* from your father." It's true. We got some money and that's nice, but it does not affect our current or future lifestyle. He bought nice jewelry for my (late) mother that we kids and/or our spouses wear and cherish and think of her. But for himself he had K-Mart-type clothes, shoes, watches for the most part. So I miss having something tangible. I know that sounds silly and I never would have expected it. He was anti-materialistic but did enjoy the finer things -- nice meals and nice vacations. And no, I would not trade happy memories for a material thing, but would it be so hard to have both? :D

So I bought a nice but wearable watch and plan to make a nice ring or two. No, I don't believe the Patek ads that I'm buying for the next generation. And I know that memories are more important than things. And I'm not super-sentimental on the spectrum and I do not feel that things hold any magical or spiritual connection to the deceased (meaning I think I'm pretty much like the rest of us). But we did "waste" money shipping some beloved pieces of furniture to many different corners of the country just to hold onto them. And I do wish I had a tangible daily reminder in the form of a ring or a watch or a...something.
I kept my Dad’s old bathrobe which I frequently saw him wear. Sounds silly, but I do end up smiling when I see it in my closet.

Post Reply