filling the vertical gap between the kitchen cabinets and flooring

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September
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filling the vertical gap between the kitchen cabinets and flooring

Post by September »

I have an old kitchen that still uses the black plastic board to fill the vertical gap between the cabinets and the flooring (see below for the picture). The black plastic board is not tall enough to cover the gap. The picture couldn't show the gap because the cabinet surface extends a bit (the plastic board does not align with the surface of the cabinet). The exterior wall next to the kitchen cabinets is poorly insulated, and as such that there is cold air coming from the gap. I don't know what these black plastic boards are called and I don't know where I can buy these.

Does anyone know where to find these black plastic boards or any other materials that I can use to fill the gap? Thanks very much!

Image
Last edited by September on Tue Nov 23, 2021 9:05 pm, edited 1 time in total.
bradinsky
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Re: filling the vertical gap between the kitchen cabinets and flooring

Post by bradinsky »

Try “toe kick” for cabinets. I’m sure Home Depot & Lowes sell them made from wood.
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ResearchMed
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Re: filling the vertical gap between the kitchen cabinets and flooring

Post by ResearchMed »

September wrote: Tue Nov 23, 2021 8:51 pm I have an old kitchen that still uses the black plastic board to fill the vertical gap between the cabinets and the flooring (see below for the picture). The black plastic board is not tall enough to cover the gap. The picture couldn't show the gap because the cabinet surface extends a bit (the plastic board does not align with the surface of the cabinet). The exterior wall next to the kitchen cabinets is poorly insulated, and as such that there is cold air coming from the gap. I don't know what these black plastic board are called and I don't know where I can buy these.

Does anyone know where to find these black plastic board or any other materials that I can use to fill the gap? Thanks very much!

Image
How high is the vertical of the black material. It's hard to judge from the photo.
Is that height pretty even all along the length?

Absent any more "professional" suggestions, what about black electrical tap (color match), from the top (1/4? 1/2? inch) of the black plastic, to the underside of the wood tone horizontal surface. It doesn't seem that would show unless someone was scrubbing the floor on hands and knees...

And maybe stick something to insulate the open bit, to the middle of the tap, so it covers the drafty opening?

RM
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Topic Author
September
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Re: filling the vertical gap between the kitchen cabinets and flooring

Post by September »

bradinsky wrote: Tue Nov 23, 2021 9:04 pm Try “toe kick” for cabinets. I’m sure Home Depot & Lowes sell them made from wood.
Thanks! I will do a search.
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September
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Re: filling the vertical gap between the kitchen cabinets and flooring

Post by September »

ResearchMed wrote: Tue Nov 23, 2021 9:07 pm
September wrote: Tue Nov 23, 2021 8:51 pm I have an old kitchen that still uses the black plastic board to fill the vertical gap between the cabinets and the flooring (see below for the picture). The black plastic board is not tall enough to cover the gap. The picture couldn't show the gap because the cabinet surface extends a bit (the plastic board does not align with the surface of the cabinet). The exterior wall next to the kitchen cabinets is poorly insulated, and as such that there is cold air coming from the gap. I don't know what these black plastic board are called and I don't know where I can buy these.

Does anyone know where to find these black plastic board or any other materials that I can use to fill the gap? Thanks very much!

Image
How high is the vertical of the black material. It's hard to judge from the photo.
Is that height pretty even all along the length?

Absent any more "professional" suggestions, what about black electrical tap (color match), from the top (1/4? 1/2? inch) of the black plastic, to the underside of the wood tone horizontal surface. It doesn't seem that would show unless someone was scrubbing the floor on hands and knees...

And maybe stick something to insulate the open bit, to the middle of the tap, so it covers the drafty opening?

RM
The black plastic is 4 inch tall and the height is even all along the length.
The gap is about 1 inch and I tried to use packaging tape to insulate it but it didn't work.
You just remind me that I can use the door sweep since it's tall enough. I am thinking of a better fix but using a door sweep will work. Thanks for your help!
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Re: filling the vertical gap between the kitchen cabinets and flooring

Post by montanagirl »

It's called a toe kick, if that helps.
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Re: filling the vertical gap between the kitchen cabinets and flooring

Post by Bogle7 »

Mind the gap.
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Duckie
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Re: filling the vertical gap between the kitchen cabinets and flooring

Post by Duckie »

September wrote: Tue Nov 23, 2021 8:51 pm Does anyone know where to find these black plastic boards or any other materials that I can use to fill the gap?
Cabinet toe kick at Lowe's
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Re: filling the vertical gap between the kitchen cabinets and flooring

Post by Sandtrap »

Your picture looks like commercial vinyl/rubber floor base molding with a tapered "shoe".
It comes in rolls and also 4 foot strips in a box.
It is applied with base molding adhesive "gunk in a can" or caulking gun (tube) that is specially made to adhere to the vinyl/rubber molding. Other types of glue adhesive in a caulking gun tube or can do not work or work as well.
Here's an example of the product at Lowes.
https://www.lowes.com/pd/FLEXCO-4-in-W- ... lsrc=aw.ds
The DIY "box stores" ie: Home Depot, Lowes, etc. normall have it in standard 4 inch widths.

You can contact various contractor supply centers and get this in a roll or box at various widths.
In your case, you can buy a width that is a little wider than what you need then cut it down lengthwise to fit so you have a good seal that you want. The contractor supply houses also might have it in more colors if you don't want black.

Use a very very sharp new blade in a utility knife and a long metal straight edge (drywall square works great) on top of a scrap sheet of plywood to do lengthwise trims. Draw your lines with the straight edge and a fat pencil first.

This kind of floor base moulding comes in various qualities and flexibility, some are more "rubbery" (technical term) and some, especially "cheapy" (technical term) ones are more vinyl and plastic like which is harder to work with and might not age as well.
IE: if you go to a hospital, you'll see it running along the bottom of the walls.

You can remove the old one with a stiff blade putty knife then scrape off any excess dried material/glue. It doesn't have to be perfectly flat and cleaned up. As long as the loose material is off.

Cut a 45 degree notch at the bottom (shoe) for inside corners. For outside corners, just wrap.
Keep joints tight as they will open up as the glue sets and dries.

j :D
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mhc
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Re: filling the vertical gap between the kitchen cabinets and flooring

Post by mhc »

Another option might be cove base. I have seen it used in kitchens also. It may be easier to install than toe kick.
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September
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Re: filling the vertical gap between the kitchen cabinets and flooring

Post by September »

Sandtrap wrote: Wed Nov 24, 2021 10:11 am Your picture looks like commercial vinyl/rubber floor base molding with a tapered "shoe".
It comes in rolls and also 4 foot strips in a box.
It is applied with base molding adhesive "gunk in a can" or caulking gun (tube) that is specially made to adhere to the vinyl/rubber molding. Other types of glue adhesive in a caulking gun tube or can do not work or work as well.
Here's an example of the product at Lowes.
https://www.lowes.com/pd/FLEXCO-4-in-W- ... lsrc=aw.ds
The DIY "box stores" ie: Home Depot, Lowes, etc. normall have it in standard 4 inch widths.

You can contact various contractor supply centers and get this in a roll or box at various widths.
In your case, you can buy a width that is a little wider than what you need then cut it down lengthwise to fit so you have a good seal that you want. The contractor supply houses also might have it in more colors if you don't want black.

Use a very very sharp new blade in a utility knife and a long metal straight edge (drywall square works great) on top of a scrap sheet of plywood to do lengthwise trims. Draw your lines with the straight edge and a fat pencil first.

This kind of floor base moulding comes in various qualities and flexibility, some are more "rubbery" (technical term) and some, especially "cheapy" (technical term) ones are more vinyl and plastic like which is harder to work with and might not age as well.
IE: if you go to a hospital, you'll see it running along the bottom of the walls.

You can remove the old one with a stiff blade putty knife then scrape off any excess dried material/glue. It doesn't have to be perfectly flat and cleaned up. As long as the loose material is off.

Cut a 45 degree notch at the bottom (shoe) for inside corners. For outside corners, just wrap.
Keep joints tight as they will open up as the glue sets and dries.

j :D
Armstrong "wall base".
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Image
Wow! You are so knowledgable on this subject. Yes, what your guess about my floor base molding is correct. It's "L" shaped plastic board that's taped to the lower edge of the cabinets. The width is standard 4 inch, but I need at least 5 inch to fill the interior edge of the cabinets. Your mention of the usage of floor base molding in hospital reminds me that a good insulated place should be - unlike my house.

Again thanks for your help and wish you and your family a great Thanksgiving!
Topic Author
September
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Re: filling the vertical gap between the kitchen cabinets and flooring

Post by September »

Thanks everyone for your help and wish you all have a great Thanksgiving!
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Re: filling the vertical gap between the kitchen cabinets and flooring

Post by gmc4h232 »

you can get resilient base with a 6" height. Id pull the old off and stuff batt insulation under your cabinets then cover with the resilient base. Trim the height if you have to.

other option would be to rip some 1/4" stain grade luan or plywood and stain it to match your cabinets if you dont want black.
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Re: filling the vertical gap between the kitchen cabinets and flooring

Post by snackdog »

But why is cold air circulating behind your cabinets?
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Re: filling the vertical gap between the kitchen cabinets and flooring

Post by Mr. Rumples »

Once the new toe kick is installed, there might still be gaps (1/32" is visible); thus, before permanently installing it consider oakum, foam insulation that comes on a roll - not spray foam - in the space. These are readily available. A yardstick laid on the floor will show any gaps.
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Re: filling the vertical gap between the kitchen cabinets and flooring

Post by investingdad »

snackdog wrote: Thu Nov 25, 2021 7:08 am But why is cold air circulating behind your cabinets?
Probably because the cabinetry sits on an external wall and there’s no heating under there. As such, it gets cold. The kitchen is heated and during the heating process he gets air movement due to the temperature delta.
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Re: filling the vertical gap between the kitchen cabinets and flooring

Post by Sandtrap »

investingdad wrote: Thu Nov 25, 2021 7:56 am
snackdog wrote: Thu Nov 25, 2021 7:08 am But why is cold air circulating behind your cabinets?
Probably because the cabinetry sits on an external wall and there’s no heating under there. As such, it gets cold. The kitchen is heated and during the heating process he gets air movement due to the temperature delta.
Yes.

Our kitchen has a heat duck grill under the sink base cabinet that is against an exterior wall to help add heat to that area in case of winter lows and freezing.

Also feels good to have that heat duck blowing warm air on your feet when standing at the sink in winter.

j🌺
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Faith20879
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Re: filling the vertical gap between the kitchen cabinets and flooring

Post by Faith20879 »

snackdog wrote: Thu Nov 25, 2021 7:08 am But why is cold air circulating behind your cabinets?
Worse yet, in our house, in a 40° day, cold air blows out from the cabinets and electric sockets. We always thought it was normal.
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September
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Re: filling the vertical gap between the kitchen cabinets and flooring

Post by September »

Faith20879 wrote: Thu Nov 25, 2021 9:17 am
snackdog wrote: Thu Nov 25, 2021 7:08 am But why is cold air circulating behind your cabinets?
Worse yet, in our house, in a 40° day, cold air blows out from the cabinets and electric sockets. We always thought it was normal.
This is true for my house too. The exterior walls (vinyl sidings) of my house are poorly insulated and the kitchen cabinets are next to the exterior wall. I can feel the cold air blowing from the electric outlets from the exterior walls, and I use the transparent duct tape to cover the ones that I don't use.

When I remodel the kitchen, I will tear up the dry wall and reinsulate the sidings.
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Re: filling the vertical gap between the kitchen cabinets and flooring

Post by bradinsky »

September wrote: Thu Nov 25, 2021 12:27 pm
Faith20879 wrote: Thu Nov 25, 2021 9:17 am
snackdog wrote: Thu Nov 25, 2021 7:08 am But why is cold air circulating behind your cabinets?
Worse yet, in our house, in a 40° day, cold air blows out from the cabinets and electric sockets. We always thought it was normal.
This is true for my house too. The exterior walls (vinyl sidings) of my house are poorly insulated and the kitchen cabinets are next to the exterior wall. I can feel the cold air blowing from the electric outlets from the exterior walls, and I use the transparent duct tape to cover the ones that I don't use.

When I remodel the kitchen, I will tear up the dry wall and reinsulate the sidings.
Insulation contractors can blow insulation into your walls from the outside. It’s typically easier with vinyl siding because they are able to pop a section of siding loose, drill access holes, blow the insulation in, plug the access holes & then reattach the siding. From the outside, you would never know anything had changed. Inside, your residence is warmer & quieter.

With regard to your drafty outlets & switches, stores like Lowes & Home Depot sell pre-cut insulating pads. They help cut down on the drafts. To use them, you remove the outlet or switch plate cover, place the insulating pad in place & reattach the cover. There should be no reason at all that you should have to deal with any electrical issues. Keep you fingers & screwdriver away from the inside of the box!!
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Re: filling the vertical gap between the kitchen cabinets and flooring

Post by Faith20879 »

bradinsky wrote: Fri Nov 26, 2021 9:52 am
Insulation contractors can blow insulation into your walls from the outside. It’s typically easier with vinyl siding because they are able to pop a section of siding loose, drill access holes, blow the insulation in, plug the access holes & then reattach the siding. From the outside, you would never know anything had changed. Inside, your residence is warmer & quieter.

With regard to your drafty outlets & switches, stores like Lowes & Home Depot sell pre-cut insulating pads. They help cut down on the drafts. To use them, you remove the outlet or switch plate cover, place the insulating pad in place & reattach the cover. There should be no reason at all that you should have to deal with any electrical issues. Keep you fingers & screwdriver away from the inside of the box!!
Thanks for the info...added to the honey do list.

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Re: filling the vertical gap between the kitchen cabinets and flooring

Post by skis4hire »

If you have cold air coming in under the cabinets, it's likely related to air infiltration from outside. It indicates that you have poor air sealing behind the cabinets. Most houses use the drywall on exterior walls as the air sealing envelope. If it's possible to repair the drywall behind the cabinet to be air tight, that would be the better fix. Trying to make the cabinet itself an air tight barrier would be difficult, fixing the area at the bottom would be just the start as there are likely many other small gaps all around the cabinet perimeter. Putting fluffy insulation under the cabinet may help a little but ultimately won't prevent air infiltration.

For the others posting about drafts around electrical boxes, it's the same idea. the outlet is a hole in your air sealing layer (drywall), so you want to seal it. They sell gaskets that go between the outlet plate and the wall to do this. Air sealing and general insulation are different things and having someone upgrade the insulation in your walls will not stop the draft at the outlet if they do not also fix the air sealing. The best wall construction or retrofit will move the air barrier to the outside of the insulation at the sheathing layer but that's more involved.
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September
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Re: filling the vertical gap between the kitchen cabinets and flooring

Post by September »

skis4hire wrote: Fri Nov 26, 2021 2:59 pm If you have cold air coming in under the cabinets, it's likely related to air infiltration from outside. It indicates that you have poor air sealing behind the cabinets. Most houses use the drywall on exterior walls as the air sealing envelope. If it's possible to repair the drywall behind the cabinet to be air tight, that would be the better fix. Trying to make the cabinet itself an air tight barrier would be difficult, fixing the area at the bottom would be just the start as there are likely many other small gaps all around the cabinet perimeter. Putting fluffy insulation under the cabinet may help a little but ultimately won't prevent air infiltration.

For the others posting about drafts around electrical boxes, it's the same idea. the outlet is a hole in your air sealing layer (drywall), so you want to seal it. They sell gaskets that go between the outlet plate and the wall to do this. Air sealing and general insulation are different things and having someone upgrade the insulation in your walls will not stop the draft at the outlet if they do not also fix the air sealing. The best wall construction or retrofit will move the air barrier to the outside of the insulation at the sheathing layer but that's more involved.
Thanks for your response.

I undersand what you said as insulating the exterior wall is different from air sealing the electric outlets. But they are related, as a poorly insulated exterior wall will likely lead to more draft from the electric boxes.

I guess it would be very expensive to have contractors to take off the sidings piece by piece and add more insulations.
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Re: filling the vertical gap between the kitchen cabinets and flooring

Post by bradinsky »

They can disconnect the bottom of a length of vinyl siding, drill holes in the exterior sheeting, blow in insulation, plug holes & snap siding back into place. This can be done all around your house to insulate it in its entirety. If you’re curious, call a reputable insulation contractor.
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September
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Re: filling the vertical gap between the kitchen cabinets and flooring

Post by September »

bradinsky wrote: Sat Nov 27, 2021 2:20 pm They can disconnect the bottom of a length of vinyl siding, drill holes in the exterior sheeting, blow in insulation, plug holes & snap siding back into place. This can be done all around your house to insulate it in its entirety. If you’re curious, call a reputable insulation contractor.
Thanks. This is on my to-do list.
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Re: filling the vertical gap between the kitchen cabinets and flooring

Post by bradinsky »

They definitely do not need to remove the vinyl siding.
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Re: filling the vertical gap between the kitchen cabinets and flooring

Post by celia »

We have a raised foundation with a crawl space under it. Our cold air comes up from under the floor. We recently went through a plumbing issue where water was leaking below the floor. After the leak was fixed, we used small fans that could fit through our crawl hole and ran them for a couple weeks to help dry things out. (The concrete and wood footings holding the walls were wet and we didn’t want mold growing there.) We definitely can feel the temperature difference when the fans are on, forcefully blowing the cold air just under the wooden floors.
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