What is your high school graduate going to be doing?

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Topic Author
kleiner
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What is your high school graduate going to be doing?

Post by kleiner »

I have read so many threads in the personal finance section recently about paying for college. This is very topical for me since my younger daughter is off to college this fall. I was curious about what your high school grad kid is going to be doing.

My daughter is off to Georgia tech this fall and will be majoring in math or physics. We are out of state so this is a more expensive for us than our in-state option (Rutgers) but still much less than a top private university. I should mention that we don't qualify for any need based financial aid thanks to 30 years of Boglehead savings. However, even so, several private universities where my daughter got admission did offer generous merit money. Georgia Tech costs about the same as the private schools with the merit money.
KlangFool
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Re: What is your high school graduate going to be doing?

Post by KlangFool »

kleiner wrote: Sat May 01, 2021 8:52 am
My daughter is off to Georgia tech this fall and will be majoring in math or physics.
kleiner,

I told my son that I am not paying for a degree in physics. He had no idea what he was going with that degree. He double majored in Mechanical Engineering plus Physics. He dropped his Physic major a year after that. He graduated and found a job two years ago.

My daughter majored in Arts. I supported her decision. She know what to do with her degree. She interned while she was in high school. She found her job before she graduated last year.

KlangFool
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quantAndHold
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Re: What is your high school graduate going to be doing?

Post by quantAndHold »

KlangFool wrote: Sat May 01, 2021 9:00 am
kleiner wrote: Sat May 01, 2021 8:52 am
My daughter is off to Georgia tech this fall and will be majoring in math or physics.
kleiner,

I told my son that I am not paying for a degree in physics. He had no idea what he was going with that degree. He double majored in Mechanical Engineering plus Physics. He dropped his Physic major a year after that. He graduated and found a job two years ago.

My daughter majored in Arts. I supported her decision. She know what to do with her degree. She interned while she was in high school. She found her job before she graduated last year.

KlangFool
I’m glad it all worked out for your son, but do you really think that someone who wants to major in physics isn’t smart enough to figure out how to use their degree when the time comes?
Yes, I’m really that pedantic.
KlangFool
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Re: What is your high school graduate going to be doing?

Post by KlangFool »

quantAndHold wrote: Sat May 01, 2021 9:10 am
I’m glad it all worked out for your son, but do you really think that someone who wants to major in physics isn’t smart enough to figure out how to use their degree when the time comes?
quantAndHold,

A) Yes. There is a significant difference between intelligence and resourcefulness. My daughter has it and my son does not have it.

B) And, it was proven that he could not graduate with his physic degree anyhow. He could not handle the higher level physic classes. If I let him major in Physic only, he would not be able to get back to Mechanical Engineering.

KlangFool
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MarkBarb
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Re: What is your high school graduate going to be doing?

Post by MarkBarb »

My sons graduated high school 1 and 3 years ago. Both are studying Computer Science at different public big-state-U schools. Both love their major and it is a good major for job prospects, so I'm happy.

As the Physics degree debate, the site below shows that they have lower median starting salaries and higher mid-career median salaries than Mech E majors. It would have been on our approved list of majors which included most engineering degrees and some science degrees, a few business degrees, or an economics degree. If any of our children wanted the life broadening experience of a degree in the liberal arts or humanities, I would have suggested that they couple that with the life broadening experience of working their way through college to give them some practical skills.

https://www.visualcapitalist.com/visual ... e-degrees/
life in slices
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Re: What is your high school graduate going to be doing?

Post by life in slices »

kleiner wrote: Sat May 01, 2021 8:52 am I have read so many threads in the personal finance section recently about paying for college. This is very topical for me since my younger daughter is off to college this fall. I was curious about what your high school grad kid is going to be doing.

My daughter is off to Georgia tech this fall and will be majoring in math or physics. We are out of state so this is a more expensive for us than our in-state option (Rutgers) but still much less than a top private university. I should mention that we don't qualify for any need based financial aid thanks to 30 years of Boglehead savings. However, even so, several private universities where my daughter got admission did offer generous merit money. Georgia Tech costs about the same as the private schools with the merit money.
Congrats! Our middle son is graduating from GT 1 next weekend :) from the MSE (material sciences engineering) program - it was a perfect blend of math, physics, chemistry and engineering for him.

In our opinion GT was a great school for him and we have been impressed with the education he received (and were happy to pay for the out of state tuition)

My youngest is graduating HS at the end of May and will be spending the summer working a job and continuing to train, since she will be running for a D1 school in the fall.

The oldest, who has been living with us and working for the past couple of years, is off to Med School this late summer

...so officially empty nesters for us :beer
Topic Author
kleiner
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Re: What is your high school graduate going to be doing?

Post by kleiner »

life in slices wrote: Sat May 01, 2021 9:46 am
Congrats! Our middle son is graduating from GT 1 next weekend :) from the MSE (material sciences engineering) program - it was a perfect blend of math, physics, chemistry and engineering for him.

In our opinion GT was a great school for him and we have been impressed with the education he received (and were happy to pay for the out of state tuition)

My youngest is graduating HS at the end of May and will be spending the summer working a job and continuing to train, since she will be running for a D1 school in the fall.

The oldest, who has been living with us and working for the past couple of years, is off to Med School this late summer

...so officially empty nesters for us :beer
Great to hear about GT! I have also talked to friends who are GT alumni and all were happy with their experience there.

Looks like you also have a busy summer ahead of you getting your kids off to school.
sport
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Re: What is your high school graduate going to be doing?

Post by sport »

I have bachelors and masters degrees in Physics. I am now retired, but spent most of my career in Engineering jobs. I believe my career would have been more successful with an Engineering degree. A friend of mine, no longer living, had a PhD in Physics from MIT. He ended up with a career in fund-raising for non-profits. The career opportunities for physicists are very limited. I would not recommend a physics major to anyone.
Slacker
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Re: What is your high school graduate going to be doing?

Post by Slacker »

In state school for graphic arts.
He flirted with the idea of comp sci for about half a year during his junior year but ultimately decided on art.

The other one is currently at an in state school and keeps bouncing around majors.

I'm not worried for either one.
Last edited by Slacker on Sun May 02, 2021 11:08 am, edited 1 time in total.
Slacker
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Re: What is your high school graduate going to be doing?

Post by Slacker »

Re Physics degrees:

The people I work with who have a MS in Physics, had to learn electrical engineering on the job and do the same thing as I do, just with a little more of a struggle to learn how to do it.
sport
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Re: What is your high school graduate going to be doing?

Post by sport »

Slacker wrote: Sat May 01, 2021 12:02 pm Re Physics degrees:

The people I work with who have a MS in Physics, had to learn electrical engineering on the job and do the same thing as I do, just with a little more of a struggle to learn how to do it.
The other problem with this is when they need/want to change jobs. The hiring manager will have an EE degree and may be reluctant to hire someone without one. Ask me how I know.
chipperd
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Re: What is your high school graduate going to be doing?

Post by chipperd »

Can't comment on the physics issue; no idea.

-Our oldest is a rising senior, accounting major (honors) at a business focused small, private university. Sitting for his CPA summer after he graduates (150 credits) . Paid Internship at a big 4 this summer
-Our middle is a rising junior bio/science and society double major at a small, kinda science focused private university. This one wants to get her PhD in cellular molecular bio and become a cancer researcher upon undergrad completion. This summer has a paid internship (Thanks Alex's Lemonade Foundation!) at large children's hospital affiliated with UPenn assisting in some type of cancer research (I forget the exact type). (Don't mean to derail the thread, but she'll be 19yo and living in Philly on her own so any tips are appreciated if anyone wants to PM me to ease this parental anxiety).
-Our youngest was admitted to a small, private university as a 4+2 medical bio/pre PA student, and just committed this past week.

So yup, three in undergrad this coming fall.
"A portfolio is like a bar of soap, the more it's handled, the less there is." Dr. William Bernstein
quantAndHold
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Re: What is your high school graduate going to be doing?

Post by quantAndHold »

Interesting the number of people in this thread who have/had perfectly fine careers despite having a degree in physics.

My point is not that a subterminal degree in physics has amazing job opportunities. My point is we do our kids a disservice when we treat college like a trade school. There will always be jobs for kids with a decent work ethic and good critical thinking skills, regardless of major. And those jobs might be doing things that we as parents have never thought of. The path to those jobs may not be as linear as simply getting an engineering degree and getting hired by Northrop Grumman straight out of school, however.
Yes, I’m really that pedantic.
kahangi
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Re: What is your high school graduate going to be doing?

Post by kahangi »

My child just committed to Stanford yesterday. It was a tough choice over Harvard but we thought for computer science, it was the right choice.

Stanford is on the other side of the country for us and it’s hard to see your child go so far away.
KlangFool
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Re: What is your high school graduate going to be doing?

Post by KlangFool »

quantAndHold wrote: Sun May 02, 2021 9:21 am Interesting the number of people in this thread who have/had perfectly fine careers despite having a degree in physics.

My point is not that a subterminal degree in physics has amazing job opportunities. My point is we do our kids a disservice when we treat college like a trade school. There will always be jobs for kids with a decent work ethic and good critical thinking skills, regardless of major. And those jobs might be doing things that we as parents have never thought of. The path to those jobs may not be as linear as simply getting an engineering degree and getting hired by Northrop Grumman straight out of school, however.
quantAndHold,

<<Interesting the number of people in this thread who have/had perfectly fine careers despite having a degree in physics.>>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Survivorship_bias

This is survivorship bias. Those that don't make it do not post in Bogleheads.

<<There will always be jobs for kids with a decent work ethic and good critical thinking skills, regardless of major. >>

Many of my son's and daughter's college mate are unemployed since they were graduated. Some worked retails. You do not need a degree to work at Starbuck.

<<My point is we do our kids a disservice>>

By not asking them what they plan to do with their degree. If they are absolutely clueless, make sure that they do some research before they proceed.

KlangFool
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Dyloot
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Re: What is your high school graduate going to be doing?

Post by Dyloot »

KlangFool wrote: Sun May 02, 2021 9:54 am
quantAndHold wrote: Sun May 02, 2021 9:21 am Interesting the number of people in this thread who have/had perfectly fine careers despite having a degree in physics.

My point is not that a subterminal degree in physics has amazing job opportunities. My point is we do our kids a disservice when we treat college like a trade school. There will always be jobs for kids with a decent work ethic and good critical thinking skills, regardless of major. And those jobs might be doing things that we as parents have never thought of. The path to those jobs may not be as linear as simply getting an engineering degree and getting hired by Northrop Grumman straight out of school, however.
quantAndHold,

<<Interesting the number of people in this thread who have/had perfectly fine careers despite having a degree in physics.>>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Survivorship_bias

This is survivorship bias. Those that don't make it do not post in Bogleheads.

<<There will always be jobs for kids with a decent work ethic and good critical thinking skills, regardless of major. >>

Many of my son's and daughter's college mate are unemployed since they were graduated. Some worked retails. You do not need a degree to work at Starbuck.

<<My point is we do our kids a disservice>>

By not asking them what they plan to do with their degree. If they are absolutely clueless, make sure that they do some research before they proceed.

KlangFool
I think you're both right, and it really depends on the young adult.

I think KF's approach may work best for the masses--especially those who are not exceptional. For example, me. I easily landed a job after college in my field, but it was low paying and I wasn't willing to do what was required to rise through the ranks and make a decent living (ie, move from market to market to gain valuable experience). I abandoned the profession after almost a decade and settled into a tech field (a lifelong passion of mine), and thrived. If I could go back and tell m7 18-year-old self that tech was far more than a hobby I would have made far more money throughout my lifetime.

I think Q&H's statement also has merit. One of my uncles was an exceptional high school student, accepted to Yale. His father talked him out of engineering--his passion--and into geology (a family trade). Rationale was there were way too many engineers and not nearly enough geologists. My uncle eventually left the geology profession and went back to school to become (as you probably guessed) an engineer.

I think you both bring up great points that should be considered by a parent as they attempt to help their child move from high school to the real world.
DoubleComma
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Re: What is your high school graduate going to be doing?

Post by DoubleComma »

kahangi wrote: Sun May 02, 2021 9:46 am My child just committed to Stanford yesterday. It was a tough choice over Harvard but we thought for computer science, it was the right choice.

Stanford is on the other side of the country for us and it’s hard to see your child go so far away.
Not to many get to make that choice congratulations.
DoubleComma
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Re: What is your high school graduate going to be doing?

Post by DoubleComma »

[quote=MarkBarb post_id=5980026 time=1619879075 user_id If any of our children wanted the life broadening experience of a degree in the liberal arts or humanities, I would have suggested that they couple that with the life broadening experience of working their way through college to give them some practical skills.

https://www.visualcapitalist.com/visual ... e-degrees/
[/quote]

My Economics degree is a BA, wasn’t offered as a BS in my school

I’m doing OK.
Dyloot
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Re: What is your high school graduate going to be doing?

Post by Dyloot »

DoubleComma wrote: Sun May 02, 2021 12:18 pm
kahangi wrote: Sun May 02, 2021 9:46 am My child just committed to Stanford yesterday. It was a tough choice over Harvard but we thought for computer science, it was the right choice.

Stanford is on the other side of the country for us and it’s hard to see your child go so far away.
Not to many get to make that choice congratulations.
Agreed--congratulations!

The obvious problem for anyone coming to the Bay Area is the cost of housing.

But, as a tech guy myself, I can't think of a more exciting place to be than Stanford University studying computer science. The college life and the amount of amazing jobs in that field in that area are just amazing. Your child has a rare opportunity. You must be very proud.
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Re: What is your high school graduate going to be doing?

Post by MarkRoulo »

kahangi wrote: Sun May 02, 2021 9:46 am My child just committed to Stanford yesterday. It was a tough choice over Harvard but we thought for computer science, it was the right choice.

Stanford is on the other side of the country for us and it’s hard to see your child go so far away.
Congrats! Sincere!

But I found this bit hilarious and think we need a phrase to come after "1st world problems" :-)
My child just committed to Stanford yesterday. It was a tough choice over Harvard but we thought for computer science, it was the right choice.
The agony of trying to choose between Harvard and Stanford :-)
MarkRoulo
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Re: What is your high school graduate going to be doing?

Post by MarkRoulo »

quantAndHold wrote: Sun May 02, 2021 9:21 am Interesting the number of people in this thread who have/had perfectly fine careers despite having a degree in physics.

My point is not that a subterminal degree in physics has amazing job opportunities. My point is we do our kids a disservice when we treat college like a trade school. There will always be jobs for kids with a decent work ethic and good critical thinking skills, regardless of major. And those jobs might be doing things that we as parents have never thought of. The path to those jobs may not be as linear as simply getting an engineering degree and getting hired by Northrop Grumman straight out of school, however.
I think a large portion of what you are seeing is that different people are optimizing for different things.

KlangFool seems to be doing some sort of min/max for career earnings.

Other people (including me for my child) are ... not.

Assuming reasonable math/quantitative skills then (a) go to engineering school, (b) work hard, (c) find worker-bee job at firm doing engineering, (d) keep doing that until you retire is a pretty straightforward life plan.

Other folks are more willing to take risks and do thing such as:
  • Taking year off when early to (a) sail around the world, or (b) bum around youth hostels in Europe, or
  • Get a theatre degree, then figure out how to get a programming job
  • Start off as a dual business/music major and then "bail out" to math ... and then get a PhD in math ... and then try to find a programming job
  • Move from China to the US for a Quantum Chemistry PhD, then look for a non-chemistry job ...
I've worked with folks who have done all of these things (not the same person, though ...). They often seem to have more interesting lives than the folks who just think career-and-career-and-career.

But, as KlangFool mentions, there is some surviorship bias. There may be more sub-optimal career/financial results along this path than along the more straightforward path. That risk/price may just be the cost one pays for a more interesting life.
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Re: What is your high school graduate going to be doing?

Post by Dyloot »

MarkRoulo wrote: Sun May 02, 2021 12:56 pm
kahangi wrote: Sun May 02, 2021 9:46 am My child just committed to Stanford yesterday. It was a tough choice over Harvard but we thought for computer science, it was the right choice.

Stanford is on the other side of the country for us and it’s hard to see your child go so far away.
Congrats! Sincere!

But I found this bit hilarious and think we need a phrase to come after "1st world problems" :-)
My child just committed to Stanford yesterday. It was a tough choice over Harvard but we thought for computer science, it was the right choice.
The agony of trying to choose between Harvard and Stanford :-)
Right! But, still, what a decision to make. You've been offered two amazing opportunities, and whichever you decline will likely be gone forever. The question may always be, what would have happened if I had picked Harvard? Who would I have met? What would I have become?

As you say, first world problems. But mind-blowing ones at that for some of us. :D
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LilyFleur
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Re: What is your high school graduate going to be doing?

Post by LilyFleur »

MarkRoulo wrote: Sun May 02, 2021 12:56 pm
kahangi wrote: Sun May 02, 2021 9:46 am My child just committed to Stanford yesterday. It was a tough choice over Harvard but we thought for computer science, it was the right choice.

Stanford is on the other side of the country for us and it’s hard to see your child go so far away.
Congrats! Sincere!

But I found this bit hilarious and think we need a phrase to come after "1st world problems" :-)
My child just committed to Stanford yesterday. It was a tough choice over Harvard but we thought for computer science, it was the right choice.
The agony of trying to choose between Harvard and Stanford :-)
It's a moment to savor.
This is on a lower tier, but my son got accepted to UC Berkeley and UCLA. It was quite gratifying to visit UCLA and hear the chancellor talk about why UCLA was a better choice than Berkeley. It's a once-in-a-lifetime experience for both the student and the parent.
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Re: What is your high school graduate going to be doing?

Post by MarkRoulo »

LilyFleur wrote: Sun May 02, 2021 1:31 pm
MarkRoulo wrote: Sun May 02, 2021 12:56 pm
kahangi wrote: Sun May 02, 2021 9:46 am My child just committed to Stanford yesterday. It was a tough choice over Harvard but we thought for computer science, it was the right choice.

Stanford is on the other side of the country for us and it’s hard to see your child go so far away.
Congrats! Sincere!

But I found this bit hilarious and think we need a phrase to come after "1st world problems" :-)
My child just committed to Stanford yesterday. It was a tough choice over Harvard but we thought for computer science, it was the right choice.
The agony of trying to choose between Harvard and Stanford :-)
It's a moment to savor.
This is on a lower tier, but my son got accepted to UC Berkeley and UCLA. It was quite gratifying to visit UCLA and hear the chancellor talk about why UCLA was a better choice than Berkeley. It's a once-in-a-lifetime experience for both the student and the parent.
A co-worker's daughter got accepted into computer science at UC San Diego and UC Santa Barbara a number of years ago. I know because he came to me to get the "pitch" for UCSB. UCSD is about a mile away from the beach. UCSB is *on* the beach. Both had highly rated CS programs. Which one? Which one?

:-)
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TomatoTomahto
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Re: What is your high school graduate going to be doing?

Post by TomatoTomahto »

MarkRoulo wrote: Sun May 02, 2021 1:06 pm Other folks are more willing to take risks and do thing such as:
Taking year off when early to (a) sail around the world, or (b) bum around youth hostels in Europe, or
Get a theatre degree, then figure out how to get a programming job
Start off as a dual business/music major and then "bail out" to math ... and then get a PhD in math ... and then try to find a programming job
Move from China to the US for a Quantum Chemistry PhD, then look for a non-chemistry job ...
I've worked with folks who have done all of these things (not the same person, though ...). They often seem to have more interesting lives than the folks who just think career-and-career-and-career.
For some of us, this affirms our choices about not imposing the supposed “skin in the game” of student loans if they are not necessary for the family’s finances. Lots of freedom comes from knowing that your family has your back and that, at worst, you’ll have to live in the (figurative) basement. I don’t remember who said it, but if you don’t fail every so often, you’re not stretching yourself enough.

It has worked well for our kids.
I get the FI part but not the RE part of FIRE.
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LilyFleur
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Re: What is your high school graduate going to be doing?

Post by LilyFleur »

TomatoTomahto wrote: Sun May 02, 2021 1:42 pm
MarkRoulo wrote: Sun May 02, 2021 1:06 pm Other folks are more willing to take risks and do thing such as:
Taking year off when early to (a) sail around the world, or (b) bum around youth hostels in Europe, or
Get a theatre degree, then figure out how to get a programming job
Start off as a dual business/music major and then "bail out" to math ... and then get a PhD in math ... and then try to find a programming job
Move from China to the US for a Quantum Chemistry PhD, then look for a non-chemistry job ...
I've worked with folks who have done all of these things (not the same person, though ...). They often seem to have more interesting lives than the folks who just think career-and-career-and-career.
For some of us, this affirms our choices about not imposing the supposed “skin in the game” of student loans if they are not necessary for the family’s finances. Lots of freedom comes from knowing that your family has your back and that, at worst, you’ll have to live in the (figurative) basement. I don’t remember who said it, but if you don’t fail every so often, you’re not stretching yourself enough.

It has worked well for our kids.
This is why I helped both of my children on their costs for study abroad. I'm divorced and not wealthy, and I live a modest lifestyle. I had never been to Europe until I was 57 years old.

I have talked to my children about each generation standing on the shoulders of the previous generation. I sacrificed to help both of them, and my son once told me that he would start paying me back after he graduated from college. I said that wouldn't be necessary, and that the way I wanted him to pay me back was by paying it forward by helping his own children someday, or if he did not have his own children, to find nieces or nephews or someone else's children to help.

I also have a spare bedroom if they need to come back home.

I can't think of a better place to invest than in my own children.
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TomatoTomahto
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Re: What is your high school graduate going to be doing?

Post by TomatoTomahto »

LilyFleur wrote: Sun May 02, 2021 1:55 pm I can't think of a better place to invest than in my own children.
And especially before we die :beer

You have raised them well. Props.
I get the FI part but not the RE part of FIRE.
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Re: What is your high school graduate going to be doing?

Post by Luckywon »

LilyFleur wrote: Sun May 02, 2021 1:55 pm This is why I helped both of my children on their costs for study abroad. I'm divorced and not wealthy, and I live a modest lifestyle. I had never been to Europe until I was 57 years old.

I have talked to my children about each generation standing on the shoulders of the previous generation. I sacrificed to help both of them, and my son once told me that he would start paying me back after he graduated from college. I said that wouldn't be necessary, and that the way I wanted him to pay me back was by paying it forward by helping his own children someday, or if he did not have his own children, to find nieces or nephews or someone else's children to help.

I also have a spare bedroom if they need to come back home.

I can't think of a better place to invest than in my own children.
Such a nice post to read, drives home that having the ability to help those you love is for many the best thing money can do.
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LilyFleur
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Re: What is your high school graduate going to be doing?

Post by LilyFleur »

TomatoTomahto wrote: Sun May 02, 2021 2:00 pm
LilyFleur wrote: Sun May 02, 2021 1:55 pm I can't think of a better place to invest than in my own children.
And especially before we die :beer

You have raised them well. Props.
Thank you.
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LilyFleur
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Re: What is your high school graduate going to be doing?

Post by LilyFleur »

Luckywon wrote: Sun May 02, 2021 2:02 pm
LilyFleur wrote: Sun May 02, 2021 1:55 pm This is why I helped both of my children on their costs for study abroad. I'm divorced and not wealthy, and I live a modest lifestyle. I had never been to Europe until I was 57 years old.

I have talked to my children about each generation standing on the shoulders of the previous generation. I sacrificed to help both of them, and my son once told me that he would start paying me back after he graduated from college. I said that wouldn't be necessary, and that the way I wanted him to pay me back was by paying it forward by helping his own children someday, or if he did not have his own children, to find nieces or nephews or someone else's children to help.

I also have a spare bedroom if they need to come back home.

I can't think of a better place to invest than in my own children.
Such a nice post to read, drives home that having the ability to help those you love is for many the best thing money can do.
Thanks, Luckywon :)
30west
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Re: What is your high school graduate going to be doing?

Post by 30west »

As a bogglehead i have a very difficult time doing the cost/benefit analysis of one school over amother. DD is graduating HS as valedictorian and got 7 offers out of 7 applications. Price/year varied from 20k/year to 70k/year. Assume a M.Arch is in her future, i was comparing total cost ranging from 175k to 400k+.

Ultimately we chose a lower priced option. I couldn't pay a quarter on a million dollars for something as fuzzy as good connections. Mind you, she chose not to apply to the ivy league schools for undergrad (despite my urging, good for her) but may for grad school. I might have been willing to pay more for a top top school, but didnt need to consider that option.

TL:DR why did you decide to pay more for GT over Rutgers, which iknow to be excellent STEM school?
retired recently
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Re: What is your high school graduate going to be doing?

Post by retired recently »

My son was applied to quite a few schools and had hoped to be accepted into MIT, but this year was tougher than the typical extremely tough years and he was denied. Thankfully he had quite a few good options and ultimately narrowed it down to GT, UPenn, Rice, and Brown. When he applied he planned to major in Physics; he also loves math and CS and felt like Physics would ensure he got all 3.

We told him it was his choice and told him to not consider costs initially but to think of the differences and determine if he felt he would actively take advantage of whatever Uni A had over Uni B and if he felt he would do that then it was fine. He talked to quite a few folks about the schools and ultimately said to him, GT was better than his other choices plus it was the least expensive.

He has changed his major to CS and hopes to double major in Math.
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kleiner
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Re: What is your high school graduate going to be doing?

Post by kleiner »

retired recently wrote: Sun May 02, 2021 3:12 pm We told him it was his choice and told him to not consider costs initially but to think of the differences and determine if he felt he would actively take advantage of whatever Uni A had over Uni B and if he felt he would do that then it was fine. He talked to quite a few folks about the schools and ultimately said to him, GT was better than his other choices plus it was the least expensive.

He has changed his major to CS and hopes to double major in Math.
Thats an interesting coincidence - my daughter will also be attending Georgia tech and majoring in math :happy
srt7
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Re: What is your high school graduate going to be doing?

Post by srt7 »

LilyFleur wrote: Sun May 02, 2021 1:55 pm
This is why I helped both of my children on their costs for study abroad. I'm divorced and not wealthy, and I live a modest lifestyle. I had never been to Europe until I was 57 years old.

I have talked to my children about each generation standing on the shoulders of the previous generation. I sacrificed to help both of them, and my son once told me that he would start paying me back after he graduated from college. I said that wouldn't be necessary, and that the way I wanted him to pay me back was by paying it forward by helping his own children someday, or if he did not have his own children, to find nieces or nephews or someone else's children to help.

I also have a spare bedroom if they need to come back home.

I can't think of a better place to invest than in my own children.
HUGE props to you!! That last line in your post summarizes everything for me.
Flashes1
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Re: What is your high school graduate going to be doing?

Post by Flashes1 »

A relative recently graduated from Tech with a CS degree. He's working for a government agency but he's not he's not allowed to say which one. Based where he's living in VA, I kind of figured out which one.
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obafgkm
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Re: What is your high school graduate going to be doing?

Post by obafgkm »

KlangFool wrote: Sat May 01, 2021 9:16 am B) And, it was proven that he could not graduate with his physic degree anyhow. He could not handle the higher level physic classes. If I let him major in Physic only, he would not be able to get back to Mechanical Engineering.
KlangFool wrote: Sun May 02, 2021 9:54 am You do not need a degree to work at Starbuck.
KlangFool,
Physics. Starbucks.
kahangi
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Re: What is your high school graduate going to be doing?

Post by kahangi »

Dyloot wrote: Sun May 02, 2021 1:18 pm
MarkRoulo wrote: Sun May 02, 2021 12:56 pm
kahangi wrote: Sun May 02, 2021 9:46 am My child just committed to Stanford yesterday. It was a tough choice over Harvard but we thought for computer science, it was the right choice.

Stanford is on the other side of the country for us and it’s hard to see your child go so far away.
Congrats! Sincere!

But I found this bit hilarious and think we need a phrase to come after "1st world problems" :-)
My child just committed to Stanford yesterday. It was a tough choice over Harvard but we thought for computer science, it was the right choice.
The agony of trying to choose between Harvard and Stanford :-)
Right! But, still, what a decision to make. You've been offered two amazing opportunities, and whichever you decline will likely be gone forever. The question may always be, what would have happened if I had picked Harvard? Who would I have met? What would I have become?

As you say, first world problems. But mind-blowing ones at that for some of us. :D
Thank you all for the kind comments. The admissions were, to put it mildly, completed unexpected. This year was such an unpredictable year.
However, we are looking forward with no regrets - exited the facebook groups etc.

It took an hour of looking at the submit button before accepting. Some tears were shed. But the next day, when it came to clicking the Decline button, that only took 10 minutes (kid had to check one more time whether the stanford.edu email and SUNetId account was really working, that they were truly accepted).

I imagine it's no different for many families who face similar choices: UCB or UCLA, Tech or State.

My hair stylist still doesn't know what or where Stanford is. She definitely knows Harvard. But that's ok.
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Picasso
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Re: What is your high school graduate going to be doing?

Post by Picasso »

kahangi wrote: Sun May 02, 2021 9:46 am My child just committed to Stanford yesterday. It was a tough choice over Harvard but we thought for computer science, it was the right choice.

Stanford is on the other side of the country for us and it’s hard to see your child go so far away.
Are those accredited schools? 8-)
wandering_aimlessly
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Re: What is your high school graduate going to be doing?

Post by wandering_aimlessly »

Our younger daughter is also heading to GTech this fall (as an out of stater- we are in SC, but she was born in New Jersey). I think her major is technically electrical engineering but I expect that to change as she gets more exposure. Older sister is an engineering major up at WPI in Worcester MA. Empty nesting (and empty wallet) here we come. :D
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Re: What is your high school graduate going to be doing?

Post by MDfan »

We paid 100% for our 3 kids' college (one in-state public, two out of state public). One majored in Communications, one in Economics, and one in Marketing/Finance. The first 2 did well and have good jobs. The 3rd will graduate next Spring. All 3 worked during college for spending money (although we helped out when needed). I never worried about the majors because I was confident all 3 would/will find their way.
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Re: What is your high school graduate going to be doing?

Post by MikeMak27 »

If your children are attending an out of state school, they should immediately begin working on establishing residence in the schools state. Get a drivers license, sign a lease if necessary under their name (you can be guaranty if need be), and get some sort of w-2 gainful employment. This will allow them to qualify for in state tuition the following year.
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Re: What is your high school graduate going to be doing?

Post by Jack FFR1846 »

I have worked with many physics majors. Back in the mid 80's my first supervisor/engineer had a BS in Physics from Harvard and then an MBA from somewhere. He continued working as an engineer and was very thorough but didn't know the meaning of the word "deadline".

I've also worked with many, many PhD physics majors. All adapted to work as engineers in all areas, from hard core hardware design to full DSP support for the chip maker.

My son was very interested in gaining a physics PhD during his first year of college. He spoke extensively with his professor, who was an MIT PhD grad and professor at his college part time and also full time at MIT. His professor urged him NOT to pursue a physics PhD as colleges now hire professors as ajunct for a semester for $75 per class. It's real tough to make a living doing this, thus Klang Fool's suggestion of Starbucks might not be a PhD's primary profession, but it will likely fill in for the lack of enough income or stability teaching college classes.

Noting the previous post: each college has their own criteria for "in state" and it is likely much more stringent than the state uses to determine residency. They're not stupid and have been doing this for a long time. Simply moving to the state the summer before Freshman year isn't going to do it with many colleges. A co-worker had a brother in the state his daughter was going to go to college. He was ready to sign over guardianship when he found that the college required the student/parent/guardian to live in state before the student turned 17. So unless you're willing to move to qualify for in-state in a few years, it may not be practical.
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OnceARunner
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Re: What is your high school graduate going to be doing?

Post by OnceARunner »

MikeMak27 wrote: Mon May 03, 2021 6:42 am If your children are attending an out of state school, they should immediately begin working on establishing residence in the schools state. Get a drivers license, sign a lease if necessary under their name (you can be guaranty if need be), and get some sort of w-2 gainful employment. This will allow them to qualify for in state tuition the following year.
I'm not sure about your area but that definitively does not work anymore in the state's I am familiar with.

So many people were doing this that there is a new rule about moving to a state "for the purposes of an education" even if you do all of those things, you continue to pay out of state tuition. The only way around it currently, is to take one complete year off after graduating high school and working full-time and then enrolling a year later. You can take classes part-time, but if you are enrolled anywhere full-time (12 hours), you are considered in that state primarily for an education and will not be able to establish residency for tuition purposes.
ModifiedDuration
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Re: What is your high school graduate going to be doing?

Post by ModifiedDuration »

MikeMak27 wrote: Mon May 03, 2021 6:42 am If your children are attending an out of state school, they should immediately begin working on establishing residence in the schools state. Get a drivers license, sign a lease if necessary under their name (you can be guaranty if need be), and get some sort of w-2 gainful employment. This will allow them to qualify for in state tuition the following year.
That depends on the school and state. I know that all the state schools my daughter was looking at when applying to college made it extremely difficult for out-of-state students to eventually qualify for in-state tuition.

Then, while attending the University of Michigan, she did not know any out-of-state students who were able to transition to in-state tuition. The University’s requirements for in-state tuition were specifically designed so that out-of-state students could not qualify for in-state tuition while attending the school.

Here are some of the factors the University states it will take into consideration when making their determination on an application for in-state tuition:

You lived or worked outside the State of Michigan at any time within the last three years;

You are 24 years of age or younger and a parent lives outside the State of Michigan;

You are 24 years of age or younger and attended or graduated from a high school outside the state of Michigan;

You attended or graduated from an out-of-state high school and have been involved in educational pursuits for the majority of time since high school graduation;

You attended any University of Michigan campus (Ann Arbor, Dearborn, or Flint) as a nonresident.
Elysium
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Re: What is your high school graduate going to be doing?

Post by Elysium »

My son is heading to college as well this fall. He selected CS as his major, at a Univ. that is just about inside the Top 50. While attending there, he does have the option to take cross courses at a Top 10 school, for no additional cost, through a unique opportunity (up to 3 full semesters). While he applied to a few Top 20 schools and was denied, we believe this is a right fit school for him, and the option to take courses at a top CS school across the street with no pressure on graduation requirements, makes this an ideal blend for his needs. We will be paying OOS tuition, while he had the opportunity to attend an in-state school for half the cost, he didn't select that school, because of the overall college experience expectations.

I should note that he is frugal with spending and already have a buy & hold investment account. I did offer him the money instead to invest in his account, and take the lower tuition option, while it was tempting, he still selected this school because overall experience was more important to him at this stage. I am fine with paying the cost, and I do not think of value of degree in terms of price. Personally, I spent nearly zero cost for mine, but the returns have been several folds. Although I wish my parents could spent more and give me better college experience, you never know how the intangibles affect life unless you took the alternative path. Since I can afford what my parents couldn't, I have chosen to give my son what my parents couldn't give. Note: I just caught the post that said best investment is on our children, and in my case this was the decider, if I can afford it why not.
cableguy
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Re: What is your high school graduate going to be doing?

Post by cableguy »

My HS Senior is going off to large public university to study computer science. His older brother finishing his junior year at a private college, majoring in accounting and finance. My youngest is still in HS. As much as they are alike...they are also so different! My HS senior is like "no way I'm going to the same school as my older brother.....no way I'd study business...….". I'm just happy these kids might be getting back some type of normal college experience as COVID situation improves .
finite_difference
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Re: What is your high school graduate going to be doing?

Post by finite_difference »

KlangFool wrote: Sat May 01, 2021 9:00 am
kleiner wrote: Sat May 01, 2021 8:52 am
My daughter is off to Georgia tech this fall and will be majoring in math or physics.
kleiner,

I told my son that I am not paying for a degree in physics. He had no idea what he was going with that degree. He double majored in Mechanical Engineering plus Physics. He dropped his Physic major a year after that. He graduated and found a job two years ago.

My daughter majored in Arts. I supported her decision. She know what to do with her degree. She interned while she was in high school. She found her job before she graduated last year.

KlangFool
I don’t think physics or math majors have issues finding jobs. Although you may need to complete graduate school.
The most precious gift we can offer anyone is our attention. - Thich Nhat Hanh
KlangFool
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Re: What is your high school graduate going to be doing?

Post by KlangFool »

finite_difference wrote: Mon May 03, 2021 10:28 am
KlangFool wrote: Sat May 01, 2021 9:00 am
kleiner wrote: Sat May 01, 2021 8:52 am
My daughter is off to Georgia tech this fall and will be majoring in math or physics.
kleiner,

I told my son that I am not paying for a degree in physics. He had no idea what he was going with that degree. He double majored in Mechanical Engineering plus Physics. He dropped his Physic major a year after that. He graduated and found a job two years ago.

My daughter majored in Arts. I supported her decision. She know what to do with her degree. She interned while she was in high school. She found her job before she graduated last year.

KlangFool
I don’t think physics or math majors have issues finding jobs. Although you may need to complete graduate school.
finite_difference,

And, does OP know this? Does OP's daughter knows this? In general, you would have a very hard time finding a job with only the undergraduate degree. Hence, the person and their parent need to know that they may be committed to a graduate degree too. And, if OP and his daughter does not know this, why is she getting a math or physics undergraduate degree?

Please note that for many colleges, if you do not go for CS and/or Engineering as your major, you may not be able to transfer into those majors later. OP's daughter should choose double majors in math/physics and cs/engineering. She could drop cs/engineering later if she do not think it is the right choice for her. But, by not enrolling into cs/engineering, she had closed off that option.

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sport
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Re: What is your high school graduate going to be doing?

Post by sport »

finite_difference wrote: Mon May 03, 2021 10:28 am I don’t think physics or math majors have issues finding jobs. Although you may need to complete graduate school.
Well, that may be true for some people. However, I can assure you it is not generally true. I have both a bachelors and masters degrees in Physics. When I needed to change jobs, it was not easy to find one. I even had two periods of extended unemployment. So, you can think what you want, but that does not make it so. Up thread, I mentioned my friend with a PhD in Physics who worked as a fund raiser for non-profits.
finite_difference
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Re: What is your high school graduate going to be doing?

Post by finite_difference »

sport wrote: Mon May 03, 2021 11:05 am
finite_difference wrote: Mon May 03, 2021 10:28 am I don’t think physics or math majors have issues finding jobs. Although you may need to complete graduate school.
Well, that may be true for some people. However, I can assure you it is not generally true. I have both a bachelors and masters degrees in Physics. When I needed to change jobs, it was not easy to find one. I even had two periods of extended unemployment. So, you can think what you want, but that does not make it so. Up thread, I mentioned my friend with a PhD in Physics who worked as a fund raiser for non-profits.
In my opinion as a physics major you need to be able to work with either hardware (optical/mechanical/electrical/quantum engineering) or software (programming) to solve problems. If you have either skillset then you should be pretty bullet proof assuming you’re flexible about location and field (industry/academia/government).

As a math major you also need to be able to work with software.

Yes it’s possible to be a pure physics/math theoretician but that’s a small sliver of the job market and requires being extraordinarily gifted.
The most precious gift we can offer anyone is our attention. - Thich Nhat Hanh
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