Long time retirees: any regrets?

Questions on how we spend our money and our time - consumer goods and services, home and vehicle, leisure and recreational activities
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tennisplyr
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Long time retirees: any regrets?

Post by tennisplyr »

I'm getting close to being retired 10 years...how time has flown! Was thinking do I wish I'd done anything differently so far. For the most part, retirement has been great, lots of satisfying experiences, reasonably good health, finances are fine. With Covid I'm realizing maybe I could have done a little more traveling but no big deal. And you?
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Re: Long time retirees: any regrets?

Post by carolinaman »

10 years for me too. I enjoyed my work and sometimes miss it. Then I think of all the organization politics, pressure, long hours and BS I had to deal with and I am very thankful to be retired. I retired at age 66. I wish I had retired a few years earlier. I planned to play a lot of golf. I played some but injuries and old age made it more difficult. I was able to travel but DW was not able to travel as much after retirement. Retiring at age 60 would have worked better. I was worried about having enough at age 60 to retire. Now I know I would have been fine. We would just have had a smaller inheritance for our kids.

But no real complaints. I am very thankful for things the way they are. We have been blessed.
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Cyclesafe
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Re: Long time retirees: any regrets?

Post by Cyclesafe »

I've been retired since 2000. My time has been spent getting another degree, keeping fit by riding my bike (quite a lot), and traveling extensively. I have taken up and discarded numerous hobbies.

With Covid, I have been busy consolidating my experiences and planning for when I can travel once more.

Perspective has informed me that my working years were important only to the extent that they enabled me to build my pile. The only real memories I still have are those formed while not actually at work. Although forced into retirement, I have been so very happy with its result.
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shell921
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Re: Long time retirees: any regrets?

Post by shell921 »

I retired in 2003 at age 55. I had taught elem school for almost 30 years. My late husband was 9 years older and he had retired at age 55 so I wanted us to be able to enjoy some retirement time together and we did! We had 9 years together-both of us retired- before he died unexpectedly in 2014. We took some great trips and I have no regrets. I have wonderful memories of my students and co-teachers but I'm glad I retired when I did.
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Blues
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Re: Long time retirees: any regrets?

Post by Blues »

Retired going on 17 years, at age 51. Not a single regret about pulling the plug.
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Sheepdog
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Re: Long time retirees: any regrets?

Post by Sheepdog »

Regret retiring or having been retired for a long time? Hell no on either one, I don't regret retiring and I sure as hell don't regret having been retired for a long time (22 years so far). It wasn't that I planned well, it was that I was able to wing it well enough. Sure I miss being the boss at the factory as it was rewarding psychologically (more than economically). I had enough money to live on well (and it wasn't near a mill when retirement started, but it is now amazingly.). We traveled, took care of everything that we needed and just plain enjoyed every thing.
The trick was being comfortable with my life and with my family's well being.

I can say this though , I am happy that I was able to retire on my terms rather than being forced to retire. A year after I retired from my factory, one of three in the company, it was closed; and a year and a half later, the entire company was sold and all of the factories were gone. Sad for me still. Thankfully I didn't have to go thru that and watch every thing slip away and having to see my staff being forced to the street.

Regret? Uh uh.
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JoeRetire
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Re: Long time retirees: any regrets?

Post by JoeRetire »

tennisplyr wrote: Thu Oct 29, 2020 7:30 am I'm getting close to being retired 10 years...how time has flown! Was thinking do I wish I'd done anything differently so far. For the most part, retirement has been great, lots of satisfying experiences, reasonably good health, finances are fine. With Covid I'm realizing maybe I could have done a little more traveling but no big deal. And you?
I've only been retired for a little over 5 years. It's been great so far. I have no regrets. I was lucky enough financially to be able to retire at 60.

I've gotten to do lots of things I really enjoy. I spent a year working 2 days per week as a consultant - only the best parts of my former career with none of the headaches. I picked up a few new hobbies that have been great and have helped to keep me active and healthy. I was able to help provide care for the grandchildren. And I also had time to deal with my cancer treatments, and to be there as both parents declined and eventually passed away.

Selfishly, I do wish my wife had retired a few years earlier, rather than waiting until last year. But I know it made her happy and was the right decision for her. She is working 2 days per week now and really enjoys it. I'm happy when she is happy.

I'm not one to ever have regrets. I've always felt that if you don't like your situation - change it. I entered retirement knowing that if I didn't like it I could always find some job to do. I also entered retirement knowing that I was financially secure, and no longer needed an income.

Life was really good before retirement. It's been really good after retirement. It will be really good going forward.
Last edited by JoeRetire on Thu Oct 29, 2020 9:42 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Long time retirees: any regrets?

Post by Beehave »

"Retired" (forced out of corporate life) about ten years ago. As with others above, I was worried about finances because of being turned out earlier than planned, but it ends up that wasn't a problem at all.

I work part-time because I want to and it keeps me in contact with younger people and intellectually stimulated - even through the pandemic. These things are important to me, and I fully understand and respect that they are not necessarily important to everyone. I still enjoy working (past the "normal" retirement age) and it is important to me.

The benefits of part-time work? I pick my days and hours. I exercise a lot every morning, eat well (and healthy), have lots of free days, and am not stressed out by my work. I teach and feel I can and do transfer useful skills to my students. I also do other volunteer work, and in all cases I am careful to do what I want in the amount and way that I want to - - which is the joy of being retired.
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Re: Long time retirees: any regrets?

Post by midareff »

tennisplyr wrote: Thu Oct 29, 2020 7:30 am I'm getting close to being retired 10 years...how time has flown! Was thinking do I wish I'd done anything differently so far. For the most part, retirement has been great, lots of satisfying experiences, reasonably good health, finances are fine. With Covid I'm realizing maybe I could have done a little more traveling but no big deal. And you?
Retired since April 2012, fo call it 8.5 years. Time has just gone by in a blurrrrr... faster and faster. Finances are fine, more than fine actually and health not so good but most issues are treatable and I'm vertical, over top soil and exercise walking 4 miles a day so I'm highly ambulatory. Covid caused us to cancel 4 or 5 cruise trips although I just re-booked them with the first trip starting December 2021 and the last for May of 2023. No regrets that I could have done anything differently about except retire a year earlier but that's based on an unknowable rear view vision.
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Re: Long time retirees: any regrets?

Post by Sandtrap »

Unplanned "Retired" 2012 due to a variety of conditions beyond my control. Planned to never "retire" (what's that).
So, going on 8 years, how time flies!
It's been an adjustment but ultimately better for my health, sanity, and DW is happy as a free range mountain puma.
We're busier than when we were "working" and in a better place and lifestyle with nothing but appreciation and thankfulness.

Financials. . . . not a concern given frugality and sound "boglehead financial basics".
Actionably: long term focus on financials and that 25+ XX factor is important, but that comprehensive approach has to include projecting other non quantifiable things before, approaching, and through retirement, such as lifestyle, health, etc.

Regrets? (what's that?)
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praxis
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Re: Long time retirees: any regrets?

Post by praxis »

I loved my 30 year career and was shocked when reorganization during a merger "retired" me. After a dizzy 6 months I decided to accept it and stopped looking for another job. It's been 15 years and here's two observations: 1) covid has stopped our travel plans. We would have traveled even more if we had known we would have to stop, maybe forever. 2) the company I worked for didn't miss me once I'd gone. I thought I was important to their success. It was like the old saying that my leaving was like taking your finger out of a pail of water. Once it's out, you can't tell it had been there. Maybe I should have left earlier.
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Re: Long time retirees: any regrets?

Post by MDfan »

carolinaman wrote: Thu Oct 29, 2020 8:01 am 10 years for me too. I enjoyed my work and sometimes miss it. Then I think of all the organization politics, pressure, long hours and BS I had to deal with and I am very thankful to be retired. I retired at age 66. I wish I had retired a few years earlier. I planned to play a lot of golf. I played some but injuries and old age made it more difficult. I was able to travel but DW was not able to travel as much after retirement. Retiring at age 60 would have worked better. I was worried about having enough at age 60 to retire. Now I know I would have been fine. We would just have had a smaller inheritance for our kids.

But no real complaints. I am very thankful for things the way they are. We have been blessed.
I am 59 and am thinking along the same lines as what you stated in your post. My original plan was to go to age 62 to qualify for the higher FERS pension. Given everything that's happened this year, I now plan to fully retire at 60 next October and take a little less. I'd much rather have the extra time.
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Re: Long time retirees: any regrets?

Post by VictoriaF »

I was preparing for retirement for several years and did it on my terms in 2014. It was one of my best decisions.

Some posters up-thread retired under unplanned adverse circumstances and still enjoy it. This should send a message to those in the One More Year (OMY) decision loop to retire sooner rather than later. The opportunity cost of time is very high but commonly neglected.

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Re: Long time retirees: any regrets?

Post by J295 »

Always planned to retire early, and prepared in earnest five years before retiring in 2013 at age 53 (technically first moving from partnership to of counsel, then eventually for retirement). Honestly, the great recession in 2008- 09 took some wind out of our sales due to 100% stock portfolio. Having cancer shortly before my transition just solidified the decision.

It’s not for everybody, but what is? It has been wonderful in unimaginable ways for me and my family. No regrets.
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Re: Long time retirees: any regrets?

Post by scrabbler1 »

Two days from now will be 12 years in retirement. I retired at 45 after working full-time for 16 years and part-time for 7 more years. I am so glad to be out of the daily rat race, especially the long, awful commute I had over those 23 years.
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Re: Long time retirees: any regrets?

Post by protagonist »

This was asked in the past...this thread has 327 responses. viewtopic.php?f=11&t=237312

A quick scan of responses makes me think that close to 9 out of 10 responders were happy with retirement.

And let's face it, one out of ten people would probably not be happy with anything.

Statistically that comes close to what I have read in a few studies that ask the same question, and that contentment seems to transcend socioeconomic status.
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Re: Long time retirees: any regrets?

Post by heyyou »

Retired 15 years ago yesterday, into the best years of my life, at age 55 in 2005.
Now I treasure those years of frequent backpacking trips and remote hiking trail maintenance, that I can just recently, no longer do. I am now grateful for the energy then to have built the concrete raised beds for my wife's garden at our new retirement home. She could sit at chair height on the 6" wide walls to reach into the middle of the 3' wide beds to tend her plants.

My regret is not spending even more time traveling with my wife who was a decade younger, but she died last year just before her 60th birthday. It seemed important to conserve retirement assets for her expected longevity, since we were almost new, but irreversible retirees, when the 2008 Crash occurred.

Annually, we went to the Big Island of Hawaii for her to see the exotic plants and for me to see the flowing lava, quite different from our high desert home in the Southwest. Now I wish we had gone more often, or stayed longer on each trip since we were often busy with separate activities when we were home.
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Re: Long time retirees: any regrets?

Post by Munir »

Retired 23 years ago at age 60. No regrets at all. If you can afford it, I recommend retiring while mind and body are both still healthy.
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Re: Long time retirees: any regrets?

Post by friar1610 »

Retired at 58 - now 75. No regrets about retiring when I did. Only mild regret looking back is that I didn’t at least give teaching a try for a few years after retiring from my military career but before retiring for good. I’ve always thought I would have liked it but - who knows? - I might not have and now I’ll never know.
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Re: Long time retirees: any regrets?

Post by andypanda »

I retired in August, 2012. I woke up the next morning smiling.

Regrets? Not doing it earlier.
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Re: Long time retirees: any regrets?

Post by snackdog »

Retired last month. Still formally on payroll one more day. No regrets so far, other than probably should have done it five years ago.
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Re: Long time retirees: any regrets?

Post by minimalistmarc »

heyyou wrote: Thu Oct 29, 2020 2:59 pm Retired 15 years ago yesterday, into the best years of my life, at age 55 in 2005.
Now I treasure those years of frequent backpacking trips and remote hiking trail maintenance, that I can just recently, no longer do. I am now grateful for the energy then to have built the concrete raised beds for my wife's garden at our new retirement home. She could sit at chair height on the 6" wide walls to reach into the middle of the 3' wide beds to tend her plants.

My regret is not spending even more time traveling with my wife who was a decade younger, but she died last year just before her 60th birthday. It seemed important to conserve retirement assets for her expected longevity, since we were almost new, but irreversible retirees, when the 2008 Crash occurred.

Annually, we went to the Big Island of Hawaii for her to see the exotic plants and for me to see the flowing lava, quite different from our high desert home in the Southwest. Now I wish we had gone more often, or stayed longer on each trip since we were often busy with separate activities when we were home.
Sorry for your loss. You clearly both loved each other very much.
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Re: Long time retirees: any regrets?

Post by fishandgolf »

Retired almost 12 years ago at age 55. Although, one time I did have the urge to find a part-time job.......it was the worst 30 seconds of my life! :sharebeer
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Re: Long time retirees: any regrets?

Post by Nestegg_User »

protagonist wrote: Thu Oct 29, 2020 1:54 pm This was asked in the past...this thread has 327 responses. viewtopic.php?f=11&t=237312

A quick scan of responses makes me think that close to 9 out of 10 responders were happy with retirement.

And let's face it, one out of ten people would probably not be happy with anything.

Statistically that comes close to what I have read in a few studies that ask the same question, and that contentment seems to transcend socioeconomic status.

Protagonist

I think that another aspect of happiness for retirement is that those who were able to retire on their terms (not forced out or had location close/etc) generally were more satisfied with their retirement. I know those that had location closed that despite being nominally well off were unsatisfied in retirement. Perhaps it's because they tied themselves too much to their position, especially if they were management, and became "invisible" to the rest of the working world.
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Re: Long time retirees: any regrets?

Post by protagonist »

Nestegg_User wrote: Thu Oct 29, 2020 5:00 pm
protagonist wrote: Thu Oct 29, 2020 1:54 pm This was asked in the past...this thread has 327 responses. viewtopic.php?f=11&t=237312

A quick scan of responses makes me think that close to 9 out of 10 responders were happy with retirement.

And let's face it, one out of ten people would probably not be happy with anything.

Statistically that comes close to what I have read in a few studies that ask the same question, and that contentment seems to transcend socioeconomic status.

Protagonist

I think that another aspect of happiness for retirement is that those who were able to retire on their terms (not forced out or had location close/etc) generally were more satisfied with their retirement.
Perhaps.
In my case it was something in-between.
At age 55 (2008 just before the crash) I had the ideal job, working on my own terms 2-3 days/week on a substantial full time income with great benefits. I probably would still be working today if status quo was maintained. But we got a new chairman who restructured things, and I would have had to accept a lot of uncomfortable changes if I kept working (including moving) , so I left.
That said, as happy and satisfied as I was with my job before leaving, I am way more happy being retired, with less money but with the freedom to do whatever I want whenever I want. And I have had way more time and energy to put into the people and things I love, and those efforts have paid me back immeasurably. As upset as I was to leave my "almost perfect" job at the time, it was the best thing that could have happened to me. I had a lot of responsibility, and when I left my stress level dropped 90%. I was happy with my work but I am way happier now, and would never go back to working, even under the old conditions with double or triple the salary.
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Re: Long time retirees: any regrets?

Post by squirm »

I want to retire when my wife is close to retiring. I want her home with me.
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Re: Long time retirees: any regrets?

Post by MathIsMyWayr »

protagonist wrote: Thu Oct 29, 2020 5:27 pm I was happy with my work but I am way happier now, and would never go back to working, even under the old conditions with double or triple the salary.
There are extremely few who are capable and lucky enough to find a career in which they do not mind working without being paid. :(
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Re: Long time retirees: any regrets?

Post by tennisplyr »

VictoriaF wrote: Thu Oct 29, 2020 12:12 pm I was preparing for retirement for several years and did it on my terms in 2014. It was one of my best decisions.

Some posters up-thread retired under unplanned adverse circumstances and still enjoy it. This should send a message to those in the One More Year (OMY) decision loop to retire sooner rather than later. The opportunity cost of time is very high but commonly neglected.

Victoria

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Re: Long time retirees: any regrets?

Post by jabberwockOG »

5.5 years and counting for me since I stopped working for money (because based on projections of expenses we did not need any more money). No regrets except I wish I had retired at 55 instead of 60. It's been really fun having 100% control of what I plan to do each day. It is still a cause for celebration. Each new day is a gift. I am mindful that this freedom to choose what I will do with my day, my week, my month is precious and transitory.
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Re: Long time retirees: any regrets?

Post by flyingaway »

squirm wrote: Thu Oct 29, 2020 6:11 pm I want to retire when my wife is close to retiring. I want her home with me.
What do you plan to do at home?
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Re: Long time retirees: any regrets?

Post by ponyboy »

Why would anyone think that someone would regret retiring? Why would anyone regret being able to do whatever they wanted, whenever they wanted?
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Re: Long time retirees: any regrets?

Post by flaccidsteele »

praxis wrote: Thu Oct 29, 2020 12:03 pm I thought I was important to their success. It was like the old saying that my leaving was like taking your finger out of a pail of water. Once it's out, you can't tell it had been there. Maybe I should have left earlier.
You can be forgiven for believing this

Many do

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Re: Long time retirees: any regrets?

Post by BolderBoy »

midareff wrote: Thu Oct 29, 2020 9:56 amTime has just gone by in a blurrrrr... faster and faster.
This is what I've noticed the most - how time seems to fly by. Retired 9 years and don't miss the work anymore (healthcare). Don't like being on the other side, however. We're not suppose to get the medical ills our patients got, right?
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Re: Long time retirees: any regrets?

Post by VictoriaF »

BolderBoy wrote: Fri Oct 30, 2020 9:37 am
midareff wrote: Thu Oct 29, 2020 9:56 amTime has just gone by in a blurrrrr... faster and faster.
This is what I've noticed the most - how time seems to fly by. Retired 9 years and don't miss the work anymore (healthcare). Don't like being on the other side, however. We're not suppose to get the medical ills our patients got, right?
To slow down time:
- Make plans and contemplate them before and after they materialize.
- Keep a journal of your daily activities. It could be a simple 3-to-5 item bullet list.
- Seek new experiences and new people.

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Re: Long time retirees: any regrets?

Post by Wricha »

Been retire about 7 years at 59. If I had a regret it was not retiring sooner as I did the one more year deal a few times. Never thought I had enough to retire even though models said I was fine. Regrets in retirement none even with Covid none.
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Re: Long time retirees: any regrets?

Post by Mr.BB »

ponyboy wrote: Fri Oct 30, 2020 8:18 am Why would anyone think that someone would regret retiring? Why would anyone regret being able to do whatever they wanted, whenever they wanted?
Because some people don't get their numbers right, and then later on realize they didn't have enough money to retire on and they don't have the retirement / lifestyle they always thought they would have.
Last edited by Mr.BB on Fri Oct 30, 2020 1:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Long time retirees: any regrets?

Post by Watty »

I have only been retired about five years.

About six months after I retired I went in to have lunch with some people I used to work with.

About ten minutes into the lunch and them talking about the office BS, and things that had gotten worse, I was sure glad that had retired and that I had no regrets that I had retired

Over the next few years I had lunch with them again a more times but that petered out and I still exchange emails with a few people a once or twice a times a year but I found that I really don't care what is going on with the company now.

Up until this year we have taken about one international trip a year, a big domestic trip, and some shorter road trips and we would have missed out on that if I had not retired when I did.

A couple of times I have thought about how I could have more money if I had worked another year but over the last five years I have gotten lucky with the sequence of returns risk so I am doing fine. If my investments were down a lot over the last five years then that might be more of concern than a real regret.
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Re: Long time retirees: any regrets?

Post by dowse »

Semi-retired in 2012, fully retired in 2016. No regrets. I think I know more people who only got a few years of retirement before checking out than I do those who retired too early and ended up regretting it. One neighbor mentioned to me that he thought he had retired too early (this was during the 2008/2009 financial crisis). He was probably in his mid-sixties at the time. He died a couple of years ago.
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Re: Long time retirees: any regrets?

Post by samsoes »

Retired during the summer of 2019 at 55 due to soul-crushing interstate commute and high-stress job. Was/am able to FIRE due to being single and no kids. I was happy as a clam until COVID hit, even on days where I did nothing. Did minimal traveling last year -- thought I'd wait until this past summer. :oops:

Since COVID hit, the days never seem to end. I am extra-cautious due to very elderly parents in the area.

Do I miss 3+ hours in the car every day and the damage it did to my lumbar spine? No way.
Am I still FI? Yes, I'll never spend it all.

But with the restrictions on travel and far fewer socially-distant gatherings of family and friends (even fewer as winter arrives), I am bored silly. I did quite a bit of volunteering over the years, but I can't risk catching/spreading COVID to my folks. I don't want to kill them both.

I wish my parents and I could hibernate for a year or two and emerge when a vaccine is readily available.
Last edited by samsoes on Fri Oct 30, 2020 3:28 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Long time retirees: any regrets?

Post by SciurusVulgaris »

Two close family members retired early in 2000, and 20 years in they regret it. The short story is that due to some poor allocation management (selling low) and money management (taking mortgages they couldn't afford), they are now skating along on social security only. It's hard for either of them to understand what they did wrong. Even pre-CV19 neither could work due to health conditions they've developed in the last 5 years.

They're good people. I feel for both of them.

My takeaway from watching this unfold is to be sure that I understand contracts, practice good financial management, and be prepared with a buffer. I may also keep a toe in the workforce when it's feasible.
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Re: Long time retirees: any regrets?

Post by GreenLawn »

ponyboy wrote: Fri Oct 30, 2020 8:18 am Why would anyone think that someone would regret retiring? Why would anyone regret being able to do whatever they wanted, whenever they wanted?
I've thought the same myself. When folks program themselves to work every month of every year of their adult life (with a week off here and there) until their 60's, I can understand how disorienting it'd be to stop and try something else.

It was the opposite for me, working is what felt forced and awkward. Retirement feels natural, and decades overdue :D
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Sheepdog
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Re: Long time retirees: any regrets?

Post by Sheepdog »

GreenLawn wrote: Fri Oct 30, 2020 6:52 pm
ponyboy wrote: Fri Oct 30, 2020 8:18 am Why would anyone think that someone would regret retiring? Why would anyone regret being able to do whatever they wanted, whenever they wanted?
I've thought the same myself. When folks program themselves to work every month of every year of their adult life (with a week off here and there) until their 60's, I can understand how disorienting it'd be to stop and try something else.

It was the opposite for me, working is what felt forced and awkward. Retirement feels natural, and decades overdue :D
You should understand that for some, their employment status is their identity in their community and when they lose it, they believe that they have lost that identity.
Time is the school in which we learn, time is the fire in which we burn.~ Delmore Schwartz
gips
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Re: Long time retirees: any regrets?

Post by gips »

I retired at 58 or so after selling our business. I thought about unretiring at 60 when my non-compete ran out. I had two offers, it turns out both had seven figure payouts but I would have ended up working very long hours. At 62 I noticed my mind was turning to mush so I decided to teach myself cloud computing and now I consult a couple of days per week. The money has been great, love the social interaction and my mind is alive and active.

pre-pandemic we took two trips to asia for about 10 weeks, would love to get back for the au open.
GreenLawn
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Re: Long time retirees: any regrets?

Post by GreenLawn »

Sheepdog wrote: Fri Oct 30, 2020 7:08 pm
GreenLawn wrote: Fri Oct 30, 2020 6:52 pm
ponyboy wrote: Fri Oct 30, 2020 8:18 am Why would anyone think that someone would regret retiring? Why would anyone regret being able to do whatever they wanted, whenever they wanted?
I've thought the same myself. When folks program themselves to work every month of every year of their adult life (with a week off here and there) until their 60's, I can understand how disorienting it'd be to stop and try something else.

It was the opposite for me, working is what felt forced and awkward. Retirement feels natural, and decades overdue :D
You should understand that for some, their employment status is their identity in their community and when they lose it, they believe that they have lost that identity.
Yes, that wasn't the case for me but I can see how someone could pour their life into their career and become one with it. In America when strangers meet a common question is "what do you do"? I read somewhere that in another country (France maybe?) the question is "what do you like to do?". I never defined myself by my job except in a superficial way by answering the stock question with the stock answer with my job title/description. I'd discuss my more enjoyable jobs in casual conversation, but that was idle chatter, not a discussion of who I am as a person.
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catdude
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Re: Long time retirees: any regrets?

Post by catdude »

I retired ten years ago at age 55. It's great... the closest thing to a regret that I have, is that every now and then I'll think about how nice it would've been to be one of those people who just loves their job. If that had been the case for me, I'd would've worked longer, and I'd have a bigger pension (or I'd still be working). But all that aside, I love being retired. I have no work-related or financial stress. I do what I want to do, when I want to do it. I highly recommend retirement!
catdude | | "I yield to the gentleman for a few feeble remarks." (Congressman Thaddeus Stevens)
MathIsMyWayr
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Re: Long time retirees: any regrets?

Post by MathIsMyWayr »

GreenLawn wrote: Fri Oct 30, 2020 7:58 pm
Sheepdog wrote: Fri Oct 30, 2020 7:08 pm
GreenLawn wrote: Fri Oct 30, 2020 6:52 pm
ponyboy wrote: Fri Oct 30, 2020 8:18 am Why would anyone think that someone would regret retiring? Why would anyone regret being able to do whatever they wanted, whenever they wanted?
I've thought the same myself. When folks program themselves to work every month of every year of their adult life (with a week off here and there) until their 60's, I can understand how disorienting it'd be to stop and try something else.

It was the opposite for me, working is what felt forced and awkward. Retirement feels natural, and decades overdue :D
You should understand that for some, their employment status is their identity in their community and when they lose it, they believe that they have lost that identity.
Yes, that wasn't the case for me but I can see how someone could pour their life into their career and become one with it. In America when strangers meet a common question is "what do you do"? I read somewhere that in another country (France maybe?) the question is "what do you like to do?". I never defined myself by my job except in a superficial way by answering the stock question with the stock answer with my job title/description. I'd discuss my more enjoyable jobs in casual conversation, but that was idle chatter, not a discussion of who I am as a person.
Why did you "choose" your job? Were you drafted or dragged into it against your will? Are you complaining that you were not born into a rich family?
Last edited by MathIsMyWayr on Fri Oct 30, 2020 10:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
smitcat
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Re: Long time retirees: any regrets?

Post by smitcat »

GreenLawn wrote: Fri Oct 30, 2020 7:58 pm
Sheepdog wrote: Fri Oct 30, 2020 7:08 pm
GreenLawn wrote: Fri Oct 30, 2020 6:52 pm
ponyboy wrote: Fri Oct 30, 2020 8:18 am Why would anyone think that someone would regret retiring? Why would anyone regret being able to do whatever they wanted, whenever they wanted?
I've thought the same myself. When folks program themselves to work every month of every year of their adult life (with a week off here and there) until their 60's, I can understand how disorienting it'd be to stop and try something else.

It was the opposite for me, working is what felt forced and awkward. Retirement feels natural, and decades overdue :D
You should understand that for some, their employment status is their identity in their community and when they lose it, they believe that they have lost that identity.
Yes, that wasn't the case for me but I can see how someone could pour their life into their career and become one with it. In America when strangers meet a common question is "what do you do"? I read somewhere that in another country (France maybe?) the question is "what do you like to do?". I never defined myself by my job except in a superficial way by answering the stock question with the stock answer with my job title/description. I'd discuss my more enjoyable jobs in casual conversation, but that was idle chatter, not a discussion of who I am as a person.
"In America when strangers meet a common question is "what do you do"? "
For as long as I can remember my first answers were always something like this:
- I try to be a good partner
- I am attempting to be a good child to my parents
- I am trying to be the best parent

And when the question was then redirected as to what I do for work the answers were always like these:
- I work in manufacturing
- I work in a factory
- I work in a service business
- I work in consulting
- I work in childcare
GreenLawn
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Re: Long time retirees: any regrets?

Post by GreenLawn »

MathIsMyWayr wrote: Fri Oct 30, 2020 9:31 pm
GreenLawn wrote: Fri Oct 30, 2020 7:58 pm
Sheepdog wrote: Fri Oct 30, 2020 7:08 pm
GreenLawn wrote: Fri Oct 30, 2020 6:52 pm
ponyboy wrote: Fri Oct 30, 2020 8:18 am Why would anyone think that someone would regret retiring? Why would anyone regret being able to do whatever they wanted, whenever they wanted?
I've thought the same myself. When folks program themselves to work every month of every year of their adult life (with a week off here and there) until their 60's, I can understand how disorienting it'd be to stop and try something else.

It was the opposite for me, working is what felt forced and awkward. Retirement feels natural, and decades overdue :D
You should understand that for some, their employment status is their identity in their community and when they lose it, they believe that they have lost that identity.
Yes, that wasn't the case for me but I can see how someone could pour their life into their career and become one with it. In America when strangers meet a common question is "what do you do"? I read somewhere that in another country (France maybe?) the question is "what do you like to do?". I never defined myself by my job except in a superficial way by answering the stock question with the stock answer with my job title/description. I'd discuss my more enjoyable jobs in casual conversation, but that was idle chatter, not a discussion of who I am as a person.
Why did you "choose" your job? Were you drafted or dragged into it against your will? Are you complaining that you were not born to a rich family?
Yes, I had to work. I prefer retirement. Just answering the OP!
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Nicolas
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Re: Long time retirees: any regrets?

Post by Nicolas »

smitcat wrote: Fri Oct 30, 2020 9:44 pm "In America when strangers meet a common question is ‘what do you do’? "
It’s usually men who ask each other this. When women meet they first ask whether they have children, then what are their ages, boys or girls, etc. Or is this no longer true and I’m a relic from the past for even thinking this?

When people asked me this question I couldn’t answer directly as I worked in a technical field that laymen couldn’t grasp, as I found out. So I started replying with just a general answer like “I work with computers”.
Last edited by Nicolas on Fri Oct 30, 2020 10:14 pm, edited 4 times in total.
GreenLawn
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Re: Long time retirees: any regrets?

Post by GreenLawn »

smitcat wrote: Fri Oct 30, 2020 9:44 pm
GreenLawn wrote: Fri Oct 30, 2020 7:58 pm
Sheepdog wrote: Fri Oct 30, 2020 7:08 pm
GreenLawn wrote: Fri Oct 30, 2020 6:52 pm
ponyboy wrote: Fri Oct 30, 2020 8:18 am Why would anyone think that someone would regret retiring? Why would anyone regret being able to do whatever they wanted, whenever they wanted?
I've thought the same myself. When folks program themselves to work every month of every year of their adult life (with a week off here and there) until their 60's, I can understand how disorienting it'd be to stop and try something else.

It was the opposite for me, working is what felt forced and awkward. Retirement feels natural, and decades overdue :D
You should understand that for some, their employment status is their identity in their community and when they lose it, they believe that they have lost that identity.
Yes, that wasn't the case for me but I can see how someone could pour their life into their career and become one with it. In America when strangers meet a common question is "what do you do"? I read somewhere that in another country (France maybe?) the question is "what do you like to do?". I never defined myself by my job except in a superficial way by answering the stock question with the stock answer with my job title/description. I'd discuss my more enjoyable jobs in casual conversation, but that was idle chatter, not a discussion of who I am as a person.
"In America when strangers meet a common question is "what do you do"? "
For as long as I can remember my first answers were always something like this:
- I try to be a good partner
- I am attempting to be a good child to my parents
- I am trying to be the best parent

And when the question was then redirected as to what I do for work the answers were always like these:
- I work in manufacturing
- I work in a factory
- I work in a service business
- I work in consulting
- I work in childcare
I never considered answering anything other than my job title. Good for you for thinking outside the box! That makes for a more interesting conversation for sure :happy
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