"Bubble level" tool

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rjbraun
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"Bubble level" tool

Post by rjbraun »

I will probably take delivery soon of a set of bookcases that will fill an entire wall. As I'm not sure if my floors are perfectly level, I thought that I would get a "level" tool to check. In case there's an issue I was told that the delivery people could help me to put a piece of felt or similar underneath to level things out.

I would need to provide the level but don't think I have one. I thought I might try to borrow one, but it seems that a basic one might not be so much money.

Would one of the ones shown below be adequate? Any thoughts on whether to get a physical level or one as an app for my phone?

https://www.amazon.com/Johnson-Level-To ... _id=553256

https://apps.apple.com/us/app/bubble-le ... orm=iphone
PizzaEater
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Re: "Bubble level" tool

Post by PizzaEater »

The level I use for hanging pictures on the wall is very similar to the first link you posted. Mine also has a magnetic strip, which I sometimes find useful. I'm very happy with it. You can also find them at Lowe's or Home Depot, I'm sure.

Personally, I would only use a smartphone application as a last resort if I needed something in a pinch.
Broken Man 1999
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Re: "Bubble level" tool

Post by Broken Man 1999 »

DW uses her Torpedo level for all her stuff she hangs on the wall.

With your bookcases, you want to check the over all levelness, and the shelves also. I have seen perfectly level bookcases, with unleveled shelves.

Levels are really low tech, and since you don't know if you have one, that kinda tells me you don't have a need for one very often.

Me, I would buy a cheap one, and call it a day.

Also, if your bookcase is tall, you need to secure it to the wall, as a small child can be crushed if they pull on it or try to climb on it.

Broken Man 1999
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cogito
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Re: "Bubble level" tool

Post by cogito »

This topic is not about what I thought it would be about.
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JoeRetire
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Re: "Bubble level" tool

Post by JoeRetire »

rjbraun wrote: Wed Oct 21, 2020 5:17 pmI thought I might try to borrow one, but it seems that a basic one might not be so much money.
If you can't afford to purchase a good level, borrow one. The plastic level in your link is far too short. And it's plastic, rather than good solid metal.

With bookcases filling an entire wall, you not only want them level, but even with each other. You want a long level that can span more than one bookcase. Unless you don't really care much how they look, do it up right.
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BoomerM3
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Re: "Bubble level" tool

Post by BoomerM3 »

The problem with the level you refer to is that it's only 9 inches. So, what you will be checking is a 9" space. If you want to know if your floor is level, a 9" measurement won't cut it. I've never used a smartphone as a level.

See if you can borrow a long level (3 feet +) from a friend.
iamlucky13
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Re: "Bubble level" tool

Post by iamlucky13 »

A torpedo level is good for checking individual cases are level (but not the whole floor). It is certainly possible for a manufacturer to make one that is not properly aligned, but these are simple tools that have been around literally for centuries.

You can check for this very easily. Place it a relatively level surface. Observe the bubble position. Spin it 180 degrees and make sure it shows the same position. The Johnson one linked should be fine.

I have not tested smartphone level apps in a controlled manner. From what I have seen, their acceleratometers give surprisingly high sensitivity, but I don't know how accurate and repeatable they are.

If you want to check if the whole floor is flat so each bookcase section will align well to the adjacent sections, then you either need a long straight edge (flat is distinct from level), or you can run a tight string from one wall to other, just above floor level, and measure the height of the string above the floor.
BuddyJet
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Re: "Bubble level" tool

Post by BuddyJet »

Given that the bookcase covers a full wall, a short level like you posted will not give the best results. I’d use a level at least 24” long. The extra length will show waves in the floor since you can see gaps between the floor and the level if there are waves. Check for level at several points along wall. I’d also buy a pack of composite shims rather than wood in case needed. They are only about $2.

https://www.lowes.com/pd/TimberWolf-Act ... ms/3377156

https://www.lowes.com/pd/Johnson-Level- ... 1000243199
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Fclevz
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Re: "Bubble level" tool

Post by Fclevz »

Got an iPhone?
Open the Measure app and tap Level.

https://support.apple.com/guide/iphone/ ... 35673d/ios
tibbitts
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Re: "Bubble level" tool

Post by tibbitts »

I'm going to disagree with everybody else. Probably your floors aren't level, your ceilings aren't level, and your walls aren't level. So whatever you do nothing will look correct. What are you going to do, call in the foundation pier guys? You should have a basic level, even a little one is much better than nothing. In fact from front to back, what are you going to do with a level more than maybe 10 or 12 inches long? The thing about bookcases is that you aren't doing anything permanent except making a couple of small anchor screw holes to keep them from tipping over. Overall longer levels are nice to have, and I wish I had one, but not everybody wants to store an 8ft level. And there are practical problems in using them sometimes - what if the floor surface is irregular? You could use one of the rotary laser levels but now you're talking serious money.

Anyway I'd make sure the bookcases are level from front to back with a level (average the results from the top and bottom fixed shelves) and if can get get them level from side to side within the accuracy of a small level (my longest is only 2ft), and the result looks good, I'd be happy with that.
kevinf
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Re: "Bubble level" tool

Post by kevinf »

You can make a torpedo level work as a larger level for big spans by placing it on a plank/board/whatchit that is straight and true and laying that across your surface.
Topic Author
rjbraun
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Re: "Bubble level" tool

Post by rjbraun »

Wow, thanks for all the replies! Gosh, I guess I hadn't fully thought through everything, not even sure I still have.

It's quite true, I think, that the walls of the room itself are likely not square. And that may be the biggest issue. To address that, my thought was to line up the front of the bookcases with the line of the wood planks on the floor. Now I'm beginning to wonder if I even need to worry about leveling the shelves. The bookcases are from Room and Board. I've never bought anything from there before, but based on the positive reviews on the forum I am hoping that they will be well made and everything will line up nicely.

Maybe I will see if I can borrow a level from a neighbor or my building super. I really don't want to have to buy and store a level of any length. I guess if I can't borrow one I will try to buy a smaller one, as it seems a nice tool to have on hand. I just wonder if I already have one somewhere, though -- nothing big or I would know, of course.
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Bogle7
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Re: "Bubble level" tool

Post by Bogle7 »

When it comes to levels, there is only one word—Stabila.
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bob60014
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Re: "Bubble level" tool

Post by bob60014 »

You can always rent the appropriate level from Home Depot or another tool rental place for a couple bucks.
Outer Marker
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Re: "Bubble level" tool

Post by Outer Marker »

A decent level should be part of every homeowners tool box. A decent one is not very expensive. They all work the same. No need to spend big bucks.
ddurrett896
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Re: "Bubble level" tool

Post by ddurrett896 »

I'd buy a torpedo, 2' and 4' aluminum.
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GMCZ71
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Re: "Bubble level" tool

Post by GMCZ71 »

Rental equip stores will have a laser level you can rent. It draws a (level) laser line across the wall (entire), you measure from that line to the floor or ceiling at different locations and you have your answer.
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Re: "Bubble level" tool

Post by Dottie57 »

GMCZ71 wrote: Thu Oct 22, 2020 7:15 am Rental equip stores will have a laser level you can rent. It draws a (level) laser line across the wall (entire), you measure from that line to the floor or ceiling at different locations and you have your answer.
Yeppers. Seen this used on “This Old House”.
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rjbraun
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Re: "Bubble level" tool

Post by rjbraun »

Thanks for the suggestions to rent or get a substantive level (in length). Maybe I should have said at the outset that we have pretty much been staying in during the pandemic. Even getting this bookcase delivery is to us a bit of a significant step in terms of deviating from our conservative risk stance during the pandemic. Also, we don't have a car or an easy and safe way to get to a store to rent a level, so that's not really an option for now.

Eta: Space is also a premium (VHCOL area). For sure, if I lived in a house with a basement to store stuff, I would probably get a decent-sized level. Personally, I remember coming across a level as a kid and thought (and still think) that they are so cool :D
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FrugalInvestor
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Re: "Bubble level" tool

Post by FrugalInvestor »

If the walls and ceilings in your house are not level, square and plumb (which sounds like the case) then you may not want to truly level the bookcases. What often matters most is how things look in relation to one another. Leveling your bookcases may just draw attention to the fact that your ceiling or floor (or both) aren't level and/or that the nearby door frame isn't plumb, which your brain will likely interpret as your bookcase not being level.

When I have a situation where surfaces in a room are not all parallel and perpendicular to one another I often end up "leveling" whatever I'm working with by eye. What usually matters most is how things look in relation to one another. Certain dominant lines that draw the eye many need to be parallel rather than the object actually being "level".
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vineviz
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Re: "Bubble level" tool

Post by vineviz »

rjbraun wrote: Wed Oct 21, 2020 5:17 pm Would one of the ones shown below be adequate? Any thoughts on whether to get a physical level or one as an app for my phone?

https://www.amazon.com/Johnson-Level-To ... _id=553256

https://apps.apple.com/us/app/bubble-le ... orm=iphone
I purchased the Johnson level in your first link a few months ago to send with my daughter to college. She thought I was nuts, because her iPhone had an app.

For woodworking and construction I use much longer levels than the Johnson, but it seems well made and for $4 and I can't see any reason not to buy one.
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wolf359
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Re: "Bubble level" tool

Post by wolf359 »

rjbraun wrote: Thu Oct 22, 2020 7:47 am Thanks for the suggestions to rent or get a substantive level (in length). Maybe I should have said at the outset that we have pretty much been staying in during the pandemic. Even getting this bookcase delivery is to us a bit of a significant step in terms of deviating from our conservative risk stance during the pandemic. Also, we don't have a car or an easy and safe way to get to a store to rent a level, so that's not really an option for now.

Eta: Space is also a premium (VHCOL area). For sure, if I lived in a house with a basement to store stuff, I would probably get a decent-sized level. Personally, I remember coming across a level as a kid and thought (and still think) that they are so cool :D
Do you have a clear straw, water, and push pins? Put the push pin in one end, fill with water, leave an air bubble, then seal the other end with the other push pin. Viola! Done.

Laser levels, iphones, renting levels, and all this fancy shmanzy stuff...

If you want a more sophisticated tool, do what the Egyptians did to build the pyramids and use a water level. https://todayshomeowner.com/how-to-make ... ter-level/
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lthenderson
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Re: "Bubble level" tool

Post by lthenderson »

rjbraun wrote: Wed Oct 21, 2020 5:17 pm I will probably take delivery soon of a set of bookcases that will fill an entire wall. As I'm not sure if my floors are perfectly level, I thought that I would get a "level" tool to check. In case there's an issue I was told that the delivery people could help me to put a piece of felt or similar underneath to level things out.

I would need to provide the level but don't think I have one. I thought I might try to borrow one, but it seems that a basic one might not be so much money.

Would one of the ones shown below be adequate? Any thoughts on whether to get a physical level or one as an app for my phone?
I'm surprised nobody's mentioned it but it sounds like you are a prime candidate for going old school. Grab a marble or any other smooth spherical object and place it on a shelf when the bookcase gets there. If it rolls towards the front, place a shim in the front. If it rolls back, place a shim in the back. If it rolls towards one side place a shim on that side. If it doesn't roll, the book shelf is plenty level enough for books.

Honestly I have done a lot of bookcases, built and installed and I don't think I have ever checked level on any of them. I am more concerned with how the reveal on the top, bottom and sides looks. If they all appear to be consistent, that is what I want. Putting in a bookcase all plumb and level but then having inconsistent reveals because the walls aren't plumb would drive me nuts.
HomeStretch
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Re: "Bubble level" tool

Post by HomeStretch »

When the set of bookcases are delivered and put in place side-by-side in your room, it will quickly become apparent if any are not level (relative to one another) by looking at the tops of the bookcases. You can raise up any low sides with felt pads or shims.

+1 to Broken Man 1999’s post about securing the bookcases to make sure they don’t topple over.
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Re: "Bubble level" tool

Post by Sandtrap »

Depending on use and need for precision:

Inexpensive 6" "Torpedo Level" in various colors. (for 90% of "good enough" and "that'll work")
Snap in 3" line level (can also be used on the flat).
2 foot to 8 foot aluminum box beam level with sealed vials.
Rotary laser level
Laser line level

A really really good carpenter's eye and natural sense for level and plumb (no tools needed). . . . :shock:

For hanging pictures on walls.
Spouse (no tools needed). :shock: :shock:

j :D
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tev9876
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Re: "Bubble level" tool

Post by tev9876 »

You are way over thinking this. Just download a free phone app and be done with it. I use my phone to level my 30' travel trailer and it works fine. It is currently telling me my desk is 1.6 degrees off level, but my coffee cup is not sliding off in my lap.

Assuming you are buying new, free standing, decent quality bookshelves you can be pretty certain that the shelves will be square to the frame. Setting a short level on a perfectly flat 24" board basically turns it into a 24" level. Shelves on a new bookcase should be flat. This is why the phone works to level my trailer - the steel frame is flat and turns it into a 30' level.

If you are butting multiple bookcases next to each other it will be obvious if your floor is not flat (or the bookcases aren't square). If the tops touch but there is a gap at the bottom, your floor is bowed and you need to shim. At the meeting point. If the gap is at the top you need to shim the outer edge(s). If the floor is flat but not level you may not want to level the bookcase as it may make it obvious to the rest of the room. I had one house where the concrete slab had sunk about 4" on one side of the living room. Sitting on the couch or walking through the room you did not notice the slope, but if you had put a level molding along the floor the 4" gap at one end would be obvious. You don't want a 4" shim sticking out like a sore thumb at the end of a 10 foot run.

You may also need to remove the floor molding behind the bookcase so it can sit flush against the wall - assuming your walls are perpendicular to the floor (and flat). If not you may need to add some molding to hide the gap. Electrical outlets can also be an issue - do you need access to them for stuff on the bookcase?

Just play it by ear. Put the cabinets in place and if everything looks good without gaps you got lucky. If they are leaning all over the place with gaps you probably want to consider finding a cabinet installer or carpenter with the proper tools and experience to get it looking good - if you don't own a level I'm also assuming you don't own a miter saw, finish nailer, combination square, etc. Unless you are storing loose golf balls on it being a degree or two out of level is not going to matter as long as it looks good to you.
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galawdawg
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Re: "Bubble level" tool

Post by galawdawg »

I'd recommend a thirty-six inch (36") level. If you think your floors are out of level and walls out of plumb, you may also want to get some wood shims to ensure the bookcases are level and plumb. Basically, you'd want them installed like cabinets, including securing them to wall studs to ensure they don't tip (think small child climbing on shelf).

This video from This Old House may give you some tips: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QPvvrOR-LJQ

Good luck!
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rjbraun
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Re: "Bubble level" tool

Post by rjbraun »

tev9876 wrote: Thu Oct 22, 2020 8:27 am You are way over thinking this. Just download a free phone app and be done with it. I use my phone to level my 30' travel trailer and it works fine. It is currently telling me my desk is 1.6 degrees off level, but my coffee cup is not sliding off in my lap.

Assuming you are buying new, free standing, decent quality bookshelves you can be pretty certain that the shelves will be square to the frame. Setting a short level on a perfectly flat 24" board basically turns it into a 24" level. Shelves on a new bookcase should be flat. This is why the phone works to level my trailer - the steel frame is flat and turns it into a 30' level.

If you are butting multiple bookcases next to each other it will be obvious if your floor is not flat (or the bookcases aren't square). If the tops touch but there is a gap at the bottom, your floor is bowed and you need to shim. At the meeting point. If the gap is at the top you need to shim the outer edge(s). If the floor is flat but not level you may not want to level the bookcase as it may make it obvious to the rest of the room. I had one house where the concrete slab had sunk about 4" on one side of the living room. Sitting on the couch or walking through the room you did not notice the slope, but if you had put a level molding along the floor the 4" gap at one end would be obvious. You don't want a 4" shim sticking out like a sore thumb at the end of a 10 foot run.

You may also need to remove the floor molding behind the bookcase so it can sit flush against the wall - assuming your walls are perpendicular to the floor (and flat). If not you may need to add some molding to hide the gap. Electrical outlets can also be an issue - do you need access to them for stuff on the bookcase?

Just play it by ear. Put the cabinets in place and if everything looks good without gaps you got lucky. If they are leaning all over the place with gaps you probably want to consider finding a cabinet installer or carpenter with the proper tools and experience to get it looking good - if you don't own a level I'm also assuming you don't own a miter saw, finish nailer, combination square, etc. Unless you are storing loose golf balls on it being a degree or two out of level is not going to matter as long as it looks good to you.
Yeah, I am stressing a bit about this. Part of it is, well, I just stress, sometimes. But, in particular, now with the pandemic I just want the delivery to be as quick as possible while, of course, also making sure that everything is "right". And, yes, the wall of bookcases will block an electrical outlet, alas. I figured that I would place an extension cord in each of the two outlets and hope for the best. I guess I may also try to measure where the outlet is on the wall so that at a future date I could potentially cut through the back of the bookcase to expose the outlet.

There is baseboard molding. I definitely do not want to remove this (for a variety of reasons) and just figured that the bookcases will just not be flush against the wall. Fortunately, given the setup the gap will not really be noticeable (I think / hope).
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Orbuculum Nongata
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Re: "Bubble level" tool

Post by Orbuculum Nongata »

rjbraun wrote: Wed Oct 21, 2020 5:17 pm I will probably take delivery soon of a set of bookcases that will fill an entire wall.
You're talking about a long span. Probably longer than any level you want to buy. Why not get a string level for a few bucks, tack it to the opposite walls in a level position then measure down from it to the floor at each end to see if the distance is the same?
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Re: "Bubble level" tool

Post by smitcat »

rjbraun wrote: Thu Oct 22, 2020 7:47 am Thanks for the suggestions to rent or get a substantive level (in length). Maybe I should have said at the outset that we have pretty much been staying in during the pandemic. Even getting this bookcase delivery is to us a bit of a significant step in terms of deviating from our conservative risk stance during the pandemic. Also, we don't have a car or an easy and safe way to get to a store to rent a level, so that's not really an option for now.

Eta: Space is also a premium (VHCOL area). For sure, if I lived in a house with a basement to store stuff, I would probably get a decent-sized level. Personally, I remember coming across a level as a kid and thought (and still think) that they are so cool :D
A length of clear plastic tubing mostly filled with water will solve your initial problem here - you can get it at any store which delivers.
Buy the lenght dependent upon the area you would like to level out.
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Re: "Bubble level" tool

Post by mptness »

Sandtrap wrote: Thu Oct 22, 2020 8:11 am A really really good carpenter's eye and natural sense for level and plumb (no tools needed)
What we used to say on the job site: "That looks level, and then some!" :wink:
OP: I agree with those suggesting spend the big bucks ($5-$10) on a 24" or 48" level. Also $5 for a bundle of shims. Start in the highest point in the floor with the first bookcase and shim low side until level and plumb and then fasten to the wall. Continue by lining up each unit to the previous unit and shiming the low side, fasten to the wall and to the previous unit. When every unit is fastened you can use a shoe molding or baseboard if you want to hide the shims/irregularities of the floor.
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Re: "Bubble level" tool

Post by TSR »

I think I own this:

https://www.amazon.com/Swanson-Tool-TL0 ... 830&sr=8-6

As a homeowner, I use it all the time. I prefer metal to plastic, and the magnet option helps with a lot of things. I agree with others that a longer level might be better for *this* application, but this level will at least tell you if the shelves themselves are level, which will help somewhat. You will use this thing all the time though, and it won't take up much space.
newguy123
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Re: "Bubble level" tool

Post by newguy123 »

LOL I thought you were talking about a tool that detects stock bubbles ... :sharebeer
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supalong52
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Re: "Bubble level" tool

Post by supalong52 »

You're trying to make standalone furniture do double duty as a built in. When cabinets are built in, a lot of work goes into shimming and leveling everything to compensate for unevenness of the floors and walls. Let's say you have a 1 degree slope over ten feet, that's a rise of 2 inches. Are you going to be able to put in risers at an increment of a quarter inch along the wall? It's unlikely. So I would just put them in. Then see if things look really wonky at one point or another. It's going to be a bandaid solution either way unless you do a shimmed built in.
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rjbraun
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Re: "Bubble level" tool

Post by rjbraun »

TSR wrote: Thu Oct 22, 2020 12:20 pm I think I own this:

https://www.amazon.com/Swanson-Tool-TL0 ... 830&sr=8-6

As a homeowner, I use it all the time. I prefer metal to plastic, and the magnet option helps with a lot of things. I agree with others that a longer level might be better for *this* application, but this level will at least tell you if the shelves themselves are level, which will help somewhat. You will use this thing all the time though, and it won't take up much space.
Thank you. I had ordered the plastic one I linked to above but was able to cancel in the nick of time! I do think having a level on hand will come in super handy and will likely order the one you suggested -- metal definitely sounds better than plastic. I will just wait a bit as I almost couldn't cancel the other one in time. Granted, I can swing the 4 bucks, but I am just trying hard to avoid accumulating *stuff*.
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rjbraun
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Re: "Bubble level" tool

Post by rjbraun »

supalong52 wrote: Thu Oct 22, 2020 1:09 pm You're trying to make standalone furniture do double duty as a built in. When cabinets are built in, a lot of work goes into shimming and leveling everything to compensate for unevenness of the floors and walls. Let's say you have a 1 degree slope over ten feet, that's a rise of 2 inches. Are you going to be able to put in risers at an increment of a quarter inch along the wall? It's unlikely. So I would just put them in. Then see if things look really wonky at one point or another. It's going to be a bandaid solution either way unless you do a shimmed built in.
Yeah, I guess maybe that's the case. I do have built-in bookcases and love them, but we decided to not build them in for various reasons in this other room. As mentioned upthread, we got them from Room & Board, whose furniture seems to receive high praise on this forum.

As the delivery and overall service is reported to be excellent, I just want to try to ensure that everything will go as smoothly as possible. Also, I want to try really hard to determine during the delivery whether or not the bookcases will work. While the company apparently allows returns after delivery and will even pick up returns at no additional charge, I don't want to worry about issues of stuff not being in the same condition as when delivered. Also, given the pandemic I really want to avoid a return visit.

These are the bookcases, which I guess do involve more pieces than a typical bookcase. That versatility seems like a plus, though I guess it also may complicate getting everything to line up nicely. :confused

https://www.roomandboard.com/catalog/of ... case-cubes
MrJones
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Re: "Bubble level" tool

Post by MrJones »

cogito wrote: Wed Oct 21, 2020 5:47 pm This topic is not about what I thought it would be about.
Hahaha.
nosivol
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Re: "Bubble level" tool

Post by nosivol »

I have one of these, Bosh Laser Level. It is a lot more handy then a bubble level.
egrets
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Re: "Bubble level" tool

Post by egrets »

I'd be much more concerned about fastening them securely to the walls so they don't fall over and kill some small being, human or animal, when they jump on it or pull on it, or get trapped under it and run out of oxygen.

If you eyeball it and it looks okay, that would seem to be okay to me. I don't know about modern houses, but in the older houses I've lived in, almost nothing was level or straight.
supalong52
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Joined: Tue Feb 09, 2010 1:51 pm

Re: "Bubble level" tool

Post by supalong52 »

rjbraun wrote: Thu Oct 22, 2020 1:27 pm
supalong52 wrote: Thu Oct 22, 2020 1:09 pm You're trying to make standalone furniture do double duty as a built in. When cabinets are built in, a lot of work goes into shimming and leveling everything to compensate for unevenness of the floors and walls. Let's say you have a 1 degree slope over ten feet, that's a rise of 2 inches. Are you going to be able to put in risers at an increment of a quarter inch along the wall? It's unlikely. So I would just put them in. Then see if things look really wonky at one point or another. It's going to be a bandaid solution either way unless you do a shimmed built in.
Yeah, I guess maybe that's the case. I do have built-in bookcases and love them, but we decided to not build them in for various reasons in this other room. As mentioned upthread, we got them from Room & Board, whose furniture seems to receive high praise on this forum.

As the delivery and overall service is reported to be excellent, I just want to try to ensure that everything will go as smoothly as possible. Also, I want to try really hard to determine during the delivery whether or not the bookcases will work. While the company apparently allows returns after delivery and will even pick up returns at no additional charge, I don't want to worry about issues of stuff not being in the same condition as when delivered. Also, given the pandemic I really want to avoid a return visit.

These are the bookcases, which I guess do involve more pieces than a typical bookcase. That versatility seems like a plus, though I guess it also may complicate getting everything to line up nicely. :confused

https://www.roomandboard.com/catalog/of ... case-cubes
If it's just one unit then that certainly is easier. I was imagining you were trying to line up 4 or 5 bookcases. You also have to be careful about dips or bulges in your floor leading to uneven distribution of the weight. It looks nice and I'm sure you'll enjoy it.
inbox788
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Re: "Bubble level" tool

Post by inbox788 »

rjbraun wrote: Thu Oct 22, 2020 9:42 amYeah, I am stressing a bit about this. Part of it is, well, I just stress, sometimes. But, in particular, now with the pandemic I just want the delivery to be as quick as possible while, of course, also making sure that everything is "right". And, yes, the wall of bookcases will block an electrical outlet, alas. I figured that I would place an extension cord in each of the two outlets and hope for the best. I guess I may also try to measure where the outlet is on the wall so that at a future date I could potentially cut through the back of the bookcase to expose the outlet.

There is baseboard molding. I definitely do not want to remove this (for a variety of reasons) and just figured that the bookcases will just not be flush against the wall. Fortunately, given the setup the gap will not really be noticeable (I think / hope).
Are the shelves being delivered built? Are they installing or just delivering? Are the attached to the wall or each other?

You've gotten many answer about the leveling, but I'm with those with simple solutions (marble, water level, just eyeball it and fix it if it bothers you).

With respect to the outlets, I'd cut them out now before you put stuff on the shelves and they don't move anymore (sometimes for years). I've had extension cords go around, but that means the self is a little out and there is a gap for the cord to come out. And I've cut a hole and it's pretty low so it's not an issue for me.

You could always cut a notch on the shelves to fit over the baseboard. It's probably about 1/4-1/2 inch depth and looks nicer from the side without the gap.
Topic Author
rjbraun
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Re: "Bubble level" tool

Post by rjbraun »

supalong52 wrote: Thu Oct 22, 2020 5:38 pm If it's just one unit then that certainly is easier. I was imagining you were trying to line up 4 or 5 bookcases. You also have to be careful about dips or bulges in your floor leading to uneven distribution of the weight. It looks nice and I'm sure you'll enjoy it.
Yes, it's actually a bunch of units: one 66" unit and two 44" units across (so, just under 13' across), and then either three or four cubes high (~6' or 8' in height). I ordered four cubes, but we may just go with three cubes. Not sure.
Topic Author
rjbraun
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Re: "Bubble level" tool

Post by rjbraun »

inbox788 wrote: Thu Oct 22, 2020 6:27 pm
rjbraun wrote: Thu Oct 22, 2020 9:42 amYeah, I am stressing a bit about this. Part of it is, well, I just stress, sometimes. But, in particular, now with the pandemic I just want the delivery to be as quick as possible while, of course, also making sure that everything is "right". And, yes, the wall of bookcases will block an electrical outlet, alas. I figured that I would place an extension cord in each of the two outlets and hope for the best. I guess I may also try to measure where the outlet is on the wall so that at a future date I could potentially cut through the back of the bookcase to expose the outlet.

There is baseboard molding. I definitely do not want to remove this (for a variety of reasons) and just figured that the bookcases will just not be flush against the wall. Fortunately, given the setup the gap will not really be noticeable (I think / hope).
Are the shelves being delivered built? Are they installing or just delivering? Are the attached to the wall or each other?

You've gotten many answer about the leveling, but I'm with those with simple solutions (marble, water level, just eyeball it and fix it if it bothers you).

With respect to the outlets, I'd cut them out now before you put stuff on the shelves and they don't move anymore (sometimes for years). I've had extension cords go around, but that means the self is a little out and there is a gap for the cord to come out. And I've cut a hole and it's pretty low so it's not an issue for me.

You could always cut a notch on the shelves to fit over the baseboard. It's probably about 1/4-1/2 inch depth and looks nicer from the side without the gap.
Bookcases are being delivered, but they are not custom. They are "cubes", so they stack on top of one another and will also need to line up nicely side-by-side.

My understanding is that Room and Board delivery service is very good, so I assume that they will help to position the bookcases / cubes so that things line up, within reason. I mean, I will disappointed if they just drop the cubes atop one another indifferently, but I also realize that there is likely a limit to how much "tinkering" one can expect from them.

Yeah, I'm reluctant to cut a notch until we know for sure that we will keep the bookcases. Also, we're not super handy with a saw, etc. so I don't want to take on a lot, at this point. Fortunately, there are walls on either end of the bookcases, so I don't think the gap from the baseboard will be an issue.

https://www.roomandboard.com/catalog/of ... case-cubes
kevinf
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Re: "Bubble level" tool

Post by kevinf »

rjbraun wrote: Wed Oct 21, 2020 5:17 pm ...As I'm not sure if my floors are perfectly level...
https://www.amazon.com/adjustable-furni ... iture+feet

Adjustable feet can attach to the bottom of the shelving via glue or fasteners with little to no carpentry ability needed. The feet add a nice look to the furniture, making it seem more complete than just a flat board laying against a floor. If your floor or wall is out of level or bowed, the adjustment is trivial to make correct. You can also adjust the feet so the cabinet center of gravity is biased toward the wall to reduce the chance of tipping accidents. Taller feet allow for cleaning under the furniture, as well as helping to keep the furniture from compressing the flooring or causing marks or discoloration from uneven light/air exposure.
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jabberwockOG
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Re: "Bubble level" tool

Post by jabberwockOG »

Suggest something like this. Less than 1 foot level is OK for hanging pictures but not much else.

https://www.amazon.com/Kapro-130-62-24- ... 434&sr=8-7
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