Flagpole recommendation

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Clark & Addison
Posts: 178
Joined: Mon Jan 14, 2013 12:15 pm
Location: Indiana

Flagpole recommendation

Post by Clark & Addison »

I'm wanting to install a flagpole at our home. I am thinking about either a 20' or 25' flagpole. We live in an area without many windbreaks (no close neighbors or tall trees and at the top of a small hill), so it would need to be able to withstand the occasional strong winds. If inclement weather or strong winds are forecast I would remove the flag(s). I plan to add lighting as well. Does anybody have any recommendations on where to buy a decent flagpole?
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galawdawg
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Joined: Thu Dec 14, 2017 12:59 pm
Location: Georgia

Re: Flagpole recommendation

Post by galawdawg »

Are you a DIY type person? If so and you want a sturdy one piece flagpole, you may wish to consider using a heavy gauge galvanized top rail for the pole.

For example, you can order a twenty-one foot top rail fence post from Lowes that is 12 gauge galvanized steel. https://www.lowes.com/pd/Common-x-x-21- ... 1000005024. Add a pulley truck (https://www.gettysburgflag.com/hardware ... rucks-caps), a finial for the top (https://www.gettysburgflag.com/hardware ... asecat=506), a rope cleat, rope, flag snaps or clips and a flag and you are all set. Those materials will run about $200.

You'll need to dig a post hole (I'd recommend 18-24") and add about four inches or crushed gravel at the bottom. Once the pole is set in the hole, raised and checked for plumb (a two or three person job), you'll need to secure it with 2x4 bracing and fill the hole with concrete. Once the concrete is cured, you can remove the bracing. (Just be sure you install the pulley truck, finial and rope BEFORE you stand the pole up. :oops: )

Here is how mine turned out:

Image


A similar single piece flagpole will cost about $700: https://www.gettysburgflag.com/flagpole ... escription. If you buy a flagpole kit from Gettysburg or another online flagpole company, I'd recommend you avoid telescoping or sectional poles.

For lighting, you can either run low-voltage or use a solar spotlight. I use a 60 lumen solar spotlight which provides subtle uplighting (https://www.lowes.com/pd/Portfolio-60-L ... 1001774610)

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tev9876
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Joined: Thu Sep 14, 2017 9:12 am

Re: Flagpole recommendation

Post by tev9876 »

If you are on a budget, I have one similar to this 20' aluminum sectional: https://www.amazon.com/VIVOHOME-Section ... B0821Z7Y31 There are many different brands that are probably all made in the same factory, but check for the aluminum gauge and find the strongest one you can. The other advantage of a sectional pole is that it is easy to take down if you need to replace any hardware, thread a new rope, etc.

They are subject to snapping at the bottom joint due to the constant flexing at that point. To combat that, get a 10' section of 1.5" EMT conduit from your local big box store. https://www.homedepot.com/p/1-1-2-in-x- ... /100400412

The outside diameter of the conduit is the same as the inside diameter of the swedged section of the pole. This ties the lower sections together and the steel conduit is much better at resisting flexing than the aluminum. Shim around the bottom so that the conduit is in solid contact with the bottom of the pole - this will further transfer force into the concrete/ground instead of allowing movement. I used the narrow section sawed off of the old, failed pole.

This latest setup has been in place for about four years with a heavy, embroidered 4x6 US flag. There is very little flex - much less than what I saw with my previous setups that failed after 1-5 years. I never take it down even in strong storms. I usually buy the heaviest Annin brand flag and get around a year out of it before it starts to fray.

For lighting I have a low voltage spot light powered on the ancient landscape lighting in my front bushes. If that ever fails I will just get the solar ring that goes on the top of the pole.
NoblesvilleIN
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Location: Noblesville IN

Re: Flagpole recommendation

Post by NoblesvilleIN »

I took a different (wood, not metal) DIY approach that has lasted at least a dozen years (new 3x5 flag every spring). Mine was made using plans from Norm Abrams (New Yankee Workshop and This Old House fame) with one modification. His plans call for a welded, metal base in the ground. I don't have welding skills and was too cheap to hire this part out. I followed the plans for the metal base, but I made mine out of treated 2x material. It has held up well (zero repairs) even though the base is wood and not metal. Just this week, it got painted for the second time since installation. If you go this route, you will need to purchase the plans from the New Yankee Workshop website and they are still available. You need the plans to build the plywood template for cutting the tapered 2x6's that make up the pole. It is probably a weekend project - if I remember correctly. I googled flagpole parts for the topper and pulley. I don't remember what it cost, but it has held up to midwest weather very well. I think it is around 22' or 24' tall - made using 8' or 10' 2x6's. You don't need special tools - I used my circular saw and some hand tools and our deck chairs as my sawhorses. It was a fun project.
Lalamimi
Posts: 562
Joined: Mon Jun 24, 2019 4:22 pm
Location: Texas

Re: Flagpole recommendation

Post by Lalamimi »

DH was happy our house came with a flag pole. It has button to push in so it can be lowered ( not electronic), rather than ropes for the flags. No clue on the brand.
Yooper
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Joined: Fri May 21, 2010 7:25 am
Location: Nothern Michigan

Re: Flagpole recommendation

Post by Yooper »

Whatever pole you get, do yourself a favor and set an annual/bi-annnual/whatever reminder to replace the rope. Even if you think it's still got a little bit of life in it. It's MUCH easier to replace an old, but functional rope than it is to put up a new rope because your old one has snapped and is laying on the ground..........
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sunny_socal
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Re: Flagpole recommendation

Post by sunny_socal »

I'm thinking of getting this one, single-piece AL, 5", 25ft external halyard model that will stand up to a stiff wind while running two flags

https://flagpolesetc.com/flagpoles/alum ... 1-25x5x125

They also sell on ebay, 960 shipped
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galawdawg
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Location: Georgia

Re: Flagpole recommendation

Post by galawdawg »

Yooper wrote: Sun Oct 18, 2020 9:47 am Whatever pole you get, do yourself a favor and set an annual/bi-annnual/whatever reminder to replace the rope. Even if you think it's still got a little bit of life in it. It's MUCH easier to replace an old, but functional rope than it is to put up a new rope because your old one has snapped and is laying on the ground..........
:thumbsup
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