Possible Relocation to Columbus, OH Area

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blackwhisker
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Possible Relocation to Columbus, OH Area

Post by blackwhisker »

Our family is contemplating to move to Columbus, OH area for 6 month - 1 year. If works out, it might turn into a permanent move.

Can someone suggest a city, or more specifically a particular school district?

Below are my search criteria:

-Safe. Would like to find a place that is safe to walk after dark.

-Good public schools. Safe but not too academically competitive. We currently live in an area in California where the public schools are too competitive for us.

-Close to shopping. It would be ideal if there are a Wholefoods and a Target close by.

-Nice and down-to-earth people. And Immigrant-friendly. Our family is east Asian. I lived in the mid west for several years long time ago. Interestingly, I made many friends in a small town with no ethnic diversity. In contrast, I didn't make many friends in a mid size town where there was plenty of diversity.

-Relatively easy to rent a single family house or town house.

I visited Columbus area a couple of years ago. I didn't see many places because of time constraint. I liked Dublin area. But I wonder what the public school system is like there.

Thank you.

Update: I would appreciate any honest and open opinions about the Columbus area (positive and negative), not limited to my list of questions above.
Last edited by blackwhisker on Wed Sep 23, 2020 2:28 pm, edited 3 times in total.
Volkdancer
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Re: Possible Relocation to Columbus, OH Area

Post by Volkdancer »

In general I would suggest in the northwest area which includes Dublin.

You will find plenty of shopping including Trader Joe's and Whole Food.

There are also several Asian grocery stores, several of which self-described as Korean, and Tensuke Market which has a large selection of primarily Japanese groceries.

If any interest in Okinawan/Japanese dancing, there is a traditional dance sensei in the area but am not aware how she has adapted to the social distancing.

Maybe this will help in a general way.

Karl V
otinkyad
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Re: Possible Relocation to Columbus, OH Area

Post by otinkyad »

If you’re coming from the Bay Area, probably nothing in Columbus is too competitive.

Old money is in Bexley, Arlington, and Worthington (the last was always the least uppity). New money was in Dublin, then New Albany. Hilliard and Olentangy are the new growth suburbs. The public schools are very good in all those places, though I’m not sure about Bexley (it was very much a private school haven). I don’t have a feel for Westerville, though I lived there in the seventies. Hipper places are closer to downtown, like the Short North and German Village. You’ll get more diverse near OSU, obviously, and specifically whiter in the northern suburbs. Clintonville has nice pockets and is cheaper and more diverse than the suburbs, without being student housing. Public schools are less good in all these places.
Topic Author
blackwhisker
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Re: Possible Relocation to Columbus, OH Area

Post by blackwhisker »

Volkdancer wrote: Sun Sep 20, 2020 3:46 pm In general I would suggest in the northwest area which includes Dublin.

You will find plenty of shopping including Trader Joe's and Whole Food.

There are also several Asian grocery stores, several of which self-described as Korean, and Tensuke Market which has a large selection of primarily Japanese groceries.

If any interest in Okinawan/Japanese dancing, there is a traditional dance sensei in the area but am not aware how she has adapted to the social distancing.

Maybe this will help in a general way.

Karl V
Thank you Karl for the helpful reply! I will definitely visit Tensuke market. Japanese dance sounds fun too.
Topic Author
blackwhisker
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Re: Possible Relocation to Columbus, OH Area

Post by blackwhisker »

otinkyad wrote: Sun Sep 20, 2020 3:53 pm If you’re coming from the Bay Area, probably nothing in Columbus is too competitive.

Old money is in Bexley, Arlington, and Worthington (the last was always the least uppity). New money was in Dublin, then New Albany. Hilliard and Olentangy are the new growth suburbs. The public schools are very good in all those places, though I’m not sure about Bexley (it was very much a private school haven). I don’t have a feel for Westerville, though I lived there in the seventies. Hipper places are closer to downtown, like the Short North and German Village. You’ll get more diverse near OSU, obviously, and specifically whiter in the northern suburbs. Clintonville has nice pockets and is cheaper and more diverse than the suburbs, without being student housing. Public schools are less good in all these places.
Thank you for the reply otinkyad! Your reply is full of insightful information. I especially appreciate your openness!
Hubris
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Re: Possible Relocation to Columbus, OH Area

Post by Hubris »

Grandview is a hidden gem
welldone
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Re: Possible Relocation to Columbus, OH Area

Post by welldone »

Would recommend Worthington. Know several East Asian and mixed marriage families living there. Excellent schools.
jlawrence01
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Re: Possible Relocation to Columbus, OH Area

Post by jlawrence01 »

Before moving to Columbus (or any other Ohio) city, make sure that you understand the impact of Ohio's tax structure. MOST Ohio cities have LOCAL income taxes on earnings in the city you work. In addition, the city that you live in may also assess a earnings tax on the same income. There might be a credit that would offset part of it, but they might not. These local earnings taxes are in addition to Ohio State income taxes.
West of Chicago
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Re: Possible Relocation to Columbus, OH Area

Post by West of Chicago »

+1 for Worthington and Grandview. Very walkable if you can find a place near the town centers, and decent schools. (Our friend's daughter went K-12 in Worthington schools and just started her freshman year at Princeton.)

The newly built 'downtown' area of Dublin might be worth checking out, too, depending on where you will be working.

I lived in Clintonville for many years and really liked the diversity of the neighborhood, but I'm not sure the schools are as good as in some of the other suburbs.

Good luck with your search!
Topic Author
blackwhisker
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Re: Possible Relocation to Columbus, OH Area

Post by blackwhisker »

Hubris wrote: Sun Sep 20, 2020 8:29 pm Grandview is a hidden gem
Thanks Hurbris.
Topic Author
blackwhisker
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Re: Possible Relocation to Columbus, OH Area

Post by blackwhisker »

welldone wrote: Sun Sep 20, 2020 8:34 pm Would recommend Worthington. Know several East Asian and mixed marriage families living there. Excellent schools.
Thank you welldone. I will check it out.
Topic Author
blackwhisker
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Re: Possible Relocation to Columbus, OH Area

Post by blackwhisker »

jlawrence01 wrote: Sun Sep 20, 2020 8:37 pm Before moving to Columbus (or any other Ohio) city, make sure that you understand the impact of Ohio's tax structure. MOST Ohio cities have LOCAL income taxes on earnings in the city you work. In addition, the city that you live in may also assess a earnings tax on the same income. There might be a credit that would offset part of it, but they might not. These local earnings taxes are in addition to Ohio State income taxes.
Thank you for bringing up this important issue! I wouldn't want to be surprised. I will do my research on tax structure.
Topic Author
blackwhisker
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Re: Possible Relocation to Columbus, OH Area

Post by blackwhisker »

West of Chicago wrote: Mon Sep 21, 2020 10:23 am +1 for Worthington and Grandview. Very walkable if you can find a place near the town centers, and decent schools. (Our friend's daughter went K-12 in Worthington schools and just started her freshman year at Princeton.)

The newly built 'downtown' area of Dublin might be worth checking out, too, depending on where you will be working.

I lived in Clintonville for many years and really liked the diversity of the neighborhood, but I'm not sure the schools are as good as in some of the other suburbs.

Good luck with your search!
Thank you West of Chicago! I appreciate the helpful reply!
6bquick
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Re: Possible Relocation to Columbus, OH Area

Post by 6bquick »

Will you be work from home or commuting somewhere? if so, where?
Topic Author
blackwhisker
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Re: Possible Relocation to Columbus, OH Area

Post by blackwhisker »

6bquick wrote: Mon Sep 21, 2020 2:11 pm Will you be work from home or commuting somewhere? if so, where?
Will be working from home. Thanks.
Liam Friend
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Re: Possible Relocation to Columbus, OH Area

Post by Liam Friend »

Some Columbus-area municipalities have the additional income tax, but others do not. I would especially agree that Worthington and Dublin both sound appropriate for your needs.

Also, second on Tensuke market. The adjacent sushi restaurant, Akai Hana, is considered by many people as the best in Columbus. There is a strong Japanese (and Korean) population due to proximity of large Honda facility about 30 miles from Dublin.
Topic Author
blackwhisker
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Re: Possible Relocation to Columbus, OH Area

Post by blackwhisker »

Liam Friend wrote: Mon Sep 21, 2020 7:56 pm Some Columbus-area municipalities have the additional income tax, but others do not. I would especially agree that Worthington and Dublin both sound appropriate for your needs.

Also, second on Tensuke market. The adjacent sushi restaurant, Akai Hana, is considered by many people as the best in Columbus. There is a strong Japanese (and Korean) population due to proximity of large Honda facility about 30 miles from Dublin.
Thank you Liam Friend!
RickyAZ
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Re: Possible Relocation to Columbus, OH Area

Post by RickyAZ »

Find the Costcos.
Draw circles about 7.5 miles from them.
Those are your targets
(This works anywhere save for that weird Costco in Eagle CO. That circle. Needs to be much bigger 😉)
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Tim_in_GA
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Re: Possible Relocation to Columbus, OH Area

Post by Tim_in_GA »

Dublin or Powell are both really nice areas. We live in Lewis Center which is a little further away from Columbus. My wife is Asian and we find the shopping decent at CAM International Market and Sunrise International Market, both easily accessible from Dublin/Powell by heading down I-270. Park to Shop is a smaller but nice Asian market closer to Dublin & Powell. Bethel Road has a good variety of Asian restaurants.
mega317
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Re: Possible Relocation to Columbus, OH Area

Post by mega317 »

BOOOOOOOOOOOO
blackwhisker wrote: Sun Sep 20, 2020 2:32 pm Can someone suggest a city, or more specifically a particular school district?
https://www.a2schools.org/

No one up north will admit it but Columbus isn't horrible. We're just happy there won't be anyone in the building to watch the embarrassment this year.
https://www.bogleheads.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=6212
Trism
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Re: Possible Relocation to Columbus, OH Area

Post by Trism »

I hesitated a couple of times before posting such overwhelmingly negative comments, but counterpoints so far have been few... so I'm offering mine.

We relocated from Southern California to Columbus in 2014. This was a "temporary" move as well (career stepping stone for my spouse while he got his Green Card and US citizenship).

But as I'm now prone to say... we're in year seven of three. :shock:

This is a mid-sized city with few amenities. Even with kids, how many times do you want to visit COSI or go to a zoo? People here are into college sports unlike any place I've encountered, probably because there's little else to do or talk about. [Go Buckeyes?]

There are two seasons: Hot & Awful and Cold & Awful. Unless you are okay sweating constantly or freezing to death, much of the time it's a chore just to be outdoors. We have never used the two bicycles we moved here, despite being avid recreational bicyclists before we got here.

We live in an affluent, established neighborhood, but the reliability of the electrical grid is in Third World territory. We lose power multiple times a year for hours at a time.

I have no favorite restaurants.

The upside is that the people are nice and the housing is cheap, although the property taxes are outrageous. We put a cap on what we were willing to spend on a home based on how much we were willing to pay in taxes, not the price of the house itself.

Add in the municipal income tax on top of what goes to the State of Ohio, and you're in California tax territory but without the great weather and all the amenities. Or really anything else.

The best decision we made was keeping our place in California. I've worked remotely for 12+ years, so I take advantage of the flexibility of working from there at least part of every month. It's a lot of time on airplanes, but it's less expensive and more effective than therapy.

If my spouse's job hadn't worked out so spectacularly well, and I couldn't spend 25% or more of my time somewhere else, I would have called off this miserable Columbus experiment at the end of our original three-year plan.
Topic Author
blackwhisker
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Re: Possible Relocation to Columbus, OH Area

Post by blackwhisker »

Tim_in_GA wrote: Tue Sep 22, 2020 3:07 pm Dublin or Powell are both really nice areas. We live in Lewis Center which is a little further away from Columbus. My wife is Asian and we find the shopping decent at CAM International Market and Sunrise International Market, both easily accessible from Dublin/Powell by heading down I-270. Park to Shop is a smaller but nice Asian market closer to Dublin & Powell. Bethel Road has a good variety of Asian restaurants.
Thank you for the helpful and detailed information Tim!
otinkyad
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Re: Possible Relocation to Columbus, OH Area

Post by otinkyad »

Trism wrote: Wed Sep 23, 2020 8:38 am I hesitated a couple of times before posting such overwhelmingly negative comments, but counterpoints so far have been few... so I'm offering mine.

We relocated from Southern California to Columbus in 2014.
The OP didn’t ask what we thought of Columbus. I wouldn’t move back there for twice my California salary, but I did 30 years there, and life is short. You’re comparing one of the richest, most demographically and geographically diverse regions on the planet to a nice, well above average, Midwestern city. Yeah, SoCal is nicer, duh. Curiously, the people in Columbus (like much of the country) love to bag on California.
This is a mid-sized city with few amenities. Even with kids, how many times do you want to visit COSI or go to a zoo? People here are into college sports unlike any place I've encountered, probably because there's little else to do or talk about. [Go Buckeyes?]
It is the biggest college town in the country. When I lived there, 10% of the city of over a million would fit into Ohio Stadium, and about 5% of the city did six times a year.
There are two seasons: Hot & Awful and Cold & Awful.
Plus ungodly rainy in the Spring, and as nice as you could wish for in the Fall.
We live in an affluent, established neighborhood, but the reliability of the electrical grid is in Third World territory. We lose power multiple times a year for hours at a time.
Same here in California.
I have no favorite restaurants.
I still remember Katzinger’s, Figlio, Rotolo’s Pizza, and even Bob Evans fondly, but I’m not a fan of fine dining.
Topic Author
blackwhisker
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Re: Possible Relocation to Columbus, OH Area

Post by blackwhisker »

Trism wrote: Wed Sep 23, 2020 8:38 am I hesitated a couple of times before posting such overwhelmingly negative comments, but counterpoints so far have been few... so I'm offering mine.

We relocated from Southern California to Columbus in 2014. This was a "temporary" move as well (career stepping stone for my spouse while he got his Green Card and US citizenship).

But as I'm now prone to say... we're in year seven of three. :shock:

This is a mid-sized city with few amenities. Even with kids, how many times do you want to visit COSI or go to a zoo? People here are into college sports unlike any place I've encountered, probably because there's little else to do or talk about. [Go Buckeyes?]

There are two seasons: Hot & Awful and Cold & Awful. Unless you are okay sweating constantly or freezing to death, much of the time it's a chore just to be outdoors. We have never used the two bicycles we moved here, despite being avid recreational bicyclists before we got here.

We live in an affluent, established neighborhood, but the reliability of the electrical grid is in Third World territory. We lose power multiple times a year for hours at a time.

I have no favorite restaurants.

The upside is that the people are nice and the housing is cheap, although the property taxes are outrageous. We put a cap on what we were willing to spend on a home based on how much we were willing to pay in taxes, not the price of the house itself.

Add in the municipal income tax on top of what goes to the State of Ohio, and you're in California tax territory but without the great weather and all the amenities. Or really anything else.

The best decision we made was keeping our place in California. I've worked remotely for 12+ years, so I take advantage of the flexibility of working from there at least part of every month. It's a lot of time on airplanes, but it's less expensive and more effective than therapy.

If my spouse's job hadn't worked out so spectacularly well, and I couldn't spend 25% or more of my time somewhere else, I would have called off this miserable Columbus experiment at the end of our original three-year plan.
Trism, I really appreciate your honest perspective! Thank you for posting! I am sorry that living in Columbus has not worked well for you. Yes it's wise of you to keep your house in CA!

I really loved living in California until about 5 years ago. I am in Bay Area. It has gotten very crowded in my area. People are lot less nice here these days. On top of that, it has gotten very hot in the summer the last few years. We are supposed to have another heat wave this weekend of 100 degrees! And we just had 105 degree weather about 2-3 weeks ago. I don't know about southern CA, but we were affected by the wild fire smoke from mid august to mid september for a whole month. it was hard to breathe sometimes even indoors.

Again, I really appreciate your reply. I need to think about the taxes in Ohio. And prepare for power outage if we live there. It is possible I might realize Ohio is not for me after I live there for a few months. Thanks for confirming the people in Ohio are nice. That will be something I really look forward to if I move.
Trism
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Re: Possible Relocation to Columbus, OH Area

Post by Trism »

blackwhisker wrote: Wed Sep 23, 2020 1:57 pm
Trism wrote: Wed Sep 23, 2020 8:38 am I hesitated a couple of times before posting such overwhelmingly negative comments, but counterpoints so far have been few... so I'm offering mine.

We relocated from Southern California to Columbus in 2014. This was a "temporary" move as well (career stepping stone for my spouse while he got his Green Card and US citizenship).

But as I'm now prone to say... we're in year seven of three. :shock:

This is a mid-sized city with few amenities. Even with kids, how many times do you want to visit COSI or go to a zoo? People here are into college sports unlike any place I've encountered, probably because there's little else to do or talk about. [Go Buckeyes?]

There are two seasons: Hot & Awful and Cold & Awful. Unless you are okay sweating constantly or freezing to death, much of the time it's a chore just to be outdoors. We have never used the two bicycles we moved here, despite being avid recreational bicyclists before we got here.

We live in an affluent, established neighborhood, but the reliability of the electrical grid is in Third World territory. We lose power multiple times a year for hours at a time.

I have no favorite restaurants.

The upside is that the people are nice and the housing is cheap, although the property taxes are outrageous. We put a cap on what we were willing to spend on a home based on how much we were willing to pay in taxes, not the price of the house itself.

Add in the municipal income tax on top of what goes to the State of Ohio, and you're in California tax territory but without the great weather and all the amenities. Or really anything else.

The best decision we made was keeping our place in California. I've worked remotely for 12+ years, so I take advantage of the flexibility of working from there at least part of every month. It's a lot of time on airplanes, but it's less expensive and more effective than therapy.

If my spouse's job hadn't worked out so spectacularly well, and I couldn't spend 25% or more of my time somewhere else, I would have called off this miserable Columbus experiment at the end of our original three-year plan.
Trism, I really appreciate your honest perspective! Thank you for posting! I am sorry that living in Columbus has not worked well for you. Yes it's wise of you to keep your house in CA!

I really loved living in California until about 5 years ago. I am in Bay Area. It has gotten very crowded in my area. People are lot less nice here these days. On top of that, it has gotten very hot in the summer the last few years. We are supposed to have another heat wave this weekend of 100 degrees! And we just had 105 degree weather about 2-3 weeks ago. I don't know about southern CA, but we were affected by the wild fire smoke from mid august to mid september for a whole month. it was hard to breathe sometimes even indoors.

Again, I really appreciate your reply. I need to think about the taxes in Ohio. And prepare for power outage if we live there. It is possible I might realize Ohio is not for me after I live there for a few months. Thanks for confirming the people in Ohio are nice. That will be something I really look forward to if I move.
You're most welcome.

There are pros and cons to living anywhere, and I hope it works out well for you no matter what you choose.

Best of luck either way!
clip651
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Re: Possible Relocation to Columbus, OH Area

Post by clip651 »

blackwhisker wrote: Wed Sep 23, 2020 1:57 pm
I really loved living in California until about 5 years ago. I am in Bay Area. It has gotten very crowded in my area. People are lot less nice here these days. On top of that, it has gotten very hot in the summer the last few years. We are supposed to have another heat wave this weekend of 100 degrees! And we just had 105 degree weather about 2-3 weeks ago. I don't know about southern CA, but we were affected by the wild fire smoke from mid august to mid september for a whole month. it was hard to breathe sometimes even indoors.
They Bay Area has beautiful weather in general (if you like sunny and mild) aside from the heat waves you mention, the droughts at times, and the smoke from fires. I think a lot of Californians think of their weather as normal, when it is really rather exceptional compared to much of the rest of the USA. Your weather is a part of why your property values are so high in some areas, and why the nicest areas are crowded despite the costs.

Moving to an area with four seasons like Columbus will likely take some adjustment if you haven't lived in an area like that before. Give it time, it is possible to adjust! You will learn to dress for the varying weather, get used to needing AC and heat in different parts of the year, figure out what activities you enjoy outdoors in different times of year, etc. It can help if you plan to try to enjoy the seasons and the changes in the weather, and remember that whichever season you like the least, it won't last forever. (Hate winter? No worries, it'll be spring soon! Too hot? Well, fall will be here in a while, etc.)

best wishes,
cj
dwc13
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Re: Possible Relocation to Columbus, OH Area

Post by dwc13 »

Trism wrote: Wed Sep 23, 2020 8:38 am I hesitated a couple of times before posting such overwhelmingly negative comments, but counterpoints so far have been few... so I'm offering mine.

We relocated from Southern California to Columbus in 2014. This was a "temporary" move as well (career stepping stone for my spouse while he got his Green Card and US citizenship).

But as I'm now prone to say... we're in year seven of three. :shock:

This is a mid-sized city with few amenities. Even with kids, how many times do you want to visit COSI or go to a zoo? People here are into college sports unlike any place I've encountered, probably because there's little else to do or talk about. [Go Buckeyes?]

There are two seasons: Hot & Awful and Cold & Awful. Unless you are okay sweating constantly or freezing to death, much of the time it's a chore just to be outdoors. We have never used the two bicycles we moved here, despite being avid recreational bicyclists before we got here.

We live in an affluent, established neighborhood, but the reliability of the electrical grid is in Third World territory. We lose power multiple times a year for hours at a time.

I have no favorite restaurants.

The upside is that the people are nice and the housing is cheap, although the property taxes are outrageous. We put a cap on what we were willing to spend on a home based on how much we were willing to pay in taxes, not the price of the house itself.

Add in the municipal income tax on top of what goes to the State of Ohio, and you're in California tax territory but without the great weather and all the amenities. Or really anything else.

The best decision we made was keeping our place in California. I've worked remotely for 12+ years, so I take advantage of the flexibility of working from there at least part of every month. It's a lot of time on airplanes, but it's less expensive and more effective than therapy.

If my spouse's job hadn't worked out so spectacularly well, and I couldn't spend 25% or more of my time somewhere else, I would have called off this miserable Columbus experiment at the end of our original three-year plan.
Every place has pros and cons. "It's not having what you want but wanting what you have" (Sheryl Crow). Your choice. But since you complained about the seasons in Columbus, perhaps we should play, What season is it in California today? BTW, the following is mostly written in jest. Except for the part about Ohio State/college football and Donatos Pizza.

In California, it was uncontrolled wildfires burning throughout the state season last month. Time to evacuate again. That was preceded by drought season -- which is largely ignored by millions of car washing & lawn watering addicts in the state collectively doing their best to drain Lake Mead. See -- northern & southern Californians can work together on some things. Then it will briefly be mudslide season, especially in areas where the fires burned off the ground cover. The good news is mudslides help Caltrans "repair" millions of potholes taking up residence on the state's roads.

Meanwhile, all summer in Northern CA has been rolling brownout season. Not just a few times, either. Alas, there might finally be relief in sight as many are fleeing the Bay Area in search of affordable housing and tolerable commutes, thereby reducing the strain on PG&E's antiquated infrastructure. Affordable housing -- what a foreign concept in California, unless you live on the wrong side of the various fault lines.

A new season begins in October, when campaigning during the annual Proposition Bullsh*t Month (aka, absurd things put up for public vote) begins in earnest. Fortunately, there are a few more months before the correlated budget impasse & gridlock season are the lead news story for weeks; that's Sacramento's turn to have the spotlight. Following another round of tax & fee hikes, it will again be time to wait in line at DMV.

Hey, I haven't even (really) mentioned earthquakes or "save the [insert name of obscure plant/animal/rock/tech company] movement".

Okay, I get that Columbus isn't San Francisco, San Diego or (thankfully) Los Angeles. Nevertheless, I enjoyed living in Columbus while I attended Ohio State. Very friendly people. Fresh air. Change of seasons. Drivers that don't cause multi-car accidents when a few raindrops start falling. Now there's even a Las Vegas-style casino -- not the glorified card rooms in California that can't even host a real craps game. Donatos Pizza -- my all-time favorite -- is headquartered in the area. Before the pandemic, you could easily drive to and spend a day or three at Cedar Point in Sandusky. Cleveland is 2+ hours away -- you could spend that on the 405 just trying to get to LAX. Cincinnati is...well, never mind. Head over to Wright Patterson AFB in Dayton once the pandemic is over.

The reason college football is so big in Columbus is because Ohio State has been pretty good over the years. I can understand why many from SoCal have no idea what a good college football program looks like (or a pro football team, for that matter), unless one from the B1G Ten or SEC (or Clemson and occasionally Oregon) is in town to pummel USC. For years, there was no MLB, NFL, NBA, NHL team in Columbus, so Buckeyes teams were what the locals followed. The Yankees had a AAA farm club (Clippers), but once it got rid of dime-a-draft night, watching minor league baseball just wasn't the same.

Hopefully you will find additional ways to improve your "quality of life". Nobody should be miserable because they live in Columbus. Unless, of course, they're a Michigan fan.
Last edited by dwc13 on Thu Sep 24, 2020 9:31 am, edited 1 time in total.
KarenC
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Re: Possible Relocation to Columbus, OH Area

Post by KarenC »

clip651 wrote: Wed Sep 23, 2020 5:59 pm
blackwhisker wrote: Wed Sep 23, 2020 1:57 pm I really loved living in California until about 5 years ago. I am in Bay Area. It has gotten very crowded in my area. People are lot less nice here these days. On top of that, it has gotten very hot in the summer the last few years. We are supposed to have another heat wave this weekend of 100 degrees! And we just had 105 degree weather about 2-3 weeks ago. I don't know about southern CA, but we were affected by the wild fire smoke from mid august to mid september for a whole month. it was hard to breathe sometimes even indoors.
[…]

Moving to an area with four seasons like Columbus will likely take some adjustment if you haven't lived in an area like that before. Give it time, it is possible to adjust! You will learn to dress for the varying weather, get used to needing AC and heat in different parts of the year, figure out what activities you enjoy outdoors in different times of year, etc. It can help if you plan to try to enjoy the seasons and the changes in the weather, and remember that whichever season you like the least, it won't last forever. (Hate winter? No worries, it'll be spring soon! Too hot? Well, fall will be here in a while, etc.)

[…]
"There's no such thing as bad weather, only bad clothes."
"The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool." — Richard P. Feynman
jlawrence01
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Re: Possible Relocation to Columbus, OH Area

Post by jlawrence01 »

dwc13 wrote: Thu Sep 24, 2020 3:32 am


Okay, I get that Columbus isn't San Francisco, San Diego or (thankfully) Los Angeles. Nevertheless, I enjoyed living in Columbus while I attended Ohio State. Very friendly people. Fresh air. Change of seasons. Drivers that don't cause multi-car accidents when a few raindrops start falling. Now there's even a Las Vegas-style casino -- not the glorified card rooms in California that can't even host a real craps game. Donatos Pizza -- my all-time favorite -- is headquartered in the area. Before the pandemic, you could easily drive to and spend a day or three at Cedar Point in Sandusky. Cleveland is 2+ hours away -- you could spend that on the 405 just trying to get to LAX. Cincinnati is...well, never mind. Head over to Wright Patterson AFB in Dayton once the pandemic is over.

This brings back the good old days when considering two job offers - one in the Cleveland area and one in Orange County, CA.

Choosing Cleveland was a great decision. It allowed me to buy a nice home in a safe walking neighborhood. It allowed me to max out my 401(k) and IRAs as the cost of living was so much less than SOCAL.

We made a lot of friends that we still meet up with twenty years later. They are great people. When my mother died during the move to Cleveland, several neighbors came in and cleaned the house so that it was ready for when the movers arrived. And if we needed anything, they were always there to help.
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Watty
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Re: Possible Relocation to Columbus, OH Area

Post by Watty »

I don't know anything about Ohio but when moving between states be sure to research the details about how to handle your drivers license, car insurance, and car registration. A common mistake is to think that you do not need to change those until your old one runs out. It varies by state but it is not uncommon for you to be require to change those within about 30 or 60 days of when you move.

A few things to keep in mind.

1) You might pay your California car registration a month before you move then have a pay the OHIO registration again after you move. You are unlikely to get a refund on your California registration. If you know you will be running into this you may be able to pay to get a temporary extension on your California registration. People need to do this when they car will not pass an emission test and they have not been able to get it fixed yet.

2) With the pandemic the rules may have changed for going into the OHIO offices to get your drivers license or car registration. Plan it it taking longer than normal and make sure that you know what the current situation is.

3) If you will be needing to get another car when you move then it will likely make sense to buy it in OHIO since you will not need to deal with the California sales tax or registration. If you have bought a car recently, like within six months or a year, then Ohio charge you sales tax on the car again even though you paid California sales tax when you bought it.
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Re: Possible Relocation to Columbus, OH Area

Post by stoptothink »

dwc13 wrote: Thu Sep 24, 2020 3:32 am
Trism wrote: Wed Sep 23, 2020 8:38 am I hesitated a couple of times before posting such overwhelmingly negative comments, but counterpoints so far have been few... so I'm offering mine.

We relocated from Southern California to Columbus in 2014. This was a "temporary" move as well (career stepping stone for my spouse while he got his Green Card and US citizenship).

But as I'm now prone to say... we're in year seven of three. :shock:

This is a mid-sized city with few amenities. Even with kids, how many times do you want to visit COSI or go to a zoo? People here are into college sports unlike any place I've encountered, probably because there's little else to do or talk about. [Go Buckeyes?]

There are two seasons: Hot & Awful and Cold & Awful. Unless you are okay sweating constantly or freezing to death, much of the time it's a chore just to be outdoors. We have never used the two bicycles we moved here, despite being avid recreational bicyclists before we got here.

We live in an affluent, established neighborhood, but the reliability of the electrical grid is in Third World territory. We lose power multiple times a year for hours at a time.

I have no favorite restaurants.

The upside is that the people are nice and the housing is cheap, although the property taxes are outrageous. We put a cap on what we were willing to spend on a home based on how much we were willing to pay in taxes, not the price of the house itself.

Add in the municipal income tax on top of what goes to the State of Ohio, and you're in California tax territory but without the great weather and all the amenities. Or really anything else.

The best decision we made was keeping our place in California. I've worked remotely for 12+ years, so I take advantage of the flexibility of working from there at least part of every month. It's a lot of time on airplanes, but it's less expensive and more effective than therapy.

If my spouse's job hadn't worked out so spectacularly well, and I couldn't spend 25% or more of my time somewhere else, I would have called off this miserable Columbus experiment at the end of our original three-year plan.
Every place has pros and cons. "It's not having what you want but wanting what you have" (Sheryl Crow). Your choice. But since you complained about the seasons in Columbus, perhaps we should play, What season is it in California today? BTW, the following is mostly written in jest. Except for the part about Ohio State/college football and Donatos Pizza.

In California, it was uncontrolled wildfires burning throughout the state season last month. Time to evacuate again. That was preceded by drought season -- which is largely ignored by millions of car washing & lawn watering addicts in the state collectively doing their best to drain Lake Mead. See -- northern & southern Californians can work together on some things. Then it will briefly be mudslide season, especially in areas where the fires burned off the ground cover. The good news is mudslides help Caltrans "repair" millions of potholes taking up residence on the state's roads.

Meanwhile, all summer in Northern CA has been rolling brownout season. Not just a few times, either. Alas, there might finally be relief in sight as many are fleeing the Bay Area in search of affordable housing and tolerable commutes, thereby reducing the strain on PG&E's antiquated infrastructure. Affordable housing -- what a foreign concept in California, unless you live on the wrong side of the various fault lines.

A new season begins in October, when campaigning during the annual Proposition Bullsh*t Month (aka, absurd things put up for public vote) begins in earnest. Fortunately, there are a few more months before the correlated budget impasse & gridlock season are the lead news story for weeks; that's Sacramento's turn to have the spotlight. Following another round of tax & fee hikes, it will again be time to wait in line at DMV.

Hey, I haven't even (really) mentioned earthquakes or "save the [insert name of obscure plant/animal/rock/tech company] movement".

Okay, I get that Columbus isn't San Francisco, San Diego or (thankfully) Los Angeles. Nevertheless, I enjoyed living in Columbus while I attended Ohio State. Very friendly people. Fresh air. Change of seasons. Drivers that don't cause multi-car accidents when a few raindrops start falling. Now there's even a Las Vegas-style casino -- not the glorified card rooms in California that can't even host a real craps game. Donatos Pizza -- my all-time favorite -- is headquartered in the area. Before the pandemic, you could easily drive to and spend a day or three at Cedar Point in Sandusky. Cleveland is 2+ hours away -- you could spend that on the 405 just trying to get to LAX. Cincinnati is...well, never mind. Head over to Wright Patterson AFB in Dayton once the pandemic is over.

The reason college football is so big in Columbus is because Ohio State has been pretty good over the years. I can understand why many from SoCal have no idea what a good college football program looks like (or a pro football team, for that matter), unless one from the B1G Ten or SEC (or Clemson and occasionally Oregon) is in town to pummel USC. For years, there was no MLB, NFL, NBA, NHL team in Columbus, so Buckeyes teams were what the locals followed. The Yankees had a AAA farm club (Clippers), but once it got rid of dime-a-draft night, watching minor league baseball just wasn't the same.

Hopefully you will find additional ways to improve your "quality of life". Nobody should be miserable because they live in Columbus. Unless, of course, they're a Michigan fan.
I've never actually been to Ohio other than a brief stop at the Cleveland Airport, but as a California native who you couldn't pay (well, maybe 8-figures...for a year) to move back there, I found this quite amusing. There are a grand total of two remaining members of my and my wife's families (both sets of parents, 9 siblings and their families) who haven't left in the last decade, and they are both now making exit plans. You hit on a few of the reasons we don't even like to visit anymore.
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blackwhisker
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Re: Possible Relocation to Columbus, OH Area

Post by blackwhisker »

dwc13 wrote: Thu Sep 24, 2020 3:32 am
Trism wrote: Wed Sep 23, 2020 8:38 am I hesitated a couple of times before posting such overwhelmingly negative comments, but counterpoints so far have been few... so I'm offering mine.

We relocated from Southern California to Columbus in 2014. This was a "temporary" move as well (career stepping stone for my spouse while he got his Green Card and US citizenship).

But as I'm now prone to say... we're in year seven of three. :shock:

This is a mid-sized city with few amenities. Even with kids, how many times do you want to visit COSI or go to a zoo? People here are into college sports unlike any place I've encountered, probably because there's little else to do or talk about. [Go Buckeyes?]

There are two seasons: Hot & Awful and Cold & Awful. Unless you are okay sweating constantly or freezing to death, much of the time it's a chore just to be outdoors. We have never used the two bicycles we moved here, despite being avid recreational bicyclists before we got here.

We live in an affluent, established neighborhood, but the reliability of the electrical grid is in Third World territory. We lose power multiple times a year for hours at a time.

I have no favorite restaurants.

The upside is that the people are nice and the housing is cheap, although the property taxes are outrageous. We put a cap on what we were willing to spend on a home based on how much we were willing to pay in taxes, not the price of the house itself.

Add in the municipal income tax on top of what goes to the State of Ohio, and you're in California tax territory but without the great weather and all the amenities. Or really anything else.

The best decision we made was keeping our place in California. I've worked remotely for 12+ years, so I take advantage of the flexibility of working from there at least part of every month. It's a lot of time on airplanes, but it's less expensive and more effective than therapy.

If my spouse's job hadn't worked out so spectacularly well, and I couldn't spend 25% or more of my time somewhere else, I would have called off this miserable Columbus experiment at the end of our original three-year plan.
Every place has pros and cons. "It's not having what you want but wanting what you have" (Sheryl Crow). Your choice. But since you complained about the seasons in Columbus, perhaps we should play, What season is it in California today? BTW, the following is mostly written in jest. Except for the part about Ohio State/college football and Donatos Pizza.

In California, it was uncontrolled wildfires burning throughout the state season last month. Time to evacuate again. That was preceded by drought season -- which is largely ignored by millions of car washing & lawn watering addicts in the state collectively doing their best to drain Lake Mead. See -- northern & southern Californians can work together on some things. Then it will briefly be mudslide season, especially in areas where the fires burned off the ground cover. The good news is mudslides help Caltrans "repair" millions of potholes taking up residence on the state's roads.

Meanwhile, all summer in Northern CA has been rolling brownout season. Not just a few times, either. Alas, there might finally be relief in sight as many are fleeing the Bay Area in search of affordable housing and tolerable commutes, thereby reducing the strain on PG&E's antiquated infrastructure. Affordable housing -- what a foreign concept in California, unless you live on the wrong side of the various fault lines.

A new season begins in October, when campaigning during the annual Proposition Bullsh*t Month (aka, absurd things put up for public vote) begins in earnest. Fortunately, there are a few more months before the correlated budget impasse & gridlock season are the lead news story for weeks; that's Sacramento's turn to have the spotlight. Following another round of tax & fee hikes, it will again be time to wait in line at DMV.

Hey, I haven't even (really) mentioned earthquakes or "save the [insert name of obscure plant/animal/rock/tech company] movement".

Okay, I get that Columbus isn't San Francisco, San Diego or (thankfully) Los Angeles. Nevertheless, I enjoyed living in Columbus while I attended Ohio State. Very friendly people. Fresh air. Change of seasons. Drivers that don't cause multi-car accidents when a few raindrops start falling. Now there's even a Las Vegas-style casino -- not the glorified card rooms in California that can't even host a real craps game. Donatos Pizza -- my all-time favorite -- is headquartered in the area. Before the pandemic, you could easily drive to and spend a day or three at Cedar Point in Sandusky. Cleveland is 2+ hours away -- you could spend that on the 405 just trying to get to LAX. Cincinnati is...well, never mind. Head over to Wright Patterson AFB in Dayton once the pandemic is over.

The reason college football is so big in Columbus is because Ohio State has been pretty good over the years. I can understand why many from SoCal have no idea what a good college football program looks like (or a pro football team, for that matter), unless one from the B1G Ten or SEC (or Clemson and occasionally Oregon) is in town to pummel USC. For years, there was no MLB, NFL, NBA, NHL team in Columbus, so Buckeyes teams were what the locals followed. The Yankees had a AAA farm club (Clippers), but once it got rid of dime-a-draft night, watching minor league baseball just wasn't the same.

Hopefully you will find additional ways to improve your "quality of life". Nobody should be miserable because they live in Columbus. Unless, of course, they're a Michigan fan.
Thank you dwc13! I appreciate your informative and entertaining reply.
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blackwhisker
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Re: Possible Relocation to Columbus, OH Area

Post by blackwhisker »

Watty wrote: Thu Sep 24, 2020 2:56 pm I don't know anything about Ohio but when moving between states be sure to research the details about how to handle your drivers license, car insurance, and car registration. A common mistake is to think that you do not need to change those until your old one runs out. It varies by state but it is not uncommon for you to be require to change those within about 30 or 60 days of when you move.

A few things to keep in mind.

1) You might pay your California car registration a month before you move then have a pay the OHIO registration again after you move. You are unlikely to get a refund on your California registration. If you know you will be running into this you may be able to pay to get a temporary extension on your California registration. People need to do this when they car will not pass an emission test and they have not been able to get it fixed yet.

2) With the pandemic the rules may have changed for going into the OHIO offices to get your drivers license or car registration. Plan it it taking longer than normal and make sure that you know what the current situation is.

3) If you will be needing to get another car when you move then it will likely make sense to buy it in OHIO since you will not need to deal with the California sales tax or registration. If you have bought a car recently, like within six months or a year, then Ohio charge you sales tax on the car again even though you paid California sales tax when you bought it.
Thank you Watty! As usual, I appreciate your sage advice!
dwc13
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Re: Possible Relocation to Columbus, OH Area

Post by dwc13 »

KarenC wrote: Thu Sep 24, 2020 7:23 am
"There's no such thing as bad weather, only bad clothes."
+1

Reminds me of a bumper sticker I saw in Jackson Hole, Wyoming: "There is no bad skiing, only bad skiers".
dwc13
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Re: Possible Relocation to Columbus, OH Area

Post by dwc13 »

blackwhisker wrote: Thu Sep 24, 2020 7:48 pm
Thank you dwc13! I appreciate your informative and entertaining reply.

You're welcome. Written from experience, having lived in the Bay Area years ago when it was still marginally affordable. Besides, there are times when an injection of levity is needed in these threads.

On a more serious note, others have mentioned Dublin, which is very nice. I have several friends who live in Lewis Center, Upper Arlington & Worthington and they're happy with their choice.

For additional information about Ohio schools, check out the following sites:

US News -- All Ohio high schools
https://www.usnews.com/education/best-h ... o/rankings

US News -- Columbus, Ohio high schools (includes suburbs)
https://www.usnews.com/education/best-h ... s-oh-18140

Niche.com -- Public & private high schools in Ohio
https://www.niche.com/k12/search/best-h ... ls/s/ohio/

Niche.com -- Public high schools in Ohio
https://www.niche.com/k12/search/best-p ... ls/s/ohio/

Columbus is primarily located in Franklin County, with parts of the city extending into Delaware and Fairfield counties. The surrounding counties are Delaware (north), Licking (northeast), Fairfield (southeast), Pickaway (south) and Madison (west) and Union (northwest).

Ohio Department of Education -- Most of the areas under consideration will probably be located in Franklin County, so you can do a sort (filter) on the ODE Designated County in the downloadable spreadsheets.
http://education.ohio.gov/lists_and_rankings

I re-read your initial post and you specifically mentioned Whole Foods and Target. Good news, there are 3 Whole Foods in Columbus: Dublin, Upper Arlington and Easton (I-270 & Morse Road on the east side). Target stores are scattered throughout the area. There are also 3 Costco locations (Easton, Plain City @5 miles west of Dublin, and north of I-270 beltway off I-71 near Polaris Fashion Place).
camiboxer
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Re: Possible Relocation to Columbus, OH Area

Post by camiboxer »

Born and raised central Ohio native. You can't go wrong with Dublin, Worthington, Westerville, Powell, Lewis Center. Houses are going for well above asking prices due to lack of demand despite them being built everywhere. The college football thing....let's just say it's in the water. Go Bucks!!
Welcome to a wonderful state. Glad to have you!
MathIsMyWayr
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Re: Possible Relocation to Columbus, OH Area

Post by MathIsMyWayr »

Don't overthink. The place where you live now or plan to move to is the best place for you. There are many who are happy there.
TechieTechie
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Re: Possible Relocation to Columbus, OH Area

Post by TechieTechie »

I grew up in Central Ohio and this info is spot on. Columbus is often thought of as the largest suburb ever to grace the earth. It's bland and loaded with sprawl. Now, that's not necessarily bad and Cbus has definitely become more 'cosmopolitan' over the last few decades. But there is little 'historic city' vibe unless you are in German Village, Victorian Village, Grandview or Old Dublin. (the West side was developed first, IIRC). I find the west side to be much prettier...the east side (around Albany/Easton) is new development, which is not to my taste. It cannot be said enough, tho, that it's a town still centered around OSU and OSU football. Be prepared to ignore or embrace.

Throwing it out there, but you may also want to consider Cleveland. It's growth trajectory is a bit lagging behind Cbus, but it has more big city amenities (great symphony, rail transit, art museum) and Lake Erie. Yes, it's colder and gets more snow, but it's a lot cooler in the summer. Just food for thought.

[Political comments removed by admin LadyGeek]
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Re: Possible Relocation to Columbus, OH Area

Post by LadyGeek »

This is a "No politics" forum. I removed an off-topic comment regarding political party preferences for Ohio. As a reminder, see: Politics and Religion
In order to avoid the inevitable frictions that arise from these topics, political or religious posts and comments are prohibited. The only exceptions to this rule are:
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Re: Possible Relocation to Columbus, OH Area

Post by dh »

Powell and Dublin
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blackwhisker
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Re: Possible Relocation to Columbus, OH Area

Post by blackwhisker »

dwc13 wrote: Fri Sep 25, 2020 11:23 am
blackwhisker wrote: Thu Sep 24, 2020 7:48 pm
Thank you dwc13! I appreciate your informative and entertaining reply.

You're welcome. Written from experience, having lived in the Bay Area years ago when it was still marginally affordable. Besides, there are times when an injection of levity is needed in these threads.

On a more serious note, others have mentioned Dublin, which is very nice. I have several friends who live in Lewis Center, Upper Arlington & Worthington and they're happy with their choice.

For additional information about Ohio schools, check out the following sites:

US News -- All Ohio high schools
https://www.usnews.com/education/best-h ... o/rankings

US News -- Columbus, Ohio high schools (includes suburbs)
https://www.usnews.com/education/best-h ... s-oh-18140

Niche.com -- Public & private high schools in Ohio
https://www.niche.com/k12/search/best-h ... ls/s/ohio/

Niche.com -- Public high schools in Ohio
https://www.niche.com/k12/search/best-p ... ls/s/ohio/

Columbus is primarily located in Franklin County, with parts of the city extending into Delaware and Fairfield counties. The surrounding counties are Delaware (north), Licking (northeast), Fairfield (southeast), Pickaway (south) and Madison (west) and Union (northwest).

Ohio Department of Education -- Most of the areas under consideration will probably be located in Franklin County, so you can do a sort (filter) on the ODE Designated County in the downloadable spreadsheets.
http://education.ohio.gov/lists_and_rankings

I re-read your initial post and you specifically mentioned Whole Foods and Target. Good news, there are 3 Whole Foods in Columbus: Dublin, Upper Arlington and Easton (I-270 & Morse Road on the east side). Target stores are scattered throughout the area. There are also 3 Costco locations (Easton, Plain City @5 miles west of Dublin, and north of I-270 beltway off I-71 near Polaris Fashion Place).
Thank you for the reply dwc13! It is really nice of you to summary the information for me and even include all the links! Thanks again and have a nice day.
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blackwhisker
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Re: Possible Relocation to Columbus, OH Area

Post by blackwhisker »

camiboxer wrote: Fri Sep 25, 2020 8:47 pm Born and raised central Ohio native. You can't go wrong with Dublin, Worthington, Westerville, Powell, Lewis Center. Houses are going for well above asking prices due to lack of demand despite them being built everywhere. The college football thing....let's just say it's in the water. Go Bucks!!
Welcome to a wonderful state. Glad to have you!
Thank you for the warm welcome camiboxer!
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blackwhisker
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Re: Possible Relocation to Columbus, OH Area

Post by blackwhisker »

dh wrote: Sat Sep 26, 2020 7:51 am Powell and Dublin
Thanks dh.
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Re: Possible Relocation to Columbus, OH Area

Post by blackwhisker »

TechieTechie wrote: Sat Sep 26, 2020 6:25 am I grew up in Central Ohio and this info is spot on. Columbus is often thought of as the largest suburb ever to grace the earth. It's bland and loaded with sprawl. Now, that's not necessarily bad and Cbus has definitely become more 'cosmopolitan' over the last few decades. But there is little 'historic city' vibe unless you are in German Village, Victorian Village, Grandview or Old Dublin. (the West side was developed first, IIRC). I find the west side to be much prettier...the east side (around Albany/Easton) is new development, which is not to my taste. It cannot be said enough, tho, that it's a town still centered around OSU and OSU football. Be prepared to ignore or embrace.

Throwing it out there, but you may also want to consider Cleveland. It's growth trajectory is a bit lagging behind Cbus, but it has more big city amenities (great symphony, rail transit, art museum) and Lake Erie. Yes, it's colder and gets more snow, but it's a lot cooler in the summer. Just food for thought.

[Political comments removed by admin LadyGeek]
Thank you TechieTechie. Cleveland sounds like a nice city.
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Re: Possible Relocation to Columbus, OH Area

Post by rockstar »

I lived there for about two years near Worthington. It was nice. That was back in the early 2000s. No idea what is looks like now.
hightower
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Re: Possible Relocation to Columbus, OH Area

Post by hightower »

blackwhisker wrote: Sun Sep 20, 2020 2:32 pm Our family is contemplating to move to Columbus, OH area for 6 month - 1 year. If works out, it might turn into a permanent move.

Can someone suggest a city, or more specifically a particular school district?

Below are my search criteria:

-Safe. Would like to find a place that is safe to walk after dark.

-Good public schools. Safe but not too academically competitive. We currently live in an area in California where the public schools are too competitive for us.

-Close to shopping. It would be ideal if there are a Wholefoods and a Target close by.

-Nice and down-to-earth people. And Immigrant-friendly. Our family is east Asian. I lived in the mid west for several years long time ago. Interestingly, I made many friends in a small town with no ethnic diversity. In contrast, I didn't make many friends in a mid size town where there was plenty of diversity.

-Relatively easy to rent a single family house or town house.

I visited Columbus area a couple of years ago. I didn't see many places because of time constraint. I liked Dublin area. But I wonder what the public school system is like there.

Thank you.

Update: I would appreciate any honest and open opinions about the Columbus area (positive and negative), not limited to my list of questions above.
My brother in law lives in Grandview. He went to college at OSU and never left, lol. It's a walkable neighborhood for sure. Not cheap though. I don't know anything about the school district there, but I'm pretty sure it's a popular place for families so my guess is schools are good too. Definitely close to a lot of shopping and restaurants/entertainment. And yes, there's all the retail stores you mention nearby.
My only negatives about Columbus is it doesn't have a lot of character. The city is kind of bland looking in my opinion. We live in Cincinnati and I think I'm spoiled by our beautiful old downtown neighborhoods with tons of 19th century Victorian architecture and sprawling hills all around. Not a big deal really, just something to consider if you like that sort of thing.
As for "immigrant friendly" it's sad that in this country people have to worry about that. But, I can say that my best friend in college was from Somalia and his entire family lived in Columbus. There is, for whatever reason, a large Somali immigrant population there. And with it being a large university town, you will certainly encounter more diversity there than other parts of the state IMO. Regardless, this country is a land of immigrants and you are welcome to live in any city you choose!
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blackwhisker
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Re: Possible Relocation to Columbus, OH Area

Post by blackwhisker »

hightower wrote: Sat Sep 26, 2020 2:42 pm
blackwhisker wrote: Sun Sep 20, 2020 2:32 pm Our family is contemplating to move to Columbus, OH area for 6 month - 1 year. If works out, it might turn into a permanent move.

Can someone suggest a city, or more specifically a particular school district?

Below are my search criteria:

-Safe. Would like to find a place that is safe to walk after dark.

-Good public schools. Safe but not too academically competitive. We currently live in an area in California where the public schools are too competitive for us.

-Close to shopping. It would be ideal if there are a Wholefoods and a Target close by.

-Nice and down-to-earth people. And Immigrant-friendly. Our family is east Asian. I lived in the mid west for several years long time ago. Interestingly, I made many friends in a small town with no ethnic diversity. In contrast, I didn't make many friends in a mid size town where there was plenty of diversity.

-Relatively easy to rent a single family house or town house.

I visited Columbus area a couple of years ago. I didn't see many places because of time constraint. I liked Dublin area. But I wonder what the public school system is like there.

Thank you.

Update: I would appreciate any honest and open opinions about the Columbus area (positive and negative), not limited to my list of questions above.
My brother in law lives in Grandview. He went to college at OSU and never left, lol. It's a walkable neighborhood for sure. Not cheap though. I don't know anything about the school district there, but I'm pretty sure it's a popular place for families so my guess is schools are good too. Definitely close to a lot of shopping and restaurants/entertainment. And yes, there's all the retail stores you mention nearby.
My only negatives about Columbus is it doesn't have a lot of character. The city is kind of bland looking in my opinion. We live in Cincinnati and I think I'm spoiled by our beautiful old downtown neighborhoods with tons of 19th century Victorian architecture and sprawling hills all around. Not a big deal really, just something to consider if you like that sort of thing.
As for "immigrant friendly" it's sad that in this country people have to worry about that. But, I can say that my best friend in college was from Somalia and his entire family lived in Columbus. There is, for whatever reason, a large Somali immigrant population there. And with it being a large university town, you will certainly encounter more diversity there than other parts of the state IMO.
Thank you hightower! I visited Cincinnati for a day several decades ago. Yes it is a beautiful city! I will keep that in mind.
dwc13
Posts: 158
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Re: Possible Relocation to Columbus, OH Area

Post by dwc13 »

jlawrence01 wrote: Thu Sep 24, 2020 2:34 pm
dwc13 wrote: Thu Sep 24, 2020 3:32 am


Okay, I get that Columbus isn't San Francisco, San Diego or (thankfully) Los Angeles. Nevertheless, I enjoyed living in Columbus while I attended Ohio State. Very friendly people. Fresh air. Change of seasons. Drivers that don't cause multi-car accidents when a few raindrops start falling. Now there's even a Las Vegas-style casino -- not the glorified card rooms in California that can't even host a real craps game. Donatos Pizza -- my all-time favorite -- is headquartered in the area. Before the pandemic, you could easily drive to and spend a day or three at Cedar Point in Sandusky. Cleveland is 2+ hours away -- you could spend that on the 405 just trying to get to LAX. Cincinnati is...well, never mind. Head over to Wright Patterson AFB in Dayton once the pandemic is over.

This brings back the good old days when considering two job offers - one in the Cleveland area and one in Orange County, CA.

Choosing Cleveland was a great decision. It allowed me to buy a nice home in a safe walking neighborhood. It allowed me to max out my 401(k) and IRAs as the cost of living was so much less than SOCAL.

We made a lot of friends that we still meet up with twenty years later. They are great people. When my mother died during the move to Cleveland, several neighbors came in and cleaned the house so that it was ready for when the movers arrived. And if we needed anything, they were always there to help.
Glad to hear things worked out very well for you while living in the North Coast. Northeast Ohio was (and still is) a great place to live -- if you're able to deal with winter weather (especially on the east side) and the occasional Cleveland joke (no, not the Browns, the city). I still get back there and Columbus on a regular basis to visit long-time friends and enjoy a large Donatos pizza (or 3). If you haven't been to downtown Cleveland in a while, you might be very surprised at its transformation.
dwc13
Posts: 158
Joined: Tue Aug 21, 2012 9:51 pm

Re: Possible Relocation to Columbus, OH Area

Post by dwc13 »

stoptothink wrote: Thu Sep 24, 2020 3:07 pm
I've never actually been to Ohio other than a brief stop at the Cleveland Airport, but as a California native who you couldn't pay (well, maybe 8-figures...for a year) to move back there, I found this quite amusing. There are a grand total of two remaining members of my and my wife's families (both sets of parents, 9 siblings and their families) who haven't left in the last decade, and they are both now making exit plans. You hit on a few of the reasons we don't even like to visit anymore.
I'm not totally down on California, not by a long shot, but there are definitely major problems in the Golden State. Even so, I still love visiting San Francisco and riding Muni to explore the different neighborhoods. Taking the N Judah line to Ocean Beach to watch the sunset remains one of my favorite things to do when I visit. Unfortunately, it's way too expensive for us to even consider living in the Bay Area. There's still hope, though, in other parts of the state. A few years ago I saw a listing for a "fixer-upper" house in Tuolumne for $19K.

Hope you're doing well wherever you relocated.
Flashes1
Posts: 960
Joined: Wed May 07, 2008 7:43 am

Re: Possible Relocation to Columbus, OH Area

Post by Flashes1 »

If you're looking for a small town with a ton of character and are okay with being 25 miles from downtown Columbus, may I suggest Granville, home of Denison University.

Settle by folks from Massachusetts in the early 1800's it has a very New England vibe with some historically important architecture. Good restaurants (Buxton Inn & Granville Inn), quaint little downtown shops, ice parlor, and brew pub. Among the top public schools in the state. College town with extra energy.

Golf course was designed by Donald Ross, arguably the greatest architect in golf history.

Google street view: Broadway Street, Granville, Ohio.
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