Toddler Education

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naturetech
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Joined: Sun May 22, 2016 8:49 pm

Toddler Education

Post by naturetech »

Hi Boggleheads,

I am looking for advice on how to educate my 'Toddler' daughter(3 years Old). Currently due to Covid situation she is not going to daycare till March(We stopped sending her to daycare because of Covid). As of now she spends some time watching Tablet/TV(appx 2-3 hrs/day), Painting, Playing with Doll Houses, Toys and in the evening outside cycling with other kids. All education experts, pediatricians don't recommend 'Tablet/TV' time but not sure how to make kid stop watching 'Tablet/TV' while working. So I am reaching out to the community for help.

I teach her Alphabets, numbers, read story books and other basics for 30-45 minutes/day. But I feel its gets boring teaching same stuff every day.

My goal is to further reduce her Tablet, TV time and help her learn new things in playful way. I am a big fan of 'Finnish/Sweden' education but not sure how to implement that at home. Planning to buy some books to understand/implement 'Finnish/Sweden' education.

Can any education experts, parents answer my below queries?
  • How to educate child playfully without forcing anything. I want knowledge/education to by product of play, rather than force child to learn
  • Any good books to read about kids education. I had ordered 'The Montessori Toddler' book.
  • Any good book to read about 'Finnish/Sweden' education system and curriculum to follow.
Please feel free to add any other advices to make child's education fun and divert the attention from 'TV/Tablet'.

Thanks.
Last edited by naturetech on Fri Sep 18, 2020 2:34 pm, edited 2 times in total.
livesoft
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Re: Toddler Education

Post by livesoft »

How about a 3 hour free-form walk-in-the-woods every day? You can talk about all the plants, insects, snakes, lizards, frogs, tadpoles, fish, turtles, rabbits, squirrels, birds, and other animals that you come across. Plus the rocks, stones, dirt, trash that you find tells a story, too.
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HomeStretch
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Re: Toddler Education

Post by HomeStretch »

What is your toddler’s age?

Cooking can be fun and also a math exercise when it comes to measuring ingredients or counting out chips or berries to add in.

How about some science experiments for kids? There are a lot available on internet sites like this one:
https://funlearningforkids.com/science- ... schoolers/

Gardening and planting can be fun and math exercise as well (i.e., counting seeds to plant). You can order kits to watch a butterfly metamorphosis, for example.
abracadabra11
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Re: Toddler Education

Post by abracadabra11 »

livesoft wrote: Fri Sep 18, 2020 11:52 am How about a 3 hour free-form walk-in-the-woods every day? You can talk about all the plants, insects, snakes, lizards, frogs, tadpoles, fish, turtles, rabbits, squirrels, birds, and other animals that you come across. Plus the rocks, stones, dirt, trash that you find tells a story, too.
That sounds like a lofty goal for a toddler! But I'll admit I may just have crazy kids (i.e. bad parenting).
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celia
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Re: Toddler Education

Post by celia »

Has she started to walk? Did she crawl on the floor for a long time before learning to stand up? I've read that crawling (using certain muscles) enhances later reading skills. So even if she is now walking, get down on the floor and crawl with her. Pull her down, if need be. (I know someone who did this with an "early" walker.) Maybe even play hide and seek by taking turns "hiding" objects under the furniture. (It will also be interesting to you to see things from her perspective.)
http://www.getyourbreakthrough.com/blog ... ng-Matters

Montessori is another movement that encourages kids to learn through play. When she is ready for day care, see if there is a "school" near you.
sailaway
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Re: Toddler Education

Post by sailaway »

Toddlers are learning any time they are exposed to something new, which they consider "new" even if they find it in a different context. They also like routines and repetition. It isn't just for Frozen, they also like the same book, the same song, far more than the average adult can tolerate. My personal theory is the routine and repetition let them rest and process so that they don't get overwhelmed by the whole world being so fricking new.

-Singing is a great activity for toddlers. I am a horrible singer, but toddlers don't care. It is fine to put the music on once in awhile, but singing with them will get them involved. There is a reason the alphabet song persists. And that the Barney clean up song really does help the vast majority of little ones get involved in cleaning up.

-Read to your toddler - have lots of age appropriate books, but many toddlers will also listen to just about anything

-Sensory play. If you have a kiddie pool or even just their old baby tub or a very large bowl, be prepared to fill it with anything. Goop, slime, sand, playdough, small papers that the kid can tear (tearing is an important small motor milestone!).

-Involve the kid in household chores, especially food prep.
Topic Author
naturetech
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Re: Toddler Education

Post by naturetech »

livesoft wrote: Fri Sep 18, 2020 11:52 am How about a 3 hour free-form walk-in-the-woods every day? You can talk about all the plants, insects, snakes, lizards, frogs, tadpoles, fish, turtles, rabbits, squirrels, birds, and other animals that you come across. Plus the rocks, stones, dirt, trash that you find tells a story, too.
Thanks @livesoft. In the evening my daughter does cycling with kids in the street for 1-2 hrs. I would love to take her walk for 2-3 hrs but because of work I will not be able to. May I will try on weekends.
Topic Author
naturetech
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Re: Toddler Education

Post by naturetech »

celia wrote: Fri Sep 18, 2020 12:07 pm Has she started to walk? Did she crawl on the floor for a long time before learning to stand up? I've read that crawling (using certain muscles) enhances later reading skills. So even if she is now walking, get down on the floor and crawl with her. Pull her down, if need be. (I know someone who did this with an "early" walker.) Maybe even play hide and seek by taking turns "hiding" objects under the furniture. (It will also be interesting to you to see things from her perspective.)
http://www.getyourbreakthrough.com/blog ... ng-Matters

Montessori is another movement that encourages kids to learn through play. When she is ready for day care, see if there is a "school" near you.
Thanks @celia. She is 3 years old. She used to go to 'Montessori' school till March, we stopped because of COVID situation. We play all kind of games 'Ninja', 'Lava', 'Hide and Seek', 'Monstor' etc. Thanks for the website. I will go through it.
Topic Author
naturetech
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Re: Toddler Education

Post by naturetech »

HomeStretch wrote: Fri Sep 18, 2020 11:58 am What is your toddler’s age?

Cooking can be fun and also a math exercise when it comes to measuring ingredients or counting out chips or berries to add in.

How about some science experiments for kids? There are a lot available on internet sites like this one:
https://funlearningforkids.com/science- ... schoolers/

Gardening and planting can be fun and math exercise as well (i.e., counting seeds to plant). You can order kits to watch a butterfly metamorphosis, for example.
Thanks @homestrech. My daughters age is 3. She does cooking along with me. We make banana bread and other dishes. She helps me in cutting vegetables etc. When ever I get chance we count leaves, stones etc.Thanks for link. I will try to do the activities mentioned in the link.
Topic Author
naturetech
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Re: Toddler Education

Post by naturetech »

sailaway wrote: Fri Sep 18, 2020 12:09 pm Toddlers are learning any time they are exposed to something new, which they consider "new" even if they find it in a different context. They also like routines and repetition. It isn't just for Frozen, they also like the same book, the same song, far more than the average adult can tolerate. My personal theory is the routine and repetition let them rest and process so that they don't get overwhelmed by the whole world being so fricking new.

-Singing is a great activity for toddlers. I am a horrible singer, but toddlers don't care. It is fine to put the music on once in awhile, but singing with them will get them involved. There is a reason the alphabet song persists. And that the Barney clean up song really does help the vast majority of little ones get involved in cleaning up.

-Read to your toddler - have lots of age appropriate books, but many toddlers will also listen to just about anything

-Sensory play. If you have a kiddie pool or even just their old baby tub or a very large bowl, be prepared to fill it with anything. Goop, slime, sand, playdough, small papers that the kid can tear (tearing is an important small motor milestone!).

-Involve the kid in household chores, especially food prep.
Thanks @Sailaway for interesting ideas. One question on reading. My toddler doesn't sit at one place while reading...she is continuously running or doing some other activities. So do you continue reading story book when she does that?.

We have kids pool and she plays in it on weekends. Household chores is interesting thought. I will include her next time.
sailaway
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Re: Toddler Education

Post by sailaway »

naturetech wrote: Fri Sep 18, 2020 12:58 pm
Thanks @Sailaway for interesting ideas. One question on reading. My toddler doesn't sit at one place while reading...she is continuously running or doing some other activities. So do you continue reading story book when she does that?.
If it isn't already a habit, it is going to take time. I would say story time is a still time - we all need them, sometimes especially the hyper active toddlers that never sit still.

Some things to try:

-if they request a book, sitting quietly is part of the process

-just sit down and quietly start reading to yourself. often, this will incite curiosity and you can offer to read to them if they sit with you.

-Make it part of a routine. You sit down and read at X time of day. If they get up and walk away mid story, I would stop and let it be. However, this is one reason that bedtime stories are popular - a time to settle down before actually switching off. I would also be looking for new books that might spark their interest. Either a book about something they are obsessed with or new colors or art designs, or...

-have books at a level where they can just pull them out and look/play with them without worrying too much about the reading. Like some kids and food, they may need time to get comfortable with the object before they are interested in the activity that object was created for.

-find a book that encourages activity - perhaps a children's yoga book that combines story and pictures and moving the body
Last edited by sailaway on Fri Sep 18, 2020 1:09 pm, edited 1 time in total.
HomeStretch
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Re: Toddler Education

Post by HomeStretch »

naturetech wrote: Fri Sep 18, 2020 12:55 pm
HomeStretch wrote: Fri Sep 18, 2020 11:58 am What is your toddler’s age?

Cooking can be fun and also a math exercise when it comes to measuring ingredients or counting out chips or berries to add in.

How about some science experiments for kids? There are a lot available on internet sites like this one:
https://funlearningforkids.com/science- ... schoolers/

Gardening and planting can be fun and math exercise as well (i.e., counting seeds to plant). You can order kits to watch a butterfly metamorphosis, for example.
Thanks @homestrech. My daughters age is 3. She does cooking along with me. We make banana bread and other dishes. She helps me in cutting vegetables etc. When ever I get chance we count leaves, stones etc.Thanks for link. I will try to do the activities mentioned in the link.
My kids always loved making a volcano that ‘erupted’ based on the reaction of vinegar and baking soda.

Learning to tell time with a non-digital clock with movable hands.

Count coins and learn to “make change” with coins and play bills.

Sounds like you do a lot with your toddler already! Perhaps just add one different creative thing everyday to keep it from getting boring.
brandy
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Re: Toddler Education

Post by brandy »

My DD just took back for her 7yoDD an old book, SCIENCE EXPERIMENTS YOU CAN EAT.
For myself, former 2nd grade teacher, a math book I used was MATH THEIR WAY BY Mary Barratta-Lorton.
Adult got the "work", kids got the fun. And learning and understanding of basic concepts of math.
Read and practice the instructors part-it can be somewhat confusing, but the author fully explains, then it is easy, and wonderful.

I will be moving in with that DD soon, and her child is having trouble with math due in part to covid related issues. I hope get her interested.
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Sandtrap
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Re: Toddler Education

Post by Sandtrap »

Study Montesorri routines and protocols that they start even earlier than that age.
Socialization and routines and behavioral norms that will help your child when they go to group environment school.
IE: get tables and chairs that are your child's size.
This table and chair is for eating, we eat at this time and we sit and eat nicely until we are finished eating. Then we clean up.
This table is for playing with certain toys and doing crafts and activities. This tub is the toy tub for legos. We put all the legos back in this tub when we are done and it goes on this shelf right here. See.

Watch Bippi and other learning channels at a certain time for a certain times.

Today is the day we go to the park.
Make a daily routine.

There are many family environments that don't have an orderly situation and everything is in chaos, from acceptable and non acceptable behavior to routines to learning the rewards and pride of personal responsibility, thus, the children have a very hard time socializing and learning in school.

I have family that are Montessori teachers and some that had sent their children their in todler and preschool stages with excellent results.

Of course, there are many ways to do these things and many thoughts and opinions on it, as many as there are people.

My DIL, who has a Masters in Special Ed and a Montessori teacher told me once, "forcing children to do things" is relative as we "force" them not to hit their siblings, not to eat toxic things, not to go up to a biting dog or step on cactus. And, teachers in a classroom "force" children to sit down and listen and learn."
But, that is just what she says to parents at work.
So this is interpretive as well and there are as many opinions as there are people on this, but an interesting concept to self explore individually per one's own viewpoints on it.

I hope this is helpful.
j :happy
Last edited by Sandtrap on Fri Sep 18, 2020 1:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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FoolMeOnce
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Re: Toddler Education

Post by FoolMeOnce »

Do your toys include manipulatives (stacking, building, sorting)? Toys aimed to help develop fine motor skills while often building a foundation for math and engineering concepts, all disguised as pure play.

For tv time, take a look at Numberblocks and Alphablocks on Netflix and YouTube.
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Re: Toddler Education

Post by forgeblast »

naturetech wrote: Fri Sep 18, 2020 11:49 am Hi Boggleheads,

I am looking for advice on how to educate my 'Toddler' daughter(3 years Old). Currently due to Covid situation she is not going to daycare till March(We stopped sending her to daycare because of Covid). As of now she spends some time watching Tablet/TV(appx 2-3 hrs/day), Painting, Playing with Doll Houses, Toys and in the evening outside cycling with other kids. All education experts, pediatricians recommend 'Tablet/TV' time but not sure how to do that during 'COVID' times with working from home. So I am reaching out to the community for help.

I teach her Alphabets, numbers, read story books and other basics for 30-45 minutes/day. But I feel its gets boring teaching same stuff every day.

My goal is to further reduce her Tablet, TV time and help her learn new things in playful way. I am a big fan of 'Finnish/Sweden' education but not sure how to implement that at home. Planning to buy some books to understand/implement 'Finnish/Sweden' education.

Can any education experts, parents answer my below queries?
  • How to educate child playfully without forcing anything. I want knowledge/education to by product of play, rather than force child to learn
  • Any good books to read about kids education. I had ordered 'The Montessori Toddler' book.
  • Any good book to read about 'Finnish/Sweden' education system and curriculum to follow.
Please feel free to add any other advices to make child's education fun and divert the attention from 'TV/Tablet'.

Thanks.
We used Meet the letters meet the numbers meet the vowels too. it was a great resource and helped my little one to sound out words etc. I highly recommend it. https://www.preschoolprepco.com/h/s/mtl.php On top of that just being with them, sharing experiences are great. plant a garden, dig in the dirt, walk or collect leaves. When they are that age they love being with you. Your hobbies become their hobbies. Kiwico is a good site for boxed/delivered goods. We have a bunch of the kits but after they are built they are not really used. Legos might be a good thing to look at too.
I teach elementary, my little one is in 6th grade now. art supplies, playdough just having markers, pencils etc to draw and sketch are great.
Normchad
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Re: Toddler Education

Post by Normchad »

Reading, reading, reading, and more reading.

You can read to her. She can read to you. Just read, read, read.......

I’m no expert. Being read to, and learning to read, is just about the most important thing you can learn. And doing it early on, I think, sets the foundation for everything else to come.

Never stop reading.

@livesoft always gives excellent advice. Do that too if you can.
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Sandtrap
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Re: Toddler Education

Post by Sandtrap »

Normchad wrote: Fri Sep 18, 2020 2:00 pm Reading, reading, reading, and more reading.

You can read to her. She can read to you. Just read, read, read.......

I’m no expert. Being read to, and learning to read, is just about the most important thing you can learn. And doing it early on, I think, sets the foundation for everything else to come.

Never stop reading.

@livesoft always gives excellent advice. Do that too if you can.
+1
and write

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iamlucky13
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Re: Toddler Education

Post by iamlucky13 »

naturetech wrote: Fri Sep 18, 2020 11:49 amAll education experts, pediatricians recommend 'Tablet/TV' time but not sure how to do that during 'COVID' times with working from home.
Do you mean recommend limiting media time? I don't think I've seen a recommendation to specifically include media time in their routine.

https://www.healthychildren.org/English ... -Time.aspx
https://www.apa.org/pi/families/resourc ... -childhood

I don't get the sense they have a lot of concern about modestly exceeding these "less than" recommendations, but they certainly seem like good goals. Eg - recommendation is less than 1 hour of screen time for 2-5 year olds, but your pediatrician might not give a stern warning unless it's regularly over 2-3 hours. If I have an important, long meeting, for example, they may get to watch a full movie to help keep them calm.

The activities you describe all seem good. We do a lot of reading with our kids, both typical children's stories and age-appropriate learning books - our boys really like topics like "How do trains work" and "All about penguins". Some of them are inane ("Trucks have wheels"), but still engaging to them. We try to keep track of the better ones. We can check half a dozen or more books out from the library, rotate through reading 3-4 of them a day for a week, and they will spend additional time on their own voluntarily looking at the pictures or even trying to recite what they heard us read. A couple months later, we can repeat many of the exact same books, and they're still engaged by them. We decided to try longer stories with our older kid, and started with the Little House series at age 4. He understood a lot of it, and seemed to simply enjoy sitting and listening to Mom or Dad for moderate periods of time.

Toys are often simple. They go through phases of asking to keep cardboard boxes to use as play houses, or to organize favorite toys in, and they'll find novel uses alone or in combination with other toys for "garbage" like tubes from paper towel rolls. These phases pass, and we throw away/recycle those items until the interest strikes again. Legos, crayons, play dough, and a wooden train set are also staples in our house. We have a couple simple activity books with lots of tear-out pages for coloring, tracing lines, cutting out shapes, counting, doing color recognition, or for the older kid, doing letter and number recognition or tracing.

Sometimes they settle down to play semi-peacefully better if we play an audio book.

We also involve them in chores. Our younger child has reached the point where he can follow directions to only hand us certain dishes when unloading the dishwasher, for example, so he's not handling glasses or knives, and he can feed the dog if we premeasure the food. They're getting decent at getting all of the gasoline into the lawn mower, too (just kidding). We have not succeeded so far in getting cleaning up to become a game they will do on their own, unfortunately. Singing a song worked for Mary Poppins, but not for us.

They carry tools or parts for me or play at doing the same tasks with their own kids tools while I work on the house or car. A small tape measure and a low output flashlight have probably been the two tool purchases that have most helped my productivity since having kids, because then they are less likely to try to demand the tools I'm using.

We try to do lots of walks, and one weekends when we have enough time, hikes. As long as we are in no hurry, have snacks to keep their blood sugar up, and are prepared to carry them if they get genuinely tired, we've done up to 5 miles with a 2-1/2 year old walking over 80% of it.

Lately, we've started doing occasional video calls with grandparents or cousins to ensure they are getting to know their extended family in the absence of visits.

I know not many of these are things that keep them occupied while doing working from home, but the more variety they have when the parent can be engaged, the better it seems they are at staying occupied when the parent can not be engaged. This is another thing books are good for, as they can inspire play that mimics the story, so spending 15 minutes reading a book about cars might inspire half an hour of playing with cars (although nothing is guaranteed with children's behavior).
njdealguy
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Re: Toddler Education

Post by njdealguy »

livesoft wrote: Fri Sep 18, 2020 11:52 am How about a 3 hour free-form walk-in-the-woods every day? You can talk about all the plants, insects, snakes, lizards, frogs, tadpoles, fish, turtles, rabbits, squirrels, birds, and other animals that you come across. Plus the rocks, stones, dirt, trash that you find tells a story, too.
3 hour walk everyday! Wow think that would be challenging if both parents work during the day. My wife & I are generally free after 6pm on weekdays and go for a walk outside with our 2 year old but the amount of time can do so is now shrinking with the summer ending and earlier sunset times everyday!

Unfortunately child does watch excessive TV during the day and too much time playing games on the Amazon fire kids tablet!
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Re: Toddler Education

Post by livesoft »

OK, change "3 hour" to "3 minutes" or "30 minutes" or "1 hour" or something! Just get outside and do something every day.

And sunset is no excuse. Get headlamps and use them. Some animals are easier to find in the dark because their eyes shine back at you and also they are more active at night.
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Re: Toddler Education

Post by Sandtrap »

An ocd boglehead might setup a complete todler and preschool program per academic and licensing requirements, then implement the appropriate daily rubrics in the proper weely academic/experiential allocations.

per "livesoft", the world is a classroom for immersive experiential learning and growing, from frog to flower to snow capped mountains.
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Soul.in.Progress
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Re: Toddler Education

Post by Soul.in.Progress »

Introductory Board games:
Candy land (a classic)
Hullabaloo. (Super fun!!)

Legos (the toddler size ones)
Any kind of building blocks or building sets for tiny hands, there are so many.

A play kitchen with play food and pots and pans.
Helping you in the kitchen too.

Household tasks (indoor or outdoor) with their own size broom for example, or rake, etc

Play doh and associated sets

Puzzles with large pieces are excellent for learning

Activity books like dot to dot are perfect starters for toddlers.
Start by doing what is necessary; | then do what is possible; | and suddenly you are doing the impossible. | -- Francis of Assisi
regularguy455
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Re: Toddler Education

Post by regularguy455 »

You didn’t specify but is daycare closed til March or are you not sending your DD there until then? The reason I ask is you may want to consider sending them now if you have the option. There is a lot of good research (https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/ ... mm6934e2_x) and protocol in place that makes daycare a (relatively) safe place for kids. In many cases, the child to faculty ratio is much smaller due to people pulling their kids out. This means your DD may get extra attention and support they would not receive otherwise.

I know this may be a controversial opinion but I think it’s worth considering.
Yinks
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Re: Toddler Education

Post by Yinks »

This post is about higher quality screen time. Maybe 2-3 hours is OK if it's educational and active.

Cosmic kids yoga. It's story telling with a 20 min toddler friendly yoga routine. My 3 year old would do 2 back to back and get 40 min of activity by herself. I've done it a few times with her and it's a workout! It's on YouTube and Amazon prime video.

I was told outschool.com is good. There are 100s of live zoom classes every day for all age ranges. You pay for individual classes (no need for subscriptions). There is science, ballet, Lego building, etc.

We also introduced our child to reading rainbow. So great and educational.
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naturetech
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Re: Toddler Education

Post by naturetech »

brandy wrote: Fri Sep 18, 2020 1:09 pm My DD just took back for her 7yoDD an old book, SCIENCE EXPERIMENTS YOU CAN EAT.
For myself, former 2nd grade teacher, a math book I used was MATH THEIR WAY BY Mary Barratta-Lorton.
Adult got the "work", kids got the fun. And learning and understanding of basic concepts of math.
Read and practice the instructors part-it can be somewhat confusing, but the author fully explains, then it is easy, and wonderful.

I will be moving in with that DD soon, and her child is having trouble with math due in part to covid related issues. I hope get her interested.
Thank you @brandy for the book titles.
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naturetech
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Re: Toddler Education

Post by naturetech »

Sandtrap wrote: Fri Sep 18, 2020 1:15 pm Study Montesorri routines and protocols that they start even earlier than that age.
Socialization and routines and behavioral norms that will help your child when they go to group environment school.
IE: get tables and chairs that are your child's size.
This table and chair is for eating, we eat at this time and we sit and eat nicely until we are finished eating. Then we clean up.
This table is for playing with certain toys and doing crafts and activities. This tub is the toy tub for legos. We put all the legos back in this tub when we are done and it goes on this shelf right here. See.

Watch Bippi and other learning channels at a certain time for a certain times.

Today is the day we go to the park.
Make a daily routine.

There are many family environments that don't have an orderly situation and everything is in chaos, from acceptable and non acceptable behavior to routines to learning the rewards and pride of personal responsibility, thus, the children have a very hard time socializing and learning in school.

I have family that are Montessori teachers and some that had sent their children their in todler and preschool stages with excellent results.

Of course, there are many ways to do these things and many thoughts and opinions on it, as many as there are people.

My DIL, who has a Masters in Special Ed and a Montessori teacher told me once, "forcing children to do things" is relative as we "force" them not to hit their siblings, not to eat toxic things, not to go up to a biting dog or step on cactus. And, teachers in a classroom "force" children to sit down and listen and learn."
But, that is just what she says to parents at work.
So this is interpretive as well and there are as many opinions as there are people on this, but an interesting concept to self explore individually per one's own viewpoints on it.

I hope this is helpful.
j :happy
Thank you @sandtrap for the advice. My daughter used to go to 'Montesorri' school from 2. But currently we stopped because of virus situation.

"forcing children to do things" :- Can you please elaborate on this point? Does this mean we can ask to sit and listen to a story forcefully?
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naturetech
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Re: Toddler Education

Post by naturetech »

FoolMeOnce wrote: Fri Sep 18, 2020 1:16 pm Do your toys include manipulatives (stacking, building, sorting)? Toys aimed to help develop fine motor skills while often building a foundation for math and engineering concepts, all disguised as pure play.

For tv time, take a look at Numberblocks and Alphablocks on Netflix and YouTube.
Thanks @FoolMeOnce. Yes, we have Legos, train sets, doll houses etc. I will look at the channel you had mentioned.
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naturetech
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Re: Toddler Education

Post by naturetech »

forgeblast wrote: Fri Sep 18, 2020 1:24 pm
naturetech wrote: Fri Sep 18, 2020 11:49 am Hi Boggleheads,

I am looking for advice on how to educate my 'Toddler' daughter(3 years Old). Currently due to Covid situation she is not going to daycare till March(We stopped sending her to daycare because of Covid). As of now she spends some time watching Tablet/TV(appx 2-3 hrs/day), Painting, Playing with Doll Houses, Toys and in the evening outside cycling with other kids. All education experts, pediatricians recommend 'Tablet/TV' time but not sure how to do that during 'COVID' times with working from home. So I am reaching out to the community for help.

I teach her Alphabets, numbers, read story books and other basics for 30-45 minutes/day. But I feel its gets boring teaching same stuff every day.

My goal is to further reduce her Tablet, TV time and help her learn new things in playful way. I am a big fan of 'Finnish/Sweden' education but not sure how to implement that at home. Planning to buy some books to understand/implement 'Finnish/Sweden' education.

Can any education experts, parents answer my below queries?
  • How to educate child playfully without forcing anything. I want knowledge/education to by product of play, rather than force child to learn
  • Any good books to read about kids education. I had ordered 'The Montessori Toddler' book.
  • Any good book to read about 'Finnish/Sweden' education system and curriculum to follow.
Please feel free to add any other advices to make child's education fun and divert the attention from 'TV/Tablet'.

Thanks.
We used Meet the letters meet the numbers meet the vowels too. it was a great resource and helped my little one to sound out words etc. I highly recommend it. https://www.preschoolprepco.com/h/s/mtl.php On top of that just being with them, sharing experiences are great. plant a garden, dig in the dirt, walk or collect leaves. When they are that age they love being with you. Your hobbies become their hobbies. Kiwico is a good site for boxed/delivered goods. We have a bunch of the kits but after they are built they are not really used. Legos might be a good thing to look at too.
I teach elementary, my little one is in 6th grade now. art supplies, playdough just having markers, pencils etc to draw and sketch are great.
Thanks @ forgeblast. I will look at the website. Yes daughter loves playing with play dough, oil/water colors, pencils, draw, sketch. Infact she has drawn 'potato man', 'dinosaur' etc on our walls :D
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naturetech
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Re: Toddler Education

Post by naturetech »

Normchad wrote: Fri Sep 18, 2020 2:00 pm Reading, reading, reading, and more reading.

You can read to her. She can read to you. Just read, read, read.......

I’m no expert. Being read to, and learning to read, is just about the most important thing you can learn. And doing it early on, I think, sets the foundation for everything else to come.

Never stop reading.

@livesoft always gives excellent advice. Do that too if you can.
Thanks @Normchad. I personally believe 'Reading' is the best thing in the world. Currently I read her 1 book a day but mostly she is playing while I read the book. I sincerely want her to read as many books as possible. Personally I love reading all kinds of books. Reading gives me peace, knowledge.
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naturetech
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Re: Toddler Education

Post by naturetech »

iamlucky13 wrote: Fri Sep 18, 2020 2:10 pm
naturetech wrote: Fri Sep 18, 2020 11:49 amAll education experts, pediatricians recommend 'Tablet/TV' time but not sure how to do that during 'COVID' times with working from home.
Do you mean recommend limiting media time? I don't think I've seen a recommendation to specifically include media time in their routine.

https://www.healthychildren.org/English ... -Time.aspx
https://www.apa.org/pi/families/resourc ... -childhood

I don't get the sense they have a lot of concern about modestly exceeding these "less than" recommendations, but they certainly seem like good goals. Eg - recommendation is less than 1 hour of screen time for 2-5 year olds, but your pediatrician might not give a stern warning unless it's regularly over 2-3 hours. If I have an important, long meeting, for example, they may get to watch a full movie to help keep them calm.

The activities you describe all seem good. We do a lot of reading with our kids, both typical children's stories and age-appropriate learning books - our boys really like topics like "How do trains work" and "All about penguins". Some of them are inane ("Trucks have wheels"), but still engaging to them. We try to keep track of the better ones. We can check half a dozen or more books out from the library, rotate through reading 3-4 of them a day for a week, and they will spend additional time on their own voluntarily looking at the pictures or even trying to recite what they heard us read. A couple months later, we can repeat many of the exact same books, and they're still engaged by them. We decided to try longer stories with our older kid, and started with the Little House series at age 4. He understood a lot of it, and seemed to simply enjoy sitting and listening to Mom or Dad for moderate periods of time.

Toys are often simple. They go through phases of asking to keep cardboard boxes to use as play houses, or to organize favorite toys in, and they'll find novel uses alone or in combination with other toys for "garbage" like tubes from paper towel rolls. These phases pass, and we throw away/recycle those items until the interest strikes again. Legos, crayons, play dough, and a wooden train set are also staples in our house. We have a couple simple activity books with lots of tear-out pages for coloring, tracing lines, cutting out shapes, counting, doing color recognition, or for the older kid, doing letter and number recognition or tracing.

Sometimes they settle down to play semi-peacefully better if we play an audio book.

We also involve them in chores. Our younger child has reached the point where he can follow directions to only hand us certain dishes when unloading the dishwasher, for example, so he's not handling glasses or knives, and he can feed the dog if we premeasure the food. They're getting decent at getting all of the gasoline into the lawn mower, too (just kidding). We have not succeeded so far in getting cleaning up to become a game they will do on their own, unfortunately. Singing a song worked for Mary Poppins, but not for us.

They carry tools or parts for me or play at doing the same tasks with their own kids tools while I work on the house or car. A small tape measure and a low output flashlight have probably been the two tool purchases that have most helped my productivity since having kids, because then they are less likely to try to demand the tools I'm using.

We try to do lots of walks, and one weekends when we have enough time, hikes. As long as we are in no hurry, have snacks to keep their blood sugar up, and are prepared to carry them if they get genuinely tired, we've done up to 5 miles with a 2-1/2 year old walking over 80% of it.

Lately, we've started doing occasional video calls with grandparents or cousins to ensure they are getting to know their extended family in the absence of visits.

I know not many of these are things that keep them occupied while doing working from home, but the more variety they have when the parent can be engaged, the better it seems they are at staying occupied when the parent can not be engaged. This is another thing books are good for, as they can inspire play that mimics the story, so spending 15 minutes reading a book about cars might inspire half an hour of playing with cars (although nothing is guaranteed with children's behavior).
Thanks @iamlucky13 for websites and books. I will look at them. I will start including my daughter in chores. Wow 5 miles walk with 2-1/2 is awesome. I never thought 2-1/2 kid can walk such long distance. I will try to take my daughter for walk next time in the trails.
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naturetech
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Re: Toddler Education

Post by naturetech »

njdealguy wrote: Fri Sep 18, 2020 2:40 pm
livesoft wrote: Fri Sep 18, 2020 11:52 am How about a 3 hour free-form walk-in-the-woods every day? You can talk about all the plants, insects, snakes, lizards, frogs, tadpoles, fish, turtles, rabbits, squirrels, birds, and other animals that you come across. Plus the rocks, stones, dirt, trash that you find tells a story, too.
3 hour walk everyday! Wow think that would be challenging if both parents work during the day. My wife & I are generally free after 6pm on weekdays and go for a walk outside with our 2 year old but the amount of time can do so is now shrinking with the summer ending and earlier sunset times everyday!

Unfortunately child does watch excessive TV during the day and too much time playing games on the Amazon fire kids tablet!
@njdealguy same concerns here. I would like to limit TV/Tablet time to 1 hr.
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naturetech
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Re: Toddler Education

Post by naturetech »

Sandtrap wrote: Fri Sep 18, 2020 4:46 pm An ocd boglehead might setup a complete todler and preschool program per academic and licensing requirements, then implement the appropriate daily rubrics in the proper weely academic/experiential allocations.

per "livesoft", the world is a classroom for immersive experiential learning and growing, from frog to flower to snow capped mountains.
:D
j
Thanks @Sandtrap. I sincerely believe @livesoft quote "the world is a classroom for immersive experiential learning and growing, from frog to flower to snow capped mountains". Once this virus situation settles, I would like to take my daughter for various national parks.
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naturetech
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Re: Toddler Education

Post by naturetech »

Soul.in.Progress wrote: Fri Sep 18, 2020 9:12 pm Introductory Board games:
Candy land (a classic)
Hullabaloo. (Super fun!!)

Legos (the toddler size ones)
Any kind of building blocks or building sets for tiny hands, there are so many.

A play kitchen with play food and pots and pans.
Helping you in the kitchen too.

Household tasks (indoor or outdoor) with their own size broom for example, or rake, etc

Play doh and associated sets

Puzzles with large pieces are excellent for learning

Activity books like dot to dot are perfect starters for toddlers.
Thanks @Soul.in.Progress I will look into the solutions provided.
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naturetech
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Re: Toddler Education

Post by naturetech »

regularguy455 wrote: Fri Sep 18, 2020 9:30 pm You didn’t specify but is daycare closed til March or are you not sending your DD there until then? The reason I ask is you may want to consider sending them now if you have the option. There is a lot of good research (https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/ ... mm6934e2_x) and protocol in place that makes daycare a (relatively) safe place for kids. In many cases, the child to faculty ratio is much smaller due to people pulling their kids out. This means your DD may get extra attention and support they would not receive otherwise.

I know this may be a controversial opinion but I think it’s worth considering.
Thanks @regularguy45. The daycare is open for almost 2 months now, we are not sending her. We get different details/update from CDC, WHO each and every day. Not sure whom to believe.

I would to send daughter to daycare now, but we are little scared.As you said Child to Faculty ratio is very low now and it would be awesome if we can send our daughter now.
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naturetech
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Re: Toddler Education

Post by naturetech »

Yinks wrote: Fri Sep 18, 2020 11:16 pm This post is about higher quality screen time. Maybe 2-3 hours is OK if it's educational and active.

Cosmic kids yoga. It's story telling with a 20 min toddler friendly yoga routine. My 3 year old would do 2 back to back and get 40 min of activity by herself. I've done it a few times with her and it's a workout! It's on YouTube and Amazon prime video.

I was told outschool.com is good. There are 100s of live zoom classes every day for all age ranges. You pay for individual classes (no need for subscriptions). There is science, ballet, Lego building, etc.

We also introduced our child to reading rainbow. So great and educational.
Thanks @Yinks. I didn't hear of 'Kids' Yoga, I will look into this. I will also look at 'outschool.com'.
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Re: Toddler Education

Post by alfaspider »

I have a 3 year old as well. At this age, I would not worry about specific "facts" or "skills" as you would for an older child. It's more about encouraging learning itself and overall language development. Your conversations with them can be very educational on both fronts.
Arabesque
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Re: Toddler Education

Post by Arabesque »

Give her rich, interactive, experiential play. This is what the studies support.

Also The APA recommendation on media for 3 years is No More than One Hour/day. I think that’s too much for toddlers. https://www.aap.org/en-us/advocacy-and- ... ldren.aspx

Children’s minds develop in complex ways. All the emphasis on academics before 5 or 6 is mostly about catching problems, not about developing curiosity, creativity, and problem solving.

My older daughter started kindergarten with less alphabet than the system expected because we had been living in a country with a non-alphabetical language and I didn’t emphasize academics. The kindergarten teacher scolded me. By first grade my kid was the best reader in the class. She went to Harvard.

Please relax and let her play.
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Re: Toddler Education

Post by Normchad »

naturetech wrote: Mon Sep 21, 2020 9:03 am
Normchad wrote: Fri Sep 18, 2020 2:00 pm Reading, reading, reading, and more reading.

You can read to her. She can read to you. Just read, read, read.......

I’m no expert. Being read to, and learning to read, is just about the most important thing you can learn. And doing it early on, I think, sets the foundation for everything else to come.

Never stop reading.

@livesoft always gives excellent advice. Do that too if you can.
Thanks @Normchad. I personally believe 'Reading' is the best thing in the world. Currently I read her 1 book a day but mostly she is playing while I read the book. I sincerely want her to read as many books as possible. Personally I love reading all kinds of books. Reading gives me peace, knowledge.
One thing we did that really helped. We didn’t keep any toys in her bedroom, only books. And bedtime meant “it’s time to go to your room for the night”, not necessarily time to go to sleep. So she could stay up and read all she wanted.

We never forced her to read, but encouraged it where we could.
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Re: Toddler Education

Post by alex_686 »

Sort of in the same boat. We have a 4 year old and daycare shut down for 2 months.

In some ways we were fortunate. I work for a megacorp who offered lots of flexibility, plus I have the ability to work from home. Wife is self-employed but her job was kind of shut down for 6 weeks. So we were able to arrange our schedules so we only had to use the TV as a babysitter for 2 to 3 hours a day at the peak. Some fights over what to watch but we kept things mostly educational. Lots of PBS. Plus Tumble Leaf from Amazon.

Plus 'Wallace and Gromit', 'Davey and Goliath', "My Neighbor Totoro, and Amazon's 'Ronja the Robber's Daughter'. Parents sometimes need to watch TV as well.

Encourage the kid to help out with the chores. Leave out the blocks and the chalk board. Make sure the sandbox is stock with digging equipment. Kids will find a way to entertainer themselves. Just limit the choices to good choices. We made a mistake with Paw Patrol. Sigh.

Good luck.
Former brokerage operations & mutual fund accountant. I hate risk, which is why I study and embrace it.
alex_686
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Re: Toddler Education

Post by alex_686 »

Sandtrap wrote: Fri Sep 18, 2020 1:15 pm Watch Bippi and other learning channels at a certain time for a certain times.
Sandtrap, I respect you but you have this one wrong. Do not watch Blippi. Not a good choice. Better options out there.
Former brokerage operations & mutual fund accountant. I hate risk, which is why I study and embrace it.
financiallycurious
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Re: Toddler Education

Post by financiallycurious »

A little art easel and paints (and lots of floor covering), peg board and beads, tinker toys, magnet tiles, and there a ton of "STEM toys" for that age range that are fun. My favorite book for teaching reading is "Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons". Dragonbox Numbers is a great app on the ipad (I know you are trying to reduce screen time, but this is one is great for little kids).
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Re: Toddler Education

Post by iamlucky13 »

naturetech wrote: Mon Sep 21, 2020 9:08 am
iamlucky13 wrote: Fri Sep 18, 2020 2:10 pm We try to do lots of walks, and one weekends when we have enough time, hikes. As long as we are in no hurry, have snacks to keep their blood sugar up, and are prepared to carry them if they get genuinely tired, we've done up to 5 miles with a 2-1/2 year old walking over 80% of it.
Thanks @iamlucky13 for websites and books. I will look at them. I will start including my daughter in chores. Wow 5 miles walk with 2-1/2 is awesome. I never thought 2-1/2 kid can walk such long distance. I will try to take my daughter for walk next time in the trails.
Keep in mind, that's going at half speed, or less. A hike of that distance easily takes 5 hours with a kid that young, and I think he gets so tired the couple times we've gone that far that he's grumpy the next day, but seems to really enjoy the exploring.

It also took us a couple of hikes to fully appreciate how frequently kids that age need food when they're being active. It actually has been pretty surprising when he starts to get cranky to see how fast he perks up after eating a couple of gummy bears, and suddenly he's good for another 15 minutes. Even better, stop, feed him a piece of sandwich, a cheese stick, or trail mix, so he gets some fat and protein, and then he'll be good for more like an hour.

Definitely start with shorter walks and work up to longer ones if she is enjoying them.
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Re: Toddler Education

Post by Sandtrap »

alex_686 wrote: Mon Sep 21, 2020 11:51 am
Sandtrap wrote: Fri Sep 18, 2020 1:15 pm Watch Bippi and other learning channels at a certain time for a certain times.
Sandtrap, I respect you but you have this one wrong. Do not watch Blippi. Not a good choice. Better options out there.
You're likely right given my only brief experience.
My son watches Blippi with his son, my grandson. They like it.

Personally, I get pretty brain dead and I think it accelerates the cognitive decline I'm already experiencing. :shock: :shock:

I remember Sesame Street. Elmo. Earnie. Burt. Also put me to sleep.
Although the "Count" did help my math :oops: . But, that's pretty far back.

Aloha!
j :D
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