Approach to "News" Consumption

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bhwabeck3533
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Approach to "News" Consumption

Post by bhwabeck3533 »

The biggest change in my lifetime, for me, is the ability to access and distill "the news". When I first began watching televised news and reading the newspaper (approx 1965) I felt most sources from TV (e.g., WBAY from Green Bay or WLUC from Marquette) delivered equivalent content. Our morning paper was the Milwaukee Journal and local paper in the afternoon.

Fast forward to the present (that was a quick 55 years). I scroll through FOX and ABC websites, I watch (but have pretty much given up on) all network evening news -- ABC, CBS, NBC all have their biases, and find Twitter one of the most entertaining sources of "news".

With that perspective, I need a different and more efficient approach to "news intake". What strategy is recommended to access reporting and content on current events without expending so much time filtering out the "interpretation and opinion" present in today's journalism?
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Re: Approach to "News" Consumption

Post by bloom2708 »

I have my internet browser set to Bing.

Bing has news along the bottom. You can scroll right and see if anything is worth clicking into.

We do get our electronic local newspaper. They all but eliminated a print newspaper.

I find I can keep up with minimal news consumption. Virtually zero on the TV.
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regularguy455
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Re: Approach to "News" Consumption

Post by regularguy455 »

I alternate between news sources depending on the mood I am in. Mostly the nytimes and wsj. Avoid the opinion columns and comment sections like the plague. I also subscribe to a daily email called the The Flip Side. It tries to balance political issues in a less polarized way. But that said, it’s tough. I don’t think anyone enjoys reading the news anymore.
dcabler
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Re: Approach to "News" Consumption

Post by dcabler »

This site might be a good start:

https://www.adfontesmedia.com/
wackerdr
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Re: Approach to "News" Consumption

Post by wackerdr »

bhwabeck3533 wrote: Wed Aug 19, 2020 6:25 am The biggest change in my lifetime, for me, is the ability to access and distill "the news". When I first began watching televised news and reading the newspaper (approx 1965) I felt most sources from TV (e.g., WBAY from Green Bay or WLUC from Marquette) delivered equivalent content. Our morning paper was the Milwaukee Journal and local paper in the afternoon.

Fast forward to the present (that was a quick 55 years). I scroll through FOX and ABC websites, I watch (but have pretty much given up on) all network evening news -- ABC, CBS, NBC all have their biases, and find Twitter one of the most entertaining sources of "news".

With that perspective, I need a different and more efficient approach to "news intake". What strategy is recommended to access reporting and content on current events without expending so much time filtering out the "interpretation and opinion" present in today's journalism?
There is no news, it’s all opinion and slanted coverage. I read multiple publications that I know are on the opposite end of spectrum. National Review, WSJ, CNN, Fox, Washington Post and even occasional Brietbart will give me a fairly well rounded perspective. Unfortunately the times we are in demand much greater due diligence in consuming news. Or it is possible I was too ignorant in the past, to consume a single source of news and be happy with it.
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JoeRetire
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Re: Approach to "News" Consumption

Post by JoeRetire »

bhwabeck3533 wrote: Wed Aug 19, 2020 6:25 am With that perspective, I need a different and more efficient approach to "news intake". What strategy is recommended to access reporting and content on current events without expending so much time filtering out the "interpretation and opinion" present in today's journalism?
I use Google News.
The headline of each opinion article is clearly labeled "Opinion".
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Bogle7
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I read a lot.

Post by Bogle7 »

I visit 100 websites every day.
I am a news junkie.
Last edited by Bogle7 on Wed Aug 19, 2020 10:43 am, edited 1 time in total.
barneycat
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Re: Approach to "News" Consumption

Post by barneycat »

I went from following the news avidly (radio both to and from work, internet daily) to limiting my intake to a weekly review (The Economist) and daily local review.

I've found my mental health has improved greatly and I still know what's going on.

Reading allows for more careful consumption, time to pause and consider arguments, all without the contempt that is often dripping from the talking heads' mouths.
guppyguy
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Re: Approach to "News" Consumption

Post by guppyguy »

I’ve struggled with the same question. Instead of a specific source I’d suggest this rough framework:
1) Read history first. While even that too is susceptible to a revisionist bias it is generally less contentious and more informative. Learning history in its broadest sense enables one to understand current events more thoroughly and quickly exposes most holes from current sources.
2) Get your news slowly. Despite the way most may feel, there is nothing that you need to know about in the present that will not make itself obvious simply by walking out the front door. Digest news for curiosity sake, not from a fear of missing out.
3) Prefer sources which cost the author something to produce, whether in terms of time or money. This rules out most online content and cable news.
4) If your are going to follow the news, choose a subject that has a direct impact on your live. A vocation or hobby comes first to mind. The best news source is applied.

Sorry, I know that isn’t a specific recommendation. Unfortunately I don’t think there is any one source out their without some faults.
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fizxman
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Re: Approach to "News" Consumption

Post by fizxman »

dcabler wrote: Wed Aug 19, 2020 6:37 am This site might be a good start:

https://www.adfontesmedia.com/
I had seen this too. So now when I open Chrome, two of my home page tabs are set to AP and Reuters. I also have both of their apps on my phone.
McDougal
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Re: Approach to "News" Consumption

Post by McDougal »

I have been going to allsides dot com for a while now. For a given topic they categorize the links to news stories on that topic as either left, center or right. Pick your poison.
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happyisland
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Re: Approach to "News" Consumption

Post by happyisland »

barneycat wrote: Wed Aug 19, 2020 6:42 am I went from following the news avidly (radio both to and from work, internet daily) to limiting my intake to a weekly review (The Economist) and daily local review.

I've found my mental health has improved greatly and I still know what's going on.

Reading allows for more careful consumption, time to pause and consider arguments, all without the contempt that is often dripping from the talking heads' mouths.
I use this exact same strategy and it has made me much happier (and better informed about the important issues in the world).

I have family members who try to sample opinion from "both sides" and end up confirming their own biases and being exposed to more negative and semi-truthful content. No thanks!
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Stinky
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Re: Approach to "News" Consumption

Post by Stinky »

In the mornings, I’ll turn on two TV newscasts. First, one of the network morning shows, like the Today Show. Next, Fox and Friends on Fox News. I’ll spend 20 minutes on each.

Between those two shows, I can get a broad view of what happened in the last 24 hours that’s important (to at least somebody).
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Re: Approach to "News" Consumption

Post by Blueskies123 »

After not watching any news on the TV I found that the BBC World News was watchable. It spends a lot more time talking about what is going on in the world than the squabbles in the USA.
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linuxizer
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Re: Approach to "News" Consumption

Post by linuxizer »

Almost every news site has an RSS feed. Use a cloud-based RSS reader. My favorite is The Old Reader. It’s easy. Just copy the news sites URL into the reader, and 99% of the time it will find the feed. If not, look for an orange RSS button which will point you towards the feed. Then you can type “N” for the next article or scroll through. Most news sites give you a paragraph summary and the link to the article. Most blogs give you the whole post.

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Re: Approach to "News" Consumption

Post by nisiprius »

I start with Google News, which seems like a decent summary in the sense that it covers the same things as ABC News does on TV. It is a reasonable consensus of what US news organizations think are the important news stories of the day. For political events, The Washington Post. For local news, the website of the nearest big-city newspaper.

1) I try to identify legitimate news. Legitimate news sources that honor journalistic standards will be in good accord on the literal facts. Some may say "It's terrible that 2 + 2 = 4" or "It's great that 2 + 2 = 4" or "Critics charge that 2 + 2 = 4" or "Hub solons slam 2 + 2 = 4," but it's always 2 + 2 = 4. For example, anything that is labeled Fox News (not Fox anything-else) is usually 2 + 2 = 4; ditto CNN.

2) I try to pepper my US news reading with the take of reliable overseas news sources (Times of India, El Pais).

3) I don't know who "Ad Fontes Media" is but their media bias chart ain't half bad.

https://www.adfontesmedia.com/interactive-media-bias-chart/

4) Because of the way Wikipedia's community editing process works, and because the community is mostly committed to core Wikipedia policies like the "neutral point of view" and "verifiability," Wikipedia's article on developing news stories are exemplary in giving a balanced view, and also do a better job than periodicals on keeping stories continuously updated. The Wikipedia "verifiability" policy means that all important facts are traceable--in the case of news stories, usually by a URL--to their source.

5) Any clever "gotcha" fact, circulating via social media, deserves a check at snopes.com. So far I haven't noticed any bias problems at snopes.com and, like Wikipedia, they give their sources. I sometimes have to disappoint Facebook friends who share my political views with the bad news that the too-good-to-be-true thing they posted, wasn't true. For example, within the last month I had to tell someone that they had posted a doctored photo, and Snopes showed both the doctored photo and the original (a key person in the doctored photo wasn't in the original, their face had been substituted for a completely different person's face).
Last edited by nisiprius on Wed Aug 19, 2020 8:04 am, edited 1 time in total.
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dodecahedron
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Re: Approach to "News" Consumption

Post by dodecahedron »

I have a lifelong personal and professional interest in public policy.

I subscribe to the two local daily newspapers in my area (electronic, but one of them still insists on sending me paper for no extra cost--I have tried to get them to stop for environmental reasons but have given up.) I am grateful we still have two local dailies, one of them independent and family owned and the other a Hearst affiliate widely respected for its watchdog journalism, and consider them important forces for monitoring misbehavior by state and local government officials. I read them more thoroughly than any other single source.

I enjoy listening to lively discussions among journalists and political officials on my local NPR affiliate, WAMC, when I am doing random tasks around the house. I download and listen to selected podcasts on current topics from NPR, the Economist, and other sources, which I listen to while taking long walks.

I also subscribe to the WaPo (my childhood hometown paper!) for sentimental reasons and because I have a number of beloved family and friends still living there, some elderly and/or in poor health. (I get a very reasonable educator discount price of $5 per month for that.) I scan it periodically for stories of particular nostalgic topics or potentially affecting family members.

My employer provides institutional subscriptions to the NYT and WSJ, which I am happy to use for free for personal as well as professional purposes. I am an avid fan of Jason Zweig´s weekly WSJ column.

For nostalgic reasons (because I lived in Boston area for many beloved formative young adult years and still have many friends living there), I found I could not resist electronic subscription to Boston Globe once Pandemic hit hard there. The discounted trial period has expired and it is now priced ridiculously higher than any other news source I subscribe to (@27.95 per month) and I don´t read all that many of its stories, but I have not yet been able to pull the plug. I also visit the Harvard Crimson and MIT The Tech student newspaper pages from time to time.
Last edited by dodecahedron on Wed Aug 19, 2020 7:41 am, edited 1 time in total.
runner3081
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Re: Approach to "News" Consumption

Post by runner3081 »

More or less, my only sources of news:

WSJ
Reuters
Local News Channel's Website
Local Newspaper (Online, free through library)
Nowizard
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Re: Approach to "News" Consumption

Post by Nowizard »

PBS feed from UK.

Tim
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Re: Approach to "News" Consumption

Post by flaccidsteele »

I use the Flipboard app
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Re: Approach to "News" Consumption

Post by Dottie57 »

PBS news hour for longer interviews. CNN in short bursts - hate that each show rehashes the same topic hour after hour. I can only take a little bit. Assume FOX is the same. Going to try BBC news to get different per perspective on events.

I wish there was a news aggregator that would put the various sides of a story together so you can compare and contrast.
Last edited by Dottie57 on Wed Aug 19, 2020 8:06 am, edited 1 time in total.
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JoMoney
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Re: Approach to "News" Consumption

Post by JoMoney »

I like the financial news, I've found FT, WSJ, and CNBC less polemic in their style and coverage.
Most of the "news" is worthless though, you just don't need someone on a screen telling you which "notable events" you should be paying attention to and what your opinion should be. They're all paid for by advertisers, and they all have specific agendas with what they cover (and don't/won't cover). If there was something actually important to you going on, you'd likely have a much closer connection to it. There's almost certainly more important things going on all around you that you'll never hear about on the "news".
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Re: Approach to "News" Consumption

Post by carolinaman »

I read WSJ and local newspaper daily. Also sometimes watch local news. I avoid network news and related programs like the plague. Occasionally I may read articles from NYTimes if it is a news article without their biases and spin.

The days when the American people had high confidence in national news people like Walter Cronkite who objectively reported the news are long gone. So sad.
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Re: Approach to "News" Consumption

Post by nimo956 »

I no longer find reading the new a worthwhile use of my time. Instead, I focus on reading books, which includes longer and more detailed non-fiction history works.

As an interesting anecdote to how the "news" works, I once wrote a short puff piece about a Google Doodle of the day. Within minutes of it being posted, the article had been scooped by other similar sites. The paragraphs were reordered slightly and some of the text changed so it wasn't identical, but the overall content/tone was essentially the same.
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BogleFanGal
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Re: Approach to "News" Consumption

Post by BogleFanGal »

Avoid all broadcast news like the plague and have done so for years: I consider it all a bunch of dumbed-down witless soundbites and posturing by annoying anchors- just noise and clickbait-style content without any deeper meaningful information. Read our local daily newspaper online and a couple of national papers (digital versions). I too like the written word, where I can take time to think about what's reported, reference other articles for better understanding, etc.
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Re: Approach to "News" Consumption

Post by palaheel »

I use RealClearPolitics (https://www.realclearpolitics.com/). They link to a variety of sources; today includes The New Yorker, The New York Post, NBC and Fox and many others. All of those places have their own spin, but at least you get to see both sides of it.
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Re: Approach to "News" Consumption

Post by Elsebet »

I look at reuters.com once per weekday and not at all on weekends.

I used to read reddit but now I only look at a few subreddits and avoid any news/political posts there, although that is getting more difficult because people find a way to inject it into almost any subject.

I do not look at any social media.

What I do is read and study trivia. My husband and I love watching and playing along with Jeopardy so I like to spend time learning things to get better at that (geography, arts, history, etc).

I feel much happier. My husband often gets angry at posts he reads on reddit and I am glad I try to avoid that now. Sometimes I even get the impression that he doesn't think I'm very "woke" or whatever since I don't walk around outraged all day. :)
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Re: Approach to "News" Consumption

Post by Clever_Username »

I assume your definition of news involves information about world events. For that case, recognize that any so-called news organization is not trying to inform you, they are trying to assign to you an opinion. This effect is most obvious if you watch one whose editorial view is for the team you don't root for. If you're going to get your news from television, please take a day or two and watch one for the other team and then apply what you've learned to whatever you're watching. If you already have a team that you like, consider staying with a "news" source that agrees with you; that way, at least you're doing what most of the news-watching population is. Alternately, if you don't like your opinion, and would like to join a different fanbase, consider which one you'd prefer and pick a "news" source that pitches that point of view.

I strongly encourage you to pick a topic you know a lot about and find news reporting related to it. Then ask if you believe that the same fact checking and bias falls into topics you don't know about, only you're less aware of the major inaccuracies.

Personally, I prefer to watch the real-time world events I care about live, or as live as possible, and in worst case I find out about a recap by watching Morning Drive or, if need be, SportsCenter. I find those, especially the former, to be credible sources for information, recap, and analysis. The world events you care about may or may not be covered on these television programs, so I don't know if this paragraph helps you.

I used to obsessively consume the news, and one observation that transcends political views is that people who follow the news seem to be a lot less happy than those who do, but with the same effect on the way things are going.

The suggestion elsewhere about finding out slow is a good one. A major event you'll want to act upon find out about anyway in short order, such as if there's a big natural disaster near you. For the rest, the recap is sufficient.

Lastly, if you need to read current events on a regular basis, consider getting your news from The Onion -- they're at least as credible as any other newspaper and at least you'll enjoy reading it.
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Re: Approach to "News" Consumption

Post by Fclevz »

nimo956 wrote: Wed Aug 19, 2020 9:11 am I no longer find reading the new a worthwhile use of my time. Instead, I focus on reading books, which includes longer and more detailed non-fiction history works.
You may find this interesting: Avoid News: Towards a Healthy News Diet By Rolf Dobelli
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Re: Approach to "News" Consumption

Post by Pomegranate »

bhwabeck3533 wrote: Wed Aug 19, 2020 6:25 am The biggest change in my lifetime, for me, is the ability to access and distill "the news". When I first began watching televised news and reading the newspaper (approx 1965) I felt most sources from TV (e.g., WBAY from Green Bay or WLUC from Marquette) delivered equivalent content. Our morning paper was the Milwaukee Journal and local paper in the afternoon.

Fast forward to the present (that was a quick 55 years). I scroll through FOX and ABC websites, I watch (but have pretty much given up on) all network evening news -- ABC, CBS, NBC all have their biases, and find Twitter one of the most entertaining sources of "news".

With that perspective, I need a different and more efficient approach to "news intake". What strategy is recommended to access reporting and content on current events without expending so much time filtering out the "interpretation and opinion" present in today's journalism?
There are no traditional news anymore but just a stream of events sponsored by someone to influence your behavior. I just ignore it and enjoy my life instead :sharebeer
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Re: Approach to "News" Consumption

Post by adamthesmythe »

I encourage everyone to occasionally check in with news sources not dedicated to reinforcing your prejudices.

Non-US news sources are sometimes useful for gaining a perspective.
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Re: Approach to "News" Consumption

Post by denovo »

Elsebet wrote: Wed Aug 19, 2020 10:13 am
I feel much happier. My husband often gets angry at posts he reads on reddit and I am glad I try to avoid that now. )
thats why /r/wholesomememes and /r/aww exists.
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Re: Approach to "News" Consumption

Post by stan1 »

I'd be careful about using news as entertainment. News shouldn't be a source of pleasure. Easy to fall into the trap because all media companies make money based on promoting addictive behavior. They make money if you stay tuned in.
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Re: Approach to "News" Consumption

Post by Strummer »

I've always avoided TV news. I can get more information from a well-written newspaper article in a tenth of the time it would take a talking head to provide a less detailed report on the same subject. TV news had its peak relevance in the 60's and early 70's, before ABC gave Roone Arledge, president of their sports division, command over the news division with the idea that news could be a profit center, too. (Prior to this, all the networks viewed news reporting as a public service that would lose money.) Unfortunately, all the major networks followed suit and started treating news as info-tainment, and that dynamic was further exacerbated by the birth of the 24-hour cable news networks, which learned quickly from the OJ Simpson murder trial that crises generate good ratings, even if the crises are hyped or otherwise manufactured.

Credibility is the gold standard of journalism; i.e., if you mis-report a story, you damage your credibility and reputation as a trusted voice. Outlets like Reuters and the AP are useful because they understand this, and therefore follow the standard protocols of good journalism: having multiple sources for a story, for example. NPR is generally pretty good at this stuff but their dependence on federal money for a significant portion of their funding means that they will sometimes show too much deference to whichever party is in power. I also like the BBC World Service for US coverage, because it's interesting to hear how the U.S. looks to reporters operating outside our media ecosystem.

I have one other recommendation but before I make it, I want to make one distinction that is often overlooked in discussions like these. News coverage is completely different from opinion/editorial pieces. I think a lot of people read an editorial or news analysis piece and think, "Oh, this paper is biased." Yes, the point of those pieces is to express a particular point of view but no, it doesn't mean the paper itself is biased. If you don't make this distinction as a reader, you're going to find it very difficult to take anything useful away from your media consumption. With that in mind — because some will see this publication as biased, when it's not — I enjoy the Washington Post's national coverage a great deal. The paper's executive editor, Marty Baron, runs a tight ship and protects the paper's credibility vigilantly. (He was running the Boston Globe when that paper won a Pulitzer Prize for its reporting on the Boston Archdiocese sexual abuse scandal, which was later portrayed in the film "Spotlight.")

For those who are interested in ongoing media analysis, I can recommend WNYC's show/podcast "On the Media," which analyses how stories are reported. One of its hosts, Brooke Gladstone, wrote a book (technically a graphic novel) called "The Influencing Machine" which breaks down the subject further.

That's about it. OP, it's good that you're asking about this now. There's a ton of misinformation out there.
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Re: Approach to "News" Consumption

Post by Kompass »

In the morning I will glance at the headlines in my Apple newsfeed and occasionally read an article that catches my interest although avoid politics like the plague. I subscribe to and read the digital version of the Economist so that I can get decent coverage of non-USA events. Something I believe is helpful for me is the fact that I have never signed up for any social media accounts, the closest I get to that is Bogleheads. :beer
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LearningAlot
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Re: Approach to "News" Consumption

Post by LearningAlot »

I recently made the decision to eliminate main stream media from my life (both the right leaning and the left leaning) and
live a happier life.

I inform myself with the following:
* WSJ (mainly for the economic and financial stuff)
* Youtube: about 75 different youtube channels
* Twitter: follow about 150 different individuals and organizations

I keep adding and subtracting to youtube and twitter, if they do not meet my standards, I eliminate them,
and usually find plenty of new ones to try.

My standard is I want sources that are very analytical and data driven and seek the truth, no matter the implication.
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batpot
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Re: Approach to "News" Consumption

Post by batpot »

I browse google news and reddit, and get a news feed from a couple local papers.

I enjoy the morning talk radio show (if I'm commuting), but the ads are jarring...mostly listen to music in the car.
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Re: Approach to "News" Consumption

Post by Orbuculum Nongata »

I read the Telluride Daily Planet. Little to no national bs. Refreshing as the mountain air.
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Re: Approach to "News" Consumption

Post by SmileyFace »

I don't read or watch the news as much as I used to but the time I do spend with the news - I try to spend an equal amount of time watching or reading both biases (e.g. if I watch CNN/MSNBC for 15 minutes I make sure I give equal time to the other side by watching Fox; if I look at NYTs I also look at NYP, etc.). Or I sometimes glance across the headlines on allsides.com to see what the two sides are saying.
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Re: Approach to "News" Consumption

Post by 123 »

I read a couple of major news sites and browse online copies of the Wall Street Journal and New York Times which we subscribe to. I'll sometimes watchthe evening network news but I'm not loyal to one, I try to watch them in rotation day-to-day.

Sometimes I'll watch our local TV news but that gets pretty repetitive, same faces/reporters for the most part every day. Since the pandemic I've taken more to streaming local TV newscasts from other cities, some I've lived in, some that I'd like to, and some at random. I've found that local TV news can give you a real flavor of an area, particularly smaller TV markets, you can see how a single employer or major industry really "tilts" what the news covers. Of course you see the same tilting in major TV markets, if you watch Los Angeles TV stations there are fluff pieces having to do with various aspects of the entertainment business and personalities.
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Candor
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Re: Approach to "News" Consumption

Post by Candor »

Reuters and AP seems to be less biased than most. I like BBC for international news.
000
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Joined: Thu Jul 23, 2020 12:04 am

Re: Approach to "News" Consumption

Post by 000 »

If a source does not provide actionable to good effect information, dump it.
rennale
Posts: 63
Joined: Sun Apr 23, 2017 6:50 am

Re: Approach to "News" Consumption

Post by rennale »

+1 to The Economist.

Two "approaches" that I (lightheartedly) observe:

- Never read anything with the word "stunning" in the headline.
- Generally avoid anything written in the first person.
oldfort
Posts: 1758
Joined: Mon Mar 02, 2020 8:45 pm

Re: Approach to "News" Consumption

Post by oldfort »

One strategy is to get as close as you can to primary sources. You want to know what the Mueller report said. Then, read the Mueller report, all of it. You want to know what the IC inspector general said about the Clinton emails. Then, read his report. Then, you're not getting information filtered through the lens of the media.
livesoft
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Re: Approach to "News" Consumption

Post by livesoft »

McDougal wrote: Wed Aug 19, 2020 6:59 am I have been going to allsides dot com for a while now. For a given topic they categorize the links to news stories on that topic as either left, center or right. Pick your poison.
Allsides.com and news.google.com are aggregators for those that don't have a method to go directly to sites. After using these though, one should go directly to a few sites directly from both in the USA and outside the USA as well as across the political spectrum. One should also read about the same news events reported by different sides, so that one can see the spin that all sides put on their news. And just because an outlet is called "news", be very careful that it is news and not just opinion.

I talked to someone today who was getting their news from opinion sites and not from news sites. I found that rather interesting.

And don't forget the following saying
Pravda and Izvestia, meant "the truth" and "the news" respectively, a popular saying was "there's no truth in Pravda and no news in Izvestia".
This saying might apply to some thing you might come across in the USA today.
Last edited by livesoft on Wed Aug 19, 2020 6:05 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Broken Man 1999
Posts: 5061
Joined: Wed Apr 08, 2015 11:31 am
Location: West coast of Florida, inland on high ground!

Re: Approach to "News" Consumption

Post by Broken Man 1999 »

I haven't watched news on TV for years.

Our middle of the road daily newspaper (The Tampa Tribune) was purchased by the former St. Petersburg Times, now combined paper is The Tampa Bay Times. However, it lists heavily to one side.

During this pandemic, the newspaper published 2 out of 7 days, with no reduction in price. I recently was offered the opportunity to still receive a real paper 2 of 7 days, and they thoughtfully raised my rate substantially. So, no more local newspaper.

I did recently start a one year subscription to the W$J, 6 days print, plus online access for $102.69/year, found it on ebay, so far so good.

I bounce around quite a bit reading various websites offerings, of all points of view, and frankly some websites that are crackhead conspiracist fodder. My W$J plus my magazines Bloomberg Businessweek and The Economist gives me more than enough material to read.

Broken Man 1999
“If I cannot drink Bourbon and smoke cigars in Heaven then I shall not go. " -Mark Twain
quantAndHold
Posts: 5030
Joined: Thu Sep 17, 2015 10:39 pm

Re: Approach to "News" Consumption

Post by quantAndHold »

dcabler wrote: Wed Aug 19, 2020 6:37 am This site might be a good start:

https://www.adfontesmedia.com/
Indeed. I try to stick to factual sources that are inside the green box in the center of that chart. For me, that’s paid subscriptions to my local newspaper and the New York Times. I get emailed both papers every morning, page through them while I’m having my morning coffee, then ignore the outside world for the rest of the day.

If someone sends me an article from a news source I’m not familiar with, Media Bias/Fact Check is a very good site to vet the source before I bother reading it.
Yes, I’m really that pedantic.
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yatesd
Posts: 605
Joined: Sun Nov 03, 2013 8:19 am
Location: MD

Re: Approach to "News" Consumption

Post by yatesd »

I primarily use:

- Wall Street Journal
- Fox News
- Rush Limbaugh
- NPR

Most news sources have declined and are aggregated from AP and Reuters with the increasing goal of using headlines for "click bait" to improve ad revenue.

A year ago, I would have bragged about WSJ. Today, it seems they have hired college students who specialize in lower quality articles. That said, WSJ still has far more "original content" written by actual professionals than almost any other news site.

On Fox News, I find Brit Hume and Tucker Carlson to be factually focused as well. Although Rush is a conservative commentator and NPR is a left leaning news source, they also tend to convey new info that I can't get other places.
Shael_AT
Posts: 49
Joined: Mon Jul 15, 2019 2:36 pm

Re: Approach to "News" Consumption

Post by Shael_AT »

I have a chip on my shoulder when people in media try to direct/steer, influence or tell me how or what to think.

For that reason, any of the personalities on ABC, NBC, CNBC and especially Fox & CNN are an absolute non starter for me. Being mindful of my own emotions has been a godsend, if someone is making me elated, joyous, ecstatic or fearful, anxious and angry, they are banned from my minds eye as a news source. These people and their corporate entities seek to influence what I think, how I behave, how I feel and where I spend my money.

No thank you!

Big fan of:

Local News Outlets
Bing News (General Feed, Local Feed)
Google News (General Feed, Local Feed)
WSJ (Sometimes, Barely)
AP, breaking news releases to stay in the loop
CNBC Television (YouTube, market analysis and insight)
Bloomberg
Lawfare
BBC (UK public broadcasting)
DW English (DEU public broadcasting)

Sometimes (seldom, rarely), I find value from some content coming from:

Vox News
Vice News

Especially love DW Documentary on YouTube.

Just when I thought my perspective of global, continental, national and local events was developed, I get a blast of insight and challenge to my own understanding of various topics.
BionicBillWalsh
Posts: 295
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Location: Sandwich Islands

Re: Approach to "News" Consumption

Post by BionicBillWalsh »

I personally use:

Bloomberg, both television and web site
WSJ
NPR on commute
Local Newspaper and news channel

I feel that this gives me adequate perspective on most things.
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