Farmed Atlantic salmon and toxic chemicals in fish feed

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blackwhisker
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Farmed Atlantic salmon and toxic chemicals in fish feed

Post by blackwhisker »

I understand in general wild salmon is healthier than farmed salmon. But I had trouble finding a tasty wild salmon that doesn't break the bank. So I have been buying the frozen farmed Atlantic salmon from Costco (Kirkland signature).

I read the following article today. It specifically mentioned Costco didn't answer the questions about if toxic chemicals are used in their fish feed.

https://michaelkummer.com/health/diet/farmed-salmon/

Now I am worried. I think I would rather err on the side of caution.

Is farmed salmon really that bad? What are the alternatives?
wootwoot
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Re: Farmed Atlantic salmon and toxic chemicals in fish feed

Post by wootwoot »

Does not answering questions to a random blogger mean that you're guilty of something?
oldfort
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Re: Farmed Atlantic salmon and toxic chemicals in fish feed

Post by oldfort »

What makes you think wild salmon is any better from a health perspective? Don't you think there are toxic substances, such as mercury in the world's oceans?
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Re: Farmed Atlantic salmon and toxic chemicals in fish feed

Post by adamthesmythe »

oldfort wrote: Mon Aug 17, 2020 9:24 pm What makes you think wild salmon is any better from a health perspective? Don't you think there are toxic substances, such as mercury in the world's oceans?
Well it's organic so it must be better, right?

I expect to continue considering price, which often leads me to buy farmed salmon.
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Re: Farmed Atlantic salmon and toxic chemicals in fish feed

Post by JonnyDVM »

Wild salmon tastes better for sure and is better for the environment but I saw some live roundworms squirming in a package of wild salmon a few weeks ago and I can’t get passed it.
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MathIsMyWayr
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Re: Farmed Atlantic salmon and toxic chemicals in fish feed

Post by MathIsMyWayr »

Since we eat salmon quite frequently, every week or so, I am concerned with heavy metals or chemicals in fish. I buy only wild salmon. Supermarkets have wild Alaskan Sockey salmon fillets on sale once in a while. I buy large quantities of frozen salmon fillet on sale. Any way, they come in stores frozen and they defreeze them before selling.
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Re: Farmed Atlantic salmon and toxic chemicals in fish feed

Post by MathIsMyWayr »

JonnyDVM wrote: Mon Aug 17, 2020 9:38 pm Wild salmon tastes better for sure and is better for the environment but I saw some live roundworms squirming in a package of wild salmon a few weeks ago and I can’t get passed it.
Actually farmed Atlantic salmon tastes better than wild salmon except Alaskan King salmon. Farmed salmon has much more fat (fish oil) than wild salmon. King salmon is very expensive. If I can find King salmon fillet under $20/lb., I will grap it any time.
Last edited by MathIsMyWayr on Mon Aug 17, 2020 10:37 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Farmed Atlantic salmon and toxic chemicals in fish feed

Post by arcticpineapplecorp. »

It's "Stay" the course, not Stray the Course. Buy and Hold works. You should really try it sometime. Get a plan: www.bogleheads.org/wiki/Investment_policy_statement
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Re: Farmed Atlantic salmon and toxic chemicals in fish feed

Post by Boglegirl81 »

I remember reading this in the Costco Connection magazine a little while back... it made me feel much better about eating the Costco salmon.

http://www.costcoconnection.com/connect ... eId1461267
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Re: Farmed Atlantic salmon and toxic chemicals in fish feed

Post by 000 »

Anything is toxic in sufficient quantity.
JOEVANDAL
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Re: Farmed Atlantic salmon and toxic chemicals in fish feed

Post by JOEVANDAL »

I love Costco's Farmed Atlantic Salmon. I have no concerns about it.
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blackwhisker
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Re: Farmed Atlantic salmon and toxic chemicals in fish feed

Post by blackwhisker »

MathIsMyWayr wrote: Mon Aug 17, 2020 9:54 pm Actually farmed Atlantic salmon tastes better than wild salmon except Alaskan King salmon. Farmed salmon has much more fat (fish oil) than wild salmon. King salmon is very expensive. If I can find King salmon fillet under $20/lb., I will grap it any time.
Yes I agree. I love King salmon. But it is too expensive for me. I haven’t found other wild salmon tastes good enough. But maybe it is because I don’t know where to look.
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Re: Farmed Atlantic salmon and toxic chemicals in fish feed

Post by blackwhisker »

MathIsMyWayr wrote: Mon Aug 17, 2020 9:49 pm Since we eat salmon quite frequently, every week or so, I am concerned with heavy metals or chemicals in fish. I buy only wild salmon. Supermarkets have wild Alaskan Sockey salmon fillets on sale once in a while. I buy large quantities of frozen salmon fillet on sale. Any way, they come in stores frozen and they defreeze them before selling.
I didn’t like the taste of Costco Alaskan sockeye salmon. Is there another brand of sockeye salmon that tastes better?
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Re: Farmed Atlantic salmon and toxic chemicals in fish feed

Post by MathIsMyWayr »

blackwhisker wrote: Mon Aug 17, 2020 11:06 pm
MathIsMyWayr wrote: Mon Aug 17, 2020 9:49 pm Since we eat salmon quite frequently, every week or so, I am concerned with heavy metals or chemicals in fish. I buy only wild salmon. Supermarkets have wild Alaskan Sockey salmon fillets on sale once in a while. I buy large quantities of frozen salmon fillet on sale. Any way, they come in stores frozen and they defreeze them before selling.
I didn’t like the taste of Costco Alaskan sockeye salmon. Is there another brand of sockeye salmon that tastes better?
Did/does Costco have Alaskan sockeye salmon, not packaged? Local Safeway, Lucky, and Sprouts carry Sockeye salmon. When on sale, I can get fillet close to $10/lb. I buy about a dozen frozen individually vacuum wrapped fillets and keep them in a freezer. Wild Sockeye salmon does not have much fat, still more than Coho or Keta salmon, but is much leaner than farmed Atlantic salmon. You may coat fillet with a thin layer of light olive oil before grilling.
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blackwhisker
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Re: Farmed Atlantic salmon and toxic chemicals in fish feed

Post by blackwhisker »

arcticpineapplecorp. wrote: Mon Aug 17, 2020 9:55 pm see for yourself:

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/wi ... #nutrition
Thank you arcticpineapplecorp! This article is well written and very helpful!
Shaka
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Re: Farmed Atlantic salmon and toxic chemicals in fish feed

Post by Shaka »

If you are not actively controlling the ratio of omega 3 to 6 fatty acids in your diet, then selecting wild VS farmed salmon is probably not going to do anything for you healthwise (since the other stuff you eat probably already blows the optimal ratio off kilter). Farmed salmon have a much poorer ratio.

If you are counting calories, farmed salmon are much fattier, and thus higher calorie, and thus may not be the best choice.

I'm no expert on the ecological concerns of wild caught VS farmed raised, but do some Google research if that is important to you. Seems like there are arguments either way.
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Re: Farmed Atlantic salmon and toxic chemicals in fish feed

Post by FrugalInvestor »

Our Costco has wild Alaskan Sockeye that is frozen and nearly indistinguishable in taste or texture from fresh Alaskan Sockeye that they sell. We buy it regularly. It's excellent and comes in nice sized portions.
Have a plan, stay the course and simplify, but most importantly....Ignore the Noise!
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blackwhisker
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Re: Farmed Atlantic salmon and toxic chemicals in fish feed

Post by blackwhisker »

MathIsMyWayr wrote: Mon Aug 17, 2020 11:19 pm
blackwhisker wrote: Mon Aug 17, 2020 11:06 pm
MathIsMyWayr wrote: Mon Aug 17, 2020 9:49 pm Since we eat salmon quite frequently, every week or so, I am concerned with heavy metals or chemicals in fish. I buy only wild salmon. Supermarkets have wild Alaskan Sockey salmon fillets on sale once in a while. I buy large quantities of frozen salmon fillet on sale. Any way, they come in stores frozen and they defreeze them before selling.
I didn’t like the taste of Costco Alaskan sockeye salmon. Is there another brand of sockeye salmon that tastes better?
Did/does Costco have Alaskan sockeye salmon, not packaged? Local Safeway, Lucky, and Sprouts carry Sockeye salmon. When on sale, I can get fillet close to $10/lb. I buy about a dozen frozen individually vacuum wrapped fillets and keep them in a freezer. Wild Sockeye salmon does not have much fat, still more than Coho or Keta salmon, but is much leaner than farmed Atlantic salmon. You may coat fillet with a thin layer of light olive oil before grilling.
Thanks for the reply. I don’t know if Costco have non-packaged sockeye salmon. I will look for it next time. I didn’t realize wild sockeye has more fat than most other wild salmon. I think $10/lb is a good price for good salmon. I have tried a couple of sockeye salmon and wasn’t crazy about them. I wish I could find $20/lb for king salmon.
Last edited by blackwhisker on Mon Aug 17, 2020 11:38 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Farmed Atlantic salmon and toxic chemicals in fish feed

Post by blackwhisker »

blackwhisker wrote: Mon Aug 17, 2020 11:35 pm
MathIsMyWayr wrote: Mon Aug 17, 2020 11:19 pm
blackwhisker wrote: Mon Aug 17, 2020 11:06 pm
MathIsMyWayr wrote: Mon Aug 17, 2020 9:49 pm Since we eat salmon quite frequently, every week or so, I am concerned with heavy metals or chemicals in fish. I buy only wild salmon. Supermarkets have wild Alaskan Sockey salmon fillets on sale once in a while. I buy large quantities of frozen salmon fillet on sale. Any way, they come in stores frozen and they defreeze them before selling.
I didn’t like the taste of Costco Alaskan sockeye salmon. Is there another brand of sockeye salmon that tastes better?
Did/does Costco have Alaskan sockeye salmon, not packaged? Local Safeway, Lucky, and Sprouts carry Sockeye salmon. When on sale, I can get fillet close to $10/lb. I buy about a dozen frozen individually vacuum wrapped fillets and keep them in a freezer. Wild Sockeye salmon does not have much fat, still more than Coho or Keta salmon, but is much leaner than farmed Atlantic salmon. You may coat fillet with a thin layer of light olive oil before grilling.
Thanks for the reply. I don’t know if Costco have non-packaged sockeye salmon. I will look for it next time. I didn’t realize wild sockeye has more fat than most other wild salmon. I think $10/lb is a good price for good salmon. I have tried a couple of sockeye salmon and wasn’t crazy about them. I wish I could find $20/lb for king salmon.

I will try the olive oil trick on sockeye salmon next time. Thanks!
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Re: Farmed Atlantic salmon and toxic chemicals in fish feed

Post by Northern Flicker »

oldfort wrote: Mon Aug 17, 2020 9:24 pm What makes you think wild salmon is any better from a health perspective? Don't you think there are toxic substances, such as mercury in the world's oceans?
Wild salmon gets it pink color from eating krill, and from eating other fish that eat krill. This is also how they get most of their healthy omega-3 fatty acids.

Farm-raised salmon get their pink color from red dye added to their food. Aside from any concerns about the dye, they lack the main source of healthy omega-3 fatty acids in their diet, which eliminates a very significant health benefit of eating wild salmon.
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Re: Farmed Atlantic salmon and toxic chemicals in fish feed

Post by FrugalInvestor »

Here's a Cleveland Clinic article comparing the health benefits of wild vs. farmed salmon.

https://health.clevelandclinic.org/fish ... ed-salmon/

Conclusion of the article....
Both farmed and wild salmon have nutrients we all need. But it is becoming clearer that the risks associated with farmed fish are higher than concerns about wild fish. If you want to get the many health benefits fish such as salmon provide, your best bet is to keep it wild.
Have a plan, stay the course and simplify, but most importantly....Ignore the Noise!
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Re: Farmed Atlantic salmon and toxic chemicals in fish feed

Post by MathIsMyWayr »

Northern Flicker wrote: Mon Aug 17, 2020 11:37 pm
oldfort wrote: Mon Aug 17, 2020 9:24 pm What makes you think wild salmon is any better from a health perspective? Don't you think there are toxic substances, such as mercury in the world's oceans?
Wild salmon gets it pink color from eating krill, and from eating other fish that eat krill. This is also how they get most of their healthy omega-3 fatty acids.

Farm-raised salmon get their pink color from red dye added to their food. Aside from any concerns about the dye, they lack the main source of healthy omega-3 fatty acids in their diet, which eliminates a very significant health benefit of eating wild salmon.
Flesh of salmon from Lake Champlain in upstate New York/Vermont is white, but its taste is no different from regular salmon. Salmon there has no way to migrate to the sea.
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Re: Farmed Atlantic salmon and toxic chemicals in fish feed

Post by Northern Flicker »

Salmon that were stocked in lakes with no access to the ocean, but figured out how to survive and reproduce in the lake are typically called kokanee or kokanee trout, because they take on the behavior of lake trout. It is correct they have white flesh as well, just like farm-raised salmon would without dye in their food.

There is another problem with farm-raised fish. Much of the food given to them is grown on land, and it is not a 100% efficient transfer, so it is a net decrease in food production relative to just producing land-based crops. Harvesting wild fish is capturing additional food production from the ocean directly, enhancing land-based food production.

On the other hand, wild salmon fisheries worldwide do not produce enough fish today to meet worldwide demand in a sustainable way.
Risk is not a guarantor of return.
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Re: Farmed Atlantic salmon and toxic chemicals in fish feed

Post by oldfort »

Northern Flicker wrote: Mon Aug 17, 2020 11:37 pm
oldfort wrote: Mon Aug 17, 2020 9:24 pm What makes you think wild salmon is any better from a health perspective? Don't you think there are toxic substances, such as mercury in the world's oceans?
Wild salmon gets it pink color from eating krill, and from eating other fish that eat krill. This is also how they get most of their healthy omega-3 fatty acids.

Farm-raised salmon get their pink color from red dye added to their food. Aside from any concerns about the dye, they lack the main source of healthy omega-3 fatty acids in their diet, which eliminates a very significant health benefit of eating wild salmon.
This is incorrect about the omega-3 acids.
Farmed salmon fillets contain as many grams of omega-3 fatty acids as wild salmon because farmed salmon are fattier than wild salmon.
https://www.doh.wa.gov/CommunityandEnvi ... rmedSalmon
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Re: Farmed Atlantic salmon and toxic chemicals in fish feed

Post by oldfort »

FrugalInvestor wrote: Mon Aug 17, 2020 11:44 pm Here's a Cleveland Clinic article comparing the health benefits of wild vs. farmed salmon.

https://health.clevelandclinic.org/fish ... ed-salmon/

Conclusion of the article....
Both farmed and wild salmon have nutrients we all need. But it is becoming clearer that the risks associated with farmed fish are higher than concerns about wild fish. If you want to get the many health benefits fish such as salmon provide, your best bet is to keep it wild.
The link is from 2014. Two of the studies it cites are from 2005. One of the studies it relies on is from 2003. This is dated research.
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Re: Farmed Atlantic salmon and toxic chemicals in fish feed

Post by Shaka »

oldfort wrote: Tue Aug 18, 2020 12:14 am
Northern Flicker wrote: Mon Aug 17, 2020 11:37 pm
oldfort wrote: Mon Aug 17, 2020 9:24 pm What makes you think wild salmon is any better from a health perspective? Don't you think there are toxic substances, such as mercury in the world's oceans?
Wild salmon gets it pink color from eating krill, and from eating other fish that eat krill. This is also how they get most of their healthy omega-3 fatty acids.

Farm-raised salmon get their pink color from red dye added to their food. Aside from any concerns about the dye, they lack the main source of healthy omega-3 fatty acids in their diet, which eliminates a very significant health benefit of eating wild salmon.
This is incorrect about the omega-3 acids.
Farmed salmon fillets contain as many grams of omega-3 fatty acids as wild salmon because farmed salmon are fattier than wild salmon.
https://www.doh.wa.gov/CommunityandEnvi ... rmedSalmon
Note that farmed salmon only have similar amounts of omega 3s to wild salmon because farmed salmon have much more fat overall. But farmed salmon have much poorer omega 3 to 6 fatty acid ratios than wild salmon. Also, the farmed salmon fat profile will depend on what it is fed.
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Re: Farmed Atlantic salmon and toxic chemicals in fish feed

Post by SevenBridgesRoad »

Try Costco fresh farmed steelhead if it’s available where you live. We live in the Pacific NW and can get all kinds of fresh fish in season. But Costco steelhead has become our once-a-week fish on the grill.
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Re: Farmed Atlantic salmon and toxic chemicals in fish feed

Post by oldfort »

There's not enough wild seafood to meet demand sustainably. In the aggregate, most of us have to eat farmed salmon or none at all or else the world's wild salmon population will be depleted.
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Re: Farmed Atlantic salmon and toxic chemicals in fish feed

Post by MathIsMyWayr »

SevenBridgesRoad wrote: Tue Aug 18, 2020 12:32 am Try Costco fresh farmed steelhead if it’s available where you live. We live in the Pacific NW and can get all kinds of fresh fish in season. But Costco steelhead has become our once-a-week fish on the grill.
I believe Costco imports farmed steelhead salmon from Norway.
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Re: Farmed Atlantic salmon and toxic chemicals in fish feed

Post by Northern Flicker »

oldfort wrote: Tue Aug 18, 2020 12:14 am
Northern Flicker wrote: Mon Aug 17, 2020 11:37 pm
oldfort wrote: Mon Aug 17, 2020 9:24 pm What makes you think wild salmon is any better from a health perspective? Don't you think there are toxic substances, such as mercury in the world's oceans?
Wild salmon gets it pink color from eating krill, and from eating other fish that eat krill. This is also how they get most of their healthy omega-3 fatty acids.

Farm-raised salmon get their pink color from red dye added to their food. Aside from any concerns about the dye, they lack the main source of healthy omega-3 fatty acids in their diet, which eliminates a very significant health benefit of eating wild salmon.
This is incorrect about the omega-3 acids.
Farmed salmon fillets contain as many grams of omega-3 fatty acids as wild salmon because farmed salmon are fattier than wild salmon.
https://www.doh.wa.gov/CommunityandEnvi ... rmedSalmon
This is misleading because the percentage of fatty acids that are omega-3's and not just tge total amount is important. Saying that farm-raised salmon has as much omega-3 because it has a higher fat content implies a lower percentage of omega-3's in the fat that it has.
Risk is not a guarantor of return.
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Re: Farmed Atlantic salmon and toxic chemicals in fish feed

Post by Pacific »

arcticpineapplecorp. wrote: Mon Aug 17, 2020 9:55 pm see for yourself:

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/wi ... #nutrition
Thank you for this. A treasure trove of information.
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Re: Farmed Atlantic salmon and toxic chemicals in fish feed

Post by wander »

We only buy "wild caught" fish.
unstartable
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Re: Farmed Atlantic salmon and toxic chemicals in fish feed

Post by unstartable »

Northern Flicker wrote: Tue Aug 18, 2020 12:08 am Salmon that were stocked in lakes with no access to the ocean, but figured out how to survive and reproduce in the lake are typically called kokanee or kokanee trout, because they take on the behavior of lake trout. It is correct they have white flesh as well, just like farm-raised salmon would without dye in their food.

There is another problem with farm-raised fish. Much of the food given to them is grown on land, and it is not a 100% efficient transfer, so it is a net decrease in food production relative to just producing land-based crops. Harvesting wild fish is capturing additional food production from the ocean directly, enhancing land-based food production.

On the other hand, wild salmon fisheries worldwide do not produce enough fish today to meet worldwide demand in a sustainable way.
That’s interesting I didn’t know about the naturally occurring landlocked salmon in the west. In Lake Ontario there are/were naturally occurring landlocked Atlantic salmon. Most of the Great Lakes has stocked chinook and coho salmon as well as steelhead and brown trout.
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Re: Farmed Atlantic salmon and toxic chemicals in fish feed

Post by Chicken Little »

The recommendation to eat salmon is typically to increase dietary DHA and EPA. From your link;

Research has shown that eicosapentacenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid in seafood provide health benefits for the developing fetus, infants, and also for adults. Learn more about the health benefits of omega-3 fatty acids.

Omega-3 fatty acids are often lumped together. ALA is converted into EPA and DHA;

https://lpi.oregonstate.edu/mic/other-n ... atty-acids

Studies of ALA metabolism in healthy young men indicated that approximately 8% of dietary ALA was converted to EPA and 0%-4% was converted to docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) (6). In healthy young women, approximately 21% of dietary ALA was converted to EPA and 9% was converted to DHA (7). The better capacity to generate long-chain PUFA from ALA in young women compared to men is related to the effects of estrogen (8, 9). Although only the essentiality of ALA is recognized because it cannot be synthesized de novo by humans, the relatively low rate of ALA conversion into EPA and DHA suggests that these long-chain omega-3 PUFA may be considered conditionally essential nutrients.

If the intention is to increase dietary EPA and DHA, then one should probably consider how much EPA and DHA is in the food.

Dietary ALA is relatively abundant (see Table 3); nuts, seeds, canola oil, soybean oil. If conversion of dietary ALA to EPA and DHA was adequate, there would be no benefit to eating salmon, or the benefit of eating salmon would be unrelated to omega-3 consumption.

What they feed the fish may matter to you;

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4761991/

However, like humans, salmon along with other coldwater marine species of fish are inefficient at converting the shorter-chain fatty acid, α-linolenic acid (ALA; 18:3n-3), into EPA and DHA, and must therefore obtain the n-3 LC-PUFA through the diet.
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Re: Farmed Atlantic salmon and toxic chemicals in fish feed

Post by austin757 »

I have bought wild salmon sold in the can at various grocery stores. It tastes good and it is easy to eat, especially if you're on the go and don't have time to prepare and cook on the grill. I'd recommend Deming's brand.
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Re: Farmed Atlantic salmon and toxic chemicals in fish feed

Post by wanderer »

Our daughter recently completed a graduate degree in sustainable agriculture and nutrition, specifically aquaculture. She has recommends we follow the Monterrey Bay Seafood Watch program.
https://www.seafoodwatch.org/
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Re: Farmed Atlantic salmon and toxic chemicals in fish feed

Post by dowse »

For those who would prefer something similar to salmon, but milder, I highly recommend arctic char. I prepare it the same way as salmon and much prefer it. It's not nearly as easy to find. When I do, it comes farm-raised from Iceland.
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Re: Farmed Atlantic salmon and toxic chemicals in fish feed

Post by t3xn »

Here is a documentary on farmed fish. The Atlantic salmon starts around the 26 min. mark. The feed is processed from polluted fish in the Baltic Sea.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zsbtit20DLo
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Re: Farmed Atlantic salmon and toxic chemicals in fish feed

Post by c1over8 »

I get wild sockeye salmon at whole foods whenever it is on sale around 10.99/lb. I never buy there if it's not sale since Costco's is 9.99/lb. I don't think it's as tasty as farmed, but I prefer to buy wild and whole foods is better than other sockeye I've bought.
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Re: Farmed Atlantic salmon and toxic chemicals in fish feed

Post by Valuethinker »

oldfort wrote: Mon Aug 17, 2020 9:24 pm What makes you think wild salmon is any better from a health perspective? Don't you think there are toxic substances, such as mercury in the world's oceans?
Farmed salmon would not be exempt from problems like mercury buildup?
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Re: Farmed Atlantic salmon and toxic chemicals in fish feed

Post by Valuethinker »

Northern Flicker wrote: Tue Aug 18, 2020 12:08 am Salmon that were stocked in lakes with no access to the ocean, but figured out how to survive and reproduce in the lake are typically called kokanee or kokanee trout, because they take on the behavior of lake trout. It is correct they have white flesh as well, just like farm-raised salmon would without dye in their food.

There is another problem with farm-raised fish. Much of the food given to them is grown on land, and it is not a 100% efficient transfer, so it is a net decrease in food production relative to just producing land-based crops. Harvesting wild fish is capturing additional food production from the ocean directly, enhancing land-based food production.

On the other hand, wild salmon fisheries worldwide do not produce enough fish today to meet worldwide demand in a sustainable way.
It is a good bet we won't have wild ocean fish in 30 years time. Or at least it will be a very rare delicacy.

The expansion of fishing activity an d the fall in estimated sea biota are both pretty stunning.
oldfort
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Re: Farmed Atlantic salmon and toxic chemicals in fish feed

Post by oldfort »

Valuethinker wrote: Tue Aug 18, 2020 9:48 am
oldfort wrote: Mon Aug 17, 2020 9:24 pm What makes you think wild salmon is any better from a health perspective? Don't you think there are toxic substances, such as mercury in the world's oceans?
Farmed salmon would not be exempt from problems like mercury buildup?
Without independent testing, it's impossible to know whether a particular source of fish has higher contaminants in terms of PPM. The bigger issue in my view is the lack of sustainability for wild seafood. If everyone tried to switch to wild salmon, the populations would be gone in short order.
Chicken Little
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Re: Farmed Atlantic salmon and toxic chemicals in fish feed

Post by Chicken Little »

Here’s a good one...since the feed is 70% plants, they are testing for agricultural pesticides.

https://salmonfacts.com/what-eats-salmo ... d-contain/#

A progressive solution for environmentally conscious
consumers eating salmon for EPA and DHA would be to find a source other than fish. Presumably synthetic versions are unrealistic, but there are supplements derived from algae that contain EPA and DHA.

https://www.amazon.com/Nordic-Naturals- ... B009KTUGSS

One consideration with polyunsaturated fat consumption is the degree of oxidation. That could be from cooking or stability. Stability could be from shelf life of a supplement, or shelf life of the feed given to farm raised fish.

There are prescription versions of omega-3 (Lovaza, Vescepa). If they were significantly less oxidized, I’d look into that as a replacement for fish.
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Re: Farmed Atlantic salmon and toxic chemicals in fish feed

Post by Kenkat »

Valuethinker wrote: Tue Aug 18, 2020 9:51 am
Northern Flicker wrote: Tue Aug 18, 2020 12:08 am Salmon that were stocked in lakes with no access to the ocean, but figured out how to survive and reproduce in the lake are typically called kokanee or kokanee trout, because they take on the behavior of lake trout. It is correct they have white flesh as well, just like farm-raised salmon would without dye in their food.

There is another problem with farm-raised fish. Much of the food given to them is grown on land, and it is not a 100% efficient transfer, so it is a net decrease in food production relative to just producing land-based crops. Harvesting wild fish is capturing additional food production from the ocean directly, enhancing land-based food production.

On the other hand, wild salmon fisheries worldwide do not produce enough fish today to meet worldwide demand in a sustainable way.
It is a good bet we won't have wild ocean fish in 30 years time. Or at least it will be a very rare delicacy.

The expansion of fishing activity an d the fall in estimated sea biota are both pretty stunning.
Grilled Soylent Green patties anyone?

I remember when Chilean Sea Bass or Orange Roughy were all the rage and were subsequently overfished and disappeared for a time. Luckily they are coming back (a bit) but it is a fragile path we are on.
MadHungarian
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Re: Farmed Atlantic salmon and toxic chemicals in fish feed

Post by MadHungarian »

oldfort wrote: Mon Aug 17, 2020 9:24 pm What makes you think wild salmon is any better from a health perspective? Don't you think there are toxic substances, such as mercury in the world's oceans?
I would probably expect wild salmon to be statistically safer, because of the much wider geographic variety of their food sources.
BBQ Nut
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Re: Farmed Atlantic salmon and toxic chemicals in fish feed

Post by BBQ Nut »

Farmed salmon (or any fish) - not allowed in my house.
dknightd
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Re: Farmed Atlantic salmon and toxic chemicals in fish feed

Post by dknightd »

I recommend Spam. Two year shelf life. No refrigeration required ... ;)
If you value a bird in the hand, pay off the loan. If you are willing to risk getting two birds (or none) from the market, invest the funds.
inbox788
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Re: Farmed Atlantic salmon and toxic chemicals in fish feed

Post by inbox788 »

Northern Flicker wrote: Tue Aug 18, 2020 2:26 am
oldfort wrote: Tue Aug 18, 2020 12:14 am
Northern Flicker wrote: Mon Aug 17, 2020 11:37 pm
oldfort wrote: Mon Aug 17, 2020 9:24 pm What makes you think wild salmon is any better from a health perspective? Don't you think there are toxic substances, such as mercury in the world's oceans?
Wild salmon gets it pink color from eating krill, and from eating other fish that eat krill. This is also how they get most of their healthy omega-3 fatty acids.

Farm-raised salmon get their pink color from red dye added to their food. Aside from any concerns about the dye, they lack the main source of healthy omega-3 fatty acids in their diet, which eliminates a very significant health benefit of eating wild salmon.
This is incorrect about the omega-3 acids.
Farmed salmon fillets contain as many grams of omega-3 fatty acids as wild salmon because farmed salmon are fattier than wild salmon.
https://www.doh.wa.gov/CommunityandEnvi ... rmedSalmon
This is misleading because the percentage of fatty acids that are omega-3's and not just tge total amount is important. Saying that farm-raised salmon has as much omega-3 because it has a higher fat content implies a lower percentage of omega-3's in the fat that it has.
What do wild salmon consume that is high in healthy omega-3 fatty acids? And why aren't we just consuming those things ourselves?

So if farmed salmon were fed omega-3 fatty acid supplements, they'd have higher omega-3 than either wild or non-supplemented farmed? And if they exercised these fish, they could be just like wild salmon in total omega-3 and omega-3/omega-6 ratio? By all means, put them in hamster wheels for fish. https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com ... L._AC_.jpg

BTW, the health difference between wild vs farmed salmon probably pales compared to that beef steak dinner (or SPAM®).
Chicken Little wrote: Tue Aug 18, 2020 10:56 amThere are prescription versions of omega-3 (Lovaza, Vescepa). If they were significantly less oxidized, I’d look into that as a replacement for fish.
For the fish or us? If you take the pills, what are you eating for dinner?
Kagord
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Re: Farmed Atlantic salmon and toxic chemicals in fish feed

Post by Kagord »

I just gotta say, the "fresh" farmed Atlantic salmon tastes really good, all that Omega-6, yeah! Not as good as Sockeye off the fishing boat in Alaska, but it's pretty good, and tastes better than the more expensive alternatives in the supermarket, IMHO.
Chicken Little
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Re: Farmed Atlantic salmon and toxic chemicals in fish feed

Post by Chicken Little »

inbox788 wrote: Tue Aug 18, 2020 1:00 pm
Chicken Little wrote: Tue Aug 18, 2020 10:56 amThere are prescription versions of omega-3 (Lovaza, Vescepa). If they were significantly less oxidized, I’d look into that as a replacement for fish.
For the fish or us? If you take the pills, what are you eating for dinner?
I’m mostly in it for me.

If somebody wanted to save the fish, maybe they could eat omega-3 from cultured algae or plankton? That’s what eventually winds up in the fish. Could cut out the middleman in an environmentally friendly fashion?

Adding fish products to farmed fish feed, or chicken feed, to boost omega-3 is kind of amusing.

The problem with an omega-3 supplement (algae or fish oil) is they’re unregulated. The level of oxidation isn’t really high on the public radar. These omega-3’s are fragile polyunsaturated fatty acids, prone to picking up bad actors. I wouldn’t be surprised if a significantly oxidized (rancid) supplement offsets all of the purported benefit.

The reason I brought up the pharmaceutical versions is that the FDA does regulate those. Maybe I’m wrong, but I have a hard time believing the FDA would allow the sale of rancid medicine.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4681158/

As far as what to eat for dinner? That’s easy. For the animal part, you just select ones with the fewest double bonds.
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