Products that last forever

Questions on how we spend our money and our time - consumer goods and services, home and vehicle, leisure and recreational activities
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Doom&Gloom
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Re: Products that last forever

Post by Doom&Gloom »

finite_difference wrote: Sun Aug 16, 2020 11:33 am
Nicolas wrote: Sun Aug 16, 2020 10:49 am
abracadabra11 wrote: Sat Aug 15, 2020 10:37 pm
Nicolas wrote: Thu Aug 13, 2020 12:02 pm TiVo DVR - installed in May 2010 with lifetime subscription. Still working perfectly, hard drive spinning ten+ years with only power outages interrupting. I had to replace the case fan once for $5. Also replaced the remote a few years ago as we dropped the original too many times.

Panasonic Viera 50” plasma TV, installed November 2010. Used almost daily and still working perfectly with no image degradation.
I have a 42" Plasma from 2006 that ran perfectly until earlier this year. So I don't know that yours will last 'forever'. But 14 years is pretty good.
When it fails, which I know it will sometime, I’ll replace it with an OLED screen. Nothing else achieves the image quality I have now. But really, I’m hoping to hold out until the advent of microLED which promises to be even better.
+1. Plasma is amazing and only OLED has wowed me in the same way, but it’s still expensive. Looks like you can get one starting at around $1200 now though.

We have a Panasonic plasma from 2009 that has no degradation and I think cost around $1200.
I have three Panasonic plasmas still going strong: 2007, 2010, and 2011. Two have been used heavily. I dread the day I will have to replace any of them.
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Orbuculum Nongata
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Re: Products that last forever

Post by Orbuculum Nongata »

Pitmaker Safe Smoker http://www.pitmaker.com/product/vin/?vin=62369936

Eley hose reel.

The early generation iPad I’m typing on.
I think I can > I believe I can > I did
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Orbuculum Nongata
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Re: Products that last forever

Post by Orbuculum Nongata »

UncleBen wrote: Sat Aug 15, 2020 6:23 am My 36 year old Maytag washer and dryer and 37 year old Electrolux canister vacuum.
+1 on the Maytag washer and dryer. Still have the one’s we got in 1994. Both still work great.
I think I can > I believe I can > I did
NJdad6
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Re: Products that last forever

Post by NJdad6 »

barnaclebob wrote: Thu Aug 13, 2020 1:31 pm
retire57 wrote: Thu Aug 13, 2020 7:17 am KitchenAid mixer.
So long as you only make 1 loaf of bread per year or it was purchased a couple decades ago.
I think it depends on the model. Some of their lower priced ones switched to plastic parts. At least a few years ago the “professional” models still used metal gears. Overall I think KitchenAid as a brand is really decreasing build quality.
Bmac
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Re: Products that last forever

Post by Bmac »

psy1 wrote: Fri Aug 14, 2020 9:25 pm I have had good luck with exercise equipment. Every contraption I have ever purchased is as good as new and appears unused.
Thank you for this. My LMAO moment on a relaxing Sunday morning.
valleyrock
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Re: Products that last forever

Post by valleyrock »

antwerp wrote: Thu Aug 13, 2020 8:58 pmCrocs
My crocs usually only last a couple of years before the tread goes, and they become extremely slippery and dangerous on anything smooth if it's even slightly wet.

(Or were you thinking of the reptilian kind?)

Somewhat OT, but this is a cool tools site: https://kk.org/cooltools/
MathWizard
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Re: Products that last forever

Post by MathWizard »

The set of craftsman sockets that I bought 45 years ago.
I will admit two issues, but both were from using cheater bars, so
I can't fault craftsman.
eddot98
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Re: Products that last forever

Post by eddot98 »

Toilets and bathtubs. Our 2 of each have been serving us since 1985 when we bought our house. I’m guessing that they were installed in the 1950’s. The toilets have had new replaceable parts periodically and the tubs have been refinished. Come to think of it, there are still some claw foot tubs in service, just not in our house. Our propane stove also dates from the 1950’s and so do our white metal kitchen cabinets and stainless steel sink. People replace all these things because they don’t like the looks of them, not that they don’t function. Just as we replaced the aqua blue sink and plastic vanity in one of our bathrooms because it looked bad, not because it didn’t work. A nice, white American Standard that will never wear out. Someone might do something dumb to break it, but that would be difficult.
jbinpa59
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Re: Products that last forever

Post by jbinpa59 »

pre 1960 singer sewing machines
the black cast iron ones

with a little oil and cleaning they'll literally go for a 100 years

got a winchester pump 22 thats coming up on a 100 yrs too
nydoc
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Re: Products that last forever

Post by nydoc »

My acer laptop. Bought in 2014. Still going strong considering it’s a windows laptop.
Coltrane75
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Re: Products that last forever

Post by Coltrane75 »

Slacker wrote: Sat Aug 15, 2020 7:50 pm
Coltrane75 wrote: Fri Aug 14, 2020 8:44 am
Slacker wrote: Thu Aug 13, 2020 7:28 pm
Coltrane75 wrote: Thu Aug 13, 2020 9:51 am 26 Years:
  • Harmon Kardon A/V Receiver AVR 25 II from 1994
    Klipsch floor standing speakers from 1994
App 80-100 Years
Wood Smoother (not sure the proper technical name), from grandfather in Italy, possibly made sometime in between WWI & II
My Harmon Kardon AVR 235 has been going strong for 15 years now.

Peavey Envoy 110 practice amp going strong for almost 30years now.
Awesome!
Are you planning on keeping your HK for the duration?

I am; I've used cable adaptors and other accessories to keep it connected to new tech.

I just wish HK made the same look and type of A/Vs as they used to. If mine gives up the ghost, won't be going HK again.
Absolutely! I am using an HDMI box that strips out the surround sound signals to feed into the HK for surround sound off my Chromecast, Video Games, BluRay player and DVD player since my HK was released before HDMI was a popular A/V format (the box has SPDIF optical output that goes into the HK).

I suppose I forgot that I also have Infinity surround sound speakers and bookshelf speakers that are also 15 years old now. Of course, just like the Peavey, I'd be hard pressed to know if the speaker cones have degraded as a slow degradation would likely be something I've just become accustomed to over time. I may have to listen to some brand new (but broken in) mid-range speakers for comparison.
Over the course of the years that I've owned HK I've come to abandon surround sound and favor stereo now. I just feel like its not worth the trouble.

I've just visited HK's site and it looks like they aren't selling any amplifiers/receivers...I wonder if they're out of the business. That would be a shame.
adestefan
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Re: Products that last forever

Post by adestefan »

NJdad6 wrote: Sun Aug 16, 2020 12:37 pm
barnaclebob wrote: Thu Aug 13, 2020 1:31 pm
retire57 wrote: Thu Aug 13, 2020 7:17 am KitchenAid mixer.
So long as you only make 1 loaf of bread per year or it was purchased a couple decades ago.
I think it depends on the model. Some of their lower priced ones switched to plastic parts. At least a few years ago the “professional” models still used metal gears. Overall I think KitchenAid as a brand is really decreasing build quality.
KitchenAid mixers have always had a mix of nylon and metal gears. The nylon gears are designed to shear off under too much stress to protect the rest of the gearbox and motor. The nylon gears are very easy to replace and only cost $15. I blow mine out every 6 or 7 years and it’s also a good time to repack the grease in the mixing head.
Zephyr2
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Re: Products that last forever

Post by Zephyr2 »

Several have mentioned hand tools. I have a few that were owned and used by my 90-year old dad. His Estwing hammer is in my toolbox for example, and I would guess it is about 60 years old. My Dad built a lot of stuff when we were young and I can remember the feel of that hammer pounding many roofing nails on a summer place we built as a family. I've got a bunch of other tools that I can remember from when I was a child, and I still use all of them.
finanzfrau
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Re: Products that last forever

Post by finanzfrau »

Staub cast iron pots and pans
Birkenstock sandals
My KitchenAid is a few years old and hoping it will last a while.
2000 Saab 9-3 owned and driven for 12+ years
Broken Man 1999
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Re: Products that last forever

Post by Broken Man 1999 »

I inherited my father's stub-nose S&W 38 revolver. It is at least 60 years old.

I doubt it wil ever wear out.

It needs to be blued again. The holster leather is cracked some. Still serviceable, though.

I will probably leave it to one of my grandchildren, or maybe a nephew.

Broken Man 1999
“If I cannot drink Bourbon and smoke cigars in Heaven then I shall not go. " -Mark Twain
Rattlesnake
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Re: Products that last forever

Post by Rattlesnake »

Didn't read the whole Post, but still have a 4.5 HP Mercury outboard from the early 50's.....
9th Infantry Division LRRP (Ranger) | 1968-69
randomguy
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Re: Products that last forever

Post by randomguy »

reisner wrote: Sun Aug 16, 2020 11:45 am randomguy wrote: "And with a lot of products you run into the ship of Thesus issues where you have to ask is what you have the same as what you started with. If you replace your leatherman with a new one did it last forever? The leatherman didn't and ended up in a landfill. But your "purchase" did in that you still have a usable product. Depending on your goals that may or may not count as lasting forever."

Correction: Jason's ship, the Argo, not Theseus' (not Thesus).
Correction: Theseus (and yes I did leave off the e:)) and not Jason. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ship_of_Theseus .
Nicolas
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Re: Products that last forever

Post by Nicolas »

Broken Man 1999 wrote: Tue Aug 18, 2020 4:36 pm I inherited my father's stub-nose S&W 38 revolver. It is at least 60 years old.

I doubt it wil ever wear out.

It needs to be blued again. The holster leather is cracked some. Still serviceable, though.

I will probably leave it to one of my grandchildren, or maybe a nephew.

Broken Man 1999
I have my dad’s .22 rifle. No idea who manufactured it. It’s about 90 years old. I used it as a child but it hasn’t been fired in 50 years.
D Newton
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Re: Products that last forever

Post by D Newton »

My Dad's 10-inch Craftsman circular saw
Lionel Trains - just over 60 years old
Buck knife
Regards, | Doug
Badger1754
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Re: Products that last forever

Post by Badger1754 »

Dutch oven.
radiowave
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Re: Products that last forever

Post by radiowave »

Not sure if this counts, but . . . my grandfather was a retired Navy chief petty officer and he "borrowed" a vise from an early 1920s destroyer. It's been in the family ever since. If I dropped it on my foot it would do serious damage. It's almost 100 years old and still working well.
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chuckb84
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Re: Products that last forever

Post by chuckb84 »

My HP-41C calculator. Purchased in 1978 and still in use. Somewhere along the way I lost my HP-35, which was still going strong too, since 1973.

Of course, the "HP-41C" that gets the most use is the perfect replica app version that is on my iPhone, but still...
mancich
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Re: Products that last forever

Post by mancich »

My Dell XPS desktop from 2013. It has a Core i7, and 16 gig memory. I added an SSD and left the HDD in there as a secondary drive. Very fast and I plan to keep it until it dies.
2muchfun
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Re: Products that last forever

Post by 2muchfun »

Toyota FJ Cruiser
Broken Man 1999
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Re: Products that last forever

Post by Broken Man 1999 »

Nicolas wrote: Tue Aug 18, 2020 8:01 pm
Broken Man 1999 wrote: Tue Aug 18, 2020 4:36 pm I inherited my father's stub-nose S&W 38 revolver. It is at least 60 years old.

I doubt it wil ever wear out.

It needs to be blued again. The holster leather is cracked some. Still serviceable, though.

I will probably leave it to one of my grandchildren, or maybe a nephew.

Broken Man 1999
I have my dad’s .22 rifle. No idea who manufactured it. It’s about 90 years old. I used it as a child but it hasn’t been fired in 50 years.
I lived in the country growing up, so just about every kid had .22 rifle. My dad had citrus groves, and rabbits liked the tender green shoots on freshly planted trees. So, my brother and I would attempt to lower the rabbit population (kinda stupid given the rabbits multiplication rate) pretty much every day after school. Times have changed, as when I was a kid I could plunk down a dollar at Western Auto and receive a box of .22 shells and some change back. I had a .22 rifle, single shot, and a .410 shotgun, also single shot. I traded both guns to my brother for a CB radio.

Broken Man 1999
“If I cannot drink Bourbon and smoke cigars in Heaven then I shall not go. " -Mark Twain
Luke Duke
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Re: Products that last forever

Post by Luke Duke »

capsaicinguy wrote: Fri Aug 14, 2020 10:14 pm
ResearchMed wrote: Fri Aug 14, 2020 10:18 am
capsaicinguy wrote: Fri Aug 14, 2020 6:43 am My 30" x 30" x 10" Boos butcher block. 8-)
Wow!

That's a serious piece of equipment!

Nice.

RM
A family heirloom from my grandfather. He had it in his kitchen since I was a kid and before I could remember. It will likely outlive my grandkids. It has been a beast to move. :D :sharebeer
Keep it oiled and out of the sun and it should last generations.
Luke Duke
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Re: Products that last forever

Post by Luke Duke »

capsaicinguy wrote: Fri Aug 14, 2020 10:20 pm
barnaclebob wrote: Fri Aug 14, 2020 12:52 pm
retire57 wrote: Thu Aug 13, 2020 8:14 pm
barnaclebob wrote: Thu Aug 13, 2020 1:31 pm
retire57 wrote: Thu Aug 13, 2020 7:17 am KitchenAid mixer.
So long as you only make 1 loaf of bread per year or it was purchased a couple decades ago.
It was purchased many years ago - late 80's. And we use it about twice a week. Why - has the quality changed?
Yep, early kitchen aids were rebranded Hobarts and very good. At least by the 2000's once everyone wanted a kitchenaid mixer as a kitchen fashion accessory, they became cheap and would overheat or break if you did anything more difficult than mix cake batter or maybe do a single loaf of bread, even in the bigger more powerful bowl lift model.
My grandfather burned up many a modern KitchenAid mixer making bread dough. Even the "good" new ones have plastic gearboxes compared to the metals ones from the Hobart era mixers from what I've heard and is the main mode of failure.
Bread dough requires one of the higher-end Kitchenaids. I've got this one and regularly make double batches (6 balls) of pizza dough and it doesn't break a sweat.
https://www.kitchenaid.com/countertop-a ... 990dp.html

The plastic gear is in there by design. It is meant to be the weak-point, so that it fails before other, more expensive components, like the motor.
Nicolas
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Re: Products that last forever

Post by Nicolas »

Broken Man 1999 wrote: Wed Aug 19, 2020 8:30 am I lived in the country growing up, so just about every kid had .22 rifle. My dad had citrus groves, and rabbits liked the tender green shoots on freshly planted trees. So, my brother and I would attempt to lower the rabbit population (kinda stupid given the rabbits multiplication rate) pretty much every day after school. Times have changed, as when I was a kid I could plunk down a dollar at Western Auto and receive a box of .22 shells and some change back. I had a .22 rifle, single shot, and a .410 shotgun, also single shot. I traded both guns to my brother for a CB radio.

Broken Man 1999
I remember, and I’ve told people recently, that I would buy a pack of 100 .22 shells for a dollar at my local sporting goods store. I hope I’m not misremembering that, but I clearly remember they were a penny apiece. I was just a kid, I don’t know if they would still sell a kid bullets, of course that sporting goods store is gone now. I shot at tin cans and bottles for fun, I didn’t like to kill things, still don’t.

I only had the one single-shot rifle of my dad’s. It was his as a kid too. I still have it.
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Elsebet
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Re: Products that last forever

Post by Elsebet »

adestefan wrote: Mon Aug 17, 2020 6:36 pm KitchenAid mixers have always had a mix of nylon and metal gears. The nylon gears are designed to shear off under too much stress to protect the rest of the gearbox and motor. The nylon gears are very easy to replace and only cost $15. I blow mine out every 6 or 7 years and it’s also a good time to repack the grease in the mixing head.
My KitchenAid mixer is at least 10 years old and I've not done any maintenance on it, after reading this I am worried that maybe I should. :)

Do you have a link/guide for doing the maintenance you described? I googled and found this one for the grease:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ND1b9P2iubg
"...the man who adapts himself to his slender means and makes himself wealthy on a little sum, is the truly rich man..." ~Seneca
Chevelle
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Re: Products that last forever

Post by Chevelle »

Clothing items that companies will stand by and repair for a small fee. Barbour jackets and rubber boots by LL Bean come to mind.
Dottie57
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Re: Products that last forever

Post by Dottie57 »

I have a beautiful polished brass Stiffel lamp that is 60+ years old and going strong.

My parents 60+ year old Drexel Heritage bedroom suite.

A cedar chest from my grandfather - 1920’s
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Doom&Gloom
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Re: Products that last forever

Post by Doom&Gloom »

mancich wrote: Wed Aug 19, 2020 4:01 am My Dell XPS desktop from 2013. It has a Core i7, and 16 gig memory. I added an SSD and left the HDD in there as a secondary drive. Very fast and I plan to keep it until it dies.
That sounds exactly like my Dell XPS from 2014 except mine has only 12 gig RAM. I plan to keep mine until it dies as well, but I never expected that it might last forever. I hope your optimism is warranted!
gonefishing01
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Re: Products that last forever

Post by gonefishing01 »

Technivorm Moccamaster drip coffee maker.

Ours has been run twice daily for the past 14 years and it still makes a perfect cup of coffee. Prior to this thing I think we went through 3 or 4 cheap coffee makers that would break or electronics would fail.
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Abe
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Re: Products that last forever

Post by Abe »

Channellock pliers
Slow and steady wins the race.
adestefan
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Re: Products that last forever

Post by adestefan »

Elsebet wrote: Wed Aug 19, 2020 10:42 am
adestefan wrote: Mon Aug 17, 2020 6:36 pm KitchenAid mixers have always had a mix of nylon and metal gears. The nylon gears are designed to shear off under too much stress to protect the rest of the gearbox and motor. The nylon gears are very easy to replace and only cost $15. I blow mine out every 6 or 7 years and it’s also a good time to repack the grease in the mixing head.
My KitchenAid mixer is at least 10 years old and I've not done any maintenance on it, after reading this I am worried that maybe I should. :)

Do you have a link/guide for doing the maintenance you described? I googled and found this one for the grease:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ND1b9P2iubg
If it’s not making any noise it’s fine. I use mine about 3 times a week and sometimes push it a little too hard.
Stipe
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Re: Products that last forever

Post by Stipe »

Filson of course....
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LilyFleur
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Re: Products that last forever

Post by LilyFleur »

Elsebet wrote: Wed Aug 19, 2020 10:42 am
adestefan wrote: Mon Aug 17, 2020 6:36 pm KitchenAid mixers have always had a mix of nylon and metal gears. The nylon gears are designed to shear off under too much stress to protect the rest of the gearbox and motor. The nylon gears are very easy to replace and only cost $15. I blow mine out every 6 or 7 years and it’s also a good time to repack the grease in the mixing head.
My KitchenAid mixer is at least 10 years old and I've not done any maintenance on it, after reading this I am worried that maybe I should. :)

Do you have a link/guide for doing the maintenance you described? I googled and found this one for the grease:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ND1b9P2iubg
Mine is still going strong at 37 years old. Other than a $25 repair in the 1990s, I haven't done anything to it, although the electrical cord is getting extremely sticky and gross. I live alone, but I have started baking bread every other week to share with an older lady who lives near me and with other folks who need a little bit of extra comfort (last week it was someone who had just had surgery). Mine can handle a double recipe of cookie dough and a 7-cup recipe of bread (makes three loaves). I also have inherited a tilt-model which I recently noticed in a photo from the late 1970s at my parent's house. I'm saving it for one of my children. I have noticed it has a new cord on it.
phxjcc
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Re: Products that last forever

Post by phxjcc »

Wood furniture.

Real wood.

Real joinery.

Just had my Uncle Bob's solid maple bar/cart's top refinished.

Watched old Bob Hope movie from 1961 the other day--and there it was.

"Friends don't let friends buy MDF furniture."

+1900's Mahogany library table and hand carved chairs.
+mid 19th century sea captain's map chest.

The last two were NOT part of a family heirloom story, but purchased at university thrift store.
For less money than some Ashley/BIG BOX MDF foreign made crapola.

Oh, and--of course--my diesel (Cummins) truck.
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Sandtrap
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Re: Products that last forever

Post by Sandtrap »

Broken Man 1999 wrote: Tue Aug 18, 2020 4:36 pm I inherited my father's stub-nose S&W 38 revolver. It is at least 60 years old.

I doubt it wil ever wear out.

It needs to be blued again. The holster leather is cracked some. Still serviceable, though.

I will probably leave it to one of my grandchildren, or maybe a nephew.

Broken Man 1999
A classic.

Used to be called:
Saturday Night Special
Heater
Snubbie

Also have one. Walnut grips.
j :D
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