"Hobby" Money: Planes, cars, boats etc...

Questions on how we spend our money and our time - consumer goods and services, home and vehicle, leisure and recreational activities
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midareff
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Re: "Hobby" Money: Planes, cars, boats etc...

Post by midareff »

Pre-Covid we traveled 4 to 6 times a year. Mostly International, most three weeks or longer, better and specialty cruise lines, some in two room suites, some in extra sized cabins, all with balcony. Budget was about $6K monthly. Now nothing....
HobbesMB
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Re: "Hobby" Money: Planes, cars, boats etc...

Post by HobbesMB »

willthrill81 wrote: Sat Aug 29, 2020 5:23 pm
dixdak wrote: Sun Aug 02, 2020 2:01 pm Backpacking. Thanks to titanium, hip and metal gear, I replaced my 1975 era gear forty years later for around $1500, plus another $1500 for additional family members, upgrades, car camping, and levels of comfort and weight. I dehydrate a lot of the meals, so the cost is just transportation
I've watched more hours of hiking videos than I care to admit. It seems that unless you want to have all world-class equipment, you can be very well equipped for a thru-hike, one of the most expensive forms of the sport, for under $5k. You can probably be reasonably equipped for under $2k. Most of the expense seems to be what is spent on transportation, as you note, and food bought off the trail. The amount of food those people consume is insane, easily 6,000 calories a day, and they still almost universally lose weight.

I'm really hoping to do a thru-hike after I retire in my early 50s.
I'm a backpacker, though due to work schedules it's mostly on long weekends. I hiked the John Muir Trail a few years ago (~220 miles) since I could do that on a long vacation. But I plan on thru-hiking the Pacific Crest Trail a year or two after I retire next year.

I have a very nice complement of ultralight gear accumulated over time, but all in it was a good bit less than $5k for my current high-end gear setup. Most of it will last many years with regular use, though a thru-hike will take its toll on some of the gear. Backpacking itself is downright inexpensive once you have the gear.
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willthrill81
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Re: "Hobby" Money: Planes, cars, boats etc...

Post by willthrill81 »

HobbesMB wrote: Fri Sep 11, 2020 2:56 pm
willthrill81 wrote: Sat Aug 29, 2020 5:23 pm
dixdak wrote: Sun Aug 02, 2020 2:01 pm Backpacking. Thanks to titanium, hip and metal gear, I replaced my 1975 era gear forty years later for around $1500, plus another $1500 for additional family members, upgrades, car camping, and levels of comfort and weight. I dehydrate a lot of the meals, so the cost is just transportation
I've watched more hours of hiking videos than I care to admit. It seems that unless you want to have all world-class equipment, you can be very well equipped for a thru-hike, one of the most expensive forms of the sport, for under $5k. You can probably be reasonably equipped for under $2k. Most of the expense seems to be what is spent on transportation, as you note, and food bought off the trail. The amount of food those people consume is insane, easily 6,000 calories a day, and they still almost universally lose weight.

I'm really hoping to do a thru-hike after I retire in my early 50s.
I'm a backpacker, though due to work schedules it's mostly on long weekends. I hiked the John Muir Trail a few years ago (~220 miles) since I could do that on a long vacation. But I plan on thru-hiking the Pacific Crest Trail a year or two after I retire next year.

I have a very nice complement of ultralight gear accumulated over time, but all in it was a good bit less than $5k for my current high-end gear setup. Most of it will last many years with regular use, though a thru-hike will take its toll on some of the gear. Backpacking itself is downright inexpensive once you have the gear.
When you watch videos about thru-hikers, it seems like a great many are broke 20-somethings. As such, you must be able to do it without spending too much money. :D
“It's a dangerous business, Frodo, going out your door. You step onto the road, and if you don't keep your feet, there's no knowing where you might be swept off to.” J.R.R. Tolkien,The Lord of the Rings
flyingaway
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Re: "Hobby" Money: Planes, cars, boats etc...

Post by flyingaway »

HobbesMB wrote: Fri Sep 11, 2020 2:56 pm
willthrill81 wrote: Sat Aug 29, 2020 5:23 pm
dixdak wrote: Sun Aug 02, 2020 2:01 pm Backpacking. Thanks to titanium, hip and metal gear, I replaced my 1975 era gear forty years later for around $1500, plus another $1500 for additional family members, upgrades, car camping, and levels of comfort and weight. I dehydrate a lot of the meals, so the cost is just transportation
I've watched more hours of hiking videos than I care to admit. It seems that unless you want to have all world-class equipment, you can be very well equipped for a thru-hike, one of the most expensive forms of the sport, for under $5k. You can probably be reasonably equipped for under $2k. Most of the expense seems to be what is spent on transportation, as you note, and food bought off the trail. The amount of food those people consume is insane, easily 6,000 calories a day, and they still almost universally lose weight.

I'm really hoping to do a thru-hike after I retire in my early 50s.
I'm a backpacker, though due to work schedules it's mostly on long weekends. I hiked the John Muir Trail a few years ago (~220 miles) since I could do that on a long vacation. But I plan on thru-hiking the Pacific Crest Trail a year or two after I retire next year.

I have a very nice complement of ultralight gear accumulated over time, but all in it was a good bit less than $5k for my current high-end gear setup. Most of it will last many years with regular use, though a thru-hike will take its toll on some of the gear. Backpacking itself is downright inexpensive once you have the gear.
Those long hiking trips seem interesting, but I give up the idea after considering how to park the car 200 miles away, how to find a bathroom during a long hiking, how to eat, etc.
HobbesMB
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Re: "Hobby" Money: Planes, cars, boats etc...

Post by HobbesMB »

flyingaway wrote: Fri Sep 11, 2020 3:17 pm
HobbesMB wrote: Fri Sep 11, 2020 2:56 pm I'm a backpacker, though due to work schedules it's mostly on long weekends. I hiked the John Muir Trail a few years ago (~220 miles) since I could do that on a long vacation. But I plan on thru-hiking the Pacific Crest Trail a year or two after I retire next year.

I have a very nice complement of ultralight gear accumulated over time, but all in it was a good bit less than $5k for my current high-end gear setup. Most of it will last many years with regular use, though a thru-hike will take its toll on some of the gear. Backpacking itself is downright inexpensive once you have the gear.
Those long hiking trips seem interesting, but I give up the idea after considering how to park the car 200 miles away, how to find a bathroom during a long hiking, how to eat, etc.
The bathroom is all around you when you are out in the wilderness. 8-)
jharkin
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Re: "Hobby" Money: Planes, cars, boats etc...

Post by jharkin »

“What do your toys cost you.”


It’s interesting that the thread started with flying. I never got around to getting my license, but have been into model flying (radio control) for close to 30 years. I know people that spend more on that than the OP was considering to fly a real airplane.

Costs are variable. A new project can be anywhere from a few hundred to (more often) a few thousand. Hobbyists that fly exotic ( jets, very large scale) can spend 5 figures on a single model. I usually start at least one new project per year, plus occasional equipment upgrades. Ongoing costs are a couple hundred a year in insurance and club fees, and fuel and battery costs.

If I had to guess, I probably spend $2-5k per year averaged out long term. When I’m retired that will probably increase as I will have a lot more time to take on big projects and travel to events.
Last edited by jharkin on Fri Sep 11, 2020 8:58 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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willthrill81
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Re: "Hobby" Money: Planes, cars, boats etc...

Post by willthrill81 »

HobbesMB wrote: Fri Sep 11, 2020 5:01 pm
flyingaway wrote: Fri Sep 11, 2020 3:17 pm
HobbesMB wrote: Fri Sep 11, 2020 2:56 pm I'm a backpacker, though due to work schedules it's mostly on long weekends. I hiked the John Muir Trail a few years ago (~220 miles) since I could do that on a long vacation. But I plan on thru-hiking the Pacific Crest Trail a year or two after I retire next year.

I have a very nice complement of ultralight gear accumulated over time, but all in it was a good bit less than $5k for my current high-end gear setup. Most of it will last many years with regular use, though a thru-hike will take its toll on some of the gear. Backpacking itself is downright inexpensive once you have the gear.
Those long hiking trips seem interesting, but I give up the idea after considering how to park the car 200 miles away, how to find a bathroom during a long hiking, how to eat, etc.
The bathroom is all around you when you are out in the wilderness. 8-)
Your toilet is a spade. Seriously.

Image
“It's a dangerous business, Frodo, going out your door. You step onto the road, and if you don't keep your feet, there's no knowing where you might be swept off to.” J.R.R. Tolkien,The Lord of the Rings
helloeveryone
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Re: "Hobby" Money: Planes, cars, boats etc...

Post by helloeveryone »

Toons wrote: Sun Aug 02, 2020 12:11 pm We travel the Country in a Roadtrek ,Class B
We both enjoy it.
We don't question the expenses anymore,
We save ,We invested,
The clock is ticking
:mrgreen:
I just looked these up they are amazing looking (and really really expensive!) How much do you use it per year would you guesstimate?
Talisker
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Joined: Thu Jan 02, 2014 9:19 am

Re: Costs to own a plane

Post by Talisker »

4nursebee wrote: Thu Aug 27, 2020 4:35 pm [Thread merged into here, see below (next page) --admin LadyGeek]

I am taking lessons, considering buying in a partnership, rough agreement worked out. C 177 Cardinal. My spouse might be okay with buying a plane but is VERY concerned about ongoing expenses. I am ignorant but have an idea of expensive insurance to start, hanger rental, (not available yet, so outside and cheap), maybe some upgrade depending upon what we want.

For those that own and have owned a plane, how did the expenses work out for you?

Did you and spouse feel they got their moneys worth?

Did you use it as much as you thought? I have big dreams of regular travel and exploring the US>

Thank you.

The opportunity to buy a plane from a friend came up and I bought his 1966 Beechcraft Musketeer.

Purchase Price, $26,000 with low engine time. My son used it to get his Private Pilot Certificate and will continue using it for time building. Basic instrumentation but in great shape overall. Low time engine.

Hangar $160mo
Insurance $100 month
Fuel/Oil dependent on hours flown, but $50/hr

Maintenance = $400/ mo as annual inspections, and routine maintenance are significant expenses. Avoid Flight School, or FBO maintenance departments as they are typically very expensive and your priority is way below flight school aircraft. Good local mechanics are fairly easy to find and talk to other owners in the area for names. A good mechanic will save you considerable expense as they can fix items that others simply remove and replace items until they get the desired outcome.

You must always be willing to write a big check for a big expense. Engine $25k or more. Before you buy, do a thorough pre purchase inspection at the mechanic of your choice with no ties to the owner. Spend some time and go through the logbooks for accuracy, especially as it pertains to engine times. I have found substantial errors twice in logbooks that showed engine times significantly higher than advertised. Those incorrect totals were carried forward for years without anyone noticing.

Flight Instructors from local flight schools typically will be happy to charge half of the FBO rate as they typically get paid far less than half.

Good luck!
stoptothink
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Re: "Hobby" Money: Planes, cars, boats etc...

Post by stoptothink »

willthrill81 wrote: Fri Sep 11, 2020 3:09 pm
HobbesMB wrote: Fri Sep 11, 2020 2:56 pm
willthrill81 wrote: Sat Aug 29, 2020 5:23 pm
dixdak wrote: Sun Aug 02, 2020 2:01 pm Backpacking. Thanks to titanium, hip and metal gear, I replaced my 1975 era gear forty years later for around $1500, plus another $1500 for additional family members, upgrades, car camping, and levels of comfort and weight. I dehydrate a lot of the meals, so the cost is just transportation
I've watched more hours of hiking videos than I care to admit. It seems that unless you want to have all world-class equipment, you can be very well equipped for a thru-hike, one of the most expensive forms of the sport, for under $5k. You can probably be reasonably equipped for under $2k. Most of the expense seems to be what is spent on transportation, as you note, and food bought off the trail. The amount of food those people consume is insane, easily 6,000 calories a day, and they still almost universally lose weight.

I'm really hoping to do a thru-hike after I retire in my early 50s.
I'm a backpacker, though due to work schedules it's mostly on long weekends. I hiked the John Muir Trail a few years ago (~220 miles) since I could do that on a long vacation. But I plan on thru-hiking the Pacific Crest Trail a year or two after I retire next year.

I have a very nice complement of ultralight gear accumulated over time, but all in it was a good bit less than $5k for my current high-end gear setup. Most of it will last many years with regular use, though a thru-hike will take its toll on some of the gear. Backpacking itself is downright inexpensive once you have the gear.
When you watch videos about thru-hikers, it seems like a great many are broke 20-somethings. As such, you must be able to do it without spending too much money. :D
I'm definitely not a "backpacker" or thru-hiker, I'm a (fast) hiker whose limitation is pack weight because of Thoracic Outlet Syndrome. My spine can not handle a direct load of camping gear and more than a day's worth of food/water, without severe pain. I'm doing two of Utah's highest peaks (King's and Gilbert) back-to-back this Thursday and Friday with my two buddies; a little over 50 miles. I am quite concerned about carrying enough water.
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whodidntante
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Re: "Hobby" Money: Planes, cars, boats etc...

Post by whodidntante »

ClevrChico wrote: Sun Aug 02, 2020 1:02 pm Biking for me. Cost is probably < $10/year and it keeps me fit. :-)
Cycling is very cheap, but it ain't that cheap, at least for me. I spend more than that just on tires for my road bike. I've also replaced worn out or damaged chain rings, chains, cables, pedals, etc. It take more than chain lube to keep a bike going. :P
stoptothink
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Re: "Hobby" Money: Planes, cars, boats etc...

Post by stoptothink »

whodidntante wrote: Sat Sep 12, 2020 7:46 am
ClevrChico wrote: Sun Aug 02, 2020 1:02 pm Biking for me. Cost is probably < $10/year and it keeps me fit. :-)
Cycling is very cheap, but it ain't that cheap, at least for me. I spend more than that just on tires for my road bike. I've also replaced worn out or damaged chain rings, chains, cables, pedals, etc. It take more than chain lube to keep a bike going. :P
I actually just sold my (cyclocross) bike, so for the first time in 20+ years I am bike-less. Definitely was costing me >$10/yr (more like $200+) with the goatheads we have around here and the extra strain pulling a trailer (hauling the kids or groceries) put on the drivetrain and brakes. Looking to get an e-assist fat bike in the future; very aware that the maintenance will be significantly more expensive than the bikes I've had in the past.
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Toons
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Location: Hills of Tennessee

Re: "Hobby" Money: Planes, cars, boats etc...

Post by Toons »

helloeveryone wrote: Fri Sep 11, 2020 11:54 pm
Toons wrote: Sun Aug 02, 2020 12:11 pm We travel the Country in a Roadtrek ,Class B
We both enjoy it.
We don't question the expenses anymore,
We save ,We invested,
The clock is ticking
:mrgreen:
I just looked these up they are amazing looking (and really really expensive!) How much do you use it per year would you guesstimate?
Hello
We Are Retired
We have invested all of our life,
so that we could afford options as such.
Our next journey will be Traveling Florida
Down the East Coast ,to the Keys ,back up the Gulf side
Leaving November
Returning to Tn. In March.
Been traveling in a Roadtrek for 8 years.
We use it at least 6 months a year.
:happy
"One does not accumulate but eliminate. It is not daily increase but daily decrease. The height of cultivation always runs to simplicity" –Bruce Lee
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ClevrChico
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Re: "Hobby" Money: Planes, cars, boats etc...

Post by ClevrChico »

stoptothink wrote: Sat Sep 12, 2020 8:12 am
whodidntante wrote: Sat Sep 12, 2020 7:46 am
ClevrChico wrote: Sun Aug 02, 2020 1:02 pm Biking for me. Cost is probably < $10/year and it keeps me fit. :-)
Cycling is very cheap, but it ain't that cheap, at least for me. I spend more than that just on tires for my road bike. I've also replaced worn out or damaged chain rings, chains, cables, pedals, etc. It take more than chain lube to keep a bike going. :P
I actually just sold my (cyclocross) bike, so for the first time in 20+ years I am bike-less. Definitely was costing me >$10/yr (more like $200+) with the goatheads we have around here and the extra strain pulling a trailer (hauling the kids or groceries) put on the drivetrain and brakes. Looking to get an e-assist fat bike in the future; very aware that the maintenance will be significantly more expensive than the bikes I've had in the past.
I ride every day and my only expenses are new grips and tube patch kits every three years. It's the original drivetrain with plenty of trailer pulling. It's a nice, but used Craigslist bike that I can probably sell for close to what I paid at any time. (I've had it for years.)

I see the used $5k racing frames on Craigslist, so the sky is definitely the limit!
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