Middle of Nowhere Retirement

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Alf 101
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Middle of Nowhere Retirement

Post by Alf 101 » Tue Jul 28, 2020 1:19 pm

As an avid outdoors person, throughout my life so far I've been struck by the number of places I'd want to live, if only there were jobs. Now my wife and I are talking about (and preparing for) a slightly early retirement; we still may be ten years out, but the planning is starting to feel a little more real.

I would say we're on the right path, and there are many excellent financial tools -- many thanks to the Bogleheads Wiki. This is why I posted on the Personal Consumer Issues board, as it's more a matter of choice. Who here has retired somewhere out of the way in the woods, and who might have thought that way previously and reconsidered?

Our situation is a simple one. We have no kids, so grandchildren and close proximity to family is not a great factor. We like having people over, but don't go out a great deal to clubs, shows, and the like. We'd rather hike, paddle, climb, fish, and grow things. Unlike many retirees, we'd also like to live somewhere that has four seasons.

This leaves a list of options. On the other hand, proximity to health care may become more of a priority, which could be an issue living in the middle of nowhere. Also I can see the appeal of being able to meet other retired people and have a community. There's also the fact that living further out requires more self-sufficiency, which could get tougher later in retirement.

I would be curious in hearing people's thoughts on this...

livesoft
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Re: Middle of Nowhere Retirement

Post by livesoft » Tue Jul 28, 2020 1:24 pm

I am happy to go into the middle of nowhere for weeks on end, but I am coming out to civilization to catch my breath. So even if you make your principal residence "out there", I think you really need a vacation home near a reasonably sized city with physicians, hospitals, and other amenities. It is easier to start in civilization and travel to remote locations for more and more weeks of the year, but not the other way around.

The internet provides a community without having to be within 10 or more miles of another living human being. But you do need an internet connection. :twisted: Cue Elon Musk and Starlink.
Last edited by livesoft on Tue Jul 28, 2020 1:29 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Marmot
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Re: Middle of Nowhere Retirement

Post by Marmot » Tue Jul 28, 2020 1:25 pm

Alaska in a heartbeat. Homer (I like) and for some reason Juneau (have not been there though).

Anywhere in the Yukon of course (whitehorse area). Out there, but not.
Marty....don't go to the year 2020....Dr. Emmett Brown

sailaway
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Re: Middle of Nowhere Retirement

Post by sailaway » Tue Jul 28, 2020 1:44 pm

This is why the Asheville area has become the new Florida.

As for proximity to health care, if you are retiring early, it might be worth your while to factor in two stages. 10 years or how ever long your bodies hold out in the middle of nowhere, then move closer to a city when necessary.

tashnewbie
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Re: Middle of Nowhere Retirement

Post by tashnewbie » Tue Jul 28, 2020 1:48 pm

What about someplace like Roanoke, Virginia? Very close proximity to many mountains in the Blue Ridge, the Appalachian Trail, and access to quality healthcare. If you're interested in being near a college town, Virginia Tech is 45 minutes away.

I also agree with mountain towns in North Carolina like Asheville.
Last edited by tashnewbie on Thu Jul 30, 2020 1:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Watty
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Re: Middle of Nowhere Retirement

Post by Watty » Tue Jul 28, 2020 1:51 pm

Alf 101 wrote:
Tue Jul 28, 2020 1:19 pm
On the other hand, proximity to health care may become more of a priority, which could be an issue living in the middle of nowhere.
That is a huge concern. I know someone that built a retirement home on the Oregon coast and it was not particularity remote and they even had a very small hospital and primary care doctor that was nearby. The problem was that when they needed a specialist they had to travel several hours inland over the coast mountain range to get to a medium size town. This meant that they had to travel several hours to an appointment then a couple of hours back too. I forget what it was but one of them had a minor problem with a knee or shoulder and their treatment was something like;

1) Travel inland see the specialist, travel home.
2) Travel inland to get an MRI, travel home.
3) Travel inland see the specialist, schedule surgery travel home.
4) Travel inland for out patient surgery, stay in hotel overnight since they were not up to the drive home.
5) Drive home
6) Travel inland see the specialist for follow up, travel home.
7) They got lucky and found someone near their house that they could do physical therapy with.
8) Travel inland see the specialist for final follow up, travel home.

For a couple of the trips they may have stayed in a hotel because they had an early or late appointment time.

They were only in their 60s but they decided that would be a big problem when they were in their 70's or older. Doing something like that would also be a huge problem if one of them survived the other and the survivor had to try doing that on their own.

They ended up selling their house and moving somewhere else.

Alf 101 wrote:
Tue Jul 28, 2020 1:19 pm
I would be curious in hearing people's thoughts on this...
College towns often have good medical facilities and a lot more going on than similar size small towns. It varies a lot but often 20 minutes outside of a college town you can feel like you are in the middle of no where but you are still relatively close to town.
Last edited by Watty on Tue Jul 28, 2020 1:52 pm, edited 1 time in total.

WanderingWilly
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Re: Middle of Nowhere Retirement

Post by WanderingWilly » Tue Jul 28, 2020 1:51 pm

I have spent my career in remote locations in Idaho, Utah, and Wyoming and am getting ready to retire myself. I've loved the lifestyle and being self sufficient has been a must. I always thought I'd want the same living arrangement in retirement but now that I'm ready to pull the trigger I'm having second thoughts.

The biggest hurdle is healthcare. I've always been healthy and rarely needed medical help but recently I needed surgery and finding someone to bring me back from the hospital was a terrible hassle. Often times clinic or dental offices in the areas I've lived were booked weeks out and small rural facilities provided limited services. If you require much more than stitches or a limb reset--good luck!

Most places I've lived did not have cell phone service and as recently as seven years I was still using dialup internet. I guess that is all fine if you know what you are in for.

I guess there are varying degrees of remote living. I certainly would not go back to an 80 mile round trip to get the mail or a jug of milk. Good luck with whatever you decide.

jebmke
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Re: Middle of Nowhere Retirement

Post by jebmke » Tue Jul 28, 2020 1:53 pm

Alf 101 wrote:
Tue Jul 28, 2020 1:19 pm
On the other hand, proximity to health care may become more of a priority, which could be an issue living in the middle of nowhere.
Doesn't even have to be that remote to be an issue. We moved to a semi-rural area in retirement. An area we knew; or thought we knew. We have found that the availability and quality of health care is a real issue - enough so that eventually we are likely to move. We are within 1.5 hours of Baltimore -- and that might seem like it is close but it is going to become a real barrier.
When you discover that you are riding a dead horse, the best strategy is to dismount.

bloom2708
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Re: Middle of Nowhere Retirement

Post by bloom2708 » Tue Jul 28, 2020 1:57 pm

Buy 40 acres out east of Tuscon. Lots of nowhere out there.

I could do it for stretches. Would need a 2 place arrangement to make it work long haul.
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Jack FFR1846
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Re: Middle of Nowhere Retirement

Post by Jack FFR1846 » Tue Jul 28, 2020 2:03 pm

Alf 101 wrote:
Tue Jul 28, 2020 1:19 pm
As an avid outdoors person, throughout my life so far I've been struck by the number of places I'd want to live, if only there were jobs. Now my wife and I are talking about (and preparing for) a slightly early retirement; we still may be ten years out, but the planning is starting to feel a little more real.

I would say we're on the right path, and there are many excellent financial tools -- many thanks to the Bogleheads Wiki. This is why I posted on the Personal Consumer Issues board, as it's more a matter of choice. Who here has retired somewhere out of the way in the woods, and who might have thought that way previously and reconsidered?

Our situation is a simple one. We have no kids, so grandchildren and close proximity to family is not a great factor. We like having people over, but don't go out a great deal to clubs, shows, and the like. We'd rather hike, paddle, climb, fish, and grow things. Unlike many retirees, we'd also like to live somewhere that has four seasons.

This leaves a list of options. On the other hand, proximity to health care may become more of a priority, which could be an issue living in the middle of nowhere. Also I can see the appeal of being able to meet other retired people and have a community. There's also the fact that living further out requires more self-sufficiency, which could get tougher later in retirement.

I would be curious in hearing people's thoughts on this...
I'm not retired. I'm not in the middle of nowhere. But the things you want to do apply to me and my current house and property meet the requirement. I'll list some characteristics.

No HOA or busy bodies who want to tell me what to do.
I'm surrounded by woods that I forest manage which yields firewood, exercise sans any gym fee and a huge tax break.
Lots of wildlife. We follow mother foxes every year, see their cubs grow up, have nests of hawks, deer who use our woods.
Across the street is a DCR lake. I can drag my kayaks or canoe down and paddle out along the shore or out to one of the islands.
Yet, I'm less than 30 miles from Boston and some of the best hospitals in the world. Other local things are 4 miles in any direction from my house. My office is 5.2 miles away.

My plans at this point are to retire here.
Bogle: Smart Beta is stupid

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Marmot
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Re: Middle of Nowhere Retirement

Post by Marmot » Tue Jul 28, 2020 2:18 pm

tashnewbie wrote:
Tue Jul 28, 2020 1:48 pm
What about someplace like Roanoke, Virginia? Very close proximity to many mountains in the Blue Ridge, the Appalachian Trail, access to quality healthcare (Virginia Tech is 45 minutes away and has a medical school; many healthcare initiatives are being started in Roanoke).

I also agree with mountain towns in North Carolina like Asheville.
I thru hiked the AT in 1977.
Marty....don't go to the year 2020....Dr. Emmett Brown

palaheel
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Re: Middle of Nowhere Retirement

Post by palaheel » Tue Jul 28, 2020 2:24 pm

Marmot wrote:
Tue Jul 28, 2020 2:18 pm
tashnewbie wrote:
Tue Jul 28, 2020 1:48 pm
What about someplace like Roanoke, Virginia? Very close proximity to many mountains in the Blue Ridge, the Appalachian Trail, access to quality healthcare (Virginia Tech is 45 minutes away and has a medical school; many healthcare initiatives are being started in Roanoke).

I also agree with mountain towns in North Carolina like Asheville.
I thru hiked the AT in 1977.
Also Boone, NC, home of Appalachian State. If DW ever agrees to move to the mountains, I intend to check out Blacksburg, VA (Virginia Tech's town).
Markets crash. Markets recover. Inflation takes your money FOREVER.

Isabelle77
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Re: Middle of Nowhere Retirement

Post by Isabelle77 » Tue Jul 28, 2020 2:29 pm

Watty wrote:
Tue Jul 28, 2020 1:51 pm
Alf 101 wrote:
Tue Jul 28, 2020 1:19 pm
On the other hand, proximity to health care may become more of a priority, which could be an issue living in the middle of nowhere.
That is a huge concern. I know someone that built a retirement home on the Oregon coast and it was not particularity remote and they even had a very small hospital and primary care doctor that was nearby. The problem was that when they needed a specialist they had to travel several hours inland over the coast mountain range to get to a medium size town. This meant that they had to travel several hours to an appointment then a couple of hours back too. I forget what it was but one of them had a minor problem with a knee or shoulder and their treatment was something like;

1) Travel inland see the specialist, travel home.
2) Travel inland to get an MRI, travel home.
3) Travel inland see the specialist, schedule surgery travel home.
4) Travel inland for out patient surgery, stay in hotel overnight since they were not up to the drive home.
5) Drive home
6) Travel inland see the specialist for follow up, travel home.
7) They got lucky and found someone near their house that they could do physical therapy with.
8) Travel inland see the specialist for final follow up, travel home.

For a couple of the trips they may have stayed in a hotel because they had an early or late appointment time.

They were only in their 60s but they decided that would be a big problem when they were in their 70's or older. Doing something like that would also be a huge problem if one of them survived the other and the survivor had to try doing that on their own.

They ended up selling their house and moving somewhere else.

Alf 101 wrote:
Tue Jul 28, 2020 1:19 pm
I would be curious in hearing people's thoughts on this...
College towns often have good medical facilities and a lot more going on than similar size small towns. It varies a lot but often 20 minutes outside of a college town you can feel like you are in the middle of no where but you are still relatively close to town.
This can often be a problem in places you wouldn’t expect. My father in law lived on Hilton Head, where there are lots of medical facilities, but when he had advanced stage melanoma he had to go to Charleston, SC for treatments and specialist visits. Made very difficult as he became sicker, my mil had to hire transportation every time.

tashnewbie
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Re: Middle of Nowhere Retirement

Post by tashnewbie » Tue Jul 28, 2020 3:10 pm

Marmot wrote:
Tue Jul 28, 2020 2:18 pm
tashnewbie wrote:
Tue Jul 28, 2020 1:48 pm
What about someplace like Roanoke, Virginia? Very close proximity to many mountains in the Blue Ridge, the Appalachian Trail, access to quality healthcare (Virginia Tech is 45 minutes away and has a medical school; many healthcare initiatives are being started in Roanoke).

I also agree with mountain towns in North Carolina like Asheville.
I thru hiked the AT in 1977.
:sharebeer

Hats off to you!! I don't think I could ever thru hike the AT. I did a lot of hiking last year, including many parts of the AT (in Virginia), but sadly haven't done any hiking this year.

tashnewbie
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Re: Middle of Nowhere Retirement

Post by tashnewbie » Tue Jul 28, 2020 3:11 pm

palaheel wrote:
Tue Jul 28, 2020 2:24 pm
Marmot wrote:
Tue Jul 28, 2020 2:18 pm
tashnewbie wrote:
Tue Jul 28, 2020 1:48 pm
What about someplace like Roanoke, Virginia? Very close proximity to many mountains in the Blue Ridge, the Appalachian Trail, access to quality healthcare (Virginia Tech is 45 minutes away and has a medical school; many healthcare initiatives are being started in Roanoke).

I also agree with mountain towns in North Carolina like Asheville.
I thru hiked the AT in 1977.
Also Boone, NC, home of Appalachian State. If DW ever agrees to move to the mountains, I intend to check out Blacksburg, VA (Virginia Tech's town).
Both cool areas. I'm in Roanoke and prefer its location to Blacksburg (closer to the eastern part of the state and although Blacksburg is a real college town, I feel more comfortable in Roanoke because of other cultural/social factors), but excellent outdoors activities in Blacksburg.
Last edited by tashnewbie on Tue Jul 28, 2020 3:23 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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mhc
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Re: Middle of Nowhere Retirement

Post by mhc » Tue Jul 28, 2020 3:15 pm

I live along the front range in Colorado. From my house, I can drive for 10 minutes in 3 directions and be away from civilization. 10 minutes in the other direction, I can be at the hospital. Within 20 minutes I can be at the trailhead and see very few people. In an hour, I definitely can be away from all people. In a little over an hour, I can be in Denver with all the big city amenities. There are many National Parks, national forests, national wilderness, state forests, ... in this part of the country. Plenty to do outside if you like. This part of the country is very sparsely populated except for the front range of Colorado (I-25 corridor).

no end to the following:
hiking
biking (road and mountain)
hunting
kayaking
rafting
camping
skiing
snow shoeing

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Stinky
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Re: Middle of Nowhere Retirement

Post by Stinky » Tue Jul 28, 2020 3:17 pm

Watty wrote:
Tue Jul 28, 2020 1:51 pm
Alf 101 wrote:
Tue Jul 28, 2020 1:19 pm
On the other hand, proximity to health care may become more of a priority, which could be an issue living in the middle of nowhere.
That is a huge concern. I know someone that built a retirement home on the Oregon coast and it was not particularity remote and they even had a very small hospital and primary care doctor that was nearby. The problem was that when they needed a specialist they had to travel several hours inland over the coast mountain range to get to a medium size town. This meant that they had to travel several hours to an appointment then a couple of hours back too. I forget what it was but one of them had a minor problem with a knee or shoulder and their treatment was something like;

1) Travel inland see the specialist, travel home.
2) Travel inland to get an MRI, travel home.
3) Travel inland see the specialist, schedule surgery travel home.
4) Travel inland for out patient surgery, stay in hotel overnight since they were not up to the drive home.
5) Drive home
6) Travel inland see the specialist for follow up, travel home.
7) They got lucky and found someone near their house that they could do physical therapy with.
8) Travel inland see the specialist for final follow up, travel home.

For a couple of the trips they may have stayed in a hotel because they had an early or late appointment time.

They were only in their 60s but they decided that would be a big problem when they were in their 70's or older. Doing something like that would also be a huge problem if one of them survived the other and the survivor had to try doing that on their own.

They ended up selling their house and moving somewhere else.

Alf 101 wrote:
Tue Jul 28, 2020 1:19 pm
I would be curious in hearing people's thoughts on this...
College towns often have good medical facilities and a lot more going on than similar size small towns. It varies a lot but often 20 minutes outside of a college town you can feel like you are in the middle of no where but you are still relatively close to town.
Lots of good thoughts in this post.

Just make sure your chosen location has access to good quality internet connection. Very important to most folks these days.
It's a GREAT day to be alive - Travis Tritt

Emilyjane
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Re: Middle of Nowhere Retirement

Post by Emilyjane » Tue Jul 28, 2020 3:43 pm

Retired, live in a rural area, 2 hour drive to preferred specialty medical care. It is a consideration, but doable. I had early breast cancer shortly after retirement, needed chemo, radiation, surgery. Lots of trips. Audiobooks were helpful for the commute. Our access to broadband is poor, satellite or Verizon. Verizon is good, but slow after initial allotment of data each month. I have high hopes for Star Link.

On the good side, hiking, fishing, skiing are amazing. We can see the Milky Way. Cost of living is excellent. An expensive restaurant is a long drive. We love it here, wouldn’t trade places.
"Real knowledge is to know the extent of one's ignorance", Confucius

RudyS
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Re: Middle of Nowhere Retirement

Post by RudyS » Tue Jul 28, 2020 4:32 pm

We love the Pacific Northwest, but are n ow in Massachusetts to be closer to the kids/grandkids.

How about Bend, Oregon? Or maybe somewhere close to it. Decent medical facilities, but Eugene is 130 miles or 2+ hours away if needed. We have a cousin who moved to Bend from the DC area, and loves it.

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Marmot
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Re: Middle of Nowhere Retirement

Post by Marmot » Tue Jul 28, 2020 4:52 pm

RudyS wrote:
Tue Jul 28, 2020 4:32 pm
We love the Pacific Northwest, but are n ow in Massachusetts to be closer to the kids/grandkids.

How about Bend, Oregon? Or maybe somewhere close to it. Decent medical facilities, but Eugene is 130 miles or 2+ hours away if needed. We have a cousin who moved to Bend from the DC area, and loves it.
Bend is growing too fast (100K). I don't think it meets his requirements. I am sitting here looking at the river in Bend. It certainly is an outdoor town and we have our share of Olympians and pro sports folks. The PCT is only 20 miles. Real estate is red hot. I guess you could go out 20 miles and make it work better(from the OP's wish list). We had 29 microbreweries before covid, so that tells you something :happy
Marty....don't go to the year 2020....Dr. Emmett Brown

RudyS
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Re: Middle of Nowhere Retirement

Post by RudyS » Tue Jul 28, 2020 5:14 pm

Marmot wrote:
Tue Jul 28, 2020 4:52 pm
RudyS wrote:
Tue Jul 28, 2020 4:32 pm
We love the Pacific Northwest, but are n ow in Massachusetts to be closer to the kids/grandkids.

How about Bend, Oregon? Or maybe somewhere close to it. Decent medical facilities, but Eugene is 130 miles or 2+ hours away if needed. We have a cousin who moved to Bend from the DC area, and loves it.
Bend is growing too fast (100K). I don't think it meets his requirements. I am sitting here looking at the river in Bend. It certainly is an outdoor town and we have our share of Olympians and pro sports folks. The PCT is only 20 miles. Real estate is red hot. I guess you could go out 20 miles and make it work better(from the OP's wish list). We had 29 microbreweries before covid, so that tells you something :happy
Yeah, some miles out maybe. My experience with Bend goes back 60 years when I worked for the Forest Service. I've been there from time to time, but not in the last 10 years. If our kids hadn't been living in the Northeast, we would likely have gone to Oregon ourselves. Still enjoy a brew from Deschutes Brewery. :sharebeer

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lthenderson
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Re: Middle of Nowhere Retirement

Post by lthenderson » Tue Jul 28, 2020 5:29 pm

I have lived my whole life in the middle of nowhere. For me, the issue isn't specialty healthcare. It is a ninety minute drive but when you have to drive 15 miles to get gas, 20 miles to the nearest restaurant or 45 miles to shop for groceries, adding another 40 minutes to the drive isn't something I bat an eye at.

Someone touched on it above but by far the hardest thing to get is a reliable, fast internet connection. It is marginal at best when it is working and that is paying premium prices. Those that can't afford the price just rely on cellphone data plans and their smart gadgets for the internet.

I have seen few people over the decades who have transitioned from urban living to living out in the middle of nowhere. They find it appealing while living in the urban city but once out here in the sticks, they gradually go crazy/miss the closeness of everything and most leave again after a few years. I'm sure the same can be said for those of us brought up in rural America and our chances of surviving living in a large urban area. It is simply the environment you are brought up and used to. I live in a county without a fast food restaurant or a stoplight and I wouldn't trade it for the world. But I do like taking the occasional jaunt into the city for some sushi, cultural events (pre-Covid anyway) and other things from time to time.

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Nicolas
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Re: Middle of Nowhere Retirement

Post by Nicolas » Tue Jul 28, 2020 5:38 pm

Marmot wrote:
Tue Jul 28, 2020 1:25 pm
Alaska in a heartbeat. Homer (I like) and for some reason Juneau (have not been there though).

Anywhere in the Yukon of course (whitehorse area). Out there, but not.
Dick Proenneke did it in 1968 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Proenneke
I would go further north, the Hudson Bay area has always appealed to me, though I’ve never been there — magnificent desolation (as Buzz Aldrin said)! But then one must take Canadian immigration laws into account. And then there’s the problem of access to health care.
When found, make a note of. — Captain Cuttle

ScubaHogg
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Re: Middle of Nowhere Retirement

Post by ScubaHogg » Tue Jul 28, 2020 5:43 pm

The Mountain West has a zillion options. Virtually anywhere in Montana, Many areas of CO (Grand junction comes to mind), 1 hour outside coeur d'alene (ID), so many places in AZ or NM, I’m sure Utah somewhere. Rural NH seems to fit as well.
“There is no problem so bad you can’t make it worse.” - Chris Hatfield, Astronaut mantra

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fortfun
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Re: Middle of Nowhere Retirement

Post by fortfun » Tue Jul 28, 2020 5:51 pm

Bonanza, Colorado. Just a short drive to the hospital in Salida, Colorado. You're welcome :)
https://www.uncovercolorado.com/ghost-towns/bonanza/

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blueblock
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Re: Middle of Nowhere Retirement

Post by blueblock » Tue Jul 28, 2020 5:58 pm

Five years ago, we retired to our lake home, which is in a semi-rural area between Chicago and Milwaukee. The area has many lakes, some larger, some smaller. Ours is mid-sized and dandy for boating, water skiing, fishing, etc. When we look out our windows at the water, we see zero other houses, just wilderness—okay, actually tree breaks that edge farm fields—but we nevertheless enjoy extra-fast internet and sewer versus septic tank. All the "name" stores you'd expect to find in the big city are close by. Admittedly, cell coverage is poor, regardless of the carrier.

Downtown Chicago is a 90-minute drive, O'Hare is 45 minutes. Milwaukee is an hour away.

My GP, cardiologist and urologist are all at Northwestern, in downtown Chicago, but if I have a medical emergency there are two gigantic hospitals within a 15 minute drive, in Kenosha, as well as a small urgent care facility that is quite good for small matters. There are also plenty of specialists. I've used and been impressed by a local physical therapist, a dermatologist and a periodontist, all within 10-20 minutes away by car. They all have the latest equipment and premises. (The only reason I have kept my Chicago doctors is because I'm likely to need a new heart valve at some point, and my cardiologist is a valve guy. Well, and I've been going to them for 30 years and I like the continuity.)

Northwestern has many satellite offices, so, for example, this Fall when I am due for a colonoscopy, I only have to drive about 30 minutes to their northern suburban urology center.

The big employers around here are Abbott Labs, AT&T and Amazon. Also a handful of mid-sized manufacturers, like a company that's been making china for the White House and the State Department for decades.

What is not available without going into the city: fine dining—we don't even bother eating dinner out locally—and the arts, like live theater, museums of note, etc.

In short, while at first glance it may look like we are in the middle of nowhere, and we do enjoy many aspects of rural lake living, we're quite close and plugged into most big city services. I think that's going to be true outside of many large cities.

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JAZZISCOOL
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Re: Middle of Nowhere Retirement

Post by JAZZISCOOL » Tue Jul 28, 2020 6:05 pm

Nicolas wrote:
Tue Jul 28, 2020 5:38 pm
Marmot wrote:
Tue Jul 28, 2020 1:25 pm
Alaska in a heartbeat. Homer (I like) and for some reason Juneau (have not been there though).

Anywhere in the Yukon of course (whitehorse area). Out there, but not.
Dick Proenneke did it in 1968 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Proenneke
I would go further north, the Hudson Bay area has always appealed to me, though I’ve never been there — magnificent desolation (as Buzz Aldrin said)! But then one must take Canadian immigration laws into account. And then there’s the problem of access to health care.
I loved the PBS special about Dick Proenneke's life. :happy

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David Jay
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Re: Middle of Nowhere Retirement

Post by David Jay » Tue Jul 28, 2020 6:13 pm

Alf 101 wrote:
Tue Jul 28, 2020 1:19 pm
You might like my neighborhood, lots of yummy cats... :D
Prediction is very difficult, especially about the future - Niels Bohr | To get the "risk premium", you really do have to take the risk - nisiprius

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Nicolas
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Re: Middle of Nowhere Retirement

Post by Nicolas » Tue Jul 28, 2020 6:14 pm

JAZZISCOOL wrote:
Tue Jul 28, 2020 6:05 pm
I loved the PBS special about Dick Proenneke's life. :happy
I did too, he was quite a guy. I’m not sure I could live alone for thirty years, I bet his stress level hit negative numbers. I remember he said he didn’t hear about Bobby Kennedy’s death until months after it happened, not until his next supply plane arrived, he didn’t even have a radio. He said he didn’t think people needed to know the news. Sometimes I see his point.

Also it was so interesting watching him build that cabin and even making his own tools.
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Big Worm
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Re: Middle of Nowhere Retirement

Post by Big Worm » Tue Jul 28, 2020 6:30 pm

tashnewbie wrote:
Tue Jul 28, 2020 1:48 pm
What about someplace like Roanoke, Virginia? Very close proximity to many mountains in the Blue Ridge, the Appalachian Trail, access to quality healthcare (Virginia Tech is 45 minutes away and has a medical school; many healthcare initiatives are being started in Roanoke).
Va Tech hospital is in Roanoke, not Blacksburg.

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Re: Middle of Nowhere Retirement

Post by JAZZISCOOL » Tue Jul 28, 2020 6:39 pm

Nicolas wrote:
Tue Jul 28, 2020 6:14 pm
JAZZISCOOL wrote:
Tue Jul 28, 2020 6:05 pm
I loved the PBS special about Dick Proenneke's life. :happy
I did too, he was quite a guy. I’m not sure I could live alone for thirty years, I bet his stress level hit negative numbers. I remember he said he didn’t hear about Bobby Kennedy’s death until months after it happened, not until his next supply plane arrived, he didn’t even have a radio. He said he didn’t think people needed to know the news. Sometimes I see his point.

Also it was so interesting watching him build that cabin and even making his own tools.
I agree! His lifestyle really fascinated me. I'm sure his stress level was quite healthy. :beer

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Re: Middle of Nowhere Retirement

Post by tashnewbie » Tue Jul 28, 2020 7:16 pm

Big Worm wrote:
Tue Jul 28, 2020 6:30 pm
tashnewbie wrote:
Tue Jul 28, 2020 1:48 pm
What about someplace like Roanoke, Virginia? Very close proximity to many mountains in the Blue Ridge, the Appalachian Trail, access to quality healthcare (Virginia Tech is 45 minutes away and has a medical school; many healthcare initiatives are being started in Roanoke).
Va Tech hospital is in Roanoke, not Blacksburg.
I was referring to Virginia Tech the school and its med school being in Blacksburg. I live in Roanoke and am not familiar with a hospital called Va Tech being in Roanoke. There’s a large hospital system called Carilion and Lewis Gale. I know Tech and Carilion have a healthcare initiative building that’s in Roanoke.

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Re: Middle of Nowhere Retirement

Post by Nestegg_User » Tue Jul 28, 2020 9:47 pm

fortfun wrote:
Tue Jul 28, 2020 5:51 pm
Bonanza, Colorado. Just a short drive to the hospital in Salida, Colorado. You're welcome :)
https://www.uncovercolorado.com/ghost-towns/bonanza/
It's not quite desolate.... population goes up to 12 in the warmer months (I might be a bit worried about water, though.... as, even though it's at the divide, there's no reservoir and you not gonna drill for anything (hard rock, and any water is waaay waaay down there)... speaking of which, given it's mining history there's probably some contamination in any water available.
the area around Mt Antero has the same problem... few residents, no clean water, hours to get anywhere
(but I did find that there was Molybdenum ore there (verified with XRF and ICP)... but without water you really can't process (like the Climax or Henderson mines)

as far as "middle of nowhere"... it's off I-84 in Idaho, east of the split from I-86 and in that flat, high wind area (with highway warning signs about that)....yeah, been there too

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Re: Middle of Nowhere Retirement

Post by AlohaJoe » Tue Jul 28, 2020 10:00 pm

Watty wrote:
Tue Jul 28, 2020 1:51 pm
For a couple of the trips they may have stayed in a hotel because they had an early or late appointment time.

They were only in their 60s but they decided that would be a big problem when they were in their 70's or older. Doing something like that would also be a huge problem if one of them survived the other and the survivor had to try doing that on their own.

They ended up selling their house and moving somewhere else.
We've been at hospitals a fair amount recently and while talking with other families there I've been surprised how common this is and a lot of people aren't coming from what I would have thought were "small towns".

There's also a surprising number of people who have to take a bus (i.e. they can't drive any longer, at least not for multi-hour journeys) and stay in a hotel for a week while a series of tests and whatnot happen. I've even met a few people who end up just renting an apartment nearby and living there (maybe going back "home" for weekends) for 3-4 months while treatments are happening.

My own father used to live in Kauai, Hawaii, and left it because the medical care available wasn't sufficient for his aging needs. Now he lives in the soulless urban sprawl of Phoenix but the doctors are much better.

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Re: Middle of Nowhere Retirement

Post by Sandtrap » Tue Jul 28, 2020 10:10 pm

Alf 101 wrote:
Tue Jul 28, 2020 1:19 pm
As an avid outdoors person, throughout my life so far I've been struck by the number of places I'd want to live, if only there were jobs. Now my wife and I are talking about (and preparing for) a slightly early retirement; we still may be ten years out, but the planning is starting to feel a little more real.

I would say we're on the right path, and there are many excellent financial tools -- many thanks to the Bogleheads Wiki. This is why I posted on the Personal Consumer Issues board, as it's more a matter of choice. Who here has retired somewhere out of the way in the woods, and who might have thought that way previously and reconsidered?

Our situation is a simple one. We have no kids, so grandchildren and close proximity to family is not a great factor. We like having people over, but don't go out a great deal to clubs, shows, and the like. We'd rather hike, paddle, climb, fish, and grow things. Unlike many retirees, we'd also like to live somewhere that has four seasons.

This leaves a list of options. On the other hand, proximity to health care may become more of a priority, which could be an issue living in the middle of nowhere. Also I can see the appeal of being able to meet other retired people and have a community. There's also the fact that living further out requires more self-sufficiency, which could get tougher later in retirement.

I would be curious in hearing people's thoughts on this...
DW and I had our career, and my origins, in Hawaii. Population on just the island of Oahu, 880,000 cramp souls in just the coastal areas of an island 30 miles by 40 miles in size. We are both outdoorsy, can give or take the ocean, prefer vast expanses of open land and hills and mountains and forests to play in with horses, utv's, 4wd's, and perhaps a fellow group of seniors once in awhile.

We planned 20 years ahead of retirement. Yes. 20 years or more.
Each year or as we could, taking drives cross country to go house hunting and to get a sense of the area. Taking into account; cost of living, housing expenses, National forests, lakes, mainstream stores like Lowes/Home Depot/Wallmart/health food stores, etc, nearby, demographics, culture, climate, etc.

We did not need social groups, shows, clubs, nightlife, city life, clubs, country clubs, HOA's, committees, boards, and chairs.
Large acreage was a must since DW is an equestrian.

We needed to be reasonably near to a major hospital and excellent heath services as well as alternative progressive health services (not backwoods meds/docs).

We ended up in a small town located a mile high in the mountains and forests with vast lands around us which included; 3 National Forests, BLM and State and Fed open lands, 4 mountain lakes, and proximity to mainstream stores and conveniences, and a mostly mild 4 seasons, and a reasonable cost of living and housing cost, with a large home on large acreage, in a high end area of town. The major hospital and medical centers are 20 miles away. Major metropolitan Phoenix and a major airport 2 hours away.

Northern Arizona. Not in the dessert!

j :happy
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Re: Middle of Nowhere Retirement

Post by Sandtrap » Tue Jul 28, 2020 10:21 pm

AlohaJoe wrote:
Tue Jul 28, 2020 10:00 pm
Watty wrote:
Tue Jul 28, 2020 1:51 pm
For a couple of the trips they may have stayed in a hotel because they had an early or late appointment time.

They were only in their 60s but they decided that would be a big problem when they were in their 70's or older. Doing something like that would also be a huge problem if one of them survived the other and the survivor had to try doing that on their own.

They ended up selling their house and moving somewhere else.
We've been at hospitals a fair amount recently and while talking with other families there I've been surprised how common this is and a lot of people aren't coming from what I would have thought were "small towns".

There's also a surprising number of people who have to take a bus (i.e. they can't drive any longer, at least not for multi-hour journeys) and stay in a hotel for a week while a series of tests and whatnot happen. I've even met a few people who end up just renting an apartment nearby and living there (maybe going back "home" for weekends) for 3-4 months while treatments are happening.

My own father used to live in Kauai, Hawaii, and left it because the medical care available wasn't sufficient for his aging needs. Now he lives in the soulless urban sprawl of Phoenix but the doctors are much better.
Yes. Hawaii outer island medical care is dismal. Even moderate cases have to be flown to Queens on Oahu. My brother is a doc at the North Kohala Medical Center in Kamuela. They were short an Internist for many years until he got there. That said, I've always had great medical care on "metropolitan urban congested" Oahu.

Phoenix/scottsdale has excellent progressive medical care, including the Mayo Clinic. But, yes, a soulless urban sprawl with 120 degree heat in the summer!

Prescott, 2 hours North of Phoenix and a mile high, has the substantial Yavapai Regional Medical Center and an extensive array of medical clinics catering to the vast numbers of wealthy seniors that move there. But, even with that, in the past, DW had to drive me 2 hours to Phoenix to see various specialists and it was miserable.

So, there are indeed tradeoffs to living at distance from modern progressive major medical care. Unfortunately, while we are in good health in early retirement, it's the one thing that should be at the top of the list but is not, until the day that it is the only thing on the list.

j :happy
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Re: Middle of Nowhere Retirement

Post by Marmot » Tue Jul 28, 2020 10:28 pm

Nestegg_User wrote:
Tue Jul 28, 2020 9:47 pm
fortfun wrote:
Tue Jul 28, 2020 5:51 pm
Bonanza, Colorado. Just a short drive to the hospital in Salida, Colorado. You're welcome :)
https://www.uncovercolorado.com/ghost-towns/bonanza/
It's not quite desolate.... population goes up to 12 in the warmer months (I might be a bit worried about water, though.... as, even though it's at the divide, there's no reservoir and you not gonna drill for anything (hard rock, and any water is waaay waaay down there)... speaking of which, given it's mining history there's probably some contamination in any water available.
the area around Mt Antero has the same problem... few residents, no clean water, hours to get anywhere
(but I did find that there was Molybdenum ore there (verified with XRF and ICP)... but without water you really can't process (like the Climax or Henderson mines)

as far as "middle of nowhere"... it's off I-84 in Idaho, east of the split from I-86 and in that flat, high wind area (with highway warning signs about that)....yeah, been there too
We used to go to meetings in Colorado in regards to the Climax mine. My wife was Phelps Dodge, which became Freeport MacMoran. We really looked forward to the meetings every summer (maybe because they were near Aspen :happy )
Marty....don't go to the year 2020....Dr. Emmett Brown

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Re: Middle of Nowhere Retirement

Post by tibbitts » Tue Jul 28, 2020 10:58 pm

Alf 101 wrote:
Tue Jul 28, 2020 1:19 pm
As an avid outdoors person, throughout my life so far I've been struck by the number of places I'd want to live, if only there were jobs. Now my wife and I are talking about (and preparing for) a slightly early retirement; we still may be ten years out, but the planning is starting to feel a little more real.

...

I would be curious in hearing people's thoughts on this...
Thoughts:

1. Are you sure both of you are equally enthusiastic about this? My experience is that one person is usually more enthusiastic about it than the other. Sometimes one person's enthusiasm is somewhat contagious - but only up to a point.

2. Ten years from now is a very long time.

3. Proenneke aside, very few people actually want to to be truly alone (such as after a spouse passes away) in a desolate location. Not that many people want to be isolated with just one other person, either, as some are finding out as a result of Covid-19. Of course there are exceptions.

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Re: Middle of Nowhere Retirement

Post by cowbman » Wed Jul 29, 2020 12:35 am

Big Worm wrote:
Tue Jul 28, 2020 6:30 pm
tashnewbie wrote:
Tue Jul 28, 2020 1:48 pm
What about someplace like Roanoke, Virginia? Very close proximity to many mountains in the Blue Ridge, the Appalachian Trail, access to quality healthcare (Virginia Tech is 45 minutes away and has a medical school; many healthcare initiatives are being started in Roanoke).
Va Tech hospital is in Roanoke, not Blacksburg.
I personally would vote for Charlottesville. You can live outside of town and be "middle of nowhere pretty fast." Virginia has a very high quality of life, mild 4 seasons, proximity to DC/Richmond/mountains, etc. Charlottesville, being a college town also has UVA and all of its amenities. Many retirees choose college towns for these reasons.

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Re: Middle of Nowhere Retirement

Post by MathIsMyWayr » Wed Jul 29, 2020 1:31 am

Sandtrap wrote:
Tue Jul 28, 2020 10:10 pm
cost of living, housing expenses, National forests, lakes, mainstream stores like Lowes/Home Depot/Wallmart/health food stores, etc, nearby, demographics, culture, climate, etc.

We did not need social groups, shows, clubs, nightlife, city life, clubs, country clubs, HOA's, committees, boards, and chairs.
Large acreage was a must since DW is an equestrian.

We needed to be reasonably near to a major hospital and excellent heath services as well as alternative progressive health services (not backwoods meds/docs).

We ended up in a small town located a mile high in the mountains and forests with vast lands around us which included; 3 National Forests, BLM and State and Fed open lands, 4 mountain lakes, and proximity to mainstream stores and conveniences, and a mostly mild 4 seasons, and a reasonable cost of living and housing cost, with a large home on large acreage, in a high end area of town. The major hospital and medical centers are 20 miles away. Major metropolitan Phoenix and a major airport 2 hours away.

Northern Arizona. Not in the dessert!
How about demographics and culture?
"Not in the desert!" - by Arizona's standard?
Phoenix/scottsdale has excellent progressive medical care, including the Mayo Clinic. But, yes, a soulless urban sprawl with 120 degree heat in the summer!

Prescott, 2 hours North of Phoenix and a mile high, has the substantial Yavapai Regional Medical Center and an extensive array of medical clinics catering to the vast numbers of wealthy seniors that move there. But, even with that, in the past, DW had to drive me 2 hours to Phoenix to see various specialists and it was miserable.

So, there are indeed tradeoffs to living at distance from modern progressive major medical care. Unfortunately, while we are in good health in early retirement, it's the one thing that should be at the top of the list but is not, until the day that it is the only thing on the list.

j :happy
"a reasonable cost of living and housing cost" with "the vast numbers of wealthy seniors that move there"?
Have you also considered Sedona? I heard Sedona is also nice.

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Re: Middle of Nowhere Retirement

Post by Sandtrap » Wed Jul 29, 2020 7:34 am

MathIsMyWayr wrote:
Wed Jul 29, 2020 1:31 am
Sandtrap wrote:
Tue Jul 28, 2020 10:10 pm
cost of living, housing expenses, National forests, lakes, mainstream stores like Lowes/Home Depot/Wallmart/health food stores, etc, nearby, demographics, culture, climate, etc.

We did not need social groups, shows, clubs, nightlife, city life, clubs, country clubs, HOA's, committees, boards, and chairs.
Large acreage was a must since DW is an equestrian.

We needed to be reasonably near to a major hospital and excellent heath services as well as alternative progressive health services (not backwoods meds/docs).

We ended up in a small town located a mile high in the mountains and forests with vast lands around us which included; 3 National Forests, BLM and State and Fed open lands, 4 mountain lakes, and proximity to mainstream stores and conveniences, and a mostly mild 4 seasons, and a reasonable cost of living and housing cost, with a large home on large acreage, in a high end area of town. The major hospital and medical centers are 20 miles away. Major metropolitan Phoenix and a major airport 2 hours away.

Northern Arizona. Not in the dessert!
How about demographics and culture?
"Not in the desert!" - by Arizona's standard?
Phoenix/scottsdale has excellent progressive medical care, including the Mayo Clinic. But, yes, a soulless urban sprawl with 120 degree heat in the summer!

Prescott, 2 hours North of Phoenix and a mile high, has the substantial Yavapai Regional Medical Center and an extensive array of medical clinics catering to the vast numbers of wealthy seniors that move there. But, even with that, in the past, DW had to drive me 2 hours to Phoenix to see various specialists and it was miserable.

So, there are indeed tradeoffs to living at distance from modern progressive major medical care. Unfortunately, while we are in good health in early retirement, it's the one thing that should be at the top of the list but is not, until the day that it is the only thing on the list.

j :happy
"a reasonable cost of living and housing cost" with "the vast numbers of wealthy seniors that move there"?
Have you also considered Sedona? I heard Sedona is also nice.
Sedona has a very high cost of living and housing costs (per value) compared to the region, if not Arizona and beyond.
Logistics are lacking with 2 major streets in and out and very dense building due to how it is positioned in the land.
No major stores.
A bit "touristy" with gridlock.
A pleasant and very interesting and unique place to visit, living there is also unique.

Prescott, Arizona demographics and culture has and is rapidly changing from the sleepy old fashioned country ranching/mining town in the forested Bradshaw Mountains that I lst came to 35 years ago. While it retains the "Mayberry", "Lake Wobegon", old fashioned values and lifestyle characteristic of towns who's histories go back to the stagecoach and horse driven wagons, the influx of people from across the Nation has modernized what can be modernized, from stores to medical care to conveniences, etc.

While it is not ideal, and no place is, and there are many better places for each person's criteria, it does remain on the "to be considered" list for many retirees that I have met through the decades.

Of course, I'm always "homesick" for Hawaii weather, culture, the beach, and "food!!", but there are a lot of places that are okay as well for DW and I. A second home in Hawaii helps.

*OP is looking for tips on "Middle Of Nowhere" living.

There is a choice and opinion for everyone on everything that makes them happy and fullfilled.
Perfect!
j :happy
Last edited by Sandtrap on Wed Jul 29, 2020 8:07 am, edited 1 time in total.
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stan1
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Re: Middle of Nowhere Retirement

Post by stan1 » Wed Jul 29, 2020 7:49 am

Challenge your assumption that you will pick one place and stay there for the rest of your lives.
One does not need to live in the same place at 60, 70, and 80.

Enjoy life while you can. If you need closer medical care or better weather move someplace else.

Agree Appalachia in general might be a good match for four seasons and having rural areas that are still within 1-2 hours of a major city with medical care and a major airport. In the Rockies some places are more remote and distant.

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Re: Middle of Nowhere Retirement

Post by dbp7777 » Wed Jul 29, 2020 7:59 am

Might consider Bellingham Washington. The city has about 80,000, but you can live on the outskirts and be in rural logging/dairy/farming areas. Skiing one hour east at Mt. Baker, Bellingham Bay has kayaking, fishing, boating, lots and lots of hiking, Cascades National Park to the south. Vancouver BC is about 50 miles north and Seattle is about 90 miles to the south. Good regional health care hospital and other health-related services in Bellingham with additional options in Seattle.

We moved here from Southern California for retirement three years ago. Really like the seasons and the outdoor lifestyle.
Last edited by dbp7777 on Wed Jul 29, 2020 8:02 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Middle of Nowhere Retirement

Post by lthenderson » Wed Jul 29, 2020 8:00 am

Nicolas wrote:
Tue Jul 28, 2020 6:14 pm
JAZZISCOOL wrote:
Tue Jul 28, 2020 6:05 pm
I loved the PBS special about Dick Proenneke's life. :happy
I did too, he was quite a guy. I’m not sure I could live alone for thirty years, I bet his stress level hit negative numbers. I remember he said he didn’t hear about Bobby Kennedy’s death until months after it happened, not until his next supply plane arrived, he didn’t even have a radio. He said he didn’t think people needed to know the news. Sometimes I see his point.

Also it was so interesting watching him build that cabin and even making his own tools.
If you haven't read the book based upon his journals, you should. Excellent read. "One Man's Wilderness". Another good book along the same line is "An Island To Oneself". I have both books in my library downstairs.

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Re: Middle of Nowhere Retirement

Post by flyingaway » Wed Jul 29, 2020 8:05 am

stan1 wrote:
Wed Jul 29, 2020 7:49 am
Challenge your assumption that you will pick one place and stay there for the rest of your lives.
One does not need to live in the same place at 60, 70, and 80.

Enjoy life while you can. If you need closer medical care or better weather move someplace else.

Agree Appalachia in general might be a good match for four seasons and having rural areas that are still within 1-2 hours of a major city with medical care and a major airport. In the Rockies some places are more remote and distant.
I guess one has to move to a nursing home eventually.

If you have money, anywhere is possible a good place to live. Build a helicopter landing pad in the woods is a choice.

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Alf 101
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Re: Middle of Nowhere Retirement

Post by Alf 101 » Wed Jul 29, 2020 8:05 am

The question of how enthusiastic my wife is about this is a good one. She too wants to live out of the way and surrounded by nature, though as a decision gets closer to implementation, I can see how differences in opinion could occur.

As the OP, I suppose what I'm looking for is not truly "middle of nowhere". I might enjoy living in a yurt somewhere in northern British Columbia, but this is probably not what my bride has in mind, and may lose some luster in my golden years. Proximity to health care is less of a concern right now, but will be increasingly so.

I do think your housing options open up if you have no worries about your work commute, and there are no other practical reasons that compel you to live in a suburban community. The ideal case is a reasonably sized house (1500-2000 sq. ft), a bit of land and privacy, nearby outdoor activities (e.g., hiking trails, fishing), and a chance to do a little homesteading -- grow a garden, raise chickens and bees, start mushroom logs, etc. My wife is quite an avid gardener, a "bird nerd", and interested in wildlife photography.

It's interesting, that you can find online lists of the "best retirement states" -- which are either low cost of living areas that aren't a big draw to us, or else places already colonized by wealthy seniors. We're looking for places that cut a middle course between those two.

My wife and I do have some differences of opinion. She has advocated for New Hampshire or Maine, which are options, but I understand New Hampshire's high property tax could be a bit of an anchor in retirement. As I understand also, the cost of living is higher too.

We both know some people who've retired in the Virginia-North Carolina-West Virginia-Tennessee area, along the corridor of national forests. Charlottesville, Blacksburg, Roanoke, and Asheville are options that have already been mentioned. There is a better than average chance these areas may be priced out of our range in ten years; who knows the future though?

The Midwest also has some options -- northern Wisconsin, the Upper Peninsula, around Duluth.

I like the west. Places like northern Arizona or Grand Junction have real appeal, only I think we'd like to be someplace less dry -- somewhere with forests, lakes, rivers, etc. Prescott is awfully nice though, and we may need to plan a trip though there, anticipating my wife might otherwise veto the high desert.

We are probably priced out of the Pacific Northwest -- that whole corridor from Bellingham, WA down to Ashland, OR -- and looking more at the intermountain west. For a longer retirement, we need to consciously live below our means. We don't need some mountain villa, but we still want to live somewhere comfortable and nice.

Eastern Washington and Idaho have some appeal, probably somewhere north of Boise in the trees, vs. west of Pullman in the wheat. There is some dry country in eastern Washington, with some interesting places to explore, but a more forested area might be better for us.

It will be interesting to see how these areas develop, and our thinking changes, over the next ten years...

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Shackleton
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Re: Middle of Nowhere Retirement

Post by Shackleton » Wed Jul 29, 2020 8:15 am

mhc wrote:
Tue Jul 28, 2020 3:15 pm
I live along the front range in Colorado. From my house, I can drive for 10 minutes in 3 directions and be away from civilization. 10 minutes in the other direction, I can be at the hospital. Within 20 minutes I can be at the trailhead and see very few people. In an hour, I definitely can be away from all people. In a little over an hour, I can be in Denver with all the big city amenities. There are many National Parks, national forests, national wilderness, state forests, ... in this part of the country. Plenty to do outside if you like. This part of the country is very sparsely populated except for the front range of Colorado (I-25 corridor).

no end to the following:
hiking
biking (road and mountain)
hunting
kayaking
rafting
camping
skiing
snow shoeing
I used to live on the front range, but when the hubby retired I told my boss I would be 100% remote (he and my team weren’t in the same state so didn’t really care.)

Now I live in the mountains, near one of the major ski resorts but I’m in one of the neighboring towns that doesn’t get over run with tourists. Our town has two stop lights, so it’s pretty small. We are actually outside of town on 3 acres (we used to live on 40 acres outside a big city, so we like some space.) We have everything we need here but are only a 1 hour drive to the Denver suburbs. We mountain bike out our back door, have 5 lakes for kayaking within 20 minutes and also access to the Colorado River within 10 minutes. I was riding my friends horse in Rocky Mountain NP on Sunday, that is a 20 min drive for us. In the winter we have two alpine ski resorts, three Nordic ski areas and miles of snowshoeing within 20 minutes. Our local hospital can handle the majority of issues and sends specialty care over the hill to the sister hospital near Denver (and we have had to make use of emergency and specially care.) So I wouldn’t call it “the middle of nowhere” but it is certainly not the middle of a city or suburb. I’d never move back to a city.
“Superhuman effort isn't worth a damn unless it achieves results.” ~Ernest Shackleton

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Nicolas
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Re: Middle of Nowhere Retirement

Post by Nicolas » Wed Jul 29, 2020 8:56 am

lthenderson wrote:
Wed Jul 29, 2020 8:00 am
Nicolas wrote:
Tue Jul 28, 2020 6:14 pm
JAZZISCOOL wrote:
Tue Jul 28, 2020 6:05 pm
I loved the PBS special about Dick Proenneke's life. :happy
I did too, he was quite a guy. I’m not sure I could live alone for thirty years, I bet his stress level hit negative numbers. I remember he said he didn’t hear about Bobby Kennedy’s death until months after it happened, not until his next supply plane arrived, he didn’t even have a radio. He said he didn’t think people needed to know the news. Sometimes I see his point.

Also it was so interesting watching him build that cabin and even making his own tools.
If you haven't read the book based upon his journals, you should. Excellent read. "One Man's Wilderness". Another good book along the same line is "An Island To Oneself". I have both books in my library downstairs.
No, I haven’t read them, but I shall. Thanks for the recommendation.
When found, make a note of. — Captain Cuttle

notBobToo
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Re: Middle of Nowhere Retirement

Post by notBobToo » Wed Jul 29, 2020 8:57 am

Alf 101 wrote:
Wed Jul 29, 2020 8:05 am
I like the west...somewhere with forests...
Eastern Washington and Idaho have some appeal, probably somewhere north of Boise in the trees, vs. west of Pullman in the wheat. There is some dry country in eastern Washington, with some interesting places to explore, but a more forested area might be better for us.
Not to be a killjoy, but the only thing that would scare me more than being in the path of a F3 or above tornado is a forest fire. I remember right after moving to Colorado in 1988 or 89, the year that Yellowstone went up, (also) watching flames and smoke of fires along the front range. And with the water situation and beetle kill since, the mitigating factors have only gotten worse. So good luck in the (West) mountains. Maybe that helicopter mentioned upthread isn't such a bad idea.

Valuethinker
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Joined: Fri May 11, 2007 11:07 am

Re: Middle of Nowhere Retirement

Post by Valuethinker » Wed Jul 29, 2020 10:30 am

Alf 101 wrote:
Tue Jul 28, 2020 1:19 pm
As an avid outdoors person, throughout my life so far I've been struck by the number of places I'd want to live, if only there were jobs. Now my wife and I are talking about (and preparing for) a slightly early retirement; we still may be ten years out, but the planning is starting to feel a little more real.

I would say we're on the right path, and there are many excellent financial tools -- many thanks to the Bogleheads Wiki. This is why I posted on the Personal Consumer Issues board, as it's more a matter of choice. Who here has retired somewhere out of the way in the woods, and who might have thought that way previously and reconsidered?

Our situation is a simple one. We have no kids, so grandchildren and close proximity to family is not a great factor. We like having people over, but don't go out a great deal to clubs, shows, and the like. We'd rather hike, paddle, climb, fish, and grow things. Unlike many retirees, we'd also like to live somewhere that has four seasons.

This leaves a list of options. On the other hand, proximity to health care may become more of a priority, which could be an issue living in the middle of nowhere. Also I can see the appeal of being able to meet other retired people and have a community. There's also the fact that living further out requires more self-sufficiency, which could get tougher later in retirement.

I would be curious in hearing people's thoughts on this...
Could you split location?

Have a condo somewhere with good medical facilities etc & then a house someplace dramatic & remote?

Having seen my aunt retire from the city to a farm, and now into a smallish town, I can see the problems. The hospital is 40 miles away. Dentist and family doctor are hard to find.

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