What surprised you the most once you retired?

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Re: What surprised you the most once you retired?

Post by ruralavalon »

Hubris wrote: Wed Jul 22, 2020 8:12 pm With all due respect, there is a thread hijack in progress...
Too late, already happened.
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Re: What surprised you the most once you retired?

Post by LadyGeek »

^^^ Not a surprise, but retirement allows me to spend a lot more time reading threads and help moderate.

The thread hijack has been moved to a new discussion. See: [Getting paid while pursuing a PhD]
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Re: What surprised you the most once you retired?

Post by HomerJ »

UpperNwGuy wrote: Fri Jul 17, 2020 5:26 pm
celia wrote: Fri Jul 17, 2020 5:08 pm
UpperNwGuy wrote: Thu Jul 16, 2020 7:26 pm — Lots of bogleheads post often during the 9-5 workday. Either they are retired, or they're reading the forum instead of working.
Or those aren't their work hours/days!
Maybe, but probably not. I used to be a boss, and my IT guys would show me lists of the non-work-related websites that our staff was logged into at 10am in the morning from within the building.
What??? They track us?!!

Best thing about working from home is I have a work computer AND a home computer. :)
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Re: What surprised you the most once you retired?

Post by HomerJ »

Watty wrote: Sat Jul 18, 2020 10:25 am
What surprised you the most once you retired?
One thing that may not have been mentioned is that some people are surprised at is how quickly and well the company gets by without them once they leave. Some people feel like they are indispensable and it can be a bit of a letdown to realize that they were actually easily replaced.
My wife retired and was replaced by 4 people... so she felt pretty vindicated.
A Goldman Sachs associate provided a variety of detailed explanations, but then offered a caveat, “If I’m being dead-### honest, though, nobody knows what’s really going on.”
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Re: What surprised you the most once you retired?

Post by HomerJ »

IMO wrote: Sat Jul 18, 2020 1:07 pm
Watty wrote: Sat Jul 18, 2020 10:25 am
What surprised you the most once you retired?
One thing that may not have been mentioned is that some people are surprised at is how quickly and well the company gets by without them once they leave. Some people feel like they are indispensable and it can be a bit of a letdown to realize that they were actually easily replaced.
Absolutely. It's interesting how many people erroneously perceive themselves as irreplaceable. If someone where to drop dead, life will go on, even if your Elon Musk, etc.
I'm curious how many people it would take to replace me... Maybe just one... but I'm guessing at least two.
A Goldman Sachs associate provided a variety of detailed explanations, but then offered a caveat, “If I’m being dead-### honest, though, nobody knows what’s really going on.”
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Re: What surprised you the most once you retired?

Post by HomerJ »

protagonist wrote: Sat Jul 18, 2020 7:28 pm
Arabesque wrote: Sat Jul 18, 2020 11:06 am I think for many professors it’s not a matter of not knowing what to do, but a matter of not knowing what would be better to do. At 69, I actually still like 85% of my job. Covid creates some problems for me, and my university’s location isn’t ideal for family connections, but I might have worked into my 70s if I lived closer to family and was not restricted by Covid (travel and online teaching).

It takes so long to build a research empire that it’s hard to walk away. The job gets easier once the empire is built. All of those decades of hard work, and then it gets to be play and splash.
On some level I understand that. I really liked my job as well. There were things I definitely missed about my career when I retired at 55. I want to emphasize "missed"....past tense...it didn't last long. 12 years later I never look back or miss what was.

It's wonderful that you like 85% of your job. The question you are not answering (and one that may be impossible to answer if you don't take the plunge) is how much you will enjoy not having to do it. As with just about everything (investing, love, adventure, career choices), the potential reward is directly proportional to the potential risk. There are few absolute truths in the universe. That might be one of them.
Professors probably have the greatest job in the world.

I doubt very many of the rest of us enjoy 85% of our jobs.

I woke up last night worried about backups... I laid awake for a good 30-45 minutes worrying about that until I forced myself to stop thinking about it.

I worked on that today to make sure I could sleep better tonight.

It would be nice not to wake up in the middle of the night worried about work (or called because of a problem).
A Goldman Sachs associate provided a variety of detailed explanations, but then offered a caveat, “If I’m being dead-### honest, though, nobody knows what’s really going on.”
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Re: What surprised you the most once you retired?

Post by flaccidsteele »

HomerJ wrote: Wed Jul 22, 2020 11:48 pm
Watty wrote: Sat Jul 18, 2020 10:25 am
What surprised you the most once you retired?
One thing that may not have been mentioned is that some people are surprised at is how quickly and well the company gets by without them once they leave. Some people feel like they are indispensable and it can be a bit of a letdown to realize that they were actually easily replaced.
My wife retired and was replaced by 4 people... so she felt pretty vindicated.
So did the company. While she was their employee the company only needed to incur 1/4 the cost

A salary is the bribe they pay you to forget your dreams
The US market always recovers. It’s never different this time. Retired in my 40s. Investing is a simple game of rinse and repeat
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Re: What surprised you the most once you retired?

Post by smitcat »

HomerJ wrote: Wed Jul 22, 2020 11:50 pm
IMO wrote: Sat Jul 18, 2020 1:07 pm
Watty wrote: Sat Jul 18, 2020 10:25 am
What surprised you the most once you retired?
One thing that may not have been mentioned is that some people are surprised at is how quickly and well the company gets by without them once they leave. Some people feel like they are indispensable and it can be a bit of a letdown to realize that they were actually easily replaced.
Absolutely. It's interesting how many people erroneously perceive themselves as irreplaceable. If someone where to drop dead, life will go on, even if your Elon Musk, etc.
I'm curious how many people it would take to replace me... Maybe just one... but I'm guessing at least two.
The best job is to start your own business and replace yourself - it eliminates not liking your job as well as who to complain to on the rare occasions when you are not happy or feel you are underpaid.
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Re: What surprised you the most once you retired?

Post by VictoriaF »

cinghiale wrote: Wed Jul 22, 2020 10:09 am
VictoriaF wrote:
While in retirement I am doing what I enjoy, I feel somewhat deficient in not having a doctorate.
Victoria, you should feel no deficiency at all. And don’t do it. Don’t get enmeshed in a formal PhD program.
cinghiale,

I'll continue exploring my topic and will try to submit a conference paper. I'll also attend a conference or two, all of which are enjoyable for me activities. If, at some point, I publish my work, it would be a reasonable alternative to the three letters.
cinghiale wrote: Wed Jul 22, 2020 10:09 am
You know the variables. How many good, vibrant, healthy years are we given in retirement? These early retirement years are infused with more energy, ability, enthusiasm, and curiosity than the later years— if we are so fortunate as to reach them— will have. I think you are on a good track, one that features variety as well as depth. I would be sure to be sure before trading what you have now for years dictated by institutional requirements.
The good, vibrant, healthy years of retirement are limited. The same is true for the cognitive stamina. I am trying to optimize my sleep, diet, and physical activity, and still I am not as productive as I used to be. I'd like to achieve a tangible intellectual goal while I still can. It won't be a PhD, though.

Thank you for your comments. They are always very good.

Victoria
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Re: What surprised you the most once you retired?

Post by midareff »

so far it's the accelerated (beyond expectations) deterioration of my health,.... hopefully, YMMV
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Re: What surprised you the most once you retired?

Post by AlohaBill »

I retired about 14 years ago due to health problems. My wife retired 3 years ago. The first thing that has surprised me is I am still alive. I set up a Retirement Policy Statement with the 4% rule unadjusted for inflation. I also soon realized I didn’t need any of our savings! Our ss and pension cover more than all our needs including trips with the family. In fact we are able to continue saving. We are SIFIers. We have both secure income and financial independence. We are using Taylor Larimore’s method of withdrawal. In the last three years we have only withdrawn about .07%. One thing that has
bothered me is we are unable to hug our grandchildren and go on trips!
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Re: What surprised you the most once you retired?

Post by protagonist »

HomerJ wrote: Wed Jul 22, 2020 11:54 pm

It would be nice not to wake up in the middle of the night worried about work (or called because of a problem).
Nicer than you can probably imagine.
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Re: What surprised you the most once you retired?

Post by protagonist »

VictoriaF wrote: Thu Jul 23, 2020 3:23 pm
While in retirement I am doing what I enjoy, I feel somewhat deficient in not having a doctorate.

That's interesting, Victoria. Why is that?
A doctorate would be pretty useless in retirement I would think.
You can study and learn anything you want, without responsibility or expense. You can have all the joys of being a student with none of the hassles.
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Re: What surprised you the most once you retired?

Post by JS-Elcano »

HomerJ wrote: Wed Jul 22, 2020 11:54 pm Professors probably have the greatest job in the world.

I doubt very many of the rest of us enjoy 85% of our jobs.

I woke up last night worried about backups... I laid awake for a good 30-45 minutes worrying about that until I forced myself to stop thinking about it.

I worked on that today to make sure I could sleep better tonight.

It would be nice not to wake up in the middle of the night worried about work (or called because of a problem).
It depends on what kind of professor you are. If you are doing scientific research in addition to your teaching (STEM fields) it is high stress and high pressure (mostly about funding, publishing) and lying awake at night is not uncommon. Many graduate students and postdocs who witness this environment choose to not enter it and go into industry, undergrad teaching, scientific writing, etc, instead of pursuing an academic career.
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Re: What surprised you the most once you retired?

Post by flyingaway »

AlohaBill wrote: Thu Jul 23, 2020 4:26 pm I retired about 14 years ago due to health problems. My wife retired 3 years ago. The first thing that has surprised me is I am still alive. I set up a Retirement Policy Statement with the 4% rule unadjusted for inflation. I also soon realized I didn’t need any of our savings! Our ss and pension cover more than all our needs including trips with the family. In fact we are able to continue saving. We are SIFIers. We have both secure income and financial independence. We are using Taylor Larimore’s method of withdrawal. In the last three years we have only withdrawn about .07%. One thing that has
bothered me is we are unable to hug our grandchildren and go on trips!
With a withdraw rate of 0.07%, do you worry about the money that you will not be able to spend, and maybe will have missed some opportunities?
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Re: What surprised you the most once you retired?

Post by AlohaBill »

Hi flying away,
I asked my wife just that. She is Chinese so her saving perspective is a little different. She said it means we are good savers. As for missing out, we have had an interesting journey. From1973 to 1989 we have lived in the Marshall Islands, Hawaii, Japan, Saudi Arabia and finally from 1989, in California. We are taking our 4 sons and their families wherever they want to go! Hawaii, Disneyworld this year, cruise down Mexico! Our oldest son wants to go to Hawaii and Japan, but his wife is Japanese and wants to go to Boston and Disneyworld. The virus has put a damper on things. I see the excess as insurance for possible old folks home or better yet , college cost for our 7grand children. I’m not sure what my wife thinks.
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Re: What surprised you the most once you retired?

Post by Hubris »

LadyGeek wrote: Wed Jul 22, 2020 8:33 pm ^^^ Not a surprise, but retirement allows me to spend a lot more time reading threads and help moderate.

The thread hijack has been moved to a new discussion. See: [Getting paid while pursuing a PhD]
Thank you, LadyGeek.
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Re: What surprised you the most once you retired?

Post by oldcomputerguy »

HomerJ wrote: Wed Jul 22, 2020 11:54 pm It would be nice not to wake up in the middle of the night worried about work (or called because of a problem).
This was the greatest thing, for me, about retirement. I realized after punching out that I had literally been living 24/7 in anxiety due to fear of the phone ringing, which always heralded some problem or other than would require me to travel back into work to handle. And the most severe problems always seemed to happen in the early morning hours just after midnight. After retirement, my stress level immediately dropped visibly, to the point of friends who had not yet heard I had retired would look at my face and asked what had happened to make me look so happy.

In fact, the final motivating push that made me decide to go ahead and retire was the realization that my wife was having to deal with the stress I was bringing home and unloading on her. That was the last straw. We are now both much happier.
"I’ve come around to this: If you’re dumb, surround yourself with smart people; and if you’re smart, surround yourself with smart people who disagree with you." (Aaron Sorkin)
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Re: What surprised you the most once you retired?

Post by flyingaway »

AlohaBill wrote: Thu Jul 23, 2020 7:14 pm Hi flying away,
I asked my wife just that. She is Chinese so her saving perspective is a little different. She said it means we are good savers. As for missing out, we have had an interesting journey. From1973 to 1989 we have lived in the Marshall Islands, Hawaii, Japan, Saudi Arabia and finally from 1989, in California. We are taking our 4 sons and their families wherever they want to go! Hawaii, Disneyworld this year, cruise down Mexico! Our oldest son wants to go to Hawaii and Japan, but his wife is Japanese and wants to go to Boston and Disneyworld. The virus has put a damper on things. I see the excess as insurance for possible old folks home or better yet , college cost for our 7grand children. I’m not sure what my wife thinks.
In Chinese tradition, parents want to leave something to their children and grandchildren, sometimes to the level of sacrificing their own lifestyle.
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Re: What surprised you the most once you retired?

Post by heyyou »

by flyingaway »
Can we hear some "negative" surprises in retirement?
Early retirement became the best years of my life, but the clock was running, so I am now older (70 and recovering from a hernia incurred at home). I can no longer do the physical, volunteer work (backpacking for remote hiking trail maintenance) that was so enjoyable in my mid-fifties through my mid-sixties. Dang. Aging from 25 to 50, was good due to my becoming wiser. So far, my 70s do not suit me.

No joy from starting SS, it is just more money, not more living. Donating a third of it has not brought me any sense of being helpful to others.
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Re: What surprised you the most once you retired?

Post by VictoriaF »

protagonist wrote: Thu Jul 23, 2020 5:09 pm
VictoriaF wrote: Thu Jul 23, 2020 3:23 pm
While in retirement I am doing what I enjoy, I feel somewhat deficient in not having a doctorate.

That's interesting, Victoria. Why is that?
A doctorate would be pretty useless in retirement I would think.
You can study and learn anything you want, without responsibility or expense. You can have all the joys of being a student with none of the hassles.
To be clear, I'd like to have had a doctorate but I am not going to pursue it now.

It is true that I can learn anything I want, and I do. But, for me, producing something of value is as important as learning. When I develop a new concept or write a paper, I'd like people to look at it and hopefully use it. Without credentials, my work is likely to be lost in the sea of information.

However, as others pointed out and I agreed, getting a formal degree for the sake of visibility is too high a price. Focusing on the quality and quantity of my work and discussing it in relevant venues is far more effective.

Victoria
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Re: What surprised you the most once you retired?

Post by smitcat »

VictoriaF wrote: Fri Jul 24, 2020 7:18 am
protagonist wrote: Thu Jul 23, 2020 5:09 pm
VictoriaF wrote: Thu Jul 23, 2020 3:23 pm
While in retirement I am doing what I enjoy, I feel somewhat deficient in not having a doctorate.

That's interesting, Victoria. Why is that?
A doctorate would be pretty useless in retirement I would think.
You can study and learn anything you want, without responsibility or expense. You can have all the joys of being a student with none of the hassles.
To be clear, I'd like to have had a doctorate but I am not going to pursue it now.

It is true that I can learn anything I want, and I do. But, for me, producing something of value is as important as learning. When I develop a new concept or write a paper, I'd like people to look at it and hopefully use it. Without credentials, my work is likely to be lost in the sea of information.

However, as others pointed out and I agreed, getting a formal degree for the sake of visibility is too high a price. Focusing on the quality and quantity of my work and discussing it in relevant venues is far more effective.

Victoria
"It is true that I can learn anything I want, and I do. But, for me, producing something of value is as important as learning."
I agree , and I think actually getting the degree has less value than you might think. A couple of links that have more thoughts on the subject....

https://medium.economist.com/why-doing- ... 9206f9addb
https://www.online-phd-degrees.com/high ... l-degrees/
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Re: What surprised you the most once you retired?

Post by protagonist »

VictoriaF wrote: Fri Jul 24, 2020 7:18 am
protagonist wrote: Thu Jul 23, 2020 5:09 pm
VictoriaF wrote: Thu Jul 23, 2020 3:23 pm
While in retirement I am doing what I enjoy, I feel somewhat deficient in not having a doctorate.

That's interesting, Victoria. Why is that?
A doctorate would be pretty useless in retirement I would think.
You can study and learn anything you want, without responsibility or expense. You can have all the joys of being a student with none of the hassles.
To be clear, I'd like to have had a doctorate but I am not going to pursue it now.

It is true that I can learn anything I want, and I do. But, for me, producing something of value is as important as learning. When I develop a new concept or write a paper, I'd like people to look at it and hopefully use it. Without credentials, my work is likely to be lost in the sea of information.

However, as others pointed out and I agreed, getting a formal degree for the sake of visibility is too high a price. Focusing on the quality and quantity of my work and discussing it in relevant venues is far more effective.

Victoria
That all makes a lot of sense. I suppose if you were still publishing (and maybe you are), the degree would add credibility and make it easier to get published. But as you pointed out, it is also an extremely high price to pay (in both labor and money).
You shouldn't have any regrets.
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Re: What surprised you the most once you retired?

Post by VictoriaF »

smitcat wrote: Fri Jul 24, 2020 7:52 am "It is true that I can learn anything I want, and I do. But, for me, producing something of value is as important as learning."
I agree , and I think actually getting the degree has less value than you might think. A couple of links that have more thoughts on the subject....

https://medium.economist.com/why-doing- ... 9206f9addb
https://www.online-phd-degrees.com/high ... l-degrees/
Thank you for the links. While my motivation is not financial, it was interesting to see that the highest paying PhDs are in Information Assurance. The last part of my working career was in IA and my second MS degree is in Cybersecurity.

Victoria
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Re: What surprised you the most once you retired?

Post by smitcat »

VictoriaF wrote: Fri Jul 24, 2020 8:05 am
smitcat wrote: Fri Jul 24, 2020 7:52 am "It is true that I can learn anything I want, and I do. But, for me, producing something of value is as important as learning."
I agree , and I think actually getting the degree has less value than you might think. A couple of links that have more thoughts on the subject....

https://medium.economist.com/why-doing- ... 9206f9addb
https://www.online-phd-degrees.com/high ... l-degrees/
Thank you for the links. While my motivation is not financial, it was interesting to see that the highest paying PhDs are in Information Assurance. The last part of my working career was in IA and my second MS degree is in Cybersecurity.

Victoria
In the past I had worked with a number of PHD's, there was little correlation between the degree and the value they added in our specific team goals. Our patents and working products were typically advanced with work that was accomplished by a range of skills many of which were very new at the time. In any case my most rewarding times have been when teaching or mentoring younger folks that may or may not have been interested in the subject or barrier at hand - of course YMMV.
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Re: What surprised you the most once you retired?

Post by jcar »

Being over three years into my retirement I found surprising how easily I tuned out the details of the job. Also I found it surprising how little money is required to support myself month to month. U til the latest unpleasantness I was traveling the world extensively, bought a new car just because I wanted one, gifted the old perfectly nice car to a grandson and generally do whatever I like. Also with more time makes it easier to improve fitness. I suspect I'm in the best shape since my Marine Corps days. If you have the gift of good health then you have it easy.
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Re: What surprised you the most once you retired?

Post by LadyGeek »

The thread is getting derailed on VictoriaF's future career path. Please start a new thread in this forum (how you spend your money and your time).

If requested, I can also split the discussion here into a new thread.
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Re: What surprised you the most once you retired?

Post by DSBH »

That time goes by so fast, much faster than when I was still working.
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Re: What surprised you the most once you retired?

Post by ruralavalon »

GFD45 wrote: Wed Jul 22, 2020 1:04 pm
Mel Lindauer wrote: Sat Jul 18, 2020 5:20 pm I saw a saying recently that I thought was cute and appropriate for this thread:
The trouble with retirement is that you never get a day off.
I like this one too.

One companion says to the other "Honey what are you going to do today?" "Oh nothing." "You did that yesterday." "I know, I wasn't finished."
That's my goal in life, that I will never finish wasting my time.
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Re: What surprised you the most once you retired?

Post by LadyGeek »

I would agree that time seems to move faster now. It took a while, but I just realized that I no longer have to fill my brain with work stuff. Not only the technical areas, but compliance training, performance reviews, how to fill out my time card, dealing with coworkers, and peer reviews.

I can now fill my brain with things that matter - hobbies (I have a lot...), working out, what to make for dinner, shopping, talking with friends, this forum, finances and investing, taking a vacation, listening to music, watching TV (Netflix, movies, sports - baseball is back :happy ).

Any day, any time. Life is good.
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Re: What surprised you the most once you retired?

Post by flyingaway »

jcar wrote: Fri Jul 24, 2020 8:41 am Being over three years into my retirement I found surprising how easily I tuned out the details of the job. Also I found it surprising how little money is required to support myself month to month. U til the latest unpleasantness I was traveling the world extensively, bought a new car just because I wanted one, gifted the old perfectly nice car to a grandson and generally do whatever I like. Also with more time makes it easier to improve fitness. I suspect I'm in the best shape since my Marine Corps days. If you have the gift of good health then you have it easy.
I agree that how little money is required to support a person month by month. I just don't know that how much money is required to travel the world extensively and buy a new car. It is the "how much part" that keeps me from retiring.
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Re: What surprised you the most once you retired?

Post by ByThePond »

That we no longer have to get ready for the future. It's here and now.
The pressures of saving and preparing are all behind us, and we should be doing whatever we wanted all along, to whatever degree we want now. It's a stark realization that I no longer have to save leftover nails and screws or scraps of wood against some vague future use, as I'll never outlive the stuff I've already saved. That's quite a reversal of mindset. Thankfully, the same applies to finances (I hope).
Now, if we could just travel and associate freely again...
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Re: What surprised you the most once you retired?

Post by Bobby206 »

heyyou wrote: Thu Jul 16, 2020 3:28 pm Most surprising was my wife saying that I became a nicer person, than when I was working (at mega-corp).

....
I can relate. Not retired quite yet but have taken significant weight off my shoulders by completely modifying my work schedule and work responsibilities slowly over the last 5 years. I feel so much more relaxed just easing off the gas pedal of life that I think (as far as I know) that I am a nicer person. I feel a heckuv a lot more laid back anyway! :)
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Re: What surprised you the most once you retired?

Post by MathIsMyWayr »

JS-Elcano wrote: Thu Jul 23, 2020 5:21 pm
HomerJ wrote: Wed Jul 22, 2020 11:54 pm Professors probably have the greatest job in the world.

I doubt very many of the rest of us enjoy 85% of our jobs.

I woke up last night worried about backups... I laid awake for a good 30-45 minutes worrying about that until I forced myself to stop thinking about it.

I worked on that today to make sure I could sleep better tonight.

It would be nice not to wake up in the middle of the night worried about work (or called because of a problem).
It depends on what kind of professor you are. If you are doing scientific research in addition to your teaching (STEM fields) it is high stress and high pressure (mostly about funding, publishing) and lying awake at night is not uncommon. Many graduate students and postdocs who witness this environment choose to not enter it and go into industry, undergrad teaching, scientific writing, etc, instead of pursuing an academic career.
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Re: What surprised you the most once you retired?

Post by snowox »

I retired 5 years ago at 50 and am surprised at how much more I work now but for myself and around the house then I use to.

How much more sore I get after doing such things

How much harder it is to keep my weight! in fact I exercise regularly but have put 20lbs on during the Pandemic mostly

Thought my sleeping pattern would change but still get up 4ish on average

Live on a lake with a great sense of community and alot of fun but cant keep up with them!

The retirement financial plan actually works!

The ability to fall asleep in my chair multiple times a day! much needed breaks
Barkingsparrow
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Re: What surprised you the most once you retired?

Post by Barkingsparrow »

Bobby206 wrote: Fri Jul 24, 2020 3:08 pm I can relate. Not retired quite yet but have taken significant weight off my shoulders by completely modifying my work schedule and work responsibilities slowly over the last 5 years. I feel so much more relaxed just easing off the gas pedal of life that I think (as far as I know) that I am a nicer person. I feel a heckuv a lot more laid back anyway! :)
I've tried this same route - moved out of a team lead position for software that accounted for 50% of business revenue and into an admin position for a different software product that for a while, allowed a much slower pace and lesser hours; and life was good! However, the software that I shifted into has exploded in terms of contributions to business revenue and now I'm finding myself sliding back into the rabbit hole. I'll just grit my teeth and stick it out until I can retire within 1 to 3 years.
mtmingus
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Re: What surprised you the most once you retired?

Post by mtmingus »

minesweep wrote: Sun Jul 19, 2020 8:52 pm
flyingaway wrote: Sun Jul 19, 2020 10:55 am Can we hear some "negative" surprises in retirement?
Time seems to go faster in retirement (I thought it would be the opposite). Retired 19 1/2 years ago.
Interestingly, WFH full-time now, this seems to be true too.
finite_difference
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Re: What surprised you the most once you retired?

Post by finite_difference »

LadyGeek wrote: Fri Jul 24, 2020 10:45 am I would agree that time seems to move faster now. It took a while, but I just realized that I no longer have to fill my brain with work stuff. Not only the technical areas, but compliance training, performance reviews, how to fill out my time card, dealing with coworkers, and peer reviews.

I can now fill my brain with things that matter - hobbies (I have a lot...), working out, what to make for dinner, shopping, talking with friends, this forum, finances and investing, taking a vacation, listening to music, watching TV (Netflix, movies, sports - baseball is back :happy ).

Any day, any time. Life is good.
I feel like the older I get, the faster time goes.

This effect may be exacerbated by The Internet, which ensures that I can never be bored at a cost of perhaps increasing distraction.

When I was a child, I remember vividly experiencing boredom, waiting for class to be over for what seemed like an Eternity. I haven’t felt that way for a long time.
The most precious gift we can offer anyone is our attention. - Thich Nhat Hanh
finite_difference
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Re: What surprised you the most once you retired?

Post by finite_difference »

MathIsMyWayr wrote: Sat Jul 25, 2020 3:48 am
JS-Elcano wrote: Thu Jul 23, 2020 5:21 pm
HomerJ wrote: Wed Jul 22, 2020 11:54 pm Professors probably have the greatest job in the world.

I doubt very many of the rest of us enjoy 85% of our jobs.

I woke up last night worried about backups... I laid awake for a good 30-45 minutes worrying about that until I forced myself to stop thinking about it.

I worked on that today to make sure I could sleep better tonight.

It would be nice not to wake up in the middle of the night worried about work (or called because of a problem).
It depends on what kind of professor you are. If you are doing scientific research in addition to your teaching (STEM fields) it is high stress and high pressure (mostly about funding, publishing) and lying awake at night is not uncommon. Many graduate students and postdocs who witness this environment choose to not enter it and go into industry, undergrad teaching, scientific writing, etc, instead of pursuing an academic career.
SOUR Grapes
There’s a spectrum, from JS-Elcano’s high stress and pressure to those that think the system is working perfectly fine.

I would say that most STEM professors tend to be smart workaholics. But I think luck plays a major role, and survivorship bias is easy to forget about, especially if you have always worked hard and have undoubtedly earned your keep.

But that might be off-topic since those workaholic STEM professors never retire ;) Their work is their hobby.
The most precious gift we can offer anyone is our attention. - Thich Nhat Hanh
MathIsMyWayr
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Re: What surprised you the most once you retired?

Post by MathIsMyWayr »

finite_difference wrote: Sat Jul 25, 2020 11:08 am
MathIsMyWayr wrote: Sat Jul 25, 2020 3:48 am
JS-Elcano wrote: Thu Jul 23, 2020 5:21 pm
HomerJ wrote: Wed Jul 22, 2020 11:54 pm Professors probably have the greatest job in the world.

I doubt very many of the rest of us enjoy 85% of our jobs.

I woke up last night worried about backups... I laid awake for a good 30-45 minutes worrying about that until I forced myself to stop thinking about it.

I worked on that today to make sure I could sleep better tonight.

It would be nice not to wake up in the middle of the night worried about work (or called because of a problem).
It depends on what kind of professor you are. If you are doing scientific research in addition to your teaching (STEM fields) it is high stress and high pressure (mostly about funding, publishing) and lying awake at night is not uncommon. Many graduate students and postdocs who witness this environment choose to not enter it and go into industry, undergrad teaching, scientific writing, etc, instead of pursuing an academic career.
SOUR Grapes
There’s a spectrum, from JS-Elcano’s high stress and pressure to those that think the system is working perfectly fine.

I would say that most STEM professors tend to be smart workaholics. But I think luck plays a major role, and survivorship bias is easy to forget about, especially if you have always worked hard and have undoubtedly earned your keep.

But that might be off-topic since those workaholic STEM professors never retire ;) Their work is their hobby.
College professors are not high school teachers. Research is a large part of their work regardless of their fields. Even we in industry feel pressure to publish unless those of us who are happy to remain so and so.
MJS
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Re: What surprised you the most once you retired?

Post by MJS »

finite_difference wrote: Sat Jul 25, 2020 10:58 am I feel like the older I get, the faster time goes.
When you were 10, 1 year was 10% of your lifetime.
When you are 75, 1 year is a 1.34% of your lifetime.

Relatively speaking, the years are getting shorter!

For instance, an 8 year old's summer is relatively longer than a 50 year old's entire year: 3% to 2% of one's lifetime.
NJdad6
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Re: What surprised you the most once you retired?

Post by NJdad6 »

TheTimeLord wrote: Tue Jul 21, 2020 10:59 am
Keenobserver wrote: Tue Jul 21, 2020 10:47 am
TheTimeLord wrote: Mon Jul 20, 2020 8:00 pm
flyingaway wrote: Sun Jul 19, 2020 10:55 am Can we hear some "negative" surprises in retirement?
Positive and negative are in the eye of the beholder.
What about a diagnosis of pancretic cancer?
Point taken, I was more referring to the implication all the previous posts had been positive. In other words what some people see as a great way to spend their retirement might be what other people fear their retirement becoming.
I don’t think a serious illness is related to retirement. Those things happen whether you are working or not. I get the concept that people see their environments differently. Some may love the lack of structure while it may drive others crazy. I am still about 6 years away (that is the plan at least). I will be late 50’s. I do sometimes think about how I will get the most out of the early years of my retirement. Hopefully we will still be healthy and can enjoy the time.
MathIsMyWayr
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Re: What surprised you the most once you retired?

Post by MathIsMyWayr »

MJS wrote: Sat Jul 25, 2020 3:38 pm
finite_difference wrote: Sat Jul 25, 2020 10:58 am I feel like the older I get, the faster time goes.
When you were 10, 1 year was 10% of your lifetime.
When you are 75, 1 year is a 1.34% of your lifetime.

Relatively speaking, the years are getting shorter!

For instance, an 8 year old's summer is relatively longer than a 50 year old's entire year: 3% to 2% of one's lifetime.
As we get older, our daily experiences become less meaningful and become routine. If you just waste a freshman year, it may have a big impact on your life. Same thing during 50s, so what?
JS-Elcano
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Re: What surprised you the most once you retired?

Post by JS-Elcano »

MathIsMyWayr wrote: Sat Jul 25, 2020 2:10 pm
finite_difference wrote: Sat Jul 25, 2020 11:08 am
MathIsMyWayr wrote: Sat Jul 25, 2020 3:48 am
JS-Elcano wrote: Thu Jul 23, 2020 5:21 pm
HomerJ wrote: Wed Jul 22, 2020 11:54 pm Professors probably have the greatest job in the world.

I doubt very many of the rest of us enjoy 85% of our jobs.

I woke up last night worried about backups... I laid awake for a good 30-45 minutes worrying about that until I forced myself to stop thinking about it.

I worked on that today to make sure I could sleep better tonight.

It would be nice not to wake up in the middle of the night worried about work (or called because of a problem).
It depends on what kind of professor you are. If you are doing scientific research in addition to your teaching (STEM fields) it is high stress and high pressure (mostly about funding, publishing) and lying awake at night is not uncommon. Many graduate students and postdocs who witness this environment choose to not enter it and go into industry, undergrad teaching, scientific writing, etc, instead of pursuing an academic career.
SOUR Grapes
There’s a spectrum, from JS-Elcano’s high stress and pressure to those that think the system is working perfectly fine.

I would say that most STEM professors tend to be smart workaholics. But I think luck plays a major role, and survivorship bias is easy to forget about, especially if you have always worked hard and have undoubtedly earned your keep.

But that might be off-topic since those workaholic STEM professors never retire ;) Their work is their hobby.
College professors are not high school teachers. Research is a large part of their work regardless of their fields. Even we in industry feel pressure to publish unless those of us who are happy to remain so and so.
I know. My post above was simply meant to dispell the (still) common misconception that university/college professors have these cushy jobs where they discuss topics of their interest with colleagues all day long and once in a while step into a classroom to teach some undergrads (who, to make it all even easier, are ususally very bright and extremely eager to learn and discuss). That's how the profession is often portrayed in popular culture, but it is not how universities work anymore (if they ever did).
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VictoriaF
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Re: What surprised you the most once you retired?

Post by VictoriaF »

MathIsMyWayr wrote: Sat Jul 25, 2020 4:31 pm
MJS wrote: Sat Jul 25, 2020 3:38 pm
finite_difference wrote: Sat Jul 25, 2020 10:58 am I feel like the older I get, the faster time goes.
When you were 10, 1 year was 10% of your lifetime.
When you are 75, 1 year is a 1.34% of your lifetime.

Relatively speaking, the years are getting shorter!

For instance, an 8 year old's summer is relatively longer than a 50 year old's entire year: 3% to 2% of one's lifetime.
As we get older, our daily experiences become less meaningful and become routine. If you just waste a freshman year, it may have a big impact on your life. Same thing during 50s, so what?
My response to "so what?" is that a meaningful life is more fulfilling. Retirees who understand what makes their daily experiences more meaningful and less routine have a more fulfilling retirement.

Victoria
WINNER of the 2015 Boglehead Contest. | Every joke has a bit of a joke. ... The rest is the truth. (Marat F)
Vihoo
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Re: What surprised you the most once you retired?

Post by Vihoo »

Interesting thread. The early retiree (~45) lifestyle is so different than those retiring at (65+). All those additional years must take a toll.
MathIsMyWayr
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Re: What surprised you the most once you retired?

Post by MathIsMyWayr »

Vihoo wrote: Sun Jul 26, 2020 2:55 pm Interesting thread. The early retiree (~45) lifestyle is so different than those retiring at (65+). All those additional years must take a toll.
A toll on the additional retirement years or on the additional working years? Does the answer depend on individuals?
MathIsMyWayr
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Re: What surprised you the most once you retired?

Post by MathIsMyWayr »

VictoriaF wrote: Sun Jul 26, 2020 9:18 am
MathIsMyWayr wrote: Sat Jul 25, 2020 4:31 pm
MJS wrote: Sat Jul 25, 2020 3:38 pm
finite_difference wrote: Sat Jul 25, 2020 10:58 am I feel like the older I get, the faster time goes.
When you were 10, 1 year was 10% of your lifetime.
When you are 75, 1 year is a 1.34% of your lifetime.

Relatively speaking, the years are getting shorter!

For instance, an 8 year old's summer is relatively longer than a 50 year old's entire year: 3% to 2% of one's lifetime.
As we get older, our daily experiences become less meaningful and become routine. If you just waste a freshman year, it may have a big impact on your life. Same thing during 50s, so what?
My response to "so what?" is that a meaningful life is more fulfilling. Retirees who understand what makes their daily experiences more meaningful and less routine have a more fulfilling retirement.

Victoria
^
This is a definition, a petitio principii. It does not say how.
hoops777
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Re: What surprised you the most once you retired?

Post by hoops777 »

I owned a small business. It was a very odd feeling seeing so many “business “ friendships literally end over night. 23 years of long term customers go poof! Never talk to 98 pct of them again.
Also just the feeling of loss on many levels combined with a sense of freedom. Strange time for sure.
K.I.S.S........so easy to say so difficult to do.
Cruise
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Re: What surprised you the most once you retired?

Post by Cruise »

hoops777 wrote: Sun Jul 26, 2020 3:49 pm I owned a small business. It was a very odd feeling seeing so many “business “ friendships literally end over night. 23 years of long term customers go poof! Never talk to 98 pct of them again.
Also just the feeling of loss on many levels combined with a sense of freedom. Strange time for sure.
I feel (felt) your pain. My small business was all about relationships. Sold the business and most of those relationships are not active. Fortunately, a few are!
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