Who has painted their own house?

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28fe6
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Who has painted their own house?

Post by 28fe6 »

I figure that with a brush and ladder, perhaps with strategic rental of scaffolding or lift basket, that I could paint my 2 story house myself in a summer of weekends. I would use brushes or rollers rather than any spraying equipment which would have setup and cleanup. Has anyone done it? Did you keep track of how much it cost or how long it took?
egrets
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Re: Who has painted their own house?

Post by egrets »

When I was a lot younger, I painted my house several times. It was a one story house with an attic about as high as an additional story. I had a very long aluminum extendable ladder. I don't recall what the professional painters who did it the first time charged, but I did it much more cheaply and did a better job. The major flaw in their work was not adequately painting the rounded bottoms of the clapboards everywhere, so while it generally looked okay, at an angle you could see the old paint color in some areas.

The only time I had the heebee jeebees was when I really had to reach to the side like painting the area over the small roof over an entry way, or twist to paint the underside of eaves. I did it in bits and pieces, maybe half a side of the house a time. I did the sections horizontally and was careful to mix cans of paint to not get a color discontinuity.

Of course, you could fall and kill yourself, so I'm not advocating this.
runner3081
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Re: Who has painted their own house?

Post by runner3081 »

7-years ago, I found a job in a new city, needed to dump the old house fast and cheaply. We painted it.

Bought a sprayer at Harbor Freight with a coupon, had a couple of ladders and knocked it out. Took about 2.5 days, including extensive prep work (scraping, taping windows, etc).

It was a cheap way to go about it and I sold the sprayer on Craiglist for roughly what I paid for it when done.

Caveat... this was a single store 1300sq foot house.

I would not paint my current 2-story house. It was about 2K the last time we had it done (5 years ago). Not worth the risk of falling.
WardnerMan
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Re: Who has painted their own house?

Post by WardnerMan »

I have painted my houses several times with nothing more than a paint brush. I painted most of my house in the greater Seattle area 3 years ago and then painted the house I moved into in SW Washington. The next year I used a roller and brush to paint my vacation house. Unfortunately, the latter paint job hurt my shoulder after borrowing the heaviest ladder I’ve ever used. If you are working, you can paint a 3000 to 4000 sq ft house in 2 to 3 months during the summer, otherwise plan on 5 weeks. Material costs are nothing compared the effort required. For a 4000 sq ft house plan on about 6 or more gallons. Good paint costs on the order of $80 per gallon. Being up 2 stories on a ladder is risky. Make sure the ladder won’t move before climbing up too high. I’m in my latter 60s.
onourway
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Re: Who has painted their own house?

Post by onourway »

Depending on the siding materials and their condition, it’s often the prep that’s the time consuming, difficult work, rather than putting the paint on. The couple times we’ve had our home with wood siding painted, I’d estimate the prep was 80% of the job.

Proper prep work will determine whether the paint lasts 1 year, 3 years, or 10+.
Jack FFR1846
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Re: Who has painted their own house?

Post by Jack FFR1846 »

Spraying is at least 10 times faster. As an experiment, I watched pro painters set up and paint my house. I have a 24 x 36 detached garage that I did not include. Seeing how they painted......using a board to block the areas to not paint like foundation and window trim, it was very fast to spray. After they finished the house, I took my roll around tank compressor, a primer gun and plenty of air hose, diluted the paint to the max and started spraying the garage after lunch. Before dinner time, I had sprayed the entire garage with 2 coats! So about 4 hours.

When we originally built the garage, I primed all the exterior panels before they were built onto the exterior. We spent the summer using brushes to paint it. With help from my wife and both in laws, it took us the entire summer to complete it.

So there's the time difference.
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Chuck107
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Re: Who has painted their own house?

Post by Chuck107 »

.....
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Nowizard
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Re: Who has painted their own house?

Post by Nowizard »

I have.....Once. Being older, I would not do it now but stopped when younger after a conversation with an Orthopedic surgeon acquaintance who said that he "Paid for my boat" with week-end surgeries on people falling off ladders.

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TxAg
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Re: Who has painted their own house?

Post by TxAg »

I just painted the interior of our two car garage. Walls and ceiling. Man, I hate painting. I'm fairly handy, but I vowed to hire out all future painting projects
carolinaman
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Re: Who has painted their own house?

Post by carolinaman »

I have always painted my 2000 sqft brick ranch. The gables was equal to 2nd story and are masonite, so they need to be painted. Otherwise, it is a lot of trim, eaves, windows and doors. I always used ladder until last time when my son insisted I used scaffolding for gables which worked great and was much safer. At 75, I will probably contract out the next paint job. No way i would have painted a 2 story house, even when I was much younger. It is too dangerous. DIY is admirable but so is risk avoidance.
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28fe6
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Re: Who has painted their own house?

Post by 28fe6 »

Instead of pressure washing, somebody told me it's better to wash the house with a scrub brush on a pole. This would further reduce the need for tools and setup.

With some types of painting, you have to maintain a "wet edge". When brush painting a house, is it required or is it ok to paint half a wall one day and the other half another day?

In my old neighborhood, the lady that cleaned our house lived in the same neighborhood, and bragged about how she painted her own house and saved thousands of dollars. Obviously she was a very motivated lady, and the paint job looked nice enough.
squirm
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Re: Who has painted their own house?

Post by squirm »

I did, not a big deal. I have a sprayer.
quantAndHold
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Re: Who has painted their own house?

Post by quantAndHold »

I know two different people who fell off of ladders painting their houses. One is dead. The other spent time in the hospital with a head injury.

Personally, I would hire someone who climbs ladders for a living rather than do it myself.
Yes, I’m really that pedantic.
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Voltaire2.0
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Re: Who has painted their own house?

Post by Voltaire2.0 »

quantAndHold wrote: Fri Jul 10, 2020 10:09 am I know two different people who fell off of ladders painting their houses. One is dead. The other spent time in the hospital with a head injury.

Personally, I would hire someone who climbs ladders for a living rather than do it myself.
I knew someone who did this- fell and fractured his skull. He survived and taught me not to paint anything I can't reach with a step ladder.
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ClevrChico
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Re: Who has painted their own house?

Post by ClevrChico »

I have a one story and do most of it myself. With proper prep and two coats brushed on with good paint, I seem to get 15 years before another repaint.

I hate heights and do have hard to reach areas due to the grade of the land, so I hire that part out to the pros. Two pro painters with materials can finish those areas in a day for around $800, saving me days of work, and my HSA. :-)
Last edited by ClevrChico on Fri Jul 10, 2020 10:34 am, edited 1 time in total.
crefwatch
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Re: Who has painted their own house?

Post by crefwatch »

It is not scare tactics to say that ladders are close to the most dangerous homeowner tool. It's a fact. Although I have lots of on-the-job ladder experience, it is still dangerous. You also have wasp nests and power service entrance wires to figure into the mix. Because my house was built in 1955, I wore a listed respirator when sanding or heat-stripping the wood siding. And the mildew preventer is very toxic until it is mixed into the paint. Even though our 2-story house is part-brickface, it was a long, tough slog.

I believe that a brush job is better. I guess our current professional has heard that, because his policy is "spray application, brush finish." I vote for a pro. It's just not worth the savings. Maybe, if you're able bodied and have absolutely nothing else to do, including take-home work.
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ohboy!
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Re: Who has painted their own house?

Post by ohboy! »

I was considering it but got an estimate for $1500 for a 1100sqft house plus 1 car garage. Doesn't seem worth it to do myself for that price. That includes stucco patching which is the part that really intimated me. Now I just need to get tired of looking at the faded paint enough to pony up the $1500. Place looks fine from the front but the back is south facing so the back looks horrible. But hey, it's a pandemic so nobody is coming over anyways.
notBobToo
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Re: Who has painted their own house?

Post by notBobToo »

Maybe 20 years ago I roll/brush painted my two story (quad level) house. I rented a bucket, which was well worth the cost. (Although I think it was amusing to others in the cul-de-sac, including one neighbor who would anchor and tie a rope around his waist when he painted the upper reaches of his house.) I thought that the bucket along with several ladders, quality brushes, rollers and other items resulted in a safe job and a very good result.

Edited to add: If I remember correctly, probably cost close to $2,000, with the bucket rental. Also replaced several siding panels. And caulk, primer, paint (two coats), etc. Two - three days of prep work, including two cleanings with TSP solution. Day of rest; first coat; day of rest; second coat. And finally, a day of trim work. Felt good; an accomplishment, but I never did it again.
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Re: Who has painted their own house?

Post by Vanguard Fan 1367 »

28fe6 wrote: Thu Jul 09, 2020 10:23 pm I figure that with a brush and ladder, perhaps with strategic rental of scaffolding or lift basket, that I could paint my 2 story house myself in a summer of weekends. I would use brushes or rollers rather than any spraying equipment which would have setup and cleanup. Has anyone done it? Did you keep track of how much it cost or how long it took?
I have painted my one story house. I didn't keep track of what it cost or how long it took. With a job like that if you have patience and keep at it you will get it done.

I like my Dad's advice that the labor is the most expensive part of the paint job so get the best paint possible. Don't try to cut corners with the paint cost.
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Sandtrap
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Re: Who has painted their own house?

Post by Sandtrap »

28fe6 wrote: Thu Jul 09, 2020 10:23 pm I figure that with a brush and ladder, perhaps with strategic rental of scaffolding or lift basket, that I could paint my 2 story house myself in a summer of weekends. I would use brushes or rollers rather than any spraying equipment which would have setup and cleanup. Has anyone done it? Did you keep track of how much it cost or how long it took?
Own construction company. G.C.
Have painted own home, buildings, etc. With crew and solo. (professionally, day in and out).
Spray, roll and flair, scaffolds, ladders up to 35 feet, etc.
Oil base, latex, special paints, wood, cement, etc.

Notes for OP:
Safety First!
House painting looks easy.
Heights are not high until you’re the one on the ladder.

On spraying.
If you spray, know how to spray or it will be horrible, and overspray will travel all the way to the neighbor's new black Corvette sitting in the driveway and you will have a very bad day.
Spraying seems faster but consider the time for masking and clean up. Again, if you don't know how to spray, don't mess your house up. And, watch out for friendly friend Harry or Uncle Joe who says they know to spray.
Many spray too heavy then runs and sags or too thin then holidays and overlaps show. Spray evenly then wait for tack up and spray again. Penetrol if needed.

Quality rollers, naps, and brushes, + high skill = great results.
Quality paint prepped properly, stirred, penetrol additive as needed to reduce dry time or increase flow, etc.

You are a DIY with no rigging. So, Roller and brush flair is more controllable. Cut as you go as well. Do by sections that are obviously delineanated with trim boards, corners, etc, so where you stop/start won't show. Be consistent in your technique. Start with no visible no key areas lst so you can learn.

Use a variety of long extension poles and a roller with the right naps. Usually thicker nap than what you think is better. Use the best quality naps you can afford. Dust them off so there's no lint in the finished paint surface. Throw them away when they are worn. Consider them disposable even though they can get pricey.

Use high quality nylok brushes. Wash them very well. Take care of them. Use them properly.

Don't depend on painters masking tape to cut good lines. Learn how to cut well, as well.

Spend a lot of time and effort on great prep. Caulking. Patching, power wash, spot priming, Etc. The final job is only as good as the prep.
Don't use cheap caulking and patching materials.

Save all your high stuff, then rent scaffolds as you need and get some help. Get more rigging so you don't have to paint and move rigging constantly.

Do not use extension ladders, planks, and ladder jacks, since you are inexperienced. You will fall. Falling doesn’t hurt. It’s the sudden stop that’s bad.

Dress safety and appropriately. When going on ladders and up high, wear good shoes. Cover up well if you will be spraying, (but you should not be spraying unless you are experienced with that). Accidents can and will happen. You might step in a bucket of paint, or step off the ladder before reaching the last step, or drop your brush in the dirt from 25 feet up, or forget to have a rag in your pocket at all times when paint drips on your face.

*(example: I have a professional compact Graco spray system with all the toys, for personal use, and still end up not using it 99% of the time).

It will take a zillion times longer than you think on a 2 story house, and a zillion times more effort and hassle, and expense.

If you are doing it only to save money, think more about it.
If you are doing it yourself to save money and have fun and learn, then great.
If you have non painter friends "help", then expect that level of result and mess up.
Get a bunch of painting estimates from various contractors. See how that goes.

Go to the supply houses besides the "box stores" and talk with the reps about paint and what you want in color, type of finish, how long to last, etc. High quality paint is very expensive nowadays but very very worth it. High quality paint is easy to work with and covers well. Cheap paint is horrible to paint with, does not cover well, and does not last very long.

Safety first. A 2 story house gable and eaves are up to or more than 25 feet above the ground. Falling from 1 story home projects results in injury and sometimes is fatal. From 2 stories is permanently damaging and often fatal.

Trades work of most kinds is really tough on a body. You can have permanent back pain and problems from things like this. Avoid back pain. Avoid having to get a handicap license plate. Unless you are young and buff and "gung ho", consider looking at some painting contractor estimates.

End of random notes.

If you can afford it, use a professional. Your home value will be great with a great professional paint job.

My thoughts and input would be a bit different if your home was 1 level and simple.
j :happy

Real life example:
My home is 3 stories high and a bit large.
Recent painting estimates ran from 8-12k to paint. Home is 90% stucco.
Highest bid for repainting and complete Synergy System color coat and base synthetic stucco was about $35k from the best company I could find.
Cost to do it myself as just prep and paint would have been around 4-5k max.
I went with the 35k and my home looks brand new and DW is happy.
Last edited by Sandtrap on Fri Jul 10, 2020 3:58 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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nordsteve
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Re: Who has painted their own house?

Post by nordsteve »

I've done this. Key (as mentioned above) is prep and buying high quality materials. If you're paying $23/gallon on sale you won't like the result. I use Benjamin Moore from the local paint dealer. A benefit of the paint dealer (vs HD / Lowes) is you can call on the phone to get your order prepped, and pop in on Friday after work to pick it up.

If you have wooden sills, nearly all of the time will be on prep -- filling checking, caulking, high quality oil based primer.

This spring I spent ~$3500 on a trim/soffit/fascia painting project on my house (brick siding). It was done right, probably 75-100 hours of work. Talking to my guy he was booked through the remainder of 2020.
Carl53
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Re: Who has painted their own house?

Post by Carl53 »

Painted my one story ranch (about 1750 sqft wall space) this spring. A few hours a day, perhaps ten painting days with a brush. Small garage roof offset of probably 2 foot by 20 foot got left to last as I have to get on low sloped roof. One coat of paint, same color as I've used perhaps 3 times before over the last 30 years. Might have been the first time I've done the whole house in a single season. I had to replace 10 sheets of T111 (2 coats on this). Years ago, would have replaced the siding pieces myself. $500 for a carpenter to do it -lots of cuts around windows and garage door- with my help plus $500 for the siding well spent.
Bobby206
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Re: Who has painted their own house?

Post by Bobby206 »

Two things:
1) I don't like doing house work;
and
2) the key to exterior painting is the prep work. There actually is some knowledge/skill involved that the average person doesn't possess. It's not just slapping some paint on a wall like you might inside your house. To properly prep a house for painting takes extensive time.

Ok, and I guess #3), since someone will say how you can watch youtube videos to learn the skills, my time is way more valuable than to learn a new skill that I don't want to be skilled at in the first place.
phxjcc
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Re: Who has painted their own house?

Post by phxjcc »

Please believe Mr. SANDTRAP.

Spraying is faster than rolling which is faster than brushing.

But, the prep is still the same regardless of the application technique...
...and then you have to thin the paint with Flotrol and strain it twice
...and when you are done for the day you have to clean the sprayer, and tips, and intake, and ...
...all the while NOT tracking paint from the sprayer across your deck, driveway and garage.

IOW, the painting part of a painting job is about 20% of the work.

Hire it done. :mrgreen:
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28fe6
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Re: Who has painted their own house?

Post by 28fe6 »

I just got a quote for $6500 for replacing 72 feet of fascia, power wash, caulk, prep and paint with Sherwin Williams Super paint.
MathWizard
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Re: Who has painted their own house?

Post by MathWizard »

I've painted my house 3 times, twice with a brush, the last time with a Wagner power roller.
The power roller was excellent at covering a large area, but there was a lot of time spend with a brush
in the crevices and around windows.

With a sprayer, you will spend a lot of time taping and covering windows. Wind is a no-no when spraying,
you could end up getting paint on the neighbor's house or on cars. Correcting that would be expensive.
The expensive sprayers that professionals use would work well, but the cheap electric model that I bought
required the paint to be watered down quite a bit, or it would not spray, leading to not as much paint
being put in the house. Maybe several coats of spray would work, but my power roller would do it in one
coat.

We used ladders. If I did it again, I'd probably get a large Little Giant or use scaffolding.
I have used ladder jacks, but prefer two step ladders with a very heavy (perhaps metal)
plank between them as a platform. Scaffolding is a pain to move around, but is the safest
option short of paying to have it done.
Cycle
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Re: Who has painted their own house?

Post by Cycle »

I just painted the windows on the 2nd story of a rental i'm getting rid of. I'd recommend having a sturdy ladder and stabalizer arms if you're doing anything high up. I've used them before, but didn't have them last night and definitely felt the height a bit more without those stabalizer arms..

In the past though, i hired out the rotten wood replacement for ~1200, then had a separate person do the painting for $~2500. It was an all week job and there are 42 windows on that property. The stucco didn't get painted. If i did it myself, i'd probably still be painting.
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egrets
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Re: Who has painted their own house?

Post by egrets »

28fe6 wrote: Fri Jul 10, 2020 8:06 am With some types of painting, you have to maintain a "wet edge". When brush painting a house, is it required or is it ok to paint half a wall one day and the other half another day?
I never heard of that. As I noted in a previous post, I painted about half a side horizontally and mixed cans of paint so as to avoid a color discontinuity. Also, my house had clapboard, so I would end at the top or bottom of a clapboard. I was using latex paint, other types may be different.
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Sandtrap
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Re: Who has painted their own house?

Post by Sandtrap »

28fe6 wrote: Fri Jul 10, 2020 8:06 am Instead of pressure washing, somebody told me it's better to wash the house with a scrub brush on a pole. This would further reduce the need for tools and setup.

With some types of painting, you have to maintain a "wet edge". When brush painting a house, is it required or is it ok to paint half a wall one day and the other half another day?

In my old neighborhood, the lady that cleaned our house lived in the same neighborhood, and bragged about how she painted her own house and saved thousands of dollars. Obviously she was a very motivated lady, and the paint job looked nice enough.
Notes:

Roll and flair is the fastest for a brush finish.
Roller in your left hand and brush in right sometimes. Use the roller to get the paint evenly on the wall then brush into the “wet” and flair to get the brush finish.
Don’t touch the paint if it starts to tack up or there will be texture changes. So yes. Wet on wet. Don’t rush and don’t go too slow. A pro painter can paint very fast with this technique.
As the days go by you will get in shape and your forearms will look like “Popeye”.

Paint by logical areas of design all at once. Walls, returns, eaves, fascia, soffits, etc. start from highest first so you don’t drip on new work.
If you do a wall do the whole wall.

Paint opposite the sun and wind. Don’t paint a hot wall. And don’t paint when it is windy because the paint will tack too fast. Add an additive for a smooth easy finish and to slow dry times and give you more time to work.

Put on a good coat. Don’t “dry roll” to save paint.
Use a higher/longer nap roller cover that holds more paint and applies faster. It may drip more so cover below. Your texture is a brush flair which is very nice so roller nap texture is meaningless.

Buy short medium and long roller extension poles. If aluminum watch out for power lines.

Use an empty 5 gallon bucket filled 1/3 with a roller screen hanging on the inside and a 12 inch roller and nap for large areas. Use a high quality roller frame that does not bend.

Use a 2-1/2 gallon bucket and smaller roller screen and a 8 inch roller for small places or high up such as eaves soffits fascia gables etc.
For tiny places with tight cuts use the mini rollers and smaller naps. Whizz or Whistler. This will save on hand cutting.

Do not use a scrub brush and a pole or you will have a mess. Use a gas powered pressure washer with extensions and you will reach the eaves on a 2 story home. Careful not to peel paint or damage things. Go easy. Start from the eaves and work your way down. Keep moving. Don’t stop or hesitate or you will dig holes or peel paint and make more work.

You can hire someone to pressure was your house that is experienced and may not cost much and save on time and hassle.

As long as you are painting every day, you can multi bag your rollers with naps on them. Use a plastic grocery bag and put the roller in n press all the air out so the nap n wet paint is against the plastic, wind it tight. Use 3 bag layers per roller.

If different colors and paints, pull off a wet nap and store it in the plastic bags wrapped tight. Don’t wash it. Use a different nap for each color or paint. Then you only have to wash the roller frame. If storing unused for longer than 2 days, put the naps in the frig wrapped tight in the grocery bag and then in a large zip lock bag. It will keep well.

Wash the expensive nyloc brushes. Use 3” straight “Purdue nylon” brushes for everything. Bigger is tough to handle and doesn’t fit in paint cans. Smaller is only for thin trim work like interiors.
It is hard to get great results with cheap stiff brushes. disposable brushes drop hairs on the work.
Wash your brush in a bucket with warm water and dishwashing soap. Dawn works well and smells nice. Be sure there is no paint left in the ferrule or the brush will die a slow death. Make it look new with nice straight hairs at the end of every day.

Great brushes are not cheap. Never dip a brush more than halfway and keep scraping it clean when painting upside down. If your going to put it down for too long while rolling, twist a plastic grocery bag around it or wrap in a damp rag and a grocery bag.

Plan a wall before doing it.

Have fun😬
j🌺
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Watty
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Re: Who has painted their own house?

Post by Watty »

Take the safety warnings seriously.

When I was a teenager I worked a couple of summers in a nursing home where all the residents were elderly, except for one guy who was a quadriplegic.

He had tried to put on his own roof to save some money and he fall off and broke his back.

After seeing him as a teenager I have had no problem with hiring people who have the right skills, experience, and equipment to do risky jobs safely.

DIY home accidents do happen.
Nicolas
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Re: Who has painted their own house?

Post by Nicolas »

I painted my house 28 years ago. I think it took me a couple of weeks but can’t be sure now. I didn’t keep track of cost. I was relatively poor then and now I’m relatively rich. I won’t be painting any more houses.
jjface
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Re: Who has painted their own house?

Post by jjface »

Just don't hire cheap bad painters. But hire painters.
westie
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Re: Who has painted their own house?

Post by westie »

did it to my 2 story aluminum siding house years ago. Took 40 days, gave it 2 coats BM paint, used a brush. Sold house 7 years later, it still looked good. I was young then...
Rudedog
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Re: Who has painted their own house?

Post by Rudedog »

Painted our two story in early 90's. Took a week of vacation and got it done. That's nine days working early to dark. Pressure washed a few days before I started. House was white and I painted it white. Now that I'm in my 60's , I might paint a one-story house, but not a two-story. If you fall, the results could be disastrous. One of our neighbors, in his early 50's fell off a 6 foot step ladder, it killed him.
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Sandtrap
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Re: Who has painted their own house?

Post by Sandtrap »

Watty wrote: Fri Jul 10, 2020 10:12 pm Take the safety warnings seriously.

When I was a teenager I worked a couple of summers in a nursing home where all the residents were elderly, except for one guy who was a quadriplegic.

He had tried to put on his own roof to save some money and he fall off and broke his back.

After seeing him as a teenager I have had no problem with hiring people who have the right skills, experience, and equipment to do risky jobs safely.

DIY home accidents do happen.
+1
Real life examples:

Roofing contractor and an old friend. A bit overweight. Fell off a 1 story roof (not very high) onto dirt. Landed wrong. Now a mess.

Fellow senior distant neighbor. Very overweight. Putting up overhead lights on a new building we helped him put up. Slipped off the ladder and fell on his ankle. Shattered it. After 1 surgery, healed wrong. Needs more surgeries. Now a mess.

Senior finish carpenter retired G.C. 30 feet up on an extension ladder putting in bird spike strips on the roof soffits. Told me it was time to hang up his "bags" for good. 9 lives used up.

FWIW:
Recently hired painting contractors, stucco contractors, roofers, to finish my home renovation. Also hired a steel building general contractor to build a large shop building (soup to dessert). Will do the electrical myself since 90% of it is standing on the earth!

Know our limitations. . . .
Even "bogleheads" can't buy health.
OP: stay safe.

j :happy
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lthenderson
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Re: Who has painted their own house?

Post by lthenderson »

28fe6 wrote: Thu Jul 09, 2020 10:23 pm I figure that with a brush and ladder, perhaps with strategic rental of scaffolding or lift basket, that I could paint my 2 story house myself in a summer of weekends. I would use brushes or rollers rather than any spraying equipment which would have setup and cleanup. Has anyone done it? Did you keep track of how much it cost or how long it took?
Just did this last year. The front side is single story so was fairly easy. The backside is two stories with a gable end and a chimney extending up beyond that. I had to buy a 28 foot extension ladder to get up to the top of the chimney. I had stabilizer bars already that fit the new ladder and those make a world of difference when up that high. The only other tool I bought was a paint can holder that slips into the D rung of most extension ladders so I could have both hands free while painting from the ladder.

I just used brush only. I have had houses spray painted before and the resulting paint layer is very thin compared to a hand brushed layer of paint and I don't think lasts nearly as long. Rollers just seemed like a hassle especially when considering doing it from a ladder so I didn't roll anything. I would just pick a section of the house wall on the shady side, scrape all the crud adhered to the siding and give it a rinse. I would then do any caulking that was needed. The next day I would paint that section, wait until it dried and paint a second coat. The next day I moved to the next section and repeated. With my cellphone and ear buds in, I actually quite enjoyed the process. It was kind of meditative.

Cost wise, I used high quality Sherwin Williams exterior paint that we bought during one of their 40% off sales that they have throughout the year. We bought primer and enough paint for two coats for around $375. I bought a couple more good brushes, the paint can holder and the ladder for probably another $400. So all told it cost me less than $800 to paint my house if I say my labor was free. We have an 1800 sq ft ranch house with walkout basement on the backside. I had been planning on using the ladder I bought for $370 or so and then selling it to recoup some of that money back but ended up buying a hoist kit and hanging it from my garage ceiling over one of the cars. I've loaned it out a few times already to friends and neighbors who need a long ladder for a project. Words gets out quickly.
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lthenderson
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Re: Who has painted their own house?

Post by lthenderson »

28fe6 wrote: Fri Jul 10, 2020 8:06 am With some types of painting, you have to maintain a "wet edge". When brush painting a house, is it required or is it ok to paint half a wall one day and the other half another day?
Yes you can easily do half of one wall one day and the other half the next. The only danger is if you are trying to skimp on paint quality and/or number of coats, sometimes the previous color can bleed through to the final color so that the overlap area with two coats will look different in the right light. If you use good quality paint and do two coats or a tinted primer coat and a top coat to mask the previous color, you shouldn't have any problems. Depends a lot if you are going with a paint color from a different spectrum as the original paint.

As mentioned above, the wet edge is mostly referring to the paint starting to tack up. When you drag a brush or a roller though paint that has started to tack up you can get a different texture that can be noticeable. There are chemicals you can buy to slow down the paint cure so that this isn't a problem. Or you can just go like I did and pick a section that is delineated by trim or a corner of the house so you have a good stopping point. I also always worked in the shade or tried to do the sunny sides early in the morning before it got too hot. Temperature really effects cure times for paint.
Nicolas
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Re: Who has painted their own house?

Post by Nicolas »

jjface wrote: Fri Jul 10, 2020 11:16 pm Just don't hire cheap bad painters. But hire painters.
+1.
Last edited by Nicolas on Sat Jul 11, 2020 9:51 pm, edited 1 time in total.
BanquetBeer
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Re: Who has painted their own house?

Post by BanquetBeer »

Painted 1/2 our house a couple years ago (Other half is brick).

High quality paint from sherwin. Used a company discount code towards end of year for max% off. (Look up contractor in phone book, ask sherwin to use their discount code) Can always say they asked you to get materials - it helps them get lower cost too as they offer cumulative volume discount.

Think it took a weekend? Pump spray bottle with TSP. Power wash, let dry. Roller with extension and brush (put in the freezer overnight In a plastic bag rather than clean)

For trim I just did it from the roof. Cut plants back before the job.

Similar color so wasn’t worried about thick coverup coats.

Make sure you get a bunch of caulk and do that prior to paint. Also get your paint formula and put that in your files.

If you’re handy, it’s pretty easy. I wasn’t concerned about tape as we don’t have accent color. A few drips on brick here or there but I don’t think anyone notices but me.

Probably wouldn’t have done it if I needed to replace boards. Did use Great Stuff to fill in a knot that fell out under the eve. Cut flush and paint.
kevinf
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Re: Who has painted their own house?

Post by kevinf »

I despise painting, it creates a huge mess both before, during, and after the job. Before you have to clean, repair, and prep everything. During you have tarp and tape everywhere, painting supplies everywhere, and your clothes are a disaster. Afterward you have to dispose of everything from the before and during stages and figure out what to do with extra supplies.

I painted part of my interior basement wall, began with rollers and brushes. Trying to get the paint into every crevice of the block wall was nightmarish and took forever. First coat of primer, second coat of finish paint.

I bought a sprayer after that ordeal, we'll see how it does when I finish up later on.
gd
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Re: Who has painted their own house?

Post by gd »

onourway wrote: Fri Jul 10, 2020 5:50 am Proper prep work will determine whether the paint lasts 1 year, 3 years, or 10+.
Wrote a long story but this says it faster. I painted my house the same time as several neighbors (some used commercial), this was literally the time scale. There is no payback for a commercial house painter to do a good job on anything even slightly difficult. I've seen someone in my area (besides me) do it once; they were historical restoration specialists. I'd add only quality of paint and using oil base primer, although not sure that's true any more given they're constantly reformulating to detoxify.

Edit: since you asked, didn't track costs or hours. Depends on house and condition. It was much cheaper than paying *good* painters or normal painters then doing it again in half the time, but was my occupation most days for 2 summers.
Priam
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Re: Who has painted their own house?

Post by Priam »

I’ve painted my house twice. It’s a cement block house so I pressure wash it first and then the next day or so paint. I don’t do it by myself though. I usually have two other people helping me but we can get it done in a day.

I use rollers and paint brushes but I’ve thought about using a spray machine however I have a lot of plants near my house and I’m worried it will blow all that spray over my plants so I haven’t bothered.

I think if possible see if anyone is willing to help you so things go a bit faster. I have a one story house and paid about $500-$600 for paint and supplies needed. The paint I used was Behr Ultra exterior.
dcabler
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Re: Who has painted their own house?

Post by dcabler »

28fe6 wrote: Thu Jul 09, 2020 10:23 pm I figure that with a brush and ladder, perhaps with strategic rental of scaffolding or lift basket, that I could paint my 2 story house myself in a summer of weekends. I would use brushes or rollers rather than any spraying equipment which would have setup and cleanup. Has anyone done it? Did you keep track of how much it cost or how long it took?
Did the exterior exactly one time myself about 20 years ago, which was enough to say "never again". 1 story house with 3 sides brick. Used Brush-and-roller for soffett/fascia, but rented a sprayer for the wood siding in the back. Was fine. Last time, I hired someone who did an OK job, but used sprayer for just about everything and oversprayed onto what, at the time, was a new roof. Live and learn...
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cashboy
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Re: Who has painted their own house?

Post by cashboy »

28fe6 wrote: Fri Jul 10, 2020 12:33 pm I just got a quote for $6500 for replacing 72 feet of fascia, power wash, caulk, prep and paint with Sherwin Williams Super paint.
having stained a 2 story cedar shingle house back when i was young (my sister's) i can say i would not do it again. for example, the sides of the house that go up to the roofline 'peak' are super high.

when i look at jobs like paint a 2 story house or roof work i compare costs vs risk vs money saved if i did it myself.

say that paint job and repair work quoted lasts 10 years. (you can also get additional quotes)

that is $650 a year.

that is $12.50 a week.

not a lot of money to pay to prevent possible injury AND have it professionally done.

be safe.
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IMO
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Re: Who has painted their own house?

Post by IMO »

28fe6 wrote: Thu Jul 09, 2020 10:23 pm I figure that with a brush and ladder, perhaps with strategic rental of scaffolding or lift basket, that I could paint my 2 story house myself in a summer of weekends. I would use brushes or rollers rather than any spraying equipment which would have setup and cleanup. Has anyone done it? Did you keep track of how much it cost or how long it took?
OP, lots of good advice given. Painting a house isn't rocket science. However, depending on what type of surface your painting and the condition of the surface, as noted, prep work can take a great deal of the time. People seem to bash certain places for getting paints, but I suspect you should pay for the consumer reports on paint quality because I believe cost is not always associated with the best paint, but you have to pay to get the results apparently: https://www.consumerreports.org/product ... 048/view2/

Have painted a 2 story (2500 sq ft) and 2 single story (about 1500 sq ft) homes in last couple years. These were stucco, one being the very very rough stucco that one really cannot use a roller as you'd never get paint into the crevices.

2 story houses are a significant issue with the height. It's not always easy to get ladders/scaffolding to the areas needed due to landscaping variations. Always helps having a helper with ladders, etc.

On the most recent painting of single story "smoother" type stucco where a very thick type of paint that cannot be sprayed was utilized (spraying is much quicker) it took a solid 3 days of work for 2 people (myself and teenager kid). It took over 25 gallons of this particular paint for the stucco and another gallon for wood trim work (so $750ish for paint and $100ish for supplies). Note that amount of paint was more specific to the specialized paint needed for the job, if I was spraying a thinner paint, I day it would have taken 1/2 that amount and much less effort. You can do the math on how much your particular paint is per gallon. I think it does take someone who is okay with DIY work and the pride one can get doing the work yourself (and it helps if you don't have another day job). I did use the most recent painting task as a life learning lesson for my kid letting him know manual labor is hard day in and day out and stressed that's why you go and get a nice cushy "white collar" job in life.
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JoeRetire
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Re: Who has painted their own house?

Post by JoeRetire »

28fe6 wrote: Thu Jul 09, 2020 10:23 pm I figure that with a brush and ladder, perhaps with strategic rental of scaffolding or lift basket, that I could paint my 2 story house myself in a summer of weekends. I would use brushes or rollers rather than any spraying equipment which would have setup and cleanup. Has anyone done it? Did you keep track of how much it cost or how long it took?
When I was younger, I had more time and energy than I had money. I always stained my own home. I never minded the painting/staining. The only difficult part for me was on the peaks on the house. I hate heights and had to force myself to get that far up.

The only cost was for the stain, and some rollers. I had a ladder, few really good brushes, trays, drop cloths, etc, so didn't have to repurchase them.

It took less than the summer and always looked good when completed. One year we did some summer travel, so I only did 2 sides that year, then came back and did the other 2 sides the following year. It worked out fine.

Be prepared to spend a good bit of time prepping and cleaning your exterior first.
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