Do you use TRIZ? [Problem solving tool for engineers]

Questions on how we spend our money and our time - consumer goods and services, home and vehicle, leisure and recreational activities
Post Reply
Topic Author
X528
Posts: 138
Joined: Fri Nov 30, 2018 8:51 am

Do you use TRIZ? [Problem solving tool for engineers]

Post by X528 »

For those that are engineers and those that do product design work, do you use TRIZ in your design development work? Is it very useful and helpful? How effective is it? Are there industry-recognized certification courses?

https://www.toolshero.com/problem-solving/triz-method/

https://triz.org/triz

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TRIZ
User avatar
mhc
Posts: 4182
Joined: Mon Apr 04, 2011 10:18 pm
Location: NoCo

Re: Do you use TRIZ?

Post by mhc »

I am a design engineer with many patents and develop best in the world products. I have never heard of TRIZ before your post. TRIZ might be useful for some, but in my brief scanning of the links you posted, I do not see the utility of TRIZ.
Jack FFR1846
Posts: 12641
Joined: Tue Dec 31, 2013 7:05 am
Location: 26 miles, 385 yards west of Copley Square

Re: Do you use TRIZ?

Post by Jack FFR1846 »

Another design engineer here with patents and publications and many of my designs in products. Never heard of it. Looked at the wiki page and see no use for it.
Bogle: Smart Beta is stupid
BH_RedRan
Posts: 93
Joined: Thu Apr 04, 2019 4:27 pm

Re: Do you use TRIZ?

Post by BH_RedRan »

I have a similar take on TRIZ. Years ago, the president of a company I worked for sent a couple of us off to a seminar on TRIZ. It was interesting and I did take home some ideas and met a couple of good contacts in a related field but I wouldn't say that using TRIZ concepts spawned any new inventions. There were new inventions with many products in the field but I can't say it was due to TRIZ. The seminar I took was at the Cal Tech campus but frankly it seemed to be partly a sales pitch for the associated software tools and training.
dtroness
Posts: 2
Joined: Wed Jun 24, 2020 2:06 pm

Re: Do you use TRIZ?

Post by dtroness »

Yes, I do all the time. I do reliability engineering, product development and improvement, and I teach TRIZ fairly often. But I am not trying to get business here, so I won't even tell you how to contact me or my web site.
There are lots of brilliant, innovative people in the world, like the other people who have replied to this post./
dtroness
Posts: 2
Joined: Wed Jun 24, 2020 2:06 pm

Re: Do you use TRIZ?

Post by dtroness »

Hi, I use TRIZ all the time - though it is my own version that I created over the past 15 years with a colleague of mine. I do reliability engineering, product development/improvement and I teach it to lots of people.
I know I sound like a salesperson, but I won't even provide my name, email or website, to show that I am sincere and honest.
I have been doing it for about 25 years, i.e. learning, doing, practicing, coaching and teaching, at Intel, Honeywell and several smaller companies.
I'm probably not as skilled as the other people who replied here, and it kind of shows that it is not all necessary or appropriate for everyone. In fact, my colleague and I have found that only 1 out of ~300 people who are exposed to it, will find it valuable enough to really commit to learning and using it. Speaking of that, it takes a lot of commitment, persistence, and humility to become an effective user. I am one of those odd people who really resonate with it. :)
I mostly use it as a systematic method for creating elegant solutions to very difficult problems. By elegant, I mean the solution should be very simple, very inexpensive, yet satisfy all requirements, i.e. no compromising.
The "difficult" type of problem is one where you believe you must trade-off, compromise or optimize between two conflicting requirements. For example, I need something that is very stiff and I also want it to be very flexible... and I don't want anything in between. TRIZ leads you through a process that will show you at least 15 ways to do this. If you can identify a way to completely solve the problem, elegantly, it is very possible that the solution could be something that it patentable, marketable, creates a competitive advantage, or just something that drastically reduces cost, etc.
There are a couple of other significant parts of TRIZ that I find very useful, but I don't want to type for another hour :)
Ependytis
Posts: 92
Joined: Mon Oct 17, 2016 11:10 am

Re: Do you use TRIZ? [Problem solving tool for engineers]

Post by Ependytis »

TRIZ is a method that looks at trends in how problems were solved in patents overtime to determine how to solve your problem. The challenge is defining your problem so you can use TRIZ. It seems like a very interesting technique however after repeatedly seeing that it would take 10 years to learn I was turned off by it.
jharkin
Posts: 2596
Joined: Mon Mar 28, 2016 7:14 am
Location: Boston suburbs

Re: Do you use TRIZ? [Problem solving tool for engineers]

Post by jharkin »

I’m a mechanical engineer by degree, but my career has been working for software companies that make design tools for engineers.

When I hear “engineering tool” I think:
Catia
NX
Creo
Solid works
Autocad/Inventor
Simulia
MATLAB
Simulink
Labview
dSpace
Spice
Etc...


Never heard of TRIZ frankly, but looking at your link I see it’s a method to data mine patent filings for ideas.

I would tread VERY cautiously. In software, our legal department has very strict rules about patent filings and our development staff are expressly discouraged... almost forbidden.. from reading patent filings related to the work we do. The logic is that by reading a patent, it’s too easy to get an idea and later on accidentally reuse something that could expose the company to an infringement lawsuit.
User avatar
batpot
Posts: 1171
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2013 8:48 pm

Re: Do you use TRIZ? [Problem solving tool for engineers]

Post by batpot »

Sounds like another 'solve everything' methodology for executives, in the same vein as Lean or Six Sigmia.
Topic Author
X528
Posts: 138
Joined: Fri Nov 30, 2018 8:51 am

Re: Do you use TRIZ? [Problem solving tool for engineers]

Post by X528 »

"I would tread VERY cautiously. In software, our legal department has very strict rules about patent filings and our development staff are expressly discouraged... almost forbidden.. from reading patent filings related to the work we do. The logic is that by reading a patent, it’s too easy to get an idea and later on accidentally reuse something that could expose the company to an infringement lawsuit."

The rationale for patents is that an inventor discloses how to make and use their invention in exchange for a monopoly on the invention for a limited time (20 years I think). Patents are supposed to spread ideas and information, and help encourage innovation in theory. But they do not seem to work this way in reality.
Post Reply