Falcon 9 Launch to the International Space Station

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Falcon 9 Launch to the International Space Station

Post by LadyGeek » Wed May 27, 2020 1:53 pm

[Launch scrubbed for Wednesday, see below.]

Streaming live now - 8-)

- SpaceX - Launches (Watch the Demo-2 launch)

- NASA Live | NASA

The weather can still impact the launch.
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Re: Falcon 9 Launch to the International Space Station - Wed. 4:33 PM Eastern

Post by DoTheMath » Wed May 27, 2020 2:15 pm

Thanks for the post LG. It's nice to be reminded of what humanity can do when it works together.
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Re: Falcon 9 Launch to the International Space Station - Wed. 4:33 PM Eastern

Post by bondsr4me » Wed May 27, 2020 2:18 pm

been watching on youtube live.
hope it goes OK.

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Re: Falcon 9 Launch to the International Space Station - Wed. 4:33 PM Eastern

Post by PoppyA » Wed May 27, 2020 2:21 pm

Excited here in Florida! I would also like to suggest to anyone who can...go see a launch, especially a night launch. It is amazing and really makes one proud to be an American!

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Re: Falcon 9 Launch to the International Space Station - Wed. 4:33 PM Eastern

Post by LadyGeek » Wed May 27, 2020 2:33 pm

I went to my high-def home theater to watch the NASA channel on my Roku. The channel is compressed and about 1 minute behind the SpaceX internet stream. :(

I'm watching SpaceX at 720p60 resolution. Go to the bottom-right corner and click on the "gear" (settings) and select 720p60. Looks awesome on my high-def monitor in full screen. I'm listening to the audio on my stereo.

T-1 hour, go for launch. :happy
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Re: Falcon 9 Launch to the International Space Station - Wed. 4:33 PM Eastern

Post by LadyGeek » Wed May 27, 2020 3:17 pm

Launch scrubbed. :(

Next attempt: Saturday, 3:22 PM Eastern.
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Re: Falcon 9 Launch to the International Space Station

Post by Candor » Wed May 27, 2020 3:26 pm

Scattered thunderstorms on Saturday. Hopefully it will be a go.

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Re: Falcon 9 Launch to the International Space Station

Post by iamlucky13 » Wed May 27, 2020 8:43 pm

Over a decade ago, I was at Cape Canaveral hoping to watch what would have been my one and only space shuttle launch - STS-119. It ended up being delayed due to safety concerns discovered during the previous mission, so while I got to see Discovery waiting at LC-39A for a fix, I missed the launch.

I also saw the first Falcon 9 standing up at LC-40. SpaceX was having countless issues that delayed their first flight for over a year after that, and they were 2-1/2 years from flying a normal mission.

They've come a long way over the last 11 years since then.

Now, there is a Falcon 9 standing on LC-39A, where Discovery was when I visited in 2009. The Falcon 9 has evolved to be 67% more massive, with twice the launch capacity. And of course, it's gone from having a prototype fairing, unfit for flight on it when I saw it, to carrying a human-rated spacecraft.

I'm more than a little bit glad the launch was delayed to Saturday, so I can watch it.

To stay consumer-issues topical: a visit to Kennedy Space Center is well worth the trip for any spaceflight enthusiast.

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Re: Falcon 9 Launch to the International Space Station

Post by LadyGeek » Wed May 27, 2020 8:55 pm

Without giving away details, I visited Houston Mission Control several years ago - and not as a tourist. I was standing behind the visitor's glass that you see at the ISS control room.

I also got to visit Apollo mission control (inside the control room itself), along with the ISS training facility. A once-in-a-lifetime visit and will never, ever forget it.

So, watching every launch has special meaning for me. I can say from experience that I know what they're doing.

When they show mission control on Saturday's launch, pay attention to all the "stuff" they have piled on top of the consoles. You'll see lots of personal items. It's just another day at the office for them.
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Re: Falcon 9 Launch to the International Space Station

Post by UpperNwGuy » Wed May 27, 2020 9:06 pm

LadyGeek wrote:
Wed May 27, 2020 8:55 pm
So, watching every launch has special meaning for me. I can say from experience that I know what they're doing.
As a retired satellite guy, I understand completely.

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Re: Falcon 9 Launch to the International Space Station

Post by JoMoney » Wed May 27, 2020 9:15 pm

I've seen quite a few launches, always impressive, but the Falcon "landing" blows my mind :shock: I suppose it looks like the launch playing in reverse but it doesn't seem like it should work that way.
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Re: Falcon 9 Launch to the International Space Station

Post by cheese_breath » Wed May 27, 2020 9:23 pm

UpperNwGuy wrote:
Wed May 27, 2020 9:06 pm
LadyGeek wrote:
Wed May 27, 2020 8:55 pm
So, watching every launch has special meaning for me. I can say from experience that I know what they're doing.
As a retired satellite guy, I understand completely.
As a retired satellite guy I'm sure you're familiar with the Apollo 12 lightning strike. But for the younger folks who might not be, here's the story from the NASA history website.

https://history.nasa.gov/afj/ap12fj/a12 ... trike.html
The surest way to know the future is when it becomes the past.

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Re: Falcon 9 Launch to the International Space Station

Post by Phineas J. Whoopee » Wed May 27, 2020 9:42 pm

My understanding from NASA is the launch window today, for just a 19-hour transit, was only one second wide. Miss it and the astronauts would miss the ISS. Given the weather conditions they had no choice but to scrub at least until the next window on Saturday.

Mean old Mr. Newton.

PJW

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Re: Falcon 9 Launch to the International Space Station - Wed. 4:33 PM Eastern

Post by TravelGeek » Wed May 27, 2020 9:49 pm

PoppyA wrote:
Wed May 27, 2020 2:21 pm
Excited here in Florida! I would also like to suggest to anyone who can...go see a launch, especially a night launch. It is amazing and really makes one proud to be an American!
Did you drive to the launch area? We were watching it live on TV and when they scrubbed, I looked at my wife and asked “Do you think we can make it to Florida by Saturday afternoon?” (we are in the PNW).

I saw two Shuttle launches - STS-131 (Discovery, the last night launch of the program) and STS-134 (Endeavour - penultimate launch), both from the NASA causeway viewing area. I actually flew to Florida twice for STS-134 because the first attempt was scrubbed a few hours before launch. It was so worth it and fortunately my work schedule allowed for it.

I saw Endeavour one more time in the air... on the back of a NASA Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (modified 747) flying low over NASA Moffett Field in Sunnyvale CA on the way to its final home in Los Angeles.

I’ll definitely be back to view another launch.

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Re: Falcon 9 Launch to the International Space Station

Post by UpperNwGuy » Wed May 27, 2020 10:11 pm

cheese_breath wrote:
Wed May 27, 2020 9:23 pm
UpperNwGuy wrote:
Wed May 27, 2020 9:06 pm
LadyGeek wrote:
Wed May 27, 2020 8:55 pm
So, watching every launch has special meaning for me. I can say from experience that I know what they're doing.
As a retired satellite guy, I understand completely.
As a retired satellite guy I'm sure you're familiar with the Apollo 12 lightning strike. But for the younger folks who might not be, here's the story from the NASA history website.

https://history.nasa.gov/afj/ap12fj/a12 ... trike.html
I was still in high school when the Apollo 12 mission took place, and I had no idea I would be working on satellites years later.

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Re: Falcon 9 Launch to the International Space Station

Post by 2pedals » Wed May 27, 2020 10:18 pm

cheese_breath wrote:
Wed May 27, 2020 9:23 pm
UpperNwGuy wrote:
Wed May 27, 2020 9:06 pm
LadyGeek wrote:
Wed May 27, 2020 8:55 pm
So, watching every launch has special meaning for me. I can say from experience that I know what they're doing.
As a retired satellite guy, I understand completely.
As a retired satellite guy I'm sure you're familiar with the Apollo 12 lightning strike. But for the younger folks who might not be, here's the story from the NASA history website.

https://history.nasa.gov/afj/ap12fj/a12 ... trike.html
Thanks for sharing the lightning strike incident. A very interesting historical event.

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Re: Falcon 9 Launch to the International Space Station

Post by cheese_breath » Wed May 27, 2020 10:27 pm

UpperNwGuy wrote:
Wed May 27, 2020 10:11 pm
cheese_breath wrote:
Wed May 27, 2020 9:23 pm
UpperNwGuy wrote:
Wed May 27, 2020 9:06 pm
LadyGeek wrote:
Wed May 27, 2020 8:55 pm
So, watching every launch has special meaning for me. I can say from experience that I know what they're doing.
As a retired satellite guy, I understand completely.
As a retired satellite guy I'm sure you're familiar with the Apollo 12 lightning strike. But for the younger folks who might not be, here's the story from the NASA history website.

https://history.nasa.gov/afj/ap12fj/a12 ... trike.html
I was still in high school when the Apollo 12 mission took place, and I had no idea I would be working on satellites years later.
I brought a battery portable radio to work that day so I could listen to the launch in my office. It was a lot more exciting than I expected. When they announced they thought lightning hit the vehicle I expected it to crash and those guys to die. What a relief when it achieved orbit and they got everything under control. And then more relief, but maybe still a little worry, when they headed for the moon.
The surest way to know the future is when it becomes the past.

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Re: Falcon 9 Launch to the International Space Station

Post by iamlucky13 » Wed May 27, 2020 10:32 pm

LadyGeek wrote:
Wed May 27, 2020 8:55 pm
Without giving away details, I visited Houston Mission Control several years ago - and not as a tourist. I was standing behind the visitor's glass that you see at the ISS control room.

I also got to visit Apollo mission control (inside the control room itself), along with the ISS training facility. A once-in-a-lifetime visit and will never, ever forget it.

So, watching every launch has special meaning for me. I can say from experience that I know what they're doing.

When they show mission control on Saturday's launch, pay attention to all the "stuff" they have piled on top of the consoles. You'll see lots of personal items. It's just another day at the office for them.
That's awesome!

Also without giving away details, I had a brief opportunity to see Falcon 9's being built, one of the prototype Dragon 2's, and a forest of Merlin engines under assembly.

I've never been close to a mission in progress, but it is still exciting to watch a launch that in some way involves something you worked on, even if it is only a very small part (not this one, though).

A coworker of mine formerly worked on the shuttle and has much more interesting stories to tell than I do.

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Re: Falcon 9 Launch to the International Space Station

Post by whodidntante » Wed May 27, 2020 10:34 pm

Phineas J. Whoopee wrote:
Wed May 27, 2020 9:42 pm
My understanding from NASA is the launch window today, for just a 19-hour transit, was only one second wide. Miss it and the astronauts would miss the ISS. Given the weather conditions they had no choice but to scrub at least until the next window on Saturday.

Mean old Mr. Newton.

PJW
They should have used their impulse drive. Amateurs. :P

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Re: Falcon 9 Launch to the International Space Station

Post by Scatterbrain » Wed May 27, 2020 10:38 pm

Phineas J. Whoopee wrote:
Wed May 27, 2020 9:42 pm
My understanding from NASA is the launch window today, for just a 19-hour transit, was only one second wide. Miss it and the astronauts would miss the ISS. Given the weather conditions they had no choice but to scrub at least until the next window on Saturday.

Mean old Mr. Newton.

PJW
That’s amazing.

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Re: Falcon 9 Launch to the International Space Station

Post by cheese_breath » Wed May 27, 2020 10:39 pm

whodidntante wrote:
Wed May 27, 2020 10:34 pm
Phineas J. Whoopee wrote:
Wed May 27, 2020 9:42 pm
My understanding from NASA is the launch window today, for just a 19-hour transit, was only one second wide. Miss it and the astronauts would miss the ISS. Given the weather conditions they had no choice but to scrub at least until the next window on Saturday.

Mean old Mr. Newton.

PJW
They should have used their impulse drive. Amateurs. :P
They do. With warp or slipstream they'd be light years past the station before they could hit the OFF switch.
The surest way to know the future is when it becomes the past.

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Re: Falcon 9 Launch to the International Space Station

Post by Cubicle » Wed May 27, 2020 11:12 pm

I heard bits about the launch this week. Today I worked in an environment with lots of TVs on. And I was following along all day when I could. Unexpectedly, I became enthralled as it unfolded today. So I’m planning on watching it on Saturday.

And golly darn it Elon Musk. He can’t be human…
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Re: Falcon 9 Launch to the International Space Station

Post by Finridge » Thu May 28, 2020 2:52 am

It was still fun to watch even though the launch got scrubbed close to the launch time. I'm planning on watching again on Saturday.

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Re: Falcon 9 Launch to the International Space Station

Post by crinkles2 » Thu May 28, 2020 3:46 am

JoMoney wrote:
Wed May 27, 2020 9:15 pm
I've seen quite a few launches, always impressive, but the Falcon "landing" blows my mind :shock: I suppose it looks like the launch playing in reverse but it doesn't seem like it should work that way.
+1,000

the landings simply blow my mind everytime they happen. I can't comprehend the control.

I watcehd with my kids... will again on Saturday.

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Re: Falcon 9 Launch to the International Space Station

Post by Stef » Thu May 28, 2020 5:16 am

Is there a way to see the landing live?

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Re: Falcon 9 Launch to the International Space Station

Post by sycamore » Thu May 28, 2020 6:50 am

Stef wrote:
Thu May 28, 2020 5:16 am
Is there a way to see the landing live?
Browse to https://www.spacex.com/launches/index.html and look for the "Demo-2" launch. I'm guessing the live stream will include the landing part.

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Re: Falcon 9 Launch to the International Space Station

Post by Stef » Thu May 28, 2020 7:08 am

I mean to see it in person, like the launch itself.

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Re: Falcon 9 Launch to the International Space Station

Post by bt365 » Thu May 28, 2020 7:50 am

The Russian people are good, however the Russian government works against America's best interests. Look forward to time US provides support to space station and stops paying Russian government to do so.

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Re: Falcon 9 Launch to the International Space Station

Post by FoolStreet » Thu May 28, 2020 10:36 am

Thank you for starting this thread and I hope we can restart it on Saturday, or Sunday if need be.

I put the NASA stream on in the background. It was minimal chatter, so it would startle me when I would hear the announcer doing checks. I loved seeing Musk talk to the Astronauts and drive the Tesla to the launch pad.

I found it funny that they got out of the car for a bio break, then got right back in to drive what looked like 30 yards to the entrance of the elevator. Probably needed to minimize impacts to the boots and walking is probably not comfortable.

When they called their loved ones for a final goodbye, I thought it odd that one of the astronauts didn’t want to make a call. The. I realized they were just taking turns on only one phone. I thought the signature on the transom was a nice touch. Will they re-sign on Saturday?

The silver lining is that they got a good solid walk through. However, I still giggle to think sending real live astronauts to the ISS is still a “demo?” lol

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Re: Falcon 9 Launch to the International Space Station

Post by FoolStreet » Thu May 28, 2020 10:44 am

cheese_breath wrote:
Wed May 27, 2020 10:39 pm
whodidntante wrote:
Wed May 27, 2020 10:34 pm
Phineas J. Whoopee wrote:
Wed May 27, 2020 9:42 pm
My understanding from NASA is the launch window today, for just a 19-hour transit, was only one second wide. Miss it and the astronauts would miss the ISS. Given the weather conditions they had no choice but to scrub at least until the next window on Saturday.

Mean old Mr. Newton.

PJW
They should have used their impulse drive. Amateurs. :P
They do. With warp or slipstream they'd be light years past the station before they could hit the OFF switch.
Maybe they should just launch from Hokkaido with the redundant system SR Hadden made?


*Where is Jodie Foster when you need her?


...okay, back to real science...

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Re: Falcon 9 Launch to the International Space Station

Post by JoMoney » Thu May 28, 2020 11:02 am

Stef wrote:
Thu May 28, 2020 7:08 am
I mean to see it in person, like the launch itself.
The landing of the booster will likely happen not too long after the launch.
For safety reasons, nobody is allowed anywhere near the actual launch site when it happens, if you're somewhere in the region you can likely find a spot that has some sort of view of it ... it's hard to beat the view available from the broadcast videos, but being nearby and hearing/feeling a sonic boom or seeing it soar into the sky and then hearing the rockets roar moments later when the sound actually reaches you is something spectacular.
I would guess these days you could probably use a smart-phone to watch the live broadcast while being somewhere in the general region to get the best of both.
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Re: Falcon 9 Launch to the International Space Station

Post by LadyGeek » Thu May 28, 2020 11:41 am

JoMoney wrote:
Thu May 28, 2020 11:02 am
For safety reasons, nobody is allowed anywhere near the actual launch site when it happens,...
I used to work with a guy who experienced that live. Years earlier, he was in the control room when a rocket exploded on the launch pad. They were safe in the control room, but dust from the debris rained down on all the cars in the parking lot. It was not easy to clean up.
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Re: Falcon 9 Launch to the International Space Station

Post by iamlucky13 » Thu May 28, 2020 4:22 pm

sycamore wrote:
Thu May 28, 2020 6:50 am
Stef wrote:
Thu May 28, 2020 5:16 am
Is there a way to see the landing live?
Browse to https://www.spacex.com/launches/index.html and look for the "Demo-2" launch. I'm guessing the live stream will include the landing part.
Landing happens in the middle of the 2nd stage burn when there is not much else happening, so they switch the broadcast to the drone ship.
Cubicle wrote:
Wed May 27, 2020 11:12 pm
I heard bits about the launch this week. Today I worked in an environment with lots of TVs on. And I was following along all day when I could. Unexpectedly, I became enthralled as it unfolded today. So I’m planning on watching it on Saturday.

And golly darn it Elon Musk. He can’t be human…
Definitely watch it. Rocket launches are always exciting if you start to follow them close. With the pace that SpaceX evolves their designs, there's frequently something new happening, so it's extra exciting. Obviously for this launch it's extra exciting with the first new manned spacecraft since the Shenzhou 17 years ago.

Elon Musk is very human, but 8,000 other humans work for him. I give him a lot of credit for being willing to commit to financially and technically risky ideas and give his employees the freedom to tackle them effectively, but despite his comments about being the chief engineer, the technical credit goes to the rest of the team.

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Re: Falcon 9 Launch to the International Space Station

Post by tvubpwcisla » Thu May 28, 2020 4:30 pm

Thanks for the post. Hope things work out for Saturday!
Stay invested my friends.

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Re: Falcon 9 Launch to the International Space Station

Post by 4nursebee » Thu May 28, 2020 4:49 pm

Is it worth it to see a launch live in person?
What about it makes it so?

Would you pay for space tourism?

Have you paid for that expensive weightless airplane ride?
Pale Blue Dot

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Re: Falcon 9 Launch to the International Space Station

Post by PoppyA » Thu May 28, 2020 4:59 pm

I live about 2 hours west of the Kennedy Space center. We hear double booms from the sonic speed when they land. One time I was in the driveway and heard the booms. I ran into the house, turned on the tv, and the shuttle was landing at Kennedy! Amazing.

At one Launch I saw the Astronauts smallish motorcade carrying them to the launch site. Had I not known a motorcade when I see one, it could have been easily missed. We honked and waved!

That same launch (2 nights in a row) as we were waiting, all airspace closed down, a large jet flew in just minutes before the expected launch. It was the First Lady and the girls soccer team! Lucky dogs!

Then there were times we stood on the roof in downtown Orlando to watch launches on workdays.

All good memories!

My first post in this thread said yes go see a launch, they are amazing but the night launches are the best! You will feel pride. If you watch a launch from the causeway, you see it rise, but don’t hear the sound & feel the rumble until it reaches you several seconds later. Very cool!

I would pay to go!!! I get car sick though. Not sure I could do the spinning simulator.

Our girls went to Space camp!
Last edited by PoppyA on Thu May 28, 2020 7:28 pm, edited 6 times in total.

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Re: Falcon 9 Launch to the International Space Station

Post by JoMoney » Thu May 28, 2020 5:05 pm

4nursebee wrote:
Thu May 28, 2020 4:49 pm
Is it worth it to see a launch live in person? ...
I've never paid anything to see one, just lucked out to be in the area when it was happening. There are options to buy tickets with access to better viewing areas. If you're a fan of space/rockets, or have anything to do with whatever the payload is, I think it would be, but if you have to ask maybe not :?
It can involve a lot of waiting around for something that doesn't last very long, and often has delays and gets rescheduled. Sometimes the re-schedule is weeks later so it could be difficult to schedule a trip specifically to watch one only to have it not go.
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Re: Falcon 9 Launch to the International Space Station

Post by One Ping » Thu May 28, 2020 7:18 pm

JoMoney wrote:
Thu May 28, 2020 5:05 pm
4nursebee wrote:
Thu May 28, 2020 4:49 pm
Is it worth it to see a launch live in person? ...
... I think it would be, but if you have to ask maybe not :?
It can involve a lot of waiting around for something that doesn't last very long, and often has delays and gets rescheduled. Sometimes the re-schedule is weeks later so it could be difficult to schedule a trip specifically to watch one only to have it not go.
I remember watching the last Saturn V launch. Skylab in '73. That one was worth it! Was going to watch the 'boys' go up the next day but because they had an anomaly during the launch (solar array ripped off) they didn't go up until about 10 days later. I missed that one because I had to be back. That was the first of many launches I later took part in as part of a career in spacecraft mission design and engineering.

I'd go see it if you've never seen one ... though Falcon 9 is no Saturn V. Landing would be cool to watch, though.
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Re: Falcon 9 Launch to the International Space Station

Post by Big Dog » Thu May 28, 2020 7:37 pm

cheese_breath wrote:
Wed May 27, 2020 10:39 pm
whodidntante wrote:
Wed May 27, 2020 10:34 pm
Phineas J. Whoopee wrote:
Wed May 27, 2020 9:42 pm
My understanding from NASA is the launch window today, for just a 19-hour transit, was only one second wide. Miss it and the astronauts would miss the ISS. Given the weather conditions they had no choice but to scrub at least until the next window on Saturday.

Mean old Mr. Newton.

PJW
They should have used their impulse drive. Amateurs. :P
They do. With warp or slipstream they'd be light years past the station before they could hit the OFF switch.
Did Kirk ever say, "Less power, Scotty"? :twisted:

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Re: Falcon 9 Launch to the International Space Station

Post by TravelGeek » Thu May 28, 2020 7:55 pm

JoMoney wrote:
Thu May 28, 2020 5:05 pm
4nursebee wrote:
Thu May 28, 2020 4:49 pm
Is it worth it to see a launch live in person? ...
I've never paid anything to see one, just lucked out to be in the area when it was happening. There are options to buy tickets with access to better viewing areas. If you're a fan of space/rockets, or have anything to do with whatever the payload is, I think it would be, but if you have to ask maybe not :?
It can involve a lot of waiting around for something that doesn't last very long, and often has delays and gets rescheduled. Sometimes the re-schedule is weeks later so it could be difficult to schedule a trip specifically to watch one only to have it not go.
Yes, it’s worth seeing it in person. I enjoy spending my money on experiences more than on things, and this is an awesome and fairly unique experience.

And yes, reschedules happen. “My” second launch (STS-134) was scrubbed after everyone had already arrived at the cape. And “everyone” included not only yours truly, but also POTUS and the First Lady.

https://spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts134/110429scrub/

It’s part of the experience, and no one I talked to on our bus back to Orlando seemed upset. I spent a few more days in Florida, flew home when it became clear it would be delayed for a while and rearranged my schedule for another trip back to Florida (“free” via award miles; the causeway viewing ticket carried over to the second launch date).

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Re: Falcon 9 Launch to the International Space Station

Post by stuper1 » Thu May 28, 2020 8:01 pm

Just a note to let everyone know that space launches also happen on the West Coast at Vandenberg Airforce Base, which is a few hours drive from my home. I've been there several times to watch launches. The nearest viewing site is maybe three miles from the launch pad, and the noise you hear is tremendous and lasts much longer than I expected. Truly an awe-inspiring experience in my opinion. Makes you really appreciate human ingenuity and perseverance. There is an e-mail list that you can sign up for that tells you when launches will happen. It's called "Launch Alert" or something like that.

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Re: Falcon 9 Launch to the International Space Station

Post by One Ping » Thu May 28, 2020 8:11 pm

stuper1 wrote:
Thu May 28, 2020 8:01 pm
Just a note to let everyone know that space launches also happen on the West Coast at Vandenberg Airforce Base ...
Yes. Yes they do. :D

And a much different experience (in a good way) than an east coast launch, in my opinion.
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Re: Falcon 9 Launch to the International Space Station

Post by TravelGeek » Thu May 28, 2020 8:26 pm

Just no Shuttle launches. :)

Here is the info for the launch alert email list: https://www.spacearchive.info/newsletter.htm

And some info for viewing launches from Vandenberg: https://www.spacearchive.info/vafbview.htm

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Re: Falcon 9 Launch to the International Space Station

Post by JoMoney » Thu May 28, 2020 8:32 pm

Vandenberg AFB, CA ... launches, yes... But no Kennedy Space Center "Space Coast" tourism and visitor stuff. Launch pads mostly hidden on the other side of a mountain range (so you won't see lift-off)... and typically very foggy.
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Re: Falcon 9 Launch to the International Space Station

Post by Mudpuppy » Thu May 28, 2020 8:52 pm

JoMoney wrote:
Thu May 28, 2020 11:02 am
Stef wrote:
Thu May 28, 2020 7:08 am
I mean to see it in person, like the launch itself.
The landing of the booster will likely happen not too long after the launch.
For safety reasons, nobody is allowed anywhere near the actual launch site when it happens, if you're somewhere in the region you can likely find a spot that has some sort of view of it ... it's hard to beat the view available from the broadcast videos, but being nearby and hearing/feeling a sonic boom or seeing it soar into the sky and then hearing the rockets roar moments later when the sound actually reaches you is something spectacular.
I would guess these days you could probably use a smart-phone to watch the live broadcast while being somewhere in the general region to get the best of both.
When I watch the SpaceX launches in California, I have my phone live-streaming the SpaceX coverage while I'm also watching it in person. The time delay is a little bit off-putting at first, but then you learn to watch the horizon a bit before the launch is announced on the live stream. It's pretty spectacular to watch in person, even if you're not very close to the launch site.

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Re: Falcon 9 Launch to the International Space Station

Post by One Ping » Fri May 29, 2020 7:58 pm

Bump.
3:22 PM EDT, Saturday 30 May 2020.
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Re: Falcon 9 Launch to the International Space Station

Post by LadyGeek » Fri May 29, 2020 8:14 pm

^^^ Thanks.

They're going to reassess weather tomorrow morning.

Here's the local weather for the general public:

- Cape Canaveral, FL Weather Conditions | Weather Underground
- Weather Radar | Weather Underground
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Re: Falcon 9 Launch to the International Space Station

Post by LadyGeek » Fri May 29, 2020 8:28 pm

One tenet I follow is "If you want something, ask. They can always say No".

My once-in-a-lifetime tour of Mission Control was simply because I asked in a meeting "Can I take a tour of Apollo Mission Control?". The answer was "Sure, it's right next door". Myself and the rest of my group literally ran across the hallway and were transported back in time.

My next question - "Can I see the ISS control room?". The answer was "Sure, it's downstairs. Sorry, but they're operating right now, so you have to stay behind the visitor glass.". Downstairs we went.

At lunch time, one of the NASA employees asked us "Do you want to see the ISS training facility? I can get you in before they open, 6:45 AM." We were there at 6:30 AM and had the run of the facility. They not only have the full-size ISS, but all the lunar module prototypes and the space shuttle trainer. Yes, myself and a coworker were inside the trainer. That's one heck of an archive and an even better tour (no one bothered us and everything was open).

I captured a ton of photos with my cellphone, not to mention movies of ISS activity while I was in the control room.

To be clear, this was several years ago on a one-time project from a prior employer.

At the time, there were over 10,000 people working in NASA Houston. They hold a lot of meetings.
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Re: Falcon 9 Launch to the International Space Station

Post by TravelGeek » Fri May 29, 2020 9:19 pm

LadyGeek wrote:
Fri May 29, 2020 8:28 pm

My once-in-a-lifetime tour of Mission Control was simply because I asked in a meeting "Can I take a tour of Apollo Mission Control?". The answer was "Sure, it's right next door". Myself and the rest of my group literally ran across the hallway and were transported back in time.
I would swear the Apollo Mission Control center was part of the tour of the Space Center when I was in Houston in ‘89.

Looks like you just need to buy a ticket?

https://spacecenter.org/exhibits-and-ex ... n-control/

https://www.nasa.gov/feature/apollo-mis ... oric-glory

Or are we talking about different places?

I would love to walk through the space station.

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Re: Falcon 9 Launch to the International Space Station

Post by whodidntante » Fri May 29, 2020 9:35 pm

LadyGeek wrote:
Fri May 29, 2020 8:28 pm
One tenet I follow is "If you want something, ask. They can always say No".

My once-in-a-lifetime tour of Mission Control was simply because I asked in a meeting "Can I take a tour of Apollo Mission Control?". The answer was "Sure, it's right next door". Myself and the rest of my group literally ran across the hallway and were transported back in time.

My next question - "Can I see the ISS control room?". The answer was "Sure, it's downstairs. Sorry, but they're operating right now, so you have to stay behind the visitor glass.". Downstairs we went.

At lunch time, one of the NASA employees asked us "Do you want to see the ISS training facility? I can get you in before they open, 6:45 AM." We were there at 6:30 AM and had the run of the facility. They not only have the full-size ISS, but all the lunar module prototypes and the space shuttle trainer. Yes, myself and a coworker were inside the trainer. That's one heck of an archive and an even better tour (no one bothered us and everything was open).

I captured a ton of photos with my cellphone, not to mention movies of ISS activity while I was in the control room.

To be clear, this was several years ago on a one-time project from a prior employer.

At the time, there were over 10,000 people working in NASA Houston. They hold a lot of meetings.
Cool.

My friend is a geologist and arranged for me to hold an assortment of Apollo moon rocks. Well, I had to wear gloves. But still, that was great.

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