Alternatives to Craftsman Tools

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Iowa David
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Alternatives to Craftsman Tools

Post by Iowa David »

I’ve slowly acquired a vast set of Craftsman hand tools over the last 20 years and have generally felt like their quality was perfectly fine for consumer use.

I recently bought a new adjustable wrench and was disappointed with quality and how “cheap” it felt in my hands.

I know a lot of their manufacturing has gradually moved abroad and hadn’t noticed the quality drop off until this tool.

I bought this adjustable wrench new from Amazon. Any chance there are different quality standards based on where it was purchased from?

As petty as it sounds, I like my stuff to match and don’t like the idea of having oddball tool brands mixed, but is there a good quality/value hand tool brand that you would recommend as an alternative?
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Housedoc
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Re: Alternatives to Craftsman Tools

Post by Housedoc »

I have switched to Home Depot and Lowe's branded hand tools. Lifetime warranty and when HD goes bankrupt I will have bigger issues than free tool replacement.
bob60014
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Re: Alternatives to Craftsman Tools

Post by bob60014 »

Buy them used! Knowing the quality has diminished, Ive bought the bulk of my older Craftsmans hand tools at garage sales and more recently on Facebook Marketplace. Not as convenient as shopping at the store or Amazon, but I watch for estate type sales, clearing dads stuff and the like. It amazing the great stuff that's out there, cheap too.
Last edited by bob60014 on Sat May 16, 2020 8:49 am, edited 1 time in total.
gmc4h232
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Re: Alternatives to Craftsman Tools

Post by gmc4h232 »

look at wright tool - they are made in usa (except cougar line) and the prices dont seem as outrageous as the snapon/mac/matco stuff.
runner3081
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Re: Alternatives to Craftsman Tools

Post by runner3081 »

Iowa David wrote: Sat May 16, 2020 7:09 am Any chance there are different quality standards based on where it was purchased from?
The only standard that remains for craftsmen, are cheaply made tools from China.

Unfortunately, they pretty much sold out the brand a few years ago. No point of wasting money on that brand anymore.
lazydavid
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Re: Alternatives to Craftsman Tools

Post by lazydavid »

Yeah unfortunately they've been crap for quite a few years now. Like others have said, Husky (Home Depot) and Kobalt (Lowe's) are the modern equivalent of what Craftsman used to be. For power tools, I would say Rigid (Home Depot) is the modern equivalent.
FRANK2009
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Re: Alternatives to Craftsman Tools

Post by FRANK2009 »

Harbor Freight seems pretty good for a consumer. I do all sorts of work on the car with their tools. No complaints.
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ClevrChico
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Re: Alternatives to Craftsman Tools

Post by ClevrChico »

I buy German made tools online for quality tools. The brands I've tried are all great quality.

For tools I'm not particular about, Harbor Freight is surprisingly decent and cheap.
tm3
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Re: Alternatives to Craftsman Tools

Post by tm3 »

Klein -- or any other made in the USA brand.
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climber2020
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Re: Alternatives to Craftsman Tools

Post by climber2020 »

I have a few Knipex tools and have been very happy with them. They're made in Germany & you can buy them on Amazon.
dukeblue219
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Re: Alternatives to Craftsman Tools

Post by dukeblue219 »

Allegedly Craftsman has some made in America tools again now that the brand is owned by Stanley Black & Decker, but there are also low end Chinese versions as well still.

The damage is done though; I've never met anyone my age or even close to it who associates the name Craftsman or Sears with quality.
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bertilak
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Re: Alternatives to Craftsman Tools

Post by bertilak »

tm3 wrote: Sat May 16, 2020 8:07 am Klein -- or any other made in the USA brand.
Over the past 2 or 3 years I bought a few Kleins. I like them. Great quality.

Their web page says American made since 1857.
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vineviz
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Re: Alternatives to Craftsman Tools

Post by vineviz »

climber2020 wrote: Sat May 16, 2020 8:13 am I have a few Knipex tools and have been very happy with them. They're made in Germany & you can buy them on Amazon.
tm3 wrote: Sat May 16, 2020 8:07 am Klein -- or any other made in the USA brand.
These two are what I choose when I want something decent.
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terran
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Re: Alternatives to Craftsman Tools

Post by terran »

Housedoc wrote: Sat May 16, 2020 7:15 am I have switched to Home Depot and Lowe's branded hand tools. Lifetime warranty and when HD goes bankrupt I will have bigger issues than free tool replacement.
Like you did when Sears went bankrupt? I think you might be overestimating how bad things would have to be for Home Depot to go bankrupt. Businesses come and go. That's what they do.
mtmingus
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Re: Alternatives to Craftsman Tools

Post by mtmingus »

The only things I like in local estate sales: good old tools!
I don't care the brands, if they are old, they are good.
koalb
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Re: Alternatives to Craftsman Tools

Post by koalb »

For sockets and wrenches, I'd try to get my hands on SnapOn, if you can get access to them.

For other hand tools, it really depends on the exact product category. I really like what Milwaukee is producing these days.

DeWalt, Bosch, Makita – don't think you can go wrong there for power tools. I know a lot of people like Rigid. It's just not my taste.

If you've got the appetite for it, you're never going to beat Festool for power tools.
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Re: Alternatives to Craftsman Tools

Post by Sandtrap »

dukeblue219 wrote: Sat May 16, 2020 8:22 am Allegedly Craftsman has some made in America tools again now that the brand is owned by Stanley Black & Decker, but there are also low end Chinese versions as well still.

The damage is done though; I've never met anyone my age or even close to it who associates the name Craftsman or Sears with quality.
+1
I know a number of folks that had continued to shop at Sears and bought "Craftsman" anything because of a long history of doing so, despite knowing that the products were now produced in China and of lower quality.

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jeep5ter
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Re: Alternatives to Craftsman Tools

Post by jeep5ter »

Look at the tool itself. If it says Made in USA, or Made in Germany, it will be of acceptable quality. If it says Made in China it won't.
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Re: Alternatives to Craftsman Tools

Post by brokendirtdart »

I stopped buying Craftsman hand tools about 20 years ago. Now, I'll pick up used replacements from flea markets and such.

If I need new sets, I'll look towards Wright, Snap On, Proto(lots of surplus tools available), or SK Tools. I picked up a nice 1/2" drive deep metric set from SK a couple years ago. My 3/8" SK flex head ratchet is the first ratchet I always grab. Good stuff.

For impact sockets, I go cheapish and chinesium. Tekton has treated me well there.
Mr. Rumples
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Re: Alternatives to Craftsman Tools

Post by Mr. Rumples »

I like Milwaukee I suppose, but there is no substitute for old Craftsman tools. I bought a Craftsman belt sander at a thrift sore a few months ago for $4. My neighbor makes custom outdoor furniture; he offered me $20, it was up to $40, by then I realized I had something I shouldn't part with.

Years ago I got a Freud jig saw which is a wonderful tool; alas they aren't carried at the stores in the area.
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Re: Alternatives to Craftsman Tools

Post by sport »

SK makes high quality professional hand tools.
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Raymond
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Re: Alternatives to Craftsman Tools

Post by Raymond »

brokendirtdart wrote: Sat May 16, 2020 9:24 am...For impact sockets, I go cheapish and chinesium. Tekton has treated me well there.
I like Tekton too.

Per their website (https://www.tekton.com/about-us), about 75% of their products are made in Taiwan (still "Chinese" but not the People's Republic), 19% in the United States, and 5% in the PRC.
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Laker1
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Re: Alternatives to Craftsman Tools

Post by Laker1 »

I use whatever the NAPA store is selling...if one breaks I call them and they will bring me another one or I can exchange when I go into the store...in over 40 years not one single issue. If NAPA Is gone we have a much bigger issue than tools...LOL
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Re: Alternatives to Craftsman Tools

Post by Nestegg_User »

thanks for the info, if I need anything in the future

All my old Craftsman tools are from US (they were made by CF & I (Colorado Fuel and Iron) tool steel division at Pueblo... now long gone)

They used to ship up crates of mixed tools up to the Denver area (ages ago when I was there) and were priced at huge discounts. I created quite a set of good tools, although there were times I had to get something from Snapon; the current offerings are nowhere near what the old stuff was.
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Re: Alternatives to Craftsman Tools

Post by Broken Man 1999 »

koalb wrote: Sat May 16, 2020 9:14 am For sockets and wrenches, I'd try to get my hands on SnapOn, if you can get access to them.

For other hand tools, it really depends on the exact product category. I really like what Milwaukee is producing these days.

DeWalt, Bosch, Makita – don't think you can go wrong there for power tools. I know a lot of people like Rigid. It's just not my taste.

If you've got the appetite for it, you're never going to beat Festool for power tools.
Years ago SnapOn used to have a truck that would visit dealerships looking for sales to mechanics. My FIL and BIL were/are Mercedes mechanics and they had/have gobs of SnapOn tools. I seem to remember they had a lot of Mac tools, as well. No idea about current quality of either brand today.

A Jaycee buddy actually sold Rigid tools, and his introduction was, "One day you will wish the tool in your hand is a Rigid tool."

Broken Man 1999
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snowman
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Re: Alternatives to Craftsman Tools

Post by snowman »

Seems like all of my suggestions have already been mentioned... but I'll add my voice anyway.

Kobalt/Husky/Rigid is what Craftsman used to be. Buy with confidence. Love the lifetime warranty but have not needed it for anything yet.
Harbor Freight - surprisingly good place to buy some tools. Their extendable wrench is my #1 go-to tool.
Estate/garage sales - if it's old and heavy, it's generally a good tool and will last my kid's lifetime.
Bosch/DeWalt/Makita/Milwaukee/PC - never had bad experience with any of them. Generally like Bosch and DeWalt the best.

Yeah, it's kind of weird shopping at Lowe's and seeing red Craftsman section next to blue Kobalt. From the business strategy standpoint, it makes no sense to me. I am sure they thought it through, just doesn't work with me. I skip the red and go straight to blue.
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Cheez-It Guy
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Re: Alternatives to Craftsman Tools

Post by Cheez-It Guy »

Please stop buying tools from Harbor Freight. I'm about as cheap as they come, but not for tools. Nothing worse than a cheap and unreliable tool. Even if it's a one-time-use tool, I don't support the business model. Don't prop it up by continuing to buy garbage tools from China at the expense of quality manufacturers.
jeep5ter
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Re: Alternatives to Craftsman Tools

Post by jeep5ter »

It may be worth it to stop by Ace Hardware. A couple of years ago, I stumbled upon a 108 piece set of Craftsman sockets made in USA and snatched it up for my kid to have a decent set.
02nz
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Re: Alternatives to Craftsman Tools

Post by 02nz »

I bought a ratcheting screwdriver made by Channellock based on a Wirecutter recommendation (https://thewirecutter.com/reviews/the-b ... d-toolbox/). It is very well made and has worked great.

Haven't used their other tools but they seem to be made in the USA or Canada, and priced accordingly. Here's their Amazon page: https://www.amazon.com/stores/Channello ... B4C4342FF2?
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Iowa David
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Re: Alternatives to Craftsman Tools

Post by Iowa David »

runner3081 wrote: Sat May 16, 2020 7:28 am
The only standard that remains for craftsmen, are cheaply made tools from China.

Unfortunately, they pretty much sold out the brand a few years ago. No point of wasting money on that brand anymore.
lazydavid wrote: Sat May 16, 2020 7:35 am Yeah unfortunately they've been crap for quite a few years now. Like others have said, Husky (Home Depot) and Kobalt (Lowe's) are the modern equivalent of what Craftsman used to be. For power tools, I would say Rigid (Home Depot) is the modern equivalent.

Sandtrap wrote: Sat May 16, 2020 9:19 am
dukeblue219 wrote: Sat May 16, 2020 8:22 am Allegedly Craftsman has some made in America tools again now that the brand is owned by Stanley Black & Decker, but there are also low end Chinese versions as well still.

The damage is done though; I've never met anyone my age or even close to it who associates the name Craftsman or Sears with quality.
+1
I know a number of folks that had continued to shop at Sears and bought "Craftsman" anything because of a long history of doing so, despite knowing that the products were now produced in China and of lower quality.

j
jeep5ter wrote: Sat May 16, 2020 9:19 am Look at the tool itself. If it says Made in USA, or Made in Germany, it will be of acceptable quality. If it says Made in China it won't.
Unfortunately, I think you are all correct.

Image
jeep5ter wrote: Sat May 16, 2020 11:05 am It may be worth it to stop by Ace Hardware. A couple of years ago, I stumbled upon a 108 piece set of Craftsman sockets made in USA and snatched it up for my kid to have a decent set.
Good tip - I’ll definitely check this out. Appreciate everyone’s perspective on this.
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tibbitts
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Re: Alternatives to Craftsman Tools

Post by tibbitts »

Broken Man 1999 wrote: Sat May 16, 2020 10:30 am
koalb wrote: Sat May 16, 2020 9:14 am For sockets and wrenches, I'd try to get my hands on SnapOn, if you can get access to them.

For other hand tools, it really depends on the exact product category. I really like what Milwaukee is producing these days.

DeWalt, Bosch, Makita – don't think you can go wrong there for power tools. I know a lot of people like Rigid. It's just not my taste.

If you've got the appetite for it, you're never going to beat Festool for power tools.
Years ago SnapOn used to have a truck that would visit dealerships looking for sales to mechanics. My FIL and BIL were/are Mercedes mechanics and they had/have gobs of SnapOn tools. I seem to remember they had a lot of Mac tools, as well. No idea about current quality of either brand today.

A Jaycee buddy actually sold Rigid tools, and his introduction was, "One day you will wish the tool in your hand is a Rigid tool."

Broken Man 1999
I thought Snap-On still sold the same way.

Years ago Snap-On sold retail via mail order - they would send out a catalog like Craftsman you could order out of. I bought several tools I still have. I don't know how they sell now. However there were no huge discounts for sets as with Craftsman, so I could only afford to buy some specialty tools from Snap-On.
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Re: Alternatives to Craftsman Tools

Post by Broken Man 1999 »

tibbitts wrote: Sat May 16, 2020 11:55 am
Broken Man 1999 wrote: Sat May 16, 2020 10:30 am
koalb wrote: Sat May 16, 2020 9:14 am For sockets and wrenches, I'd try to get my hands on SnapOn, if you can get access to them.

For other hand tools, it really depends on the exact product category. I really like what Milwaukee is producing these days.

DeWalt, Bosch, Makita – don't think you can go wrong there for power tools. I know a lot of people like Rigid. It's just not my taste.

If you've got the appetite for it, you're never going to beat Festool for power tools.
Years ago SnapOn used to have a truck that would visit dealerships looking for sales to mechanics. My FIL and BIL were/are Mercedes mechanics and they had/have gobs of SnapOn tools. I seem to remember they had a lot of Mac tools, as well. No idea about current quality of either brand today.

A Jaycee buddy actually sold Rigid tools, and his introduction was, "One day you will wish the tool in your hand is a Rigid tool."

Broken Man 1999
I thought Snap-On still sold the same way.

Years ago Snap-On sold retail via mail order - they would send out a catalog like Craftsman you could order out of. I bought several tools I still have. I don't know how they sell now. However there were no huge discounts for sets as with Craftsman, so I could only afford to buy some specialty tools from Snap-On.
SnapOn very well might still send their tool trucks around to repair shops. I'll ask BIL the next time I talk to him.

I was at his shop one day when the SnapOn truck came by. The mechanics reminded me of kids running to ice-cream trucks!

Broken Man 1999
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CardinalRule
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Re: Alternatives to Craftsman Tools

Post by CardinalRule »

Trucks are still a key sales channel for Snap-On. You can get your very own "mobile" franchise, with no real estate costs. :happy

https://www.snapon.com/EN/Franchise/Inv ... nformation
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Re: Alternatives to Craftsman Tools

Post by ubermax »

bob60014 wrote: Sat May 16, 2020 7:22 am Buy them used! Knowing the quality has diminished, Ive bought the bulk of my older Craftsmans hand tools at garage sales and more recently on Facebook Marketplace. Not as convenient as shopping at the store or Amazon, but I watch for estate type sales, clearing dads stuff and the like. It amazing the great stuff that's out there, cheap too.
+1 , I agree , and I think a lot of the responses were good advise , German made (Solingen steel) , Snap On , and some of the power tool makers like Milwaukee , etc. - I still have Craftsman hand tools with a metal toolbox that are at least 45 years old and a Porter Cable router and circular saw that go back a few years and think I still might have a Disston hand saw that's worth a few bucks to someone - buying Chinese today is like it was buying Japanese back in the 50's , the connotation was cheap and poor quality - it's a bottom line world today unfortunately .
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Re: Alternatives to Craftsman Tools

Post by London »

Completely serious question; what makes Snap On tools worth the premium? I do a reasonable amount of small engine work with Home Depot tools and have never had an issue but perhaps I don’t know what I’m missing with a more high end brand?
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Re: Alternatives to Craftsman Tools

Post by baconavocado »

I don't have much to add to what has already been said except that I'm not too impressed by a lifetime warranty. If a wrench or socket doesn't fit well it doesn't matter to me whether the manufacturer will replace it if it breaks.
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Re: Alternatives to Craftsman Tools

Post by Jack FFR1846 »

Snap on makes very good tools. I have a couple (found both at various times on the road during my walk). There's a shop on my street and I still see the Snap On and Mac trucks there from time to time. My mechanic friends tell me that advantage of Snap On is that you can get that needed tool RIGHT NOW with the truck there and pay for it over time.
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Re: Alternatives to Craftsman Tools

Post by curmudgeon »

London wrote: Sat May 16, 2020 1:01 pm Completely serious question; what makes Snap On tools worth the premium? I do a reasonable amount of small engine work with Home Depot tools and have never had an issue but perhaps I don’t know what I’m missing with a more high end brand?
My view is that Snap-On and other pro grade tools generally use higher grade steel and more precision in their manufacturing, so you are less likely to get a tool that starts a bit out of spec or wears/bends where it shouldn't. They also pay more attention to the design and offer more specific angles and options for wrench heads. The old Craftsman wrenches tended to put a bit of extra steel in the wrenches, which made them less breakable, but also harder to use in really tight spots. I sometimes find I can get a snap-on box end wrench on a bolt where with the craftsman I could only use the open-end version.

I've got a mixture of 60-year old Craftsman, Snap-On of various vintage, and SK in my main tool box, and the Snap-On wrenches and ratchet are definitely the first I will grab; they are just a bit better.

I've also got a second fairly complete set of sockets and wrenches bought from Costco a few years ago (sold under the Crescent name). They were made in China, but built to a pretty high standard, and I've found them equal to the old Craftsman tools.
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Re: Alternatives to Craftsman Tools

Post by Scatterbrain »

Buy the good older stuff on ebay/craigslist for very good prices
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Watty
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Re: Alternatives to Craftsman Tools

Post by Watty »

Iowa David wrote: Sat May 16, 2020 7:09 am I bought this adjustable wrench new from Amazon. Any chance there are different quality standards based on where it was purchased from?
Craftsman quality has gone downhill but there is a chance that it was counterfeit.

I would return it to Amazon if this was a recent purchase.

This is a huge problem with almost anything including things you would not normally think of.

Of all things I bought a 12 pack of some brand name socks from Amazon that were almost comically terrible and nothing like other socks by that brand that I had. I contacted Amazon and suggested they might be counterfeit, they quickly refunded the money and they did not even have me ship the old socks back. Homeless shelters normally need socks but these were so bad that I just threw them away.

Amazon has been criticized for not doing much about counterfeits and if you Google that you will see lots of information on that.

I recently bought SD cards somewhere somewhere else just because there were so many reports of counterfeit SD cards on Amazon.
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Re: Alternatives to Craftsman Tools

Post by London »

curmudgeon wrote: Sat May 16, 2020 4:37 pm
London wrote: Sat May 16, 2020 1:01 pm Completely serious question; what makes Snap On tools worth the premium? I do a reasonable amount of small engine work with Home Depot tools and have never had an issue but perhaps I don’t know what I’m missing with a more high end brand?
My view is that Snap-On and other pro grade tools generally use higher grade steel and more precision in their manufacturing, so you are less likely to get a tool that starts a bit out of spec or wears/bends where it shouldn't. They also pay more attention to the design and offer more specific angles and options for wrench heads. The old Craftsman wrenches tended to put a bit of extra steel in the wrenches, which made them less breakable, but also harder to use in really tight spots. I sometimes find I can get a snap-on box end wrench on a bolt where with the craftsman I could only use the open-end version.
Good explanation, thanks.
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Re: Alternatives to Craftsman Tools

Post by jello_nailer »

^+1 above.
I have a mix of Snap-On and older craftsman, mostly S-O. They just perform better, but I can't put my finger on why? It's probably a combination of everything mentioned above.

I was just on the Snap-On website 5 minutes ago picking out a Series 80 3/8" Ratchet. It's about $155, it's worth it in my opinion.
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FrankTheViking
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Re: Alternatives to Craftsman Tools

Post by FrankTheViking »

For power tools I use all DeWalt and I am very, very happy with them.

I do know gun manufacturers will make cheaper variants of guns for WalMart etc. Wouldn't surprise me if Craftsman does this for Amazon.
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Re: Alternatives to Craftsman Tools

Post by Ping Pong »

For awhile Craftsman tools were going downhill (during the tail end of Sears owning the brand), but the contract Lowe’s has with the brand (new owner) dictates they must be high quality. If you buy Craftsman from Lowe’s, you get the good stuff. As mentioned up thread, Kobalt is also good.

It’s possible that by now all new Craftsman is good, though if you buy from a marketplace you won’t know if you’re getting the old crappy stock or a knockoff.
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Re: Alternatives to Craftsman Tools

Post by Normchad »

The fall of craftsman tools is sad, but was probably inevitable. I have a lot of their tools that my dad had used professionally dating back to the sixties. I don’t think anything from Husky or Kobalt is similar in quality.

On the other hand, I don’t think it’s that important anymore. Gone are the days when normal folks did frequent auto maintenance, etc. so there just aren’t that many people that need lifetime quality tools.

Not that it matters, but they aren’t garbage because they are made in China. They are garbage because the owners of the brand decided to make garbage. Similarly, things made in the USA will only be superior if yet owners want it to be that way. China is certainly capable of excellent manufacturing, as is the US and numerous other countries.
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Re: Alternatives to Craftsman Tools

Post by onthecusp »

London wrote: Sat May 16, 2020 1:01 pm Completely serious question; what makes Snap On tools worth the premium? I do a reasonable amount of small engine work with Home Depot tools and have never had an issue but perhaps I don’t know what I’m missing with a more high end brand?
Just two data points from me. I have a bunch of older Craftsman combination wrenches. Nice tools. I have a single Snap On 9/16 combo wrench I picked up cheap at an auction 30 years ago. It's my go to 9/16. Comfortable in the hand even though it looks thin enough to cut you. The thin profile gives more room in tight places. The chamfers on the box end slip on and off of nuts easier. But I'm no pro mechanic and would not pay the price after I already have what I need for 99% of what I do. My second data point, three months ago (seems like yesterday) I wandered an estate sale. Bought an old pair of snap on needle nose pliers for a couple dollars. Dark to black but not rusted. They work like they were built yesterday.

Someone mentioned NAPA. I have a set of very small combo wrenches from there. They remind me of my 9/16, nice stuff.
boglefannyc
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Re: Alternatives to Craftsman Tools

Post by boglefannyc »

I am not loyal to any brand or country. I have tools from Hitachi, Ryobi, Wera, Engineer, Knipex, Craftsman, Channellock, Milwaukee, Gearwrench, Kobalt, Husky and Harbor Freight. I buy based on reviews, quality, sales and need at the moment.
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Ged
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Re: Alternatives to Craftsman Tools

Post by Ged »

Some of the brands I've had good luck with in the past few years:

Wiha Klein Bessey Wera Foredom Festool Bosch Porter-Cable Whiteside Bessey Fein.
boomer_techie
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Re: Alternatives to Craftsman Tools

Post by boomer_techie »

Iowa David wrote: Sat May 16, 2020 7:09 am I know a lot of their manufacturing has gradually moved abroad and hadn’t noticed the quality drop off until this tool.
Look on the tool for markings of the form D-AI. The code before the dash will identify the subcontractor who made the tool. There are lists online where people have figured out the subcontractor codes. The code after the dash will identify the year. I think AA means 2011. This advances to the next letter each year. That would mean that AI is 2019.

Craftsman hand tools used to be made domestically at a variety of places. About a decade ago, production started moving to China. One of the last domestic vendors was Western Forge (code of WF) who made screwdrivers and adjustable wrenches.

Stanley's acquisition of the Craftsman name has upset the tool cart once again. I think there was a brief interval where Stanley had to source whatever they could just to keep product flowing. Looks like they've had time now to improve the production - and return to the design language of ten years ago. The wrenches now offered at Lowe's look just like my USA Craftsman - just with the addition of the "dash codes"* and without the "USA".

* Before the year "AA", tools generally didn't have a date code, though some did. BTW, "Z" came before "AA".
LearnerSD
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Re: Alternatives to Craftsman Tools

Post by LearnerSD »

Try Pawn shops. The maker's name may be unreadable, but you can tell by the condition how well it will work, scars and all!
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