How to sell inherited collections?

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atomicsquirrel
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How to sell inherited collections?

Post by atomicsquirrel » Mon Feb 17, 2020 12:22 pm

I have many baseball and football cards from the 40's and 50's. Also have a medium sized coin collection and some gold jewelry. I have no sentimental attachment to any of this stuff and see them as only something else I have to move around and secure. None of the collections are what I would consider mint so I'm not seeking to sell for top dollar I just don't want to get ripped off. What percentage of retail would be appropriate and how can I make sure I don't have a hidden gem?

I don't mind selling any special pieces piecemeal but I'd prefer to sell them as whole collections and make less money.

Any advice on where to begin and pitfalls to watch out for?

decapod10
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Re: How to sell inherited collections?

Post by decapod10 » Mon Feb 17, 2020 12:33 pm

I have some related experience buying and selling collectible cards (Magic the Gathering cards specifically).

For sure, you will get top dollar by selling things individually on places like eBay. Not sure if sports cards and coins have a separate forum for selling.

The second option would be just to take out the high value items (whatever cutoff you think is reasonable) and sell those individually, then sell the rest of the collection in bulk to a store/collector.

The third option would be just to sell the whole thing as one piece.

One of the best ways to determine the market value of a card is to go on ebay and look to see what your card has sold for (not necessarily what people are listing them for). The true value is what they are selling for.

I think if you sell the collection as one piece, maybe 50% of value is a reasonable starting place? The store you sell it to will want to be able to turn a profit, and selling collectibles is not the easiest thing in the world. It depends in part on how liquid these things are. The more liquid the collectible is, the more (percentage wise) the store will be willing to pay.

Bobby206
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Re: How to sell inherited collections?

Post by Bobby206 » Mon Feb 17, 2020 12:40 pm

atomicsquirrel wrote:
Mon Feb 17, 2020 12:22 pm
I have many baseball and football cards from the 40's and 50's. Also have a medium sized coin collection and some gold jewelry. I have no sentimental attachment to any of this stuff and see them as only something else I have to move around and secure. None of the collections are what I would consider mint so I'm not seeking to sell for top dollar I just don't want to get ripped off. What percentage of retail would be appropriate and how can I make sure I don't have a hidden gem?

I don't mind selling any special pieces piecemeal but I'd prefer to sell them as whole collections and make less money.

Any advice on where to begin and pitfalls to watch out for?
With cards it's all about condition. The difference between a true "mint" condition card and a "near mint" can be ten-fold or more. Likewise, drop down to VG or EX and it might be another 5-fold down. So, making these up let's say a 1955 Willie Mays is worth $100,000 if it's graded a 10, $10,000 if graded a 9, $1,000 if an 8, and $20 if graded a 2. You can do the math in between. Just completely hypothetical numbers as I have no clue what a '55 Mays is worth. You might look into getting a few of the top cards (Aaron, Mays, etc...) graded by PSA or Beckett. It's about $15-20 each to grade but if the card is worth $500 or $1,000 it's worth it. Or just find someone trustworthy to advise you (ya, good luck with that). You can open a free account at Collectors Universe (collectors.com I think) and post a few scans. You'll get many detailed replies from people indicating what they think the cards would grade for and thus what they are "worth." Selling on Ebay is probably best for maximizing the money but it's a job to sell.

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prudent
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Re: How to sell inherited collections?

Post by prudent » Mon Feb 17, 2020 12:43 pm

The only way I know to find out if you have a hidden gem is to research what you have. I would not count on any potential buyer to examine each card or coin and offer more for any rarer items.

As a coin dealer once explained to me, "if a seller asks what would I pay for their collection, and I make an offer, they can accept or not. It's not my job to do their homework and spend an hour or more looking at their items to maximize THEIR return. I do not answer the question 'what are these worth' ". When I asked if that was entirely fair, he explained how he used to do it and why he changed.
It played out like this:
Customer will ask me what are these 50 silver dollars worth?
I would say I would pay $15 each for these 49, but this last one I would pay $200.
Customer will say Wow! OK, I'll sell those 49 and keep the $200 one.
Then they take the $200 one to another coin shop and after telling that person they got an offer for $200, the other shop will offer $210 and get the coin. So why would I want to only get the common stuff and have the good items go somewhere else after I did all the work?

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atomicsquirrel
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Re: How to sell inherited collections?

Post by atomicsquirrel » Mon Feb 17, 2020 12:47 pm

decapod10 wrote:
Mon Feb 17, 2020 12:33 pm
I have some related experience buying and selling collectible cards (Magic the Gathering cards specifically).

For sure, you will get top dollar by selling things individually on places like eBay. Not sure if sports cards and coins have a separate forum for selling.

The second option would be just to take out the high value items (whatever cutoff you think is reasonable) and sell those individually, then sell the rest of the collection in bulk to a store/collector.

The third option would be just to sell the whole thing as one piece.

One of the best ways to determine the market value of a card is to go on ebay and look to see what your card has sold for (not necessarily what people are listing them for). The true value is what they are selling for.

I think if you sell the collection as one piece, maybe 50% of value is a reasonable starting place? The store you sell it to will want to be able to turn a profit, and selling collectibles is not the easiest thing in the world. It depends in part on how liquid these things are. The more liquid the collectible is, the more (percentage wise) the store will be willing to pay.
I was thinking if I got 25% to 45% of retail price may be reasonable on the cards and coins (with no silver value).

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atomicsquirrel
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Re: How to sell inherited collections?

Post by atomicsquirrel » Mon Feb 17, 2020 12:49 pm

Bobby206 wrote:
Mon Feb 17, 2020 12:40 pm
atomicsquirrel wrote:
Mon Feb 17, 2020 12:22 pm
I have many baseball and football cards from the 40's and 50's. Also have a medium sized coin collection and some gold jewelry. I have no sentimental attachment to any of this stuff and see them as only something else I have to move around and secure. None of the collections are what I would consider mint so I'm not seeking to sell for top dollar I just don't want to get ripped off. What percentage of retail would be appropriate and how can I make sure I don't have a hidden gem?

I don't mind selling any special pieces piecemeal but I'd prefer to sell them as whole collections and make less money.

Any advice on where to begin and pitfalls to watch out for?
With cards it's all about condition. The difference between a true "mint" condition card and a "near mint" can be ten-fold or more. Likewise, drop down to VG or EX and it might be another 5-fold down. So, making these up let's say a 1955 Willie Mays is worth $100,000 if it's graded a 10, $10,000 if graded a 9, $1,000 if an 8, and $20 if graded a 2. You can do the math in between. Just completely hypothetical numbers as I have no clue what a '55 Mays is worth. You might look into getting a few of the top cards (Aaron, Mays, etc...) graded by PSA or Beckett. It's about $15-20 each to grade but if the card is worth $500 or $1,000 it's worth it. Or just find someone trustworthy to advise you (ya, good luck with that). You can open a free account at Collectors Universe (collectors.com I think) and post a few scans. You'll get many detailed replies from people indicating what they think the cards would grade for and thus what they are "worth." Selling on Ebay is probably best for maximizing the money but it's a job to sell.
Yeah, my fear is I go to a dealer and get scammed. Point taken on the condition being everything. Thank You.

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atomicsquirrel
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Re: How to sell inherited collections?

Post by atomicsquirrel » Mon Feb 17, 2020 12:53 pm

prudent wrote:
Mon Feb 17, 2020 12:43 pm
The only way I know to find out if you have a hidden gem is to research what you have. I would not count on any potential buyer to examine each card or coin and offer more for any rarer items.

As a coin dealer once explained to me, "if a seller asks what would I pay for their collection, and I make an offer, they can accept or not. It's not my job to do their homework and spend an hour or more looking at their items to maximize THEIR return. I do not answer the question 'what are these worth' ". When I asked if that was entirely fair, he explained how he used to do it and why he changed.
It played out like this:
Customer will ask me what are these 50 silver dollars worth?
I would say I would pay $15 each for these 49, but this last one I would pay $200.
Customer will say Wow! OK, I'll sell those 49 and keep the $200 one.
Then they take the $200 one to another coin shop and after telling that person they got an offer for $200, the other shop will offer $210 and get the coin. So why would I want to only get the common stuff and have the good items go somewhere else after I did all the work?
Yup, this makes 100% sense. Its up to me to know the value. Guess I have some work ahead of me.

decapod10
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Re: How to sell inherited collections?

Post by decapod10 » Mon Feb 17, 2020 12:54 pm

prudent wrote:
Mon Feb 17, 2020 12:43 pm
The only way I know to find out if you have a hidden gem is to research what you have. I would not count on any potential buyer to examine each card or coin and offer more for any rarer items.

As a coin dealer once explained to me, "if a seller asks what would I pay for their collection, and I make an offer, they can accept or not. It's not my job to do their homework and spend an hour or more looking at their items to maximize THEIR return. I do not answer the question 'what are these worth' ". When I asked if that was entirely fair, he explained how he used to do it and why he changed.
It played out like this:
Customer will ask me what are these 50 silver dollars worth?
I would say I would pay $15 each for these 49, but this last one I would pay $200.
Customer will say Wow! OK, I'll sell those 49 and keep the $200 one.
Then they take the $200 one to another coin shop and after telling that person they got an offer for $200, the other shop will offer $210 and get the coin. So why would I want to only get the common stuff and have the good items go somewhere else after I did all the work?
Yeah, if OP really cares about not getting ripped off, doing research into the value of these things are important. I know nothing about coins, but i would imagine that baseball cards from the 40's and 50's could be quite valuable.

It's actually not that difficult to sell cards on eBay actually, I've never had a problem with it, but not everyone would find that worth their time. You also have to understand grading really well if you're going to sell on your own, otherwise you may get complaints about what you advertise vs what the buyer perception of the card condition is.

Another place that other than eBay you can look is PWCC Auctions. Don't listen to all their "investment" advice, but the useful thing they have is they have a database of all their previous sales which is free to access. Also they can sell cards individually for you if you want, and they take a 10% cut or so, in addition to eBay/PayPal fees I think. Probably better than selling to a store.

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atomicsquirrel
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Re: How to sell inherited collections?

Post by atomicsquirrel » Mon Feb 17, 2020 1:00 pm

decapod10 wrote:
Mon Feb 17, 2020 12:54 pm
prudent wrote:
Mon Feb 17, 2020 12:43 pm
The only way I know to find out if you have a hidden gem is to research what you have. I would not count on any potential buyer to examine each card or coin and offer more for any rarer items.

As a coin dealer once explained to me, "if a seller asks what would I pay for their collection, and I make an offer, they can accept or not. It's not my job to do their homework and spend an hour or more looking at their items to maximize THEIR return. I do not answer the question 'what are these worth' ". When I asked if that was entirely fair, he explained how he used to do it and why he changed.
It played out like this:
Customer will ask me what are these 50 silver dollars worth?
I would say I would pay $15 each for these 49, but this last one I would pay $200.
Customer will say Wow! OK, I'll sell those 49 and keep the $200 one.
Then they take the $200 one to another coin shop and after telling that person they got an offer for $200, the other shop will offer $210 and get the coin. So why would I want to only get the common stuff and have the good items go somewhere else after I did all the work?
Yeah, if OP really cares about not getting ripped off, doing research into the value of these things are important. I know nothing about coins, but i would imagine that baseball cards from the 40's and 50's could be quite valuable.

It's actually not that difficult to sell cards on eBay actually, I've never had a problem with it, but not everyone would find that worth their time. You also have to understand grading really well if you're going to sell on your own, otherwise you may get complaints about what you advertise vs what the buyer perception of the card condition is.

Another place that other than eBay you can look is PWCC Auctions. Don't listen to all their "investment" advice, but the useful thing they have is they have a database of all their previous sales which is free to access. Also they can sell cards individually for you if you want, and they take a 10% cut or so, in addition to eBay/PayPal fees I think. Probably better than selling to a store.
I know nothing about sports cards other than some are valuable, others aren't. Since I'm not fan its hard to know which players are desirable. I get the Babe Ruth's and Micky Mantle's but the rest are lost on me. I'll use Ebay completed sales to do some digging.

There is a Red book and Blue book for coins so I'm going to pick those up for reference.

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Re: How to sell inherited collections?

Post by prudent » Mon Feb 17, 2020 1:01 pm

You don't need both Red and Blue books. Red book is for retail values, Blue is for "what could I get on a good day" when selling.

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atomicsquirrel
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Re: How to sell inherited collections?

Post by atomicsquirrel » Mon Feb 17, 2020 1:07 pm

prudent wrote:
Mon Feb 17, 2020 1:01 pm
You don't need both Red and Blue books. Red book is for retail values, Blue is for "what could I get on a good day" when selling.
The Blue Book it is. My expectations are tempered. I have no delusions of grandeur regarding retail pricing.

HereToLearn
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Re: How to sell inherited collections?

Post by HereToLearn » Mon Feb 17, 2020 1:09 pm

Is the gold jewelry something that could be reworked and worn by someone in your family? I have noticed people having the charms removed from those 1960's charm bracelets and hanging each charm on a slender chain. Or a broach/pin could be remade to hang as a pendant.

decapod10
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Re: How to sell inherited collections?

Post by decapod10 » Mon Feb 17, 2020 1:10 pm

atomicsquirrel wrote:
Mon Feb 17, 2020 1:00 pm
decapod10 wrote:
Mon Feb 17, 2020 12:54 pm
prudent wrote:
Mon Feb 17, 2020 12:43 pm
The only way I know to find out if you have a hidden gem is to research what you have. I would not count on any potential buyer to examine each card or coin and offer more for any rarer items.

As a coin dealer once explained to me, "if a seller asks what would I pay for their collection, and I make an offer, they can accept or not. It's not my job to do their homework and spend an hour or more looking at their items to maximize THEIR return. I do not answer the question 'what are these worth' ". When I asked if that was entirely fair, he explained how he used to do it and why he changed.
It played out like this:
Customer will ask me what are these 50 silver dollars worth?
I would say I would pay $15 each for these 49, but this last one I would pay $200.
Customer will say Wow! OK, I'll sell those 49 and keep the $200 one.
Then they take the $200 one to another coin shop and after telling that person they got an offer for $200, the other shop will offer $210 and get the coin. So why would I want to only get the common stuff and have the good items go somewhere else after I did all the work?
Yeah, if OP really cares about not getting ripped off, doing research into the value of these things are important. I know nothing about coins, but i would imagine that baseball cards from the 40's and 50's could be quite valuable.

It's actually not that difficult to sell cards on eBay actually, I've never had a problem with it, but not everyone would find that worth their time. You also have to understand grading really well if you're going to sell on your own, otherwise you may get complaints about what you advertise vs what the buyer perception of the card condition is.

Another place that other than eBay you can look is PWCC Auctions. Don't listen to all their "investment" advice, but the useful thing they have is they have a database of all their previous sales which is free to access. Also they can sell cards individually for you if you want, and they take a 10% cut or so, in addition to eBay/PayPal fees I think. Probably better than selling to a store.
I know nothing about sports cards other than some are valuable, others aren't. Since I'm not fan its hard to know which players are desirable. I get the Babe Ruth's and Micky Mantle's but the rest are lost on me. I'll use Ebay completed sales to do some digging.

There is a Red book and Blue book for coins so I'm going to pick those up for reference.
Yeah, eBay is good to start, but you can only search back 90 days or so. PWCC for very high end stuff, the history goes back farther which is nice. You can use the website Watchcount.com as well (http://www.watchcount.com/completed.php) which searches ebay. Sometimes the sale price is not listed for whatever reason, like sometimes best offers and things like that, so sometimes you can see that info on Watchcount.

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atomicsquirrel
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Re: How to sell inherited collections?

Post by atomicsquirrel » Mon Feb 17, 2020 1:14 pm

HereToLearn wrote:
Mon Feb 17, 2020 1:09 pm
Is the gold jewelry something that could be reworked and worn by someone in your family? I have noticed people having the charms removed from those 1960's charm bracelets and hanging each charm on a slender chain. Or a broach/pin could be remade to hang as a pendant.
My wife is not a fan of gold jewelry, so its really not possible.

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Re: How to sell inherited collections?

Post by Jack FFR1846 » Mon Feb 17, 2020 1:17 pm

Personally, I'd send all the gold to Apmex IF there's at least $1000 worth (about 1 Oz). Otherwise, they don't take it. They'll give you melt value.

For non-silver coins.....what are they? I can't think of coins that have any value that aren't silver or gold. I suppose the proof sets are worth something....I'd just go to a coin shop.

For the cards, depends what they are. If they were Magic the Gathering, yu-gi-oh, Poke Mon, there are shops that specialize in this stuff and even hold weekend games. They'd be a great bet. For sport-ball cards, I have no idea. I gave away all my 60's cards. Worthless to me. I'd warn about eBay. My son sold a bunch of cards there and had one challenged as real. eBay ALWAYS sides with the buyer, so there's always a chance that you pay shipping to give away your card and you get to still pay the eBay fee. I don't know what to do there.

There are good coin dealers out there. I had been culling non-wheat copper pennies (58-81) for fun and asked him what they were worth. He didn't try to low ball me or make up a story....he simply said "spend them". I dumped them into my credit union coin machine.

I wanted to add, for oddball coins of silver content, I sell them to my scrap dealer. He pays more than the coin shops or Apmex does.

For silver plate or gold plate, they pay base metal price. So figure that TV coin, plated in 18 mili grams of pure gold, it's got $5 of gold on it, but you're only going to get base metal price, which is probably zinc, so figure 5 cents a pound.
Last edited by Jack FFR1846 on Mon Feb 17, 2020 1:27 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Kenkat
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Re: How to sell inherited collections?

Post by Kenkat » Mon Feb 17, 2020 1:20 pm

If the 40s and 50s baseball cards are in reasonable condition, you could also contact Heritage Auctions (ha.com) and ask them to evaluate your collection for sale. They also have guides where you can look up past auction values. They also cover coins but typically only certified coins; these are encapsulated in plastic holders “aka slabs” from coin certification companies such as PCGS, NGC and ANACS.

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Re: How to sell inherited collections?

Post by psteinx » Mon Feb 17, 2020 1:22 pm

These are all separate kinds of collectibles, and there have been discussions about each kind at various times on this forum. You can try searching for them.

IIUC (I'm no expert):

Plated gold jewelry is junk, with minimal value. 14k or 18k gold jewelry generally has value based on metal content. A local "I buy gold" shop might offer you, I dunno, 60-70% of metal content value? There's at least one on-line melt place that, as of a few years ago, was in the 90% range. You can perhaps find the name in a search of these forums.

Coins - Yes, obviously, the silver and gold are going to be the most likely candidates for premium values, with a floor around their metal content.

Cards - 40s-50s is pretty old, but I think the overall market for this stuff is way down over the last 15-25 years.

For both the coins and the cards, even a non-expert can likely identify most of the likely high value ones, and get a sense of their value online. This will give you some kind of feel for the whole collection. Where to go from there depends, in part, on the likely overall value, and how much time the seller wants to invest into this. If the two collections are worth perhaps $500 each (retail), then perhaps the right approach is to spend a Saturday, visit ~3-4 local shops for each collection, and take the best offer. If the value is perhaps $5K or $50K or more, then a more time intensive approach is likely to be in order...

go140point6
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Re: How to sell inherited collections?

Post by go140point6 » Mon Feb 17, 2020 5:35 pm

It's a grind, but ebay is really the only method that you'll get anything of value I think, at least for comic books that was the case. Check out this thread from a couple years ago, I posted my experience on selling my 4000+ comic book collection. I think the basic premise is the same, do your homework, find out if you have anything rare or valuable enough to spend time selling and then start selling from the top.

viewtopic.php?f=11&t=197987#p3026356

I did somewhat have sentimental value to my collection, at least enough that I was willing to put in the work in selling it. I honestly can't imagine I would have gotten anywhere close to what I did had I just tried to sell it in bulk. But probably about 100 books made up the most value of what I received.

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Re: How to sell inherited collections?

Post by decapod10 » Mon Feb 17, 2020 5:44 pm

psteinx wrote:
Mon Feb 17, 2020 1:22 pm

Cards - 40s-50s is pretty old, but I think the overall market for this stuff is way down over the last 15-25 years.
For the high end stuff, baseball cards are still doing quite well, but all the stuff that I have from when I was growing up in the 80's is worthless. Like 1952 Topps Mickey Mantle prices are still quite high, especially stuff that is graded in good condition. Like a 6.5 1952 Topps Mantle sold for $95k a couple days ago. It is definitely worth taking an inventory of the cards and figuring out the value. No idea about coins though.

I know for MtG cards, internet forums love "I found these cards in my dad's attic are they worth anything?" kind of posts and can be helpful in sorting out what to look for, not sure if sports cards have an equivalent.

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Re: How to sell inherited collections?

Post by CAsage » Mon Feb 17, 2020 5:57 pm

psteinx wrote:
Mon Feb 17, 2020 1:22 pm
There's at least one on-line melt place that, as of a few years ago, was in the 90% range. You can perhaps find the name in a search of these forums.
Midwest Refineries will pay you a decent % of the actual gold value for all your scrap gold. Just box it up, insure it, and mail it to them. You will get a check in a few days. Note that you can weigh it yourself to estimate, but remember that 14kt gold is only 14/24 real gold, and they pay about 90% of the real value. The good thing is - you can be done with it very quickly!
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Re: How to sell inherited collections?

Post by suemarkp » Mon Feb 17, 2020 7:46 pm

I used to buy coins at or just under blue book prices on Craigslist. After selling some to dealers, I'm only getting about 60% of that book's value. Consider the blue book the price that dealers may sell to each other. If they buy from you, they want to sell it to another dealer so they still need some markup room. Grading with coins is also difficult, as grade matters a lot to numismatic coins. I've sold coins I was confident were Extra Fine whereas the dealer said no it is only Very Fine so I got the 60% factor on an even lower value. Its a subjective thing they beat you over the head with. You can send it out to be graded, but that costs about $30, so doesn't make sense on a lot of coins. And if it has been cleaned, it won't grade and you lose your $30.
Mark | Kent, WA

harvestbook
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Re: How to sell inherited collections?

Post by harvestbook » Mon Feb 17, 2020 7:50 pm

Former sports card dealer and shop owner. As stated above, condition is ALMOST everything, so the first thing I'd do is get a rough idea of grading--sharp corners, clean borders, good centering, absolutely no tears, creases, or writing. It won't take you much time to get a realistic view of condition, especially since you don't have a sentimental attachment and aren't anchored to a certain value or price.

40s and 50s are great eras to own cards from. but if the condition isn't top notch, then only the star and rookie and rarer cards will have much value. Unfortunately cards are a lot easier to buy than sell. I've been selling off the remnants of my collection on eBay for a couple of years, many at a loss, but I had to just look at what actual values were and not what I paid or thought "they should be worth." I've had very few problems doing this, just a couple of nickle-and-dimers complaining, but it does take effort.

If I wanted to get rid of all of it at once, I'd likely take the entire collection either to a few shops or a very large (100 dealers or more) card show and get offers. Most dealers are fair, especially if they know others might be making offers, but again, cards are easy to buy and hard to sell, so they will want to make sure they build in a profit margin when easily 80 percent of the cards might never sell at any real price. When I sold my store I probably sold at about 5-10 percent of what the total book value of the cards were at the time. So aside from condition, you'd need to familiarize yourself with the star, rookie, and rare cards (such as the high numbers of many Topps baseball card sets that were printed in much shorter supply).

So it will take a little time to max out the value, or I suppose you could let someone else inherit it from you and go to all the trouble. If you had someone you could trust who had interest, maybe they could sell them for you on eBay for a commission.
I'm not smart enough to know, and I can't afford to guess.

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atomicsquirrel
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Re: How to sell inherited collections?

Post by atomicsquirrel » Tue Feb 18, 2020 9:07 am

harvestbook wrote:
Mon Feb 17, 2020 7:50 pm
Former sports card dealer and shop owner. As stated above, condition is ALMOST everything, so the first thing I'd do is get a rough idea of grading--sharp corners, clean borders, good centering, absolutely no tears, creases, or writing. It won't take you much time to get a realistic view of condition, especially since you don't have a sentimental attachment and aren't anchored to a certain value or price.

40s and 50s are great eras to own cards from. but if the condition isn't top notch, then only the star and rookie and rarer cards will have much value. Unfortunately cards are a lot easier to buy than sell. I've been selling off the remnants of my collection on eBay for a couple of years, many at a loss, but I had to just look at what actual values were and not what I paid or thought "they should be worth." I've had very few problems doing this, just a couple of nickle-and-dimers complaining, but it does take effort.

If I wanted to get rid of all of it at once, I'd likely take the entire collection either to a few shops or a very large (100 dealers or more) card show and get offers. Most dealers are fair, especially if they know others might be making offers, but again, cards are easy to buy and hard to sell, so they will want to make sure they build in a profit margin when easily 80 percent of the cards might never sell at any real price. When I sold my store I probably sold at about 5-10 percent of what the total book value of the cards were at the time. So aside from condition, you'd need to familiarize yourself with the star, rookie, and rare cards (such as the high numbers of many Topps baseball card sets that were printed in much shorter supply).

So it will take a little time to max out the value, or I suppose you could let someone else inherit it from you and go to all the trouble. If you had someone you could trust who had interest, maybe they could sell them for you on eBay for a commission.
Thank you for your thoughts. Looks like educating myself is my best way to ensure I'm not ripped off.

NotWhoYouThink
Posts: 3037
Joined: Fri Dec 26, 2014 4:19 pm

Re: How to sell inherited collections?

Post by NotWhoYouThink » Tue Feb 18, 2020 9:31 am

I would give the stuff away to unclutter my life, and not spend one nanosecond worrying about getting ripped off. If someone else wants to spend their time sorting through and valuing and selling that stuff, good for them. But I wouldn't invest time becoming expert on something that didn't interest me just for a small amount of money.

RVosen
Posts: 73
Joined: Sun Dec 20, 2015 11:00 am

Re: How to sell inherited collections?

Post by RVosen » Wed Feb 19, 2020 7:30 am

EBay has a few cosigner options that would probably be the easiest way to get good value for the cards. You would just have to contact them, ship the cards out, they take care of the sales and you get the money after the fees are taken out.

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