Coronavirus (Consumer Issues) How you are preparing?

Questions on how we spend our money and our time - consumer goods and services, home and vehicle, leisure and recreational activities
Lynette
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Re: Coronavirus (Consumer Issues) How you are preparing?

Post by Lynette »

RobLyons wrote: Fri Mar 20, 2020 6:54 am I appreciate the recognition. This is the profession I chose and love. It's concerning and challenging but also rewarding.
Indeed, thanks for the work you do.

I also appreciate the work of the people who restock the grocery stores, delivery people, garbage collectors and others who do essential services.
Last edited by Lynette on Fri Mar 20, 2020 11:21 am, edited 1 time in total.
nigel_ht
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Re: Coronavirus (Consumer Issues) How you are preparing?

Post by nigel_ht »

stoptothink wrote: Fri Mar 20, 2020 9:38 am
livesoft wrote: Fri Mar 20, 2020 9:08 am It might be worthwhile to tell your children that "Life is not fair" and "You can't always get what you want." I would have no qualms not going to the store and buying milk for my children. I do have some powdered milk around for possible use when there is no power (i.e. hurricanes), but I know it doesn't taste as good as dairy-case milk.

Anyways, I'm curious why you seem to feel guilty about not providing milk for your children?
The 3x I've gone to the store in the last few weeks I've seen no milk or bread. Thank heavens we never had milk and greatly minimize the consumption of bread in our house. My 8 and 4yr olds don't even notice.
We're ambivalent on milk...as in we try to get our kids to drink it but not entirely sold on whether it really is a good thing or not.

That said, cereal without milk is a non-starter for them. Not that cereal is all that healthy either...my wife had to go into work today so will swing by Costco and hope to score a couple jugs. Fresh veggies and fruit has been the thing hardest to keep in stock so more frozen I guess.
cusetownusa
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Re: Coronavirus (Consumer Issues) How you are preparing?

Post by cusetownusa »

nigel_ht wrote: Fri Mar 20, 2020 9:48 am
stoptothink wrote: Fri Mar 20, 2020 9:38 am
livesoft wrote: Fri Mar 20, 2020 9:08 am It might be worthwhile to tell your children that "Life is not fair" and "You can't always get what you want." I would have no qualms not going to the store and buying milk for my children. I do have some powdered milk around for possible use when there is no power (i.e. hurricanes), but I know it doesn't taste as good as dairy-case milk.

Anyways, I'm curious why you seem to feel guilty about not providing milk for your children?
The 3x I've gone to the store in the last few weeks I've seen no milk or bread. Thank heavens we never had milk and greatly minimize the consumption of bread in our house. My 8 and 4yr olds don't even notice.
We're ambivalent on milk...as in we try to get our kids to drink it but not entirely sold on whether it really is a good thing or not.

That said, cereal without milk is a non-starter for them. Not that cereal is all that healthy either...my wife had to go into work today so will swing by Costco and hope to score a couple jugs. Fresh veggies and fruit has been the thing hardest to keep in stock so more frozen I guess.
How about Soy milk? We haven't had cows milk in our house in a long time. WHile we prefer Soy milk, I do understand that others may no like the taste. Just a thought. Plus, it doesn't go bad as quickly as cows milk.
alfaspider
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Re: Coronavirus (Consumer Issues) How you are preparing?

Post by alfaspider »

livesoft wrote: Fri Mar 20, 2020 9:08 am It might be worthwhile to tell your children that "Life is not fair" and "You can't always get what you want." I would have no qualms not going to the store and buying milk for my children. I do have some powdered milk around for possible use when there is no power (i.e. hurricanes), but I know it doesn't taste as good as dairy-case milk.

Anyways, I'm curious why you seem to feel guilty about not providing milk for your children?
They are 1 and 3. "Life is not fair" is not exactly a message they are going to understand at this point. The fact of the matter is not having milk will result in cranky kids, and cranky kids are hard to manage when you have two parents trying to work from home.
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Re: Coronavirus (Consumer Issues) How you are preparing?

Post by alfaspider »

cusetownusa wrote: Fri Mar 20, 2020 9:52 am
nigel_ht wrote: Fri Mar 20, 2020 9:48 am
stoptothink wrote: Fri Mar 20, 2020 9:38 am
livesoft wrote: Fri Mar 20, 2020 9:08 am It might be worthwhile to tell your children that "Life is not fair" and "You can't always get what you want." I would have no qualms not going to the store and buying milk for my children. I do have some powdered milk around for possible use when there is no power (i.e. hurricanes), but I know it doesn't taste as good as dairy-case milk.

Anyways, I'm curious why you seem to feel guilty about not providing milk for your children?
The 3x I've gone to the store in the last few weeks I've seen no milk or bread. Thank heavens we never had milk and greatly minimize the consumption of bread in our house. My 8 and 4yr olds don't even notice.
We're ambivalent on milk...as in we try to get our kids to drink it but not entirely sold on whether it really is a good thing or not.

That said, cereal without milk is a non-starter for them. Not that cereal is all that healthy either...my wife had to go into work today so will swing by Costco and hope to score a couple jugs. Fresh veggies and fruit has been the thing hardest to keep in stock so more frozen I guess.
How about Soy milk? We haven't had cows milk in our house in a long time. WHile we prefer Soy milk, I do understand that others may no like the taste. Just a thought. Plus, it doesn't go bad as quickly as cows milk.
Soy milk is subject to the same purchase restrictions.
quantAndHold
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Re: Coronavirus (Consumer Issues) How you are preparing?

Post by quantAndHold »

I can’t imagine that the milk shortages will last long. People can only store so much milk for so long before it goes bad. People will figure that out soon.
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Re: Coronavirus (Consumer Issues) How you are preparing?

Post by Old_Dollar »

Purchased some non-perishable food. Not a crazy amount, I see a lot of shelf stocking going on at the grocery stores and lots of pallets of filled boxes ready to be stocked.
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ResearchMed
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Re: Coronavirus (Consumer Issues) How you are preparing?

Post by ResearchMed »

We thought that early morning grocery pickup would have more available, from new deliveries. However, there was a lot that was not available, anyway.

So we've decided to try a pickup later in the day. Perhaps some things don't come it pre-opening, or can't get put on shelves? Or maybe are put on shelves a few times a day, given the crowds all day?

Has anyone tried to compare grocery availability at different times of day, and noticed any patterns?

Thanks.

RM
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Re: Coronavirus (Consumer Issues) How you are preparing?

Post by iamlucky13 »

alfaspider wrote: Fri Mar 20, 2020 10:05 am
livesoft wrote: Fri Mar 20, 2020 9:08 am It might be worthwhile to tell your children that "Life is not fair" and "You can't always get what you want." I would have no qualms not going to the store and buying milk for my children. I do have some powdered milk around for possible use when there is no power (i.e. hurricanes), but I know it doesn't taste as good as dairy-case milk.

Anyways, I'm curious why you seem to feel guilty about not providing milk for your children?
They are 1 and 3. "Life is not fair" is not exactly a message they are going to understand at this point. The fact of the matter is not having milk will result in cranky kids, and cranky kids are hard to manage when you have two parents trying to work from home.
Indeed. And it's doubly frustrating when disruptions like this are unnecessary. It would be more understandable if there were a milk shortage, but it's just due to demand artificially pulled forward (and I wouldn't be surprised if ultimately waste is also a problem if people are overstocking and letting some spoil).
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Re: Coronavirus (Consumer Issues) How you are preparing?

Post by iamlucky13 »

ResearchMed wrote: Fri Mar 20, 2020 11:30 am We thought that early morning grocery pickup would have more available, from new deliveries. However, there was a lot that was not available, anyway.

So we've decided to try a pickup later in the day. Perhaps some things don't come it pre-opening, or can't get put on shelves? Or maybe are put on shelves a few times a day, given the crowds all day?

Has anyone tried to compare grocery availability at different times of day, and noticed any patterns?
This is very anecdotal, but it seems like in my area a lot of people are trying alternative times to avoid the crowds...which means the crowded times are shifting.

Also, most stores don't have everything delivered daily. One store may get bread Monday, Wednesday, Friday; dairy Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday; canned goods on a single day each week; and household goods like toilet paper on a different day, while a neighboring store may have a completely different routine.
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ResearchMed
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Re: Coronavirus (Consumer Issues) How you are preparing?

Post by ResearchMed »

iamlucky13 wrote: Fri Mar 20, 2020 11:53 am
ResearchMed wrote: Fri Mar 20, 2020 11:30 am We thought that early morning grocery pickup would have more available, from new deliveries. However, there was a lot that was not available, anyway.

So we've decided to try a pickup later in the day. Perhaps some things don't come it pre-opening, or can't get put on shelves? Or maybe are put on shelves a few times a day, given the crowds all day?

Has anyone tried to compare grocery availability at different times of day, and noticed any patterns?
This is very anecdotal, but it seems like in my area a lot of people are trying alternative times to avoid the crowds...which means the crowded times are shifting.

Also, most stores don't have everything delivered daily. One store may get bread Monday, Wednesday, Friday; dairy Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday; canned goods on a single day each week; and household goods like toilet paper on a different day, while a neighboring store may have a completely different routine.
Thanks.

We are going to try different store/chains, also, in case they have different supplies (that may not be the case, of course), or receive things on different days, or just restock shelves at different times.
And yes, different days of the week, but we are just starting this little experiment!

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Re: Coronavirus (Consumer Issues) How you are preparing?

Post by LadyGeek »

quantAndHold wrote: Fri Mar 20, 2020 10:34 am I can’t imagine that the milk shortages will last long. People can only store so much milk for so long before it goes bad. People will figure that out soon.
You can freeze milk. See: How to Freeze Milk
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Re: Coronavirus (Consumer Issues) How you are preparing?

Post by nascar090210 »

Ordered new running shoes since they won’t let us in the gym. Mapping out new running routes as well.
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Re: Coronavirus (Consumer Issues) How you are preparing?

Post by frugalmama »

ResearchMed wrote: Fri Mar 20, 2020 12:06 pm
iamlucky13 wrote: Fri Mar 20, 2020 11:53 am
ResearchMed wrote: Fri Mar 20, 2020 11:30 am We thought that early morning grocery pickup would have more available, from new deliveries. However, there was a lot that was not available, anyway.

So we've decided to try a pickup later in the day. Perhaps some things don't come it pre-opening, or can't get put on shelves? Or maybe are put on shelves a few times a day, given the crowds all day?

Has anyone tried to compare grocery availability at different times of day, and noticed any patterns?
This is very anecdotal, but it seems like in my area a lot of people are trying alternative times to avoid the crowds...which means the crowded times are shifting.

Also, most stores don't have everything delivered daily. One store may get bread Monday, Wednesday, Friday; dairy Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday; canned goods on a single day each week; and household goods like toilet paper on a different day, while a neighboring store may have a completely different routine.
Thanks.

We are going to try different store/chains, also, in case they have different supplies (that may not be the case, of course), or receive things on different days, or just restock shelves at different times.
And yes, different days of the week, but we are just starting this little experiment!

RM
I worked in a grocery store for a long time. Stores generally get trucks 3-4 times a week, but 2 things can change what are on those trucks - What the store ordered (if there was a run on an item after they ordered, they won't have more 2 days from then) and whether the warehouse is out (because none of their stores will be getting more of that item until their warehouses do). Each chain has their own system, so trying different stores is a good idea. Additionally, I would try ethnic grocery stores for some items as their distribution systems are different than the larger chains and not everyone is shopping at them. Finally, if you are shopping at larger chains, try different stores in the chain, as generally larger stores (with more people going to them) get priority for items over smaller stores with less demand...so it could work either way for you...a store gets more milk, but more people might need it, or a store gets less milk than its counterpart, but fewer people shop at that store so there is some left. Dairy trucks often may come during the day, but all non-perishable trucks tend to come at night and stockers put the items out at night, so if it is a non-perishable item you need, you will want to get it first thing in the morning as they are most likely to have put it out then (unless they are short on people at night). HTH!
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ray.james
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Re: Coronavirus (Consumer Issues) How you are preparing?

Post by ray.james »

We are doing once a week run. If there is fresh food, I am buying 20% more -freezable veggies/meat. Eat some, freeze the rest. I think our small freezer will be full in 2-3 runs and beyond that just usual shopping once a week.

I west to Costco this Thursday. It has a line of 20-30 shoppers. No way I am gonna stand in that line!
Went to a Asian store 2 streets away- got rice, noodles, veggies, snacks, milk, eggs. Last week was Indian store which is fully stocked. In and out in less than 15 mins. Use those supply chains! Reduce the interaction/social time.

We had pasta and oats from before this started which will run us for next 2 months when rice/noodles substitute 25% of meals. I do think Costco etc will be more accessible after first 2 weeks of shelter in place.
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Re: Coronavirus (Consumer Issues) How you are preparing?

Post by Barkingsparrow »

I'm using the local Market Wagon to order things such as artisan bread, cheese, etc. I've stocked up on frozen/canned fish from an online retailer. I've got 10 pounds of beans in storage. I tend to buy items such as nuts and quinoa in bulk so I'm good there. There's a local Winter farmers market that has closed down and they are listing the links to all vendors who are offering online sales. I'm finding it easier to get things from the local vendors and small businesses than the big stores.

That said, I have found one Fresh Thyme that is kind of out of the way and never seems to be too busy and I've good luck stocking up with fresh produce from them.
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Re: Coronavirus (Consumer Issues) How you are preparing?

Post by peppers »

The Governor of Illinois has issued a shelter in place order effective 3/20/2020. It is in effect through 04/07/2020.
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Re: Coronavirus (Consumer Issues) How you are preparing?

Post by blackholescion »

ResearchMed wrote: Fri Mar 20, 2020 11:30 am We thought that early morning grocery pickup would have more available, from new deliveries. However, there was a lot that was not available, anyway.

So we've decided to try a pickup later in the day. Perhaps some things don't come it pre-opening, or can't get put on shelves? Or maybe are put on shelves a few times a day, given the crowds all day?

Has anyone tried to compare grocery availability at different times of day, and noticed any patterns?

Thanks.

RM
The grocery stores near us (all 3) have a days long delay on pickup. One of the stores isn’t even letting people order. Not even for like 5 days from now.

We could look out further but we are pretty well stocked. Just need milk and snacks every week for the toddler.
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Re: Coronavirus (Consumer Issues) How you are preparing?

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Re: Coronavirus (Consumer Issues) How you are preparing?

Post by Stinky »

F150HD wrote: Fri Mar 20, 2020 7:38 pm Redding, CA

Shredded T-shirts used as toilet paper back up city sewer

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Will do good
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Re: Coronavirus (Consumer Issues) How you are preparing?

Post by Will do good »

With more and longer lockdowns announced, it seems some of my friends didn't stock up enough and start going back out to buy more stuff. Are you planning to do the same?
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Re: Coronavirus (Consumer Issues) How you are preparing?

Post by quantAndHold »

Will do good wrote: Sat Mar 21, 2020 9:49 am With more and longer lockdowns announced, it seems some of my friends didn't stock up enough and start going back out to buy more stuff. Are you planning to do the same?
Getting groceries is one of the exceptions to the lockdown. No matter how much we stocked up ahead of time, we still need milk and fresh produce regularly. Instead of going to the store every couple of days, we go once a week, though.

We were out for a walk yesterday, and the laundromat was wide open (with nobody inside). Since we have our own washer and dryer, I hadn’t thought of that, but of course people still need to do laundry.
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Re: Coronavirus (Consumer Issues) How you are preparing?

Post by Barkingsparrow »

Whole Foods has an hour from 8-9 reserved for folks over 60. They have a security guard and employee checking IDs. I went a little late today, arriving at 10 till 9, but the store was pretty quiet and well-supplied, for about 10 minutes. Come 9 however, the rush came in. Next time I'll go right at 8 and avoid the mobs. Got quite a bit of fresh produce and yes, even TP. Frozen veggies are still in short supply. I'll take advantage of the "Elderly" hours where possible and avoid the crush at Costco, Target, etc.
livesoft
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Re: Coronavirus (Consumer Issues) How you are preparing?

Post by livesoft »

While we might want milk and fresh produce, we definitely don't need them.
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Re: Coronavirus (Consumer Issues) How you are preparing?

Post by stoptothink »

livesoft wrote: Sat Mar 21, 2020 11:00 am While we might want milk and fresh produce, we definitely don't need them.
+1. I bought enough food for ~2 months on Tuesday. I am not going shopping again until it is gone. We eat a ton of fresh produce regularly in our home, but it simply isn't happening at least for the next month. My kids can do without their bread and fresh fruit.
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Re: Coronavirus (Consumer Issues) How you are preparing?

Post by Kenkat »

We went to Wal-Mart today around 10am or so. Walked right in, it was crowded but not crazy crowded.

They had a fair amount of toilet paper and although some were buying, it wasn’t flying off the shelf. Limit two per customer; we didn’t need it so we didn’t buy it. Fully in stock on milk; a decent stock of eggs (at 58 cents a dozen) but not fully stocked. They had meat, they had bread (limits on purchase of these). They had flour but no yeast (my 85 year old mom wants to do some depression style baking). Soup was low in stock but there were some varieties available (I bought myself some clam chowder). Bleach spray was in stock. Pasta and spaghetti was very low stock. Plenty of produce available. Gas was $1.59 at the Kroger fuel station next door.

Our first panic buying occurred Ohio about 10 days ago. I talked to some co-workers in Nebraska yesterday and the panic buying was just starting there - maybe a week behind what we saw.

My impression today was that the stock was coming back up in the store pretty rapidly but there were still some items low. We saw multiple employees sanitizing the store as we shopped. It felt like the panic buying was mostly over at this point.
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Re: Coronavirus (Consumer Issues) How you are preparing?

Post by Mako »

Some people think we might get a shelter in place order soon here in MD so I went to Walmart this morning at 7 when they opened to top off supplies, this is at the MD-DE border. There was a line to get in, and it was very crowded, but everyone was orderly and check out was actually faster than normal because they actually had a reasonable amount of lines open, which they never do.

No TP, no bleach or Clorox wipes or any other disinfectant type things. No eggs. Very little peanut butter, soups, pasta/sauce, flour, cooking oils. Very little meat or seafood. Cereals and canned goods like beans/veggies were decently stocked but low. Most other things were well stocked, including milk (1 per person limit), bread, and most produce.

A sign said they are doing a senior hour every Tuesday before open, which seems like a joke, other stores are doing it every day.

Anyway, I shouldn't need to go to the store again for some time. We go through a lot of milk and produce but like others said above we don't need these things. Will just have to play it by ear.
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Re: Coronavirus (Consumer Issues) How you are preparing?

Post by clip651 »

In our area, where there is a stay at home order, and where panic buying started around the time the first school closures were announced 7-10 days ago, they (governor, mayors, retail chains) are specifically asking people *not* to stock up. They are asking people to try to keep their normal shopping patterns (e.g. weekly) so supply chains, stores, stockers, etc, can keep up with more normal demand that reflects more normal use.

So it seems to make sense on the one hand to stock up a bunch so you don't have to go out to the store often and are around fewer people. But doing that can prevent others from getting what they need when they need it, make people wait in long lines and go to multiple stores, like we're seeing now. The nurse that's a single mom needs to be able to grab whatever she needs when she gets a chance to shop, for instance. Same with seniors. We want to keep easy access for everyone.

The supply chains are fine, but they aren't set up for all of the US (or any other country) to buy 3-4 weeks of food and TP at once. It's a bit late for everyone to try to stock up in an orderly fashion and not strain the system. If you stocked up earlier, sure eat through your stock before you go get more. But if you didn't already do that, now is not the time to stock up. Just get your normal stuff, if you can find it easily, or make do with what you can until people settle down. Be one of the people that settles down sooner than later!

Also for perishable things like milk and produce ... if you're going to the store anyway, and you normally use it, and they have it in stock (not short supply), keep buying it. Perishables are, well, perishable. If no one buys milk for months, the milk produced will just go to waste. It's not like the farmers can tell the cows to change their output on short notice. Same for fruit trees, etc. But no need to run from store to store to get milk or your favorite salad ingredients if they're low. Make do with what's available for now.
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Re: Coronavirus (Consumer Issues) How you are preparing?

Post by clip651 »

And ... if you think your area is going to have a shelter in place soon, that means you should be working hard on social distancing. You might as well start as early on that as you can. Your grocery store will be open before and after whatever date your mayor, governor, or president decides to start the stay at home order. Every time someone tells you they're going to get stuff in case they have to shelter in place ... remind them that essential stores will stay open. There is no rush. Everyone rushing in right before the order starts just adds crowding, which decreases social distancing, which defeats the purpose.
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Re: Coronavirus (Consumer Issues) How you are preparing?

Post by Lynette »

I am confused about the restrictions that Cuomo has placed on New Yorkers over the age of 70. From what I understand they cannot go out at all - even grocery shopping. Something else I read indicated that +70 year old people could go out if they wore masks. There have been rumors that Michigan might add further restrictions though our governor said in a press conference that she was not imposing martial law. So I decided I had been stock up even more. I am in my seventies but I have no underlying health conditions. I live on my own and have been doing my own shopping - usually really early in the morning or late at night. This morning I hopped into my car and went and got a Diet Coke and oatmeal from McDonalds. They do have healthy food is one looks. Later I went to a deli and bought some more stuff. Everyone was keeping their distance.

Ironically when I examined my painting and gardening supplies, I found I have a 3M R95 mask. It keeps out oil particles so is possibly even more effective than the N95 mask. I found I also have a monstrous Painter's mask I bought as I have allergies. I don't like these masks as I find it difficult to breathe in them.

I also found two local issues interesting. A local hospital is making their own masks:

https://www.clickondetroit.com/news/loc ... their-own/

GM is working with a medical supplier to increase ventilator production:

https://www.clickondetroit.com/news/loc ... roduction/

Best wishes to all.

Lynette
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Re: Coronavirus (Consumer Issues) How you are preparing?

Post by jay22 »

livesoft wrote: Sat Mar 21, 2020 11:00 am While we might want milk and fresh produce, we definitely don't need them.
What have you been eating, then?
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Re: Coronavirus (Consumer Issues) How you are preparing?

Post by livesoft »

Oatmeal for breakfast, of course. For lunch today, I had Chinese leftovers. I intend to support my local restaurants by ordering take-out as needed.

Otherwise, I have plenty of cans of black beans, tortillas, tomatoes, apples, rice, nuts, candy, frozen fish, chicken, etc. Believe me, I am not going to starve.

What have you been eating?
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Re: Coronavirus (Consumer Issues) How you are preparing?

Post by Broken Man 1999 »

DW advised me yesterday she is now using my last bag of coffee beans. She uses K-Cups. I DO NOT want to run out of coffee. I would be grumpier than usual. DW wouldn't be much better. For now I can't even go to a nearby Cuban restaurant and order a cafe con leche!

So, I shopped online at Costco and bought 2 ea 3lb bags of Sumatran coffee beans, and some protein shakes.

It is amazing to see the different stuff that is "out of stock" online at Costco, and Sam's Club, also. I suppose some of the slower-selling items might be pushed aside for now to get the items the majority of the customers want.

One data-point only: Costco seemed to have plenty of coffee available, both whole bean and ground. Not as large a selection as usual, but everyone should be able to find something they can swill down in the morning, at this moment in time.

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Re: Coronavirus (Consumer Issues) How you are preparing?

Post by Ivygirl »

My idea is that "preparing" should have a short game, an intermediate game, and a long game. Sort of like investing having cash, bonds, and stocks.

Today I planted 21 golden beet seeds, 28 red beet seeds, and 14 French Breakfast radishes. Yesterday I planted (to start in the house) 3 Mortgage Lifter tomatoes, 6 banana peppers, 6 California Wonder bell peppers, and 3 cucumbers. Oh, and 6 cabbage and 3 broccoli. That's the intermediate game.

For the long game, I am ordering 2 Jostaberry bushes, 2 Nanking cherry trees, and a Contender peach tree.

I already have strawberries, blackberries, and a fig tree. In May I will plant Scarlet Runner green beans, zucchini, and butternut squash.

Supply chain shocks, I have deduced from this crisis, are the very devil. No harm in some diversification, especially since it costs so little. The seeds are free, left over from last year, and I have the time because I am working from home. No commute, no useless "lunch hour" in the middle of the day, no dressing up and fixing the hair. I wish I never had to go back to the office!
softwaregeek
Posts: 564
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Re: Coronavirus (Consumer Issues) How you are preparing?

Post by softwaregeek »

OK, report from Santa Clara county CA, where we have ~200 cases. In addition, the widespread belief is that there are way more cases that aren't being reported. For example, the wife of one of our employees is having serious symptoms but can't get tested. I personally have not been in the office since the 13th, so I am hoping I wasn't exposed.

Compliance with the lockdown order is so-so here. There are many people who are willfully noncompliant. As a result, I anticipate greater restrictions in the near future.

I went to the bank and the supermarket yesterday to stock up on cash and groceries even more before things get much worse.

I went wearing N95, Gloves, and winter coat. I was not the only one, most of the Asians in the store (in my heavily Asian area) were wearing much the same. A few of the workers were wearing masks and gloves, but the checker had nothing at all. I doused my credit card and ATM card in sanitizer and also myself when I got home.

Safeway was very busy and produce was mostly sold out but a few items still available in organic. Dairy aisle was cleaned out. The cheaper canned goods were gone, but the expensive stuff was still there. The liquor aisle was starting to get depleted, but you could still find stuff in every category, if not in every brand. All of the paper, cleaning products, and handsoap were gone. All of it. Freezer, medicines and dry goods were pretty raided, meaning some brands sold out but some still there. Meat and lunchmeat still available in quantity. Bread and specialty cheese was still available in quantity near the deli. However, dairy aisle cheese was wiped out.

I'm conserving the respirator and gloves by sealing them in a ziploc bag. After I run through my supply, I will reopen the oldest ones and hopefully they will be safe. I expect the virus can live for a few days on them, but I am not going out much at all so I expect that it will be at least six weeks before I need to reuse equipment.
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ResearchMed
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Re: Coronavirus (Consumer Issues) How you are preparing?

Post by ResearchMed »

Interesting idea about how to keep/re-use the respirators, etc.

I've heard the N95 respirators are very difficult to use... to fit right, and, importantly, to breath in when out and about (e.g., walking).
How did you find breathing in them?

RM
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stoptothink
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Re: Coronavirus (Consumer Issues) How you are preparing?

Post by stoptothink »

jay22 wrote: Sat Mar 21, 2020 1:26 pm
livesoft wrote: Sat Mar 21, 2020 11:00 am While we might want milk and fresh produce, we definitely don't need them.
What have you been eating, then?
Definitely not milk. Shocking, I know, but frozen vegetables and fruit are edible.
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Watty
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Re: Coronavirus (Consumer Issues) How you are preparing?

Post by Watty »

In one of reports about Italy it mentioned that the trash collection had stopped either because the garbage men were sick or afraid of getting the virus when picking up the trash.

We already compost and recycle what we can but I am starting to seperate the rest of the trash into "yucky" and "non-Yucky" bags so the yucky stuff will be easier to deal with if our trash collections is interrupted.
MP173
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Re: Coronavirus (Consumer Issues) How you are preparing?

Post by MP173 »

Ivygirl:

I wonder how this is going to change how we work....the home office might be the new trend.

Personally I have worked out of my home for 29 years - sales so I have all supplies needed. I recall about 25 years ago most people I called on were dressed in suits or similar attire. Then "casual Friday" was introduced and the suits went away for good (except at Tootsie Roll in Chicago). People will not only learn how to work from home but start demanding it (once we return to normal). Productivity is so much higher (as long as one doesnt watch Oprah).

Regarding how we are preparing...our 17cf freezer is well stocked with pork, chix, beef, bread, butter, and vegetables. It is usually pretty well stocked, but we are paying attention to certain product. Today our local store had a "12 Hour Meat Sale" with very good prices (a usual once per month event). However, most of the sale items did not show up, a supply chain issue these days. I did pickup 8 pounds of bacon @ $2.99 per pound and packed it in freezer bags. That is a typical purchase for us a few times a year.

My shopping trip was at 7am and there was a very brisk crowd but there were low supplies of TP, bread, milk, frozen orange juice concentrate, yogart, soap, etc. Fresh vegetables were in good supply.

We garden and have planted seeds (indoors) for tomatoes, peppers, and broccoli. Seeds arrived this week and we planted more tomatoes, peppers, cauliflower and basil.

Made a batch of lentil/ham soup today but that is normal event on weekends during winter. Tonight is homemade pizza.

We have made a very concentrated effort not to waste any food during this period of time, for example re-purposing leftover corned beef into corned beef hash - amazing.

My parent were depression era (my father graduated from high school in 1929 and mom could "squeeze 9 cents out of a dime.") so I have had that mentality - but not like they did. Now, I am ramping up. Could this be our "depression?"

I have enough interests to keep me occupied besides work (which is starting to slow some). My wife and I are talking much more and shutting the news off. Not sticking our heads in the sand, but limiting the painful reminders.

Ed
M.Lee
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Re: Coronavirus (Consumer Issues) How you are preparing?

Post by M.Lee »

Lynette wrote: Sat Mar 21, 2020 12:56 pm I am confused about the restrictions that Cuomo has placed on New Yorkers over the age of 70. From what I understand they cannot go out at all - even grocery shopping. Something else I read indicated that +70 year old people could go out if they wore masks. There have been rumors that Michigan might add further restrictions though our governor said in a press conference that she was not imposing martial law. So I decided I had been stock up even more. I am in my seventies but I have no underlying health conditions. I live on my own and have been doing my own shopping - usually really early in the morning or late at night. This morning I hopped into my car and went and got a Diet Coke and oatmeal from McDonalds. They do have healthy food is one looks. Later I went to a deli and bought some more stuff. Everyone was keeping their distance.
Lynette
I'm also in your age group. I'm in NJ and our governor just put out an edict very close to that of NY. I googled around to see if I could find any info about prohibiting us elders from grocery shopping. While grocery shopping wasn't mentioned, it can be assumed by the restrictions he specified that I copied and pasted below. I know this virus is tough on everyone, but to assume that all the elderly can find someone to shop for them is a incorrect assumption. I guess, like you, I am quite fit and healthy and do not fit the stereotype of an lady in her 70's.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The governor shared even stricter rules for vulnerable populations, like senior citizens or people with underlying respiratory issues:

Remain indoors
Can go outside for solitary exercise
Pre-screen all visitors and aides by taking their temperature and seeing if person is exhibiting other flu-like symptoms
Do not visit households with multiple people
All vulnerable persons should wear a mask when in the company of others
To the greatest extent possible, everyone in the presence of vulnerable people should wear a mask
Always stay at least six feet away from individuals
Do not take public transportation unless urgent and absolutely necessary

“I call it Matilda’s Law. My mother’s name is Matilda. Everybody’s mother, father, sister, friend in a vulnerable population – this is about protecting them,” he said. “What you do highly, highly affects their health and wellbeing.”

The governor admits these are dramatic restrictions that may prove devastating to many businesses and leave seniors feeling isolated, but he insists they are necessary.
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MortgageOnBlack
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Re: Coronavirus (Consumer Issues) How you are preparing?

Post by MortgageOnBlack »

To put it lightly, I am FREAKING OUT... I'm hopeful that things will calm down in the coming weeks, but anticipation mixed with high anxiety are killing me. After this post, I'm going to try my hardest to tune-out the news/google searches for the remainder of the weekend and get caught up on NetFlix binging. My family is doing their part by staying in the house.

I'm paranoid and constantly worried for my parents (67 years old). I'm fearful for all our family and friends (health and financial). They are being careful, but I constantly fear for the worst.

We were scheduled to go to Hawaii for our first time in mid-June for a friend's wedding; I do not see that happening :(

My fiancee and I were set to get married at the end of August (destination wedding in CA) and I don't see that happening either. :(

I realize that nobody has the answers for how long this will last, but I just need to vent. I realize these are 1st world problems as there is loss of life from this virus, but the disruption so far is killing me. I'm thankful that we have jobs for now (fiancee is school teacher and I'm an IT consultant for a small MSP) and I feel very bad for anyone who is getting laid off and worried about income and their health.

If there are any positives, I am getting to spend a lot more time with my fiancee and dog. Also, I find comfort in knowing that the coronavirus has been positive for the planet; I'm hopeful that the reset will be a positive event for humanity once everything is said and done.

Please take care everyone. I have really enjoyed the discussion on this forum.
Lynette
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Re: Coronavirus (Consumer Issues) How you are preparing?

Post by Lynette »

M.Lee wrote: Sat Mar 21, 2020 4:09 pm
Lynette wrote: Sat Mar 21, 2020 12:56 pm I am confused about the restrictions that Cuomo has placed on New Yorkers over the age of 70. From what I understand they cannot go out at all - even grocery shopping. Something else I read indicated that +70 year old people could go out if they wore masks. There have been rumors that Michigan might add further restrictions though our governor said in a press conference that she was not imposing martial law. So I decided I had been stock up even more. I am in my seventies but I have no underlying health conditions. I live on my own and have been doing my own shopping - usually really early in the morning or late at night. This morning I hopped into my car and went and got a Diet Coke and oatmeal from McDonalds. They do have healthy food is one looks. Later I went to a deli and bought some more stuff. Everyone was keeping their distance.
Lynette
I'm also in your age group. I'm in NJ and our governor just put out an edict very close to that of NY. I googled around to see if I could find any info about prohibiting us elders from grocery shopping. While grocery shopping wasn't mentioned, it can be assumed by the restrictions he specified that I copied and pasted below. I know this virus is tough on everyone, but to assume that all the elderly can find someone to shop for them is a incorrect assumption. I guess, like you, I am quite fit and healthy and do not fit the stereotype of an lady in her 70's.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The governor shared even stricter rules for vulnerable populations, like senior citizens or people with underlying respiratory issues:

Remain indoors
Can go outside for solitary exercise
Pre-screen all visitors and aides by taking their temperature and seeing if person is exhibiting other flu-like symptoms
Do not visit households with multiple people
All vulnerable persons should wear a mask when in the company of others
To the greatest extent possible, everyone in the presence of vulnerable people should wear a mask
Always stay at least six feet away from individuals
Do not take public transportation unless urgent and absolutely necessary

“I call it Matilda’s Law. My mother’s name is Matilda. Everybody’s mother, father, sister, friend in a vulnerable population – this is about protecting them,” he said. “What you do highly, highly affects their health and wellbeing.”

The governor admits these are dramatic restrictions that may prove devastating to many businesses and leave seniors feeling isolated, but he insists they are necessary.
Thank you for your efforts.

To me Matilda's law is confusing. I do not know if it is intended for those living in retirement homes, nursing home etc. This is the definition I found of "vulnerable populations"

Vulnerable populations refer to those 70+, people with compromised immune systems and those with underlying illnesses.

He mentions we can go out for exercise - but what about grocery shopping? By dumb luck I have a mask as I enjoy gardening and do some house maintenance such as painting. What about those who don't have masks.

I have a difficult time seeing myself as being part of the vulnerable population. I have been fortunate in being regarded as very healthy most of my life - with a few blips. I exercise and eat well. I am soon going to start to haul 40 lbs bags of soil and mulch to fix my front yard to fix my lawn and landscaping. I assume that I am allowed to work in my own garden! I will see people passing by .. mainly walking their dogs but I will be far away enough on my property.
Ivygirl
Posts: 299
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Re: Coronavirus (Consumer Issues) How you are preparing?

Post by Ivygirl »

MP173 wrote: Sat Mar 21, 2020 3:56 pm Ivygirl:

I wonder how this is going to change how we work....the home office might be the new trend.

Personally I have worked out of my home for 29 years - sales so I have all supplies needed. I recall about 25 years ago most people I called on were dressed in suits or similar attire. Then "casual Friday" was introduced and the suits went away for good (except at Tootsie Roll in Chicago). People will not only learn how to work from home but start demanding it (once we return to normal). Productivity is so much higher (as long as one doesnt watch Oprah).

Regarding how we are preparing...our 17cf freezer is well stocked with pork, chix, beef, bread, butter, and vegetables. It is usually pretty well stocked, but we are paying attention to certain product. Today our local store had a "12 Hour Meat Sale" with very good prices (a usual once per month event). However, most of the sale items did not show up, a supply chain issue these days. I did pickup 8 pounds of bacon @ $2.99 per pound and packed it in freezer bags. That is a typical purchase for us a few times a year.

My shopping trip was at 7am and there was a very brisk crowd but there were low supplies of TP, bread, milk, frozen orange juice concentrate, yogart, soap, etc. Fresh vegetables were in good supply.

We garden and have planted seeds (indoors) for tomatoes, peppers, and broccoli. Seeds arrived this week and we planted more tomatoes, peppers, cauliflower and basil.

Made a batch of lentil/ham soup today but that is normal event on weekends during winter. Tonight is homemade pizza.

We have made a very concentrated effort not to waste any food during this period of time, for example re-purposing leftover corned beef into corned beef hash - amazing.

My parent were depression era (my father graduated from high school in 1929 and mom could "squeeze 9 cents out of a dime.") so I have had that mentality - but not like they did. Now, I am ramping up. Could this be our "depression?"

I have enough interests to keep me occupied besides work (which is starting to slow some). My wife and I are talking much more and shutting the news off. Not sticking our heads in the sand, but limiting the painful reminders.

Ed
My parents are depression-era also. Mom will soon be 92. She might have been a very different person if not for the depression, but it made her obsessed with "earning her keep" and never asking for anything for herself. Her "favorite" piece of chicken was the backbone; she made a virtue of taking it and claiming to like it, I think, because her family was large and no one wanted it. She always claimed to want the liquid of a soup instead of the meat and vegetables, and always ate the burned cookies if there were any. These rough virtues have not been required of us for a long time, maybe we will need them again.

Right now of course there is plenty of food brought to us by a long stretched-out and suddenly fragile supply chain of ships, planes, trains, trucks, smaller trucks, vans, and human hands. If that is interrupted, I'd like to have options, including having something to share. My mother could not abide lazy people, but she was always providing, baking, preserving, and sharing with guests and neighbors.

I didn't get any corned beef but I did get a roast last week and it has stretched out with potatoes, carrots, and canned tomatoes so long I have had to put the rest in the freezer. It takes only a little food to live so long as there isn't any waste. I threw the potato peelings on the compost pile and covered them with soil; maybe I'll get potatoes. Before I would have put them in the trash.

Thanks for reminding me about the basil! My plant didn't overwinter and I can't find any seed in my stash, so I'll order it. The oregano and rosemary made it just fine.

I'm in the central U.S. and the projection I saw for my state shows our COVID-19 cases peaking toward the end of May, tapering off in mid-July. I may be spending a bit of time in my garden! Could I get away with raising rabbits for meat in my backyard? Someone nearby has a rooster, I hear it.

All employees at my medium-megacorp company are working from home. In fact the company just sent me a big beautiful printer to my door. I'm working diligently because I would like to be deemed trustworthy and productive enough to keep doing this. Some of my coworkers seem to be flaking out a bit.

I watched Doris Day songs and dance routines on YouTube last night instead of more depressing "news" - what a difference in my attitude after that! I slept well and started to love my fellowman again. I talked with my sister on the phone for a long time. I prayed to God in the familiar way I used to do more of. I played "Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring" on the keyboard and mostly got the notes right. If everyone can stay well it will not be so bad at all.
Ivygirl
Posts: 299
Joined: Sun Apr 06, 2014 1:36 pm

Re: Coronavirus (Consumer Issues) How you are preparing?

Post by Ivygirl »

Watty wrote: Sat Mar 21, 2020 3:25 pm In one of reports about Italy it mentioned that the trash collection had stopped either because the garbage men were sick or afraid of getting the virus when picking up the trash.

We already compost and recycle what we can but I am starting to seperate the rest of the trash into "yucky" and "non-Yucky" bags so the yucky stuff will be easier to deal with if our trash collections is interrupted.
None of the things we had been taking for granted, can be taken for granted, can they? You have me thinking where I could safely burn non-compostable trash.

I don't expect water to be shut off - no of course not - but I did order replacement filters for the Berkey water filter that has been sitting in the closet unused. Not sure where those filters are made, possibly somewhere at the beginning of a long, fragile supply chain.
Ivygirl
Posts: 299
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Re: Coronavirus (Consumer Issues) How you are preparing?

Post by Ivygirl »

quantAndHold wrote: Sat Mar 21, 2020 9:58 am
Will do good wrote: Sat Mar 21, 2020 9:49 am With more and longer lockdowns announced, it seems some of my friends didn't stock up enough and start going back out to buy more stuff. Are you planning to do the same?
Getting groceries is one of the exceptions to the lockdown. No matter how much we stocked up ahead of time, we still need milk and fresh produce regularly. Instead of going to the store every couple of days, we go once a week, though.

We were out for a walk yesterday, and the laundromat was wide open (with nobody inside). Since we have our own washer and dryer, I hadn’t thought of that, but of course people still need to do laundry.
I bought a portable washing machine for $120 a couple years ago and will be using that for the next few weeks. I put it in the bathtub sitting on two plastic stepstools (it drains by gravity), and fill the machine with a bucket. It has a nifty spin-dryer on the side that spins the clothes almost dry. It does take more work than just plugging in some quarters though.
rich126
Posts: 1975
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Re: Coronavirus (Consumer Issues) How you are preparing?

Post by rich126 »

Obviously paper products are rare here in AZ. While grocery store can be busy and supplies limited you certainly wouldn’t starve. Chicken, ground beef are in limited supplies but can be found. The deli meats were well stocked and plenty of fruits and veggies, not exactly my type of diet but if you had to.

I have more citrus fruit than I can deal with in my back yard, lemons, oranges, grapefruits.

Only today are restaurants forced to close in house dining and that certainly is making the run on grocery stores worse. Hoarding is part of the problem but tons of people eat out daily, 1/3? And now they have to stock up food.

I’ve still been going to work, many arent. I still had my physical Friday morning. First appointment of the day. No real change in procedures except no handshake.

Hopefully in the next few weeks supplies will get better and the hoarders will get dealt with.
livesoft
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Re: Coronavirus (Consumer Issues) How you are preparing?

Post by livesoft »

Re: Restaurants and in-house dining: My favorite Tex-Mex place that didn't have drive-thru, now has a well-oiled drive-thru. Regular customers know to call and place a phone order and head over to pick up their food. The line of cars was long this evening of people picking up orders. No need to even open the car door.
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kacang
Posts: 199
Joined: Fri Apr 20, 2018 7:43 am
Location: CA

Re: Coronavirus (Consumer Issues) How you are preparing?

Post by kacang »

While we're taking steps to take care of ourselves, if we have capacity to, it would be good to think about our community needs as well. Eg. if you/your employer/school lab have PPE supplies that are not needed immediately, your local hospitals may be accepting donations. Hospitals in my area (SF Bay Area) are reporting a shortage and are accepting public donations of gloves, masks, hand sanitizer, goggles.

https://www.kqed.org/news/11807823/wher ... e-bay-area
runner540
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Re: Coronavirus (Consumer Issues) How you are preparing?

Post by runner540 »

softwaregeek wrote: Sat Mar 21, 2020 2:36 pm OK, report from Santa Clara county CA, where we have ~200 cases. In addition, the widespread belief is that there are way more cases that aren't being reported. For example, the wife of one of our employees is having serious symptoms but can't get tested. I personally have not been in the office since the 13th, so I am hoping I wasn't exposed.

Compliance with the lockdown order is so-so here. There are many people who are willfully noncompliant. As a result, I anticipate greater restrictions in the near future.

I went to the bank and the supermarket yesterday to stock up on cash and groceries even more before things get much worse.

I went wearing N95, Gloves, and winter coat. I was not the only one, most of the Asians in the store (in my heavily Asian area) were wearing much the same. A few of the workers were wearing masks and gloves, but the checker had nothing at all. I doused my credit card and ATM card in sanitizer and also myself when I got home.

Safeway was very busy and produce was mostly sold out but a few items still available in organic. Dairy aisle was cleaned out. The cheaper canned goods were gone, but the expensive stuff was still there. The liquor aisle was starting to get depleted, but you could still find stuff in every category, if not in every brand. All of the paper, cleaning products, and handsoap were gone. All of it. Freezer, medicines and dry goods were pretty raided, meaning some brands sold out but some still there. Meat and lunchmeat still available in quantity. Bread and specialty cheese was still available in quantity near the deli. However, dairy aisle cheese was wiped out.

I'm conserving the respirator and gloves by sealing them in a ziploc bag. After I run through my supply, I will reopen the oldest ones and hopefully they will be safe. I expect the virus can live for a few days on them, but I am not going out much at all so I expect that it will be at least six weeks before I need to reuse equipment.
I’m concerned by the number of people on this thread who bought masks and gloves, and now there are not enough in the hospitals. Why do you need one?
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