I have a question for those in early FIRE or planning on early FIRE

Questions on how we spend our money and our time - consumer goods and services, home and vehicle, leisure and recreational activities
quantAndHold
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Re: I have a question for those in early FIRE or planning on early FIRE

Post by quantAndHold »

I do the same things as when I worked, just more of it.

Health and fitness. I’m in the best shape of my life, since I now have the time and energy to consistently do all those things we say we’re going to do but never do. Work out, eat right, meditate. The only money I make is teaching martial arts at a local college. I always worked out and did martial arts, but now I actually have time to do it.

Travel. We travel about 4 months a year, a variety of places, and a variety of ways. Half of our spending last year was travel. We always traveled, but now we have time for more and longer trips.

Hobbies. I have time to try different hobbies now. If I see a continuing ed class that looks interesting, I just take it. Ukulele? Printmaking? Check. I also worked with a historian and researched the history of our old house, which was fascinating.

Reading. I always was a reader, but now I read about twice as many books as I did before.

Volunteering. I tried several different volunteer opportunities. Ended up sticking with one because it’s fun and works with our travel schedule.

The main thing I would say is that when we retired, we both thought we were going to do all this stuff. Six months in, we were exhausted, and the pace of “doing” slowed down. We figured out that we can only do a couple of things and do them right. So we both do health and fitness stuff consistently, then usually have one other activity that we’re spending time and energy on.
Yes, I’m really that pedantic.
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TheTimeLord
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Re: I have a question for those in early FIRE or planning on early FIRE

Post by TheTimeLord »

flaccidsteele wrote: Fri Jan 31, 2020 11:24 pm It doesn’t take much imagination to picture what retired life is like. It’s exactly how you experienced it

People just do what they want until they decide otherwise
I am hoping it can be different than I experienced now that I am older. I am really not much of a do things around the house or sleep in person. I guess the problem is I don't see full-time work as optimal long term, I don't see retirement as optimal currently and some part-time job would like require a compensation cut that would make me wonder why I left my full-time gig. Sooner or later I will either decide I need to retire while I am young enough to knock off a few of my more demanding bucket list items or my employer will decide I can no longer keep up or some corporate change will leave me without a chair. In any case I expect to end up retired and figure I need to get a better handle on the concept than I currently have.
IMHO, Investing should be about living the life you want, not avoiding the life you fear. | Run, You Clever Boy! [9085]
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4nursebee
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Re: I have a question for those in early FIRE or planning on early FIRE

Post by 4nursebee »

I've heard from a substance abuse counselor that some men turn to drinking as a hobby to occupy their time. The wives tell him that they never drank that much when working.

I hope everyone has better things to retire to!
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quantAndHold
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Re: I have a question for those in early FIRE or planning on early FIRE

Post by quantAndHold »

TheTimeLord wrote: Sat Feb 01, 2020 10:47 am
flaccidsteele wrote: Fri Jan 31, 2020 11:24 pm It doesn’t take much imagination to picture what retired life is like. It’s exactly how you experienced it

People just do what they want until they decide otherwise
I am hoping it can be different than I experienced now that I am older. I am really not much of a do things around the house or sleep in person. I guess the problem is I don't see full-time work as optimal long term, I don't see retirement as optimal currently and some part-time job would like require a compensation cut that would make me wonder why I left my full-time gig. Sooner or later I will either decide I need to retire while I am young enough to knock off a few of my more demanding bucket list items or my employer will decide I can no longer keep up or some corporate change will leave me without a chair. In any case I expect to end up retired and figure I need to get a better handle on the concept than I currently have.
Well, what do you do when you’re not working now? That’s what you’ll be doing when you retire. If that isn’t what you want to be doing, then now is probably the time to solve that problem.
Yes, I’m really that pedantic.
MathIsMyWayr
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Re: I have a question for those in early FIRE or planning on early FIRE

Post by MathIsMyWayr »

flaccidsteele wrote: Wed Jan 29, 2020 10:35 am I’ll tell you what the average day is like: walk the dog, get kid ready for school, take kid to school, walk to coffee shop, browse interweb, eat lunch, walk the dog, meet personal trainer for work out, pick up kid, hang out at coffee shop, dinner, watch a movie or show, play video games, walk the dog, bed time
Days go by ...
visualguy wrote: Sat Feb 01, 2020 9:01 am I find that it's easy to fritter away time. I had no problem finding ways to pass time when I attempted retirement. It's easily possible to make things like chores, errands, taking care of the house, web surfing, exercising, a hobby or two, some travel eat up all your time. Looking back at a period like this, though, it felt to me like the time was wasted and I couldn't account for it - it just passed without leaving much of a trace in my memory. I decided that truly early retirement wasn't for me, although I can see myself retiring a bit early, such as 60.
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TheTimeLord
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Re: I have a question for those in early FIRE or planning on early FIRE

Post by TheTimeLord »

4nursebee wrote: Sat Feb 01, 2020 10:50 am I've heard from a substance abuse counselor that some men turn to drinking as a hobby to occupy their time. The wives tell him that they never drank that much when working.

I hope everyone has better things to retire to!
24x7x365 is a lot of time to fill if you don't have some hobbies you can do solo. I am amazed at the contrast in opinions on how easy it is to fill time between the posters here and the people I know in real life. I only know 1 retiree that I would consider to be having a really successful early retirement (not that my opinion matters). That is mainly due to their focus/obsession with a new hobby that takes lots of solo preparation time. When not engaged in that they are just hanging around the house and running errands like everyone else. There are a fair number of people who could FIRE in my social circle, they just don't want to, so this forum offers me a perspective I do not experience in my life.
IMHO, Investing should be about living the life you want, not avoiding the life you fear. | Run, You Clever Boy! [9085]
flaccidsteele
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Re: I have a question for those in early FIRE or planning on early FIRE

Post by flaccidsteele »

TheTimeLord wrote: Sat Feb 01, 2020 10:47 am
flaccidsteele wrote: Fri Jan 31, 2020 11:24 pm It doesn’t take much imagination to picture what retired life is like. It’s exactly how you experienced it

People just do what they want until they decide otherwise
I am hoping it can be different than I experienced now that I am older. I am really not much of a do things around the house or sleep in person. I guess the problem is I don't see full-time work as optimal long term, I don't see retirement as optimal currently and some part-time job would like require a compensation cut that would make me wonder why I left my full-time gig. Sooner or later I will either decide I need to retire while I am young enough to knock off a few of my more demanding bucket list items or my employer will decide I can no longer keep up or some corporate change will leave me without a chair. In any case I expect to end up retired and figure I need to get a better handle on the concept than I currently have.
Those are good observations

Unlike retirees who hit their ideal retirement in the first go, I had to retire a few times to find the best combination of structure, social, physical and spiritual pursuits that suited my personality. You appear to be on the same path of self-discovery

Good luck!
The US market always recovers. It’s never different this time. Retired in my 40s. Investing is a simple game of rinse and repeat
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TheTimeLord
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Re: I have a question for those in early FIRE or planning on early FIRE

Post by TheTimeLord »

flaccidsteele wrote: Sat Feb 01, 2020 11:13 am
TheTimeLord wrote: Sat Feb 01, 2020 10:47 am
flaccidsteele wrote: Fri Jan 31, 2020 11:24 pm It doesn’t take much imagination to picture what retired life is like. It’s exactly how you experienced it

People just do what they want until they decide otherwise
I am hoping it can be different than I experienced now that I am older. I am really not much of a do things around the house or sleep in person. I guess the problem is I don't see full-time work as optimal long term, I don't see retirement as optimal currently and some part-time job would like require a compensation cut that would make me wonder why I left my full-time gig. Sooner or later I will either decide I need to retire while I am young enough to knock off a few of my more demanding bucket list items or my employer will decide I can no longer keep up or some corporate change will leave me without a chair. In any case I expect to end up retired and figure I need to get a better handle on the concept than I currently have.
Those are good observations

Unlike retirees who hit their ideal retirement in the first go, I had to retire a few times to find the best combination of structure, social, physical and spiritual pursuits that suited my personality. You appear to be on the same path of self-discovery

Good luck!
Thanks, I just had a new experience recently that you don't usually encounter when you are younger. I lost a friend because he and his wife decide to relocate closer to their kids (no grandkids yet, but probably soon). So I also need to account for people moving out of my life to live somewhere else for whatever reason.
IMHO, Investing should be about living the life you want, not avoiding the life you fear. | Run, You Clever Boy! [9085]
1130Super
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Re: I have a question for those in early FIRE or planning on early FIRE

Post by 1130Super »

EddyB wrote: Tue Jan 28, 2020 2:26 pm
JoeRetire wrote: Tue Jan 28, 2020 2:21 pm
sjt wrote: Tue Jan 28, 2020 1:45 pm
fabdog wrote: Tue Jan 28, 2020 1:43 pm Well, it's been 5 years since I retired early.


I work a job I like for a few months of the year (I enjoy the work, but don't want to do it full time, and they like having the seasonal help)


I do some freelance consulting
Uh oh, the retirement police will be here soon to tell you you're not actually retired..... :wink:
If I work full-time, can I call myself retired too?
Being in the retirement police is a full-time job?
Ever since I’ve retired from the retirement police, I’ve benn stuck in paradox of arresting myself because the act of arresting myself would be an arrestable offense.
visualguy
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Re: I have a question for those in early FIRE or planning on early FIRE

Post by visualguy »

TheTimeLord wrote: Sat Feb 01, 2020 11:05 am
4nursebee wrote: Sat Feb 01, 2020 10:50 am I've heard from a substance abuse counselor that some men turn to drinking as a hobby to occupy their time. The wives tell him that they never drank that much when working.

I hope everyone has better things to retire to!
24x7x365 is a lot of time to fill if you don't have some hobbies you can do solo. I am amazed at the contrast in opinions on how easy it is to fill time between the posters here and the people I know in real life. I only know 1 retiree that I would consider to be having a really successful early retirement (not that my opinion matters). That is mainly due to their focus/obsession with a new hobby that takes lots of solo preparation time. When not engaged in that they are just hanging around the house and running errands like everyone else. There are a fair number of people who could FIRE in my social circle, they just don't want to, so this forum offers me a perspective I do not experience in my life.
It is easy to pass the time. You just take your time on myriad trivial things, take it easy, and time just evaporates. Sleep in, shop at multiple places to get the stuff you like most, take good care of the pets, get all the stuff done at the house, including decluttering and renovations (very time consuming), exercise, go hiking, go on leisurely drives, surf the web and spend time on forums like this, watch movies and read books, plan travel and go on the trips, do all your medical stuff, fix all dental problems, etc. Pretty soon you wonder how you ever had time to work. Like I mentioned, I didn't find this to be a good thing because it feels like time is just frittered away and passes without a trace. A good job or career shrinks the time you spend on trivialities, and forces you to make time for something that gives more of a sense of achievement or a sense that you actually did something with your time. The extra money helps too, of course.
quantAndHold
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Re: I have a question for those in early FIRE or planning on early FIRE

Post by quantAndHold »

TheTimeLord wrote: Sat Feb 01, 2020 11:05 am
4nursebee wrote: Sat Feb 01, 2020 10:50 am I've heard from a substance abuse counselor that some men turn to drinking as a hobby to occupy their time. The wives tell him that they never drank that much when working.

I hope everyone has better things to retire to!
24x7x365 is a lot of time to fill if you don't have some hobbies you can do solo. I am amazed at the contrast in opinions on how easy it is to fill time between the posters here and the people I know in real life. I only know 1 retiree that I would consider to be having a really successful early retirement (not that my opinion matters). That is mainly due to their focus/obsession with a new hobby that takes lots of solo preparation time. When not engaged in that they are just hanging around the house and running errands like everyone else. There are a fair number of people who could FIRE in my social circle, they just don't want to, so this forum offers me a perspective I do not experience in my life.
I think a lot of people who have always built their social circle around work overestimate the difficulty in finding playmates in retirement. There are loads of people out there who are either retired but still active, or still working but have time away from work during the day. You just don’t know them, because you’re working. If you chose social activities, you will find a social circle. I don’t take classes at the gym, so I only know a couple of people there (and I actually originally knew those people from outside the gym), but the people who take the daytime classes all socialize with each other outside of class. Sometimes I have trouble getting to my locker because some class let out and they’re all too busy making social plans to notice me. The daytime classes at my martial arts studio are better attended than the nighttime ones. The daytime demographic skews older than the nighttime classes, but they are still fit, active people. Those people are my friends and my social circle. My volunteer work has loads of people who don’t work and socialize with each other. The demographic skews older than the working population, but there are plenty of people my age, as well as students and younger adults.

You can find groups that get together around pretty much any hobby or activity, and those groups are filled with people who are unemployed or underemployed, of all ages. You just have to get out and find them.
Yes, I’m really that pedantic.
SQRT
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Re: I have a question for those in early FIRE or planning on early FIRE

Post by SQRT »

visualguy wrote: Sat Feb 01, 2020 11:33 am
It is easy to pass the time. You just take your time on myriad trivial things, take it easy, and time just evaporates. Sleep in, shop at multiple places to get the stuff you like most, take good care of the pets, get all the stuff done at the house, including decluttering and renovations (very time consuming), exercise, go hiking, go on leisurely drives, surf the web and spend time on forums like this, watch movies and read books, plan travel and go on the trips, do all your medical stuff, fix all dental problems, etc. Pretty soon you wonder how you ever had time to work. Like I mentioned, I didn't find this to be a good thing because it feels like time is just frittered away and passes without a trace. A good job or career shrinks the time you spend on trivialities, and forces you to make time for something that gives more of a sense of achievement or a sense that you actually did something with your time. The extra money helps too, of course.
This resonates with me. Retired at 56 from senior exec job. Took a few years, maybe 3 to feel comfortable with the kind of activities you mention. I now love my retirement (13 years of it now). In fact I can hardly remember the stress and actual feeling of working. If you feel that these types of activities are a “waste” and don’t think you will eventually get to enjoy them, I guess you should keep working. Eventually, your boss will decide when you should retire, especially if you keep spending so much time on this site during work hours. :happy
SQRT
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Re: I have a question for those in early FIRE or planning on early FIRE

Post by SQRT »

quantAndHold wrote: Sat Feb 01, 2020 11:46 am
TheTimeLord wrote: Sat Feb 01, 2020 11:05 am
4nursebee wrote: Sat Feb 01, 2020 10:50 am I've heard from a substance abuse counselor that some men turn to drinking as a hobby to occupy their time. The wives tell him that they never drank that much when working.

I hope everyone has better things to retire to!
24x7x365 is a lot of time to fill if you don't have some hobbies you can do solo. I am amazed at the contrast in opinions on how easy it is to fill time between the posters here and the people I know in real life. I only know 1 retiree that I would consider to be having a really successful early retirement (not that my opinion matters). That is mainly due to their focus/obsession with a new hobby that takes lots of solo preparation time. When not engaged in that they are just hanging around the house and running errands like everyone else. There are a fair number of people who could FIRE in my social circle, they just don't want to, so this forum offers me a perspective I do not experience in my life.
I think a lot of people who have always built their social circle around work overestimate the difficulty in finding playmates in retirement. There are loads of people out there who are either retired but still active, or still working but have time away from work during the day. You just don’t know them, because you’re working. If you chose social activities, you will find a social circle. I don’t take classes at the gym, so I only know a couple of people there (and I actually originally knew those people from outside the gym), but the people who take the daytime classes all socialize with each other outside of class. Sometimes I have trouble getting to my locker because some class let out and they’re all too busy making social plans to notice me. The daytime classes at my martial arts studio are better attended than the nighttime ones. The daytime demographic skews older than the nighttime classes, but they are still fit, active people. Those people are my friends and my social circle. My volunteer work has loads of people who don’t work and socialize with each other. The demographic skews older than the working population, but there are plenty of people my age, as well as students and younger adults.

You can find groups that get together around pretty much any hobby or activity, and those groups are filled with people who are unemployed or underemployed, of all ages. You just have to get out and find them.
I agree with this. Our social circle has almost totally changed since we retired 13 years ago. Hardly any of our current friends are people we worked with. We have met new friends in each of our new locations, on themed travel trips, through volunteering, and just being friendly with people we come across (hair dressers, neighbours,landscapers, builders, physiotherapists,etc). I think it helps to be outgoing and recognize that maintaining/enhancing your social circle is especially important in retirement.
Last edited by SQRT on Sat Feb 01, 2020 12:57 pm, edited 2 times in total.
quantAndHold
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Re: I have a question for those in early FIRE or planning on early FIRE

Post by quantAndHold »

SQRT wrote: Sat Feb 01, 2020 11:52 am
visualguy wrote: Sat Feb 01, 2020 11:33 am
It is easy to pass the time. You just take your time on myriad trivial things, take it easy, and time just evaporates. Sleep in, shop at multiple places to get the stuff you like most, take good care of the pets, get all the stuff done at the house, including decluttering and renovations (very time consuming), exercise, go hiking, go on leisurely drives, surf the web and spend time on forums like this, watch movies and read books, plan travel and go on the trips, do all your medical stuff, fix all dental problems, etc. Pretty soon you wonder how you ever had time to work. Like I mentioned, I didn't find this to be a good thing because it feels like time is just frittered away and passes without a trace. A good job or career shrinks the time you spend on trivialities, and forces you to make time for something that gives more of a sense of achievement or a sense that you actually did something with your time. The extra money helps too, of course.
This resonates with me. Retired at 56 from senior exec job. Took a few years, maybe 3 to feel comfortable with the kind of activities you mention. I now love my retirement (13 years of it now). In fact I can hardly remember the stress and actual feeling of working. If you feel that these types of activities are a “waste” and don’t think you will eventually get to enjoy them, I guess you should keep working. Eventually, your boss will decide when you should retire, especially if you keep spending so much time on this site during work hours. :happy
One of the things we had to learn was to create our own structure, because work didn’t impose it on us. We had to create a consistent weekly schedule because we were spending a lot of time not accomplishing very much. Since we’re in martial arts classes 5x/week and the gym 3x/week, we structured our week around that. We still have plenty of downtime to do what we want, but we don’t feel like we’re frittering our lives away anymore.
Yes, I’m really that pedantic.
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Third Son
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Re: I have a question for those in early FIRE or planning on early FIRE

Post by Third Son »

TheTimeLord wrote: Tue Jan 28, 2020 1:29 pm I have a question for those in early FIRE or planning on early FIRE. 5 years in, what you you see yourself doing daily? I get the excitement of it when it is new, but 5 years in what do you see an average day being like?
It would be interesting to know how's old the ER folks are as that would have a bearing on the answers given.
"A part of all you earn is yours to keep" | | -The Richest Man in Babylon
SQRT
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Re: I have a question for those in early FIRE or planning on early FIRE

Post by SQRT »

quantAndHold wrote: Sat Feb 01, 2020 12:05 pm
SQRT wrote: Sat Feb 01, 2020 11:52 am
visualguy wrote: Sat Feb 01, 2020 11:33 am
It is easy to pass the time. You just take your time on myriad trivial things, take it easy, and time just evaporates. Sleep in, shop at multiple places to get the stuff you like most, take good care of the pets, get all the stuff done at the house, including decluttering and renovations (very time consuming), exercise, go hiking, go on leisurely drives, surf the web and spend time on forums like this, watch movies and read books, plan travel and go on the trips, do all your medical stuff, fix all dental problems, etc. Pretty soon you wonder how you ever had time to work. Like I mentioned, I didn't find this to be a good thing because it feels like time is just frittered away and passes without a trace. A good job or career shrinks the time you spend on trivialities, and forces you to make time for something that gives more of a sense of achievement or a sense that you actually did something with your time. The extra money helps too, of course.
This resonates with me. Retired at 56 from senior exec job. Took a few years, maybe 3 to feel comfortable with the kind of activities you mention. I now love my retirement (13 years of it now). In fact I can hardly remember the stress and actual feeling of working. If you feel that these types of activities are a “waste” and don’t think you will eventually get to enjoy them, I guess you should keep working. Eventually, your boss will decide when you should retire, especially if you keep spending so much time on this site during work hours. :happy
One of the things we had to learn was to create our own structure, because work didn’t impose it on us. We had to create a consistent weekly schedule because we were spending a lot of time not accomplishing very much. Since we’re in martial arts classes 5x/week and the gym 3x/week, we structured our week around that. We still have plenty of downtime to do what we want, but we don’t feel like we’re frittering our lives away anymore.
That makes sense. Workouts, biking, web surfing, investment management, reading newspaper, easily take up each morning. So really we only have the afternoons, say 1-4 for all the other stuff. I feel busy enough. Never bored.
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Re: I have a question for those in early FIRE or planning on early FIRE

Post by Unladen_Swallow »

visualguy wrote: Sat Feb 01, 2020 11:33 am It is easy to pass the time. You just take your time on myriad trivial things, take it easy, and time just evaporates. Sleep in, shop at multiple places to get the stuff you like most, take good care of the pets, get all the stuff done at the house, including decluttering and renovations (very time consuming), exercise, go hiking, go on leisurely drives, surf the web and spend time on forums like this, watch movies and read books, plan travel and go on the trips, do all your medical stuff, fix all dental problems, etc. Pretty soon you wonder how you ever had time to work. Like I mentioned, I didn't find this to be a good thing because it feels like time is just frittered away and passes without a trace. A good job or career shrinks the time you spend on trivialities, and forces you to make time for something that gives more of a sense of achievement or a sense that you actually did something with your time. The extra money helps too, of course.

One person's trivialities is another person's wonderful life. Different strokes.

As the great poet Roger Waters once said:

"Ticking away the moments that make up a dull day
Fritter and waste the hours in an offhand way.
Kicking around on a piece of ground in your home town
Waiting for someone or something to show you the way.......

So you run and you run to catch up with the sun but it's sinking
Racing around to come up behind you again.
The sun is the same in a relative way but you're older,
Shorter of breath and one day closer to death.

Every year is getting shorter never seem to find the time,
Plans that either come to naught, or half a page of scribbled lines...."

:D
"I think it's much more interesting to live not knowing than to have answers which might be wrong." - Richard Feynman
Bobby206
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Re: I have a question for those in early FIRE or planning on early FIRE

Post by Bobby206 »

flyingaway wrote: Tue Jan 28, 2020 2:55 pm I am only semi-retired since 42, but I work fewer hours than many people claiming to be FIRED.

If I were fully retired, I would do (I am doing some of) the following:

(1) Sleep late or early and get up as late as I want;
(2) Drink beers, but no more than one bottle a day, one liquor a week;
(3) Travel internationally at least four times a year, stay as long as I want;
(3) Play at casinos once a week when I am not on international travels;
(4) Play cards with friends at least once a week when at home;
(5) Visit each of my children at least twice a year;
(6) Take care of my parents (when they are alive) and my fruit trees;
(7) Try some good food;
(8) Do anything (good or bad, who judge) that money can help;
(9) Not interested in volunteer work;
(10) Never work for a penny again;
I am in general agreement with most of this but if I want two beers in a day I will do it because I don't want any rules! :) I am still working almost full time (well maybe 30 hours a week). A few more years I hope....
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bligh
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Re: I have a question for those in early FIRE or planning on early FIRE

Post by bligh »

TheTimeLord wrote: Sat Feb 01, 2020 11:18 am Thanks, I just had a new experience recently that you don't usually encounter when you are younger. I lost a friend because he and his wife decide to relocate closer to their kids (no grandkids yet, but probably soon). So I also need to account for people moving out of my life to live somewhere else for whatever reason.
I think getting to financial independence is a worthy goal, whether you choose to retire once you hit that goal is completely up to the individual and what they want to do with their time. My plan, once I hit FI (hopefully only a few years from now), is to just take a 2-4 year sabbatical and then return to some form of employment/self-employment. Will it all work out? No idea. Will I be able to re-enter my field once I leave? Again.. most likely yes, but who knows?

Your response to the anecdote above reveals that you are trying to plan and control for something you have very little control over. You cannot "account" for people moving out of your life, (or moving into your life). Life happens. Accidents happen. Death happens.... including your own. One of the comforts of employment, is that it gives your life structure. You wake up each morning and you basically know what you need to do. To me, what retirees often appear to struggle with, is the complete lack of structure. You wake up each morning and are free to do whatever you please. Some people thrive in that setting, but not all.

The anecdote I have for you is my own parents (my dad semi retired from his business when he was 50 and fully retired when he turned 55.. and he is going to be 70 soon). I am sure a lot of people would say he "wastes" a lot of his time, but he has a lot of time to waste. He spends so much time with his family and his grandkids, takes his afternoon siestas daily, has a busy social life with other retired friends, travels, reads books (though with a lot of prompting from me).. It is a good life. Age is taking a toll on his body as it does for everyone, but he just deals with it and moves on. For example, He can't go hiking anymore due to knee issues and such. He has no expectations or plans, he just takes it as it comes.. and adapts. It is a good life.

I am not sure if that approach will work for everyone though. In my case, I hope to have a broad plan and direction but then, to let life unfold, and adapt as I go. It's worked out pretty well for my folks.
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Re: I have a question for those in early FIRE or planning on early FIRE

Post by flyingaway »

Bobby206 wrote: Sat Feb 01, 2020 12:39 pm
flyingaway wrote: Tue Jan 28, 2020 2:55 pm I am only semi-retired since 42, but I work fewer hours than many people claiming to be FIRED.

If I were fully retired, I would do (I am doing some of) the following:

(1) Sleep late or early and get up as late as I want;
(2) Drink beers, but no more than one bottle a day, one liquor a week;
(3) Travel internationally at least four times a year, stay as long as I want;
(3) Play at casinos once a week when I am not on international travels;
(4) Play cards with friends at least once a week when at home;
(5) Visit each of my children at least twice a year;
(6) Take care of my parents (when they are alive) and my fruit trees;
(7) Try some good food;
(8) Do anything (good or bad, who judge) that money can help;
(9) Not interested in volunteer work;
(10) Never work for a penny again;
I am in general agreement with most of this but if I want two beers in a day I will do it because I don't want any rules! :) I am still working almost full time (well maybe 30 hours a week). A few more years I hope....
I just think too much beer does no good for me. I really don't like any rules either.
Financologist
Posts: 235
Joined: Wed Jan 01, 2020 11:16 pm

Re: I have a question for those in early FIRE or planning on early FIRE

Post by Financologist »

Been thinking more and more about FIRE these days...

I have a long list of stuff that I want to do like learn an instrument, join a band, get good at tennis, spend more time with friends and family, get more involved in community and charitable pursuits, help friends and family with various matters, get into the best shape of my life, take more of an interest in the hobbies that my wife prefers, read piles of books, travel, play more poker, take more walks, get to know distant relatives, study astronomy, etc...

More broadly I want to continue to be useful and positively impact those around me. These are the cornerstones of retirement for me.

All of the aforementioned pursuits should serve these broader objective.. either directly or by energizing my soul. Really looking forward to joining the ranks of FIRE before long (still some years away.. but not that many). Thoroughly enjoying the journey in the meanwhile.
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Stef
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Re: I have a question for those in early FIRE or planning on early FIRE

Post by Stef »

My goal is to retire at 50-55. But I have no idea what I will do then. Probably just get a dog.
Caduceus
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Joined: Mon Sep 17, 2012 1:47 am

Re: I have a question for those in early FIRE or planning on early FIRE

Post by Caduceus »

When I FIRE, I would imagine a typical year being filled with two parts. One when I travel - I'd like to spend a few months in particular cities and "go local." The other part of the year, I'd be back home.

While at home, this is what a typical day would look like: Wake up at noon and go out for lunch. Read a book on my Kindle over lunch. Reading would take an hour or two. Mid-afternoons would be spent on various activities on various days - gardening, baking, writing my book, restoring vintage items, going for long hikes/walks, volunteering with environmental organizations, reading annual reports to manage my portfolio. Dinner would be at a restaurant. Nights would be devoted to gaming. Gaming would start maybe around 9p.m. and go to 3 a.m. 8-)

At least this was what it looked like before I met my fiance. He doesn't want to FIRE and the idea of me going off to Cambodia or Thailand for six months at a time is a no-go for him ... so we'll see.
kacang
Posts: 201
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Location: CA

Re: I have a question for those in early FIRE or planning on early FIRE

Post by kacang »

TheTimeLord wrote: Tue Jan 28, 2020 1:29 pm ... 5 years in, what you you see yourself doing daily? ...
50, first year of retirement. No concrete plan, but I know what my key priorities in retirement are. Am trying different things and keep what that fits with those priorities & gives me joy.

Scheduling is just execution. So 5 years from now, I do not know/care what my average day is, but I will be happy if whatever I am doing, it is consistent with what that is important to me.

What is important to you? Do you think retirement (early or not) will get you closer to that?
StealthRabbit
Posts: 528
Joined: Sat Jun 13, 2009 1:25 am

Re: I have a question for those in early FIRE or planning on early FIRE

Post by StealthRabbit »

There are so many interesting things to do in life, I really never had time to invest in work. Tho I 'attended' and contributed my 200%, was always ranked high, and given much latitude. (Sabbaticals, international assignments, flexible schedule, challenging projects, much responsibility, and freedom to make important business decisions). I disliked working days, so often did Asia interface at night. I vacationed and traveled a lot. Taking 6-10 week field trips with my Homeschool kids. Spent time teaching them to design and build their own homes while they were in Jr high.

I left employment @age 49, FIRE (for the 3rd time). That was nearly 15 yrs ago.
I go in spurts (play hard/ work hard).

Since my last FIRE...
Did a master's program
Learned several new skills
Volunteered Local, USA, international. Various organizations I wanted to learn about.
Did a few RE deals in my free time... Rezoning commercial, bailing out investors who were too deep and knew too little. It's a hobby for me, never really spent the time to learn RE... Just did it.
Helped many neighbors and elderly and poor.
Helped rural communities get Economic Development grants.
Volunteer counsel businesses, usual migrants ESL
Teach business finance to small businesses (free )
Volunteer in community gardens
Took a year long Round-the-world trip... Bought a one-way ticket to Sidney and winged-it from there. Took many interesting detours, and volunteer gigs. Followed the long days of early summer! When the days got shorter, we headed further west.
Traveled over 100 USA flights 3 yrs in a row.
Last yr 78 USA only flights + several international trips.
Went to nearly 20 state fairs last year.(like to chat with 4H kids and learn about their passions and pursuits.)
Did Bonneville Speed Week. And HotRod drag week, and several national antique truck and car events.
Helped neighbors and friends build houses and barns and roads.
Cleared and replanted about 100 trees per yr I'm home.
Cut split, stack, dry and move 7 cords of firewood / yr.
Built a few 50mpg Sports Cars (GTDs)
Maintain and use my 9 vintage racing motorcycles.
Spend a lot of time on my bulldozer and tracked Bobcat.
Help farmers and ranchers with harvest.
Volunteer with kids tech / engineering projects.
Building a few of my inventions.
Do Hospice volunteering (which I like and appreciate)
Master Gardener - much volunteer and continuing ed time required.
Teach small farming finance to new growers and Farmer's Markets.
Actively manage way too many accts. (12 +)
Help others manage Retirement accts.
Research companies, technologies, investments, and socio economic world issues.

Future...
Plan to learn more musical instruments.
More technical / classical singing small groups.
Want to do immersion language program.
Would like to do international finance degree in Europe.
Would like to spend a winter working in Yellowstone or Tetons (I keep certifications current to do so)
Would like to spend a season in Antarctica as research volunteer.

May die tonight, if death can catch up with me. (Trust me... It eventually will!)
Then... Poof Gone... But filled life adequately while physically able. (My dad became disabled at age 49, and I cared for him for the next 32 years).... That was not fun for any of us. Lesson learned! Live fully while able.
Unladen_Swallow
Posts: 784
Joined: Tue Dec 10, 2019 6:12 pm

Re: I have a question for those in early FIRE or planning on early FIRE

Post by Unladen_Swallow »

StealthRabbit wrote: Sun Feb 02, 2020 1:37 am There are so many interesting things to do in life, I really never had time to invest in work. Tho I 'attended' and contributed my 200%, was always ranked high, and given much latitude. (Sabbaticals, international assignments, flexible schedule, challenging projects, much responsibility, and freedom to make important business decisions). I disliked working days, so often did Asia interface at night. I vacationed and traveled a lot. Taking 6-10 week field trips with my Homeschool kids. Spent time teaching them to design and build their own homes while they were in Jr high.

I left employment @age 49, FIRE (for the 3rd time). That was nearly 15 yrs ago.
I go in spurts (play hard/ work hard).

Since my last FIRE...
Did a master's program
Learned several new skills
Volunteered Local, USA, international. Various organizations I wanted to learn about.
Did a few RE deals in my free time... Rezoning commercial, bailing out investors who were too deep and knew too little. It's a hobby for me, never really spent the time to learn RE... Just did it.
Helped many neighbors and elderly and poor.
Helped rural communities get Economic Development grants.
Volunteer counsel businesses, usual migrants ESL
Teach business finance to small businesses (free )
Volunteer in community gardens
Took a year long Round-the-world trip... Bought a one-way ticket to Sidney and winged-it from there. Took many interesting detours, and volunteer gigs. Followed the long days of early summer! When the days got shorter, we headed further west.
Traveled over 100 USA flights 3 yrs in a row.
Last yr 78 USA only flights + several international trips.
Went to nearly 20 state fairs last year.(like to chat with 4H kids and learn about their passions and pursuits.)
Did Bonneville Speed Week. And HotRod drag week, and several national antique truck and car events.
Helped neighbors and friends build houses and barns and roads.
Cleared and replanted about 100 trees per yr I'm home.
Cut split, stack, dry and move 7 cords of firewood / yr.
Built a few 50mpg Sports Cars (GTDs)
Maintain and use my 9 vintage racing motorcycles.
Spend a lot of time on my bulldozer and tracked Bobcat.
Help farmers and ranchers with harvest.
Volunteer with kids tech / engineering projects.
Building a few of my inventions.
Do Hospice volunteering (which I like and appreciate)
Master Gardener - much volunteer and continuing ed time required.
Teach small farming finance to new growers and Farmer's Markets.
Actively manage way too many accts. (12 +)
Help others manage Retirement accts.
Research companies, technologies, investments, and socio economic world issues.

Future...
Plan to learn more musical instruments.
More technical / classical singing small groups.
Want to do immersion language program.
Would like to do international finance degree in Europe.
Would like to spend a winter working in Yellowstone or Tetons (I keep certifications current to do so)
Would like to spend a season in Antarctica as research volunteer.

May die tonight, if death can catch up with me. (Trust me... It eventually will!)
Then... Poof Gone... But filled life adequately while physically able. (My dad became disabled at age 49, and I cared for him for the next 32 years).... That was not fun for any of us. Lesson learned! Live fully while able.
:beer :beer
"I think it's much more interesting to live not knowing than to have answers which might be wrong." - Richard Feynman
tiburblium
Posts: 111
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Re: I have a question for those in early FIRE or planning on early FIRE

Post by tiburblium »

For any former software developer who has genuine passion for the field, I would think this is an easy question, they would focus on building either personal projects, creating new Open Source projects, or contribute to existing OSS projects. After a 10-20 year career in this field, many of us can think of tools or libraries that would have been super helpful for problem XYZ, retirement from a 9-5 is your opportunity to focus on building what matters to you. Perhaps you can have a greater impact on the world in this way than one ever did working for Corporate America, not to mention OSS experts for projects which have wide adoption are often tapped for lucrative part time consulting opportunities.

Cost: Free
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LadyGeek
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Re: I have a question for those in early FIRE or planning on early FIRE

Post by LadyGeek »

I removed an off-topic post and several replies.

This thread is now in the Personal Consumer Issues forum (how you spend your money and your time).
Wiki To some, the glass is half full. To others, the glass is half empty. To an engineer, it's twice the size it needs to be.
Caduceus
Posts: 2745
Joined: Mon Sep 17, 2012 1:47 am

Re: I have a question for those in early FIRE or planning on early FIRE

Post by Caduceus »

You know, when T. Boone Pickens passed away, he mentioned something to the effect that he'd give away all of his wealth for the chance to start over again.

The one thing you can't buy in life is more time, short of staying healthy, eating healthy, etc.

My fantasy is to be bitten by a vampire and made immortal so that I can see what the world is like in 100, 200, 500 years. How glorious that would be.
michaeljc70
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Joined: Thu Oct 15, 2015 3:53 pm

Re: I have a question for those in early FIRE or planning on early FIRE

Post by michaeljc70 »

BW1985 wrote: Tue Jan 28, 2020 2:40 pm Same thing I do on the weekends and when I'm on PTO, enjoy my hobbies, friends & family, travel, exercise.
Exactly. I'm not sure how it would be much different than if you retired at 65 and what you do at age 70 (other than probably being healthier).
michaeljc70
Posts: 7112
Joined: Thu Oct 15, 2015 3:53 pm

Re: I have a question for those in early FIRE or planning on early FIRE

Post by michaeljc70 »

StealthRabbit wrote: Sun Feb 02, 2020 1:37 am There are so many interesting things to do in life, I really never had time to invest in work. Tho I 'attended' and contributed my 200%, was always ranked high, and given much latitude. (Sabbaticals, international assignments, flexible schedule, challenging projects, much responsibility, and freedom to make important business decisions). I disliked working days, so often did Asia interface at night. I vacationed and traveled a lot. Taking 6-10 week field trips with my Homeschool kids. Spent time teaching them to design and build their own homes while they were in Jr high.

I left employment @age 49, FIRE (for the 3rd time). That was nearly 15 yrs ago.
I go in spurts (play hard/ work hard).

Since my last FIRE...
Did a master's program
Learned several new skills
Volunteered Local, USA, international. Various organizations I wanted to learn about.
Did a few RE deals in my free time... Rezoning commercial, bailing out investors who were too deep and knew too little. It's a hobby for me, never really spent the time to learn RE... Just did it.
Helped many neighbors and elderly and poor.
Helped rural communities get Economic Development grants.
Volunteer counsel businesses, usual migrants ESL
Teach business finance to small businesses (free )
Volunteer in community gardens
Took a year long Round-the-world trip... Bought a one-way ticket to Sidney and winged-it from there. Took many interesting detours, and volunteer gigs. Followed the long days of early summer! When the days got shorter, we headed further west.
Traveled over 100 USA flights 3 yrs in a row.
Last yr 78 USA only flights + several international trips.
Went to nearly 20 state fairs last year.(like to chat with 4H kids and learn about their passions and pursuits.)
Did Bonneville Speed Week. And HotRod drag week, and several national antique truck and car events.
Helped neighbors and friends build houses and barns and roads.
Cleared and replanted about 100 trees per yr I'm home.
Cut split, stack, dry and move 7 cords of firewood / yr.
Built a few 50mpg Sports Cars (GTDs)
Maintain and use my 9 vintage racing motorcycles.
Spend a lot of time on my bulldozer and tracked Bobcat.
Help farmers and ranchers with harvest.
Volunteer with kids tech / engineering projects.
Building a few of my inventions.
Do Hospice volunteering (which I like and appreciate)
Master Gardener - much volunteer and continuing ed time required.
Teach small farming finance to new growers and Farmer's Markets.
Actively manage way too many accts. (12 +)
Help others manage Retirement accts.
Research companies, technologies, investments, and socio economic world issues.

Future...
Plan to learn more musical instruments.
More technical / classical singing small groups.
Want to do immersion language program.
Would like to do international finance degree in Europe.
Would like to spend a winter working in Yellowstone or Tetons (I keep certifications current to do so)
Would like to spend a season in Antarctica as research volunteer.

May die tonight, if death can catch up with me. (Trust me... It eventually will!)
Then... Poof Gone... But filled life adequately while physically able. (My dad became disabled at age 49, and I cared for him for the next 32 years).... That was not fun for any of us. Lesson learned! Live fully while able.
Great list. Congrats on your 500th post. :D
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willthrill81
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Re: I have a question for those in early FIRE or planning on early FIRE

Post by willthrill81 »

Caduceus wrote: Sun Feb 02, 2020 10:15 amMy fantasy is to be bitten by a vampire and made immortal so that I can see what the world is like in 100, 200, 500 years. How glorious that would be.
In Tolkien's Middle Earth, mortality was part of the Gift of Men. It's a very interesting idea.
“It's a dangerous business, Frodo, going out your door. You step onto the road, and if you don't keep your feet, there's no knowing where you might be swept off to.” J.R.R. Tolkien,The Lord of the Rings
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