Microsoft Office Home & Student - 2013 and 2019 Versions

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Electron
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Microsoft Office Home & Student - 2013 and 2019 Versions

Post by Electron »

I have Office Home & Student 2013 installed on a Windows 7 computer and Office Home & Student 2019 installed on a Windows 10 computer.

At the time I purchased the 2013 version, I believe the installation could be transferred to a different computer. I'm wondering if that is still the case and whether there are any restrictions.

When I purchased the 2019 version, I was told that it was for a single computer only. It looks like the rules changed. Is there a way to reinstall the software if the disk failed and had to be replaced?

Thanks for any information.
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RickBoglehead
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Re: Microsoft Office Home & Student - 2013 and 2019 Versions

Post by RickBoglehead »

OEM installations of software are often for one computer only. If you have the DVD/CD, and a hard drive fails, you would also have the key (on the disk package) to reinstall it.

Without the key, you'd likely have to contact Microsoft to be able to activate the software.

Some Googling shows that Office 2013 Home & Student was for one computer. 2019 is also. Again, if OEM software, then both would be for one computer.

I use Office 2010, and it's allows 2 computers, but it's not OEM software.
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Re: Microsoft Office Home & Student - 2013 and 2019 Versions

Post by 123 »

Maybe its time to get a copy of Microsoft Office Home & Student 2007. The 2007 version had been great and very flexible. We started out with it on a couple of Windows XP computers and it's successfully re-activated through computer replacements, OS upgrades (Windows 7 & 10), and hard drive replacements along the way. It's worked on 32-bit and 64-bit machines. Every time we re-install we get the activation screen and Microsoft activates it.
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Re: Microsoft Office Home & Student - 2013 and 2019 Versions

Post by Electron »

Thanks RickBoglehead and 123 for the help.

Office Home & Student 2013 and 2019 were both purchased as nothing more than a card with a Product Key. You go to office.com/setup and enter the appropriate information to start the download and installation. You log into your Microsoft account which also displays any other products registered to that account.

I also have a version of Office 2003 on CD that was installed on an earlier WinXP system. As I recall that was for one computer also. I do a lot with Excel and liked the 2003 version quite a bit. It was an effort migrating to Excel 2013.
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Re: Microsoft Office Home & Student - 2013 and 2019 Versions

Post by jrbdmb »

Curious - when Microsoft says "for one computer" do they mean "one computer at a time?" In other words, is it an OEM version tied to a specific computer, or can it be moved from an old computer to a new one?
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Re: Microsoft Office Home & Student - 2013 and 2019 Versions

Post by 02nz »

jrbdmb wrote: Fri Jan 17, 2020 4:00 pm Curious - when Microsoft says "for one computer" do they mean "one computer at a time?" In other words, is it an OEM version tied to a specific computer, or can it be moved from an old computer to a new one?
OEM software - at least OS software like Windows - generally cannot be moved to another computer. But if you just replace the SSD or hard drive, you can reinstall it, in most cases it should activate just fine (without having to call in) because the activation system will recognize that most of your system components haven't changed.

However, just because it came with a computer doesn't mean it cannot be moved to another computer. I bought an HP laptop a few years ago that came with Office Home and Student 2016. It came with a key on a piece of paper and is labeled "not for individual resale" but nothing indicates I cannot transfer it to another computer (if I uninstall it from the HP laptop).
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Re: Microsoft Office Home & Student - 2013 and 2019 Versions

Post by 02nz »

Electron wrote: Fri Jan 17, 2020 3:55 pm Thanks RickBoglehead and 123 for the help.

Office Home & Student 2013 and 2019 were both purchased as nothing more than a card with a Product Key. You go to office.com/setup and enter the appropriate information to start the download and installation. You log into your Microsoft account which also displays any other products registered to that account.

I also have a version of Office 2003 on CD that was installed on an earlier WinXP system. As I recall that was for one computer also. I do a lot with Excel and liked the 2003 version quite a bit. It was an effort migrating to Excel 2013.
You should be able to activate it using the key for Office 2019 if you swap out the hard drive, or even if you replace it with a whole new computer. If the automated activation fails, call the number that comes up, and go through entering the various codes. When it asks you how many PCs you have already activated the software on, answer 0. It should then activate fine.
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Re: Microsoft Office Home & Student - 2013 and 2019 Versions

Post by LiterallyIronic »

02nz wrote: Fri Jan 17, 2020 4:08 pm
jrbdmb wrote: Fri Jan 17, 2020 4:00 pm Curious - when Microsoft says "for one computer" do they mean "one computer at a time?" In other words, is it an OEM version tied to a specific computer, or can it be moved from an old computer to a new one?
OEM software - at least OS software like Windows - generally cannot be moved to another computer. But if you just replace the SSD or hard drive, you can reinstall it, in most cases it should activate just fine (without having to call in) because the activation system will recognize that most of your system components haven't changed.
I've had no difficulty installing Windows 7 on multiple different computers over the years. Completely new build with no shared hardware from the previous machine and just insert the disc after finishing building my rig. After a number of times, though, I did have to start using the phone activation instead of the Internet-based activation. Called the number, entered my CD key, and it would read off a string of characters for me to type in during activation.
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Re: Microsoft Office Home & Student - 2013 and 2019 Versions

Post by Electron »

jrbdmb wrote: Fri Jan 17, 2020 4:00 pm Curious - when Microsoft says "for one computer" do they mean "one computer at a time?" In other words, is it an OEM version tied to a specific computer, or can it be moved from an old computer to a new one?
My understanding is that the 2019 one PC/Mac version cannot be moved to another computer. The rules apparently changed after 2013. I believe my 2013 version can be moved by first uninstalling from one system and then reinstalling in another. However, I was trying to confirm that along with any associated rules.

I just bought the 2019 card at Best Buy and was amazed at the huge number of those cards available on the software rack.
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Re: Microsoft Office Home & Student - 2013 and 2019 Versions

Post by 02nz »

LiterallyIronic wrote: Fri Jan 17, 2020 4:13 pm
02nz wrote: Fri Jan 17, 2020 4:08 pm
jrbdmb wrote: Fri Jan 17, 2020 4:00 pm Curious - when Microsoft says "for one computer" do they mean "one computer at a time?" In other words, is it an OEM version tied to a specific computer, or can it be moved from an old computer to a new one?
OEM software - at least OS software like Windows - generally cannot be moved to another computer. But if you just replace the SSD or hard drive, you can reinstall it, in most cases it should activate just fine (without having to call in) because the activation system will recognize that most of your system components haven't changed.
I've had no difficulty installing Windows 7 on multiple different computers over the years. Completely new build with no shared hardware from the previous machine and just insert the disc after finishing building my rig. After a number of times, though, I did have to start using the phone activation instead of the Internet-based activation. Called the number, entered my CD key, and it would read off a string of characters for me to type in during activation.
My earlier post was about OEM OS software. First, you may have had a retail or other non-OEM product key, in which case the activation system could be more lenient, although I don't know every in and out of Microsoft's system. Second, regardless of what the system allows, the End-User License Agreement definitely does not permit an OEM Windows license (meaning the license on a PC that came pre-loaded) to be moved to a different computer, and it also does not permit a single-computer Windows license to be simultaneously installed on multiple PCs. Office is different in that you used to be allowed to install on multiple PCs, and that is still possible for Office 365.
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Re: Microsoft Office Home & Student - 2013 and 2019 Versions

Post by 02nz »

Electron wrote: Fri Jan 17, 2020 4:15 pm
jrbdmb wrote: Fri Jan 17, 2020 4:00 pm Curious - when Microsoft says "for one computer" do they mean "one computer at a time?" In other words, is it an OEM version tied to a specific computer, or can it be moved from an old computer to a new one?
My understanding is that the 2019 one PC/Mac version cannot be moved to another computer. The rules apparently changed after 2013. I believe my 2013 version can be moved by first uninstalling from one system and then reinstalling in another. However, I was trying to confirm that along with any associated rules.

I just bought the 2019 card at Best Buy and was amazed at the huge number of those cards available on the software rack.
This is not correct. I'm not aware of any Microsoft product that does not allow you to transfer to a different PC, other than OEM Windows.

See here: https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/mso ... b8fd47e201
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Re: Microsoft Office Home & Student - 2013 and 2019 Versions

Post by Tamales »

Electron wrote: Fri Jan 17, 2020 4:15 pm I just bought the 2019 card at Best Buy and was amazed at the huge number of those cards available on the software rack.
At $150 (home/student edition), they probably aren't hot sellers. I think I recall it being $100 during black friday at the microsoft store. And of course, there are the questionable versions available online as a key for $30 or so. I've read where it can be a royal pain to activate those though. They are apparently usually legal copies, but are in sort of a gray area.
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Re: Microsoft Office Home & Student - 2013 and 2019 Versions

Post by Electron »

Thanks all for the help. I found several pieces of key information on this topic and may have misunderstood information given to me when I purchased Office Home & Student 2019.

Here is a CNET article from March 2013.

https://www.cnet.com/news/office-2013-l ... nother-pc/

"In the face of user concerns over its previous policy, Microsoft today amended its Office 2013 license agreement. Now Office 2013 customers can move the software and license to another PC once every 90 days."

"Microsoft's previous policy for Office 2013 limited users to a perpetual license good for only one PC. Buy a new PC, and you were restricted from transferring your Office 2013 license. The only exception was for a PC that failed under warranty. In that case, users could contact Microsoft support to activate Office 2013 on a replacement PC."

"Any time you transfer the software to a new computer, you must remove the software from the prior computer and you may not retain any copies."

I then discovered that licensing information is available in the Office applications. In Excel, I went to Account and then About Excel where you can access the Software License Terms. Here is some key text from Office Home & Student 2019. Similar information is shown in the Office Home & Student 2013 license.

"If you acquired the software from a retailer as stand-alone software, you may transfer the software to another device that belongs to you, but not more than one time every 90 days (except due to hardware failure, in which case you may transfer sooner). If you transfer the software to another device, that other device becomes the “licensed device.” You may also transfer the software to a device owned by someone else if (i) you are the first licensed user of the software and (ii) the new user agrees to the terms of this agreement. Every time you transfer the software to a new device, you must remove the software from the prior device."

It appears that the information in the CNET article carried over to later versions. Note that these rules do not apply if the software came preinstalled on the device. The licenses have separate terms for retail and OEM.

The link that 02nz passed along provides additional links with information on reinstalling on a new device, activation, and removing the software from the previous device.

https://support.office.com/en-ie/articl ... _reinstall

https://support.office.com/en-gb/articl ... df5dbf61d8
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Re: Microsoft Office Home & Student - 2013 and 2019 Versions

Post by RickBoglehead »

That is not for OEM Office.
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Re: Microsoft Office Home & Student - 2013 and 2019 Versions

Post by tennisplyr »

Some on this forum have recommended www.libreoffice.org as an alternative which is free.
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Re: Microsoft Office Home & Student - 2013 and 2019 Versions

Post by pantomime »

tennisplyr wrote: Sun Jan 19, 2020 6:26 pm Some on this forum have recommended www.libreoffice.org as an alternative which is free.
Personally, I like Libre Office. I use MS Office on my work computer, and Libre Office at home because I got tired of the issue with licensing and transferring the software when getting a new computer. Haven’t had problems with word/text documents being translated between the two systems (MS and Libre) and although I’m no spreadsheet genius, Libre Office seems to be very similar to Excel (minus some of the bells and whistles) and works fine for me.
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Re: Microsoft Office Home & Student - 2013 and 2019 Versions

Post by EZ James »

A few days ago I installed Microsoft Office Standard 2007. The help menu advised me that version is retired and no help is provided.

Google informs me of security risks with the 2007 now that it's no longer supported.

Libra Office files can be saved in several MS compatible formats but none are dated later than 2007.

Is there any reason why all the LO files saved in MS compatible formats are not now more vulnerable to hacking?
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Re: Microsoft Office Home & Student - 2013 and 2019 Versions

Post by LiterallyIronic »

02nz wrote: Fri Jan 17, 2020 4:19 pm
LiterallyIronic wrote: Fri Jan 17, 2020 4:13 pm
02nz wrote: Fri Jan 17, 2020 4:08 pm
jrbdmb wrote: Fri Jan 17, 2020 4:00 pm Curious - when Microsoft says "for one computer" do they mean "one computer at a time?" In other words, is it an OEM version tied to a specific computer, or can it be moved from an old computer to a new one?
OEM software - at least OS software like Windows - generally cannot be moved to another computer. But if you just replace the SSD or hard drive, you can reinstall it, in most cases it should activate just fine (without having to call in) because the activation system will recognize that most of your system components haven't changed.
I've had no difficulty installing Windows 7 on multiple different computers over the years. Completely new build with no shared hardware from the previous machine and just insert the disc after finishing building my rig. After a number of times, though, I did have to start using the phone activation instead of the Internet-based activation. Called the number, entered my CD key, and it would read off a string of characters for me to type in during activation.
My earlier post was about OEM OS software. First, you may have had a retail or other non-OEM product key, in which case the activation system could be more lenient, although I don't know every in and out of Microsoft's system. Second, regardless of what the system allows, the End-User License Agreement definitely does not permit an OEM Windows license (meaning the license on a PC that came pre-loaded) to be moved to a different computer, and it also does not permit a single-computer Windows license to be simultaneously installed on multiple PCs. Office is different in that you used to be allowed to install on multiple PCs, and that is still possible for Office 365.
In that case, I seriously doubt mine is an OEM copy. It didn't come pre-loaded on a computer. I don't buy computers with an OS already on them - I buy the parts and build them myself. The copy of Windows 7 Professional was bought retail on disc.
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Re: Microsoft Office Home & Student - 2013 and 2019 Versions

Post by rich126 »

I bought a new iMac and was able to transfer everything from the old iMac to the new one except for Microsoft Office (2011). It wanted a key (which i had) but it also wanted to contact a Microsoft server but over the years it either was deactivated or got a new IP address so it couldn't activate it. I tried a few online hacks but finally gave up and bought a new stand alone copy. I figured 8 years of use wasn't bad.

I'm not a fan of the Cloud version.
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Re: Microsoft Office Home & Student - 2013 and 2019 Versions

Post by 02nz »

rich126 wrote: Tue Jan 21, 2020 10:55 am I'm not a fan of the Cloud version.
If by "cloud version" you mean Office 365, I find that it's a good value, particularly since I'd need to pay for OneDrive anyway (Office 365 subscription covers that). With 365 Home 6 users can install Office, each on an unlimited number of PCs. It's installed locally on the PC so it isn't really "cloud" software, although it does have features that are cloud-enabled or -enhanced. $100/year, half that when Amazon puts it on sale.

Or maybe you meant the online version of Office that's run within a browser. That has limited functionality and most people would probably only use it in a pinch (e.g., need to edit a document on a PC that doesn't have Office installed).
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Re: Microsoft Office Home & Student - 2013 and 2019 Versions

Post by Electron »

Here is an article that outlines the procedure for transferring Office Home & Student to a different computer and clears up a lot of confusion.

https://windowsreport.com/transfer-offi ... t-pc-user/

I recently logged onto my Microsoft Account and saw the "Install" links for both of my versions of Office Home & Student. According to the article, clicking install brings up another page where you can deactivate the installation before installing on another computer.

One surprise was that Microsoft shows the computer name for each of my Office Home & Student installations. This is the same computer name that shows up in the Windows Control Panel under System. It is typically something like DESKTOP-XXXXXXX.

One other area of confusion that came up involves a Product Key Card (PKC) versus a retail license. It appears that the two licenses were different at one time but I don't believe that applied after the 2013 changes. Product Key Cards were used to enable software that came preloaded on a computer.

https://products.office.com/EN/buy/micr ... d-faq-faqs

Lastly, I found an article about moving Office Home & Student 2013 that indicates that Microsoft could not even provide consistent information. The article is out-of-date but helps explain some of the confusion in recent years.

https://www.smh.com.au/technology/does- ... 2e342.html
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Re: Microsoft Office Home & Student - 2013 and 2019 Versions

Post by rich126 »

02nz wrote: Tue Jan 21, 2020 1:25 pm
rich126 wrote: Tue Jan 21, 2020 10:55 am I'm not a fan of the Cloud version.
If by "cloud version" you mean Office 365, I find that it's a good value, particularly since I'd need to pay for OneDrive anyway (Office 365 subscription covers that). With 365 Home 6 users can install Office, each on an unlimited number of PCs. It's installed locally on the PC so it isn't really "cloud" software, although it does have features that are cloud-enabled or -enhanced. $100/year, half that when Amazon puts it on sale.

Or maybe you meant the online version of Office that's run within a browser. That has limited functionality and most people would probably only use it in a pinch (e.g., need to edit a document on a PC that doesn't have Office installed).
No, I was referring to the Office 365. I'd prefer a local copy even if it costs me more. I don't use or have any need for OneDrive. Although I go back to the DOS days of Microsoft, I try to avoid it when possible now. It just isn't worth the aggravation. My iMac simply works. I've had one since 2008 and I just don't have to deal with crashes or upgrade issues.
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