Charity vs. Scrooge- how do you think of things?

Questions on how we spend our money and our time - consumer goods and services, home and vehicle, leisure and recreational activities
User avatar
Topic Author
4nursebee
Posts: 1345
Joined: Sun Apr 01, 2012 7:56 am
Location: US

Charity vs. Scrooge- how do you think of things?

Post by 4nursebee » Sat Nov 30, 2019 8:54 am

We are employed in a service business and regularly feel like people get too much and give too little. Holiday time is upon us and emotional factors pull at heart strings to give to the less fortunate. We "struggle" with what to do and how to do it, perhaps have hardened hearts. Perhaps some explanations would help.

We have family out of state that never seems to have enough money to come visit. We think that all visits in recent years have been subsidized by local family, perhaps many local family members, likely well enough above the cost of gas. They get fed well, contribute little. This family has all the same comforts of life as we do: Up until July they had a newer vehicle, summer accommodations, regular other vacations, cell phone, internet, clothes, etc... all while not employed and seemingly on just survivor benefits and state checks.

We know severely underemployed people that we would like to help but they do little to nothing to help themselves, won't take the simplest of jobs, just getting by.

Other young family members don't communicate and make bad decisions. We would really be willing to do a lot for them. I wonder if my own extended family felt the same about my own non communicative self?

The bell ringers have issues in our town, seemingly heroin for some. Organizational issues where the buildings are all nice and new- all new resale shop, large other building that does not offer many services, certainly not like the old ones.

Employer giving campaigns? So many changes requiring blood, sweat, and tears while at work, yet they still ask for more money and now our organs...

Illegal immigrant college student- we wanted to help but he never gave us his address. We were going to send a check.

Veterans asking directly for money? We pay our taxes, they seem to get many benefits for life.

People that seek handouts seem to not do enough to help themselves.


Having said these things, we have 1/5 of our estate set aside for the ACLU, and might adjust things for the public good. We admire the Gates Foundation and aware of them trying to search out healthcare solutions having funded research for things like an RSV vaccine. We are willing to give more, just so much that is easy to find is for causes that we don't deem worthy.

How do you think of and make decisions for charitable giving?
4nursebee

clip651
Posts: 482
Joined: Thu Oct 02, 2014 11:02 am

Re: Charity vs. Scrooge- how do you think of things?

Post by clip651 » Sat Nov 30, 2019 9:06 am

Look for worthy causes, rather than spending any thought on causes you don't like. Make a positive decision rather than looking at all the iffy options.

Charity Navigator is a good place to start when looking for well run reputable charities doing good work.

Also think of what good you would like too see happen in the world, and focus your efforts in that direction. Plenty of good people working to make the world better. Find those causes and organizations and support them.

best wishes,
cj
Last edited by clip651 on Sat Nov 30, 2019 9:13 am, edited 1 time in total.

clip651
Posts: 482
Joined: Thu Oct 02, 2014 11:02 am

Re: Charity vs. Scrooge- how do you think of things?

Post by clip651 » Sat Nov 30, 2019 9:12 am

I also never give to anyone coming to me soliciting a donation. Too many scams posing as charities, and this is one way to avoid them.

It's different if it is an organization I've previously researched and decided to support (yearly pledge to reputable charities, etc). Even then, no new phone donations. Mail to the real charity's real address.

Swansea
Posts: 766
Joined: Sat Feb 13, 2016 5:16 am

Re: Charity vs. Scrooge- how do you think of things?

Post by Swansea » Sat Nov 30, 2019 9:15 am

If you find a charity that you wish to support, read their IRS 990 form first so you can see where the money goes. It is not unusual to see very little spent on actual programs that they purport to support.

AlohaJoe
Posts: 4941
Joined: Mon Nov 26, 2007 2:00 pm
Location: Saigon, Vietnam

Re: Charity vs. Scrooge- how do you think of things?

Post by AlohaJoe » Sat Nov 30, 2019 9:31 am

4nursebee wrote:
Sat Nov 30, 2019 8:54 am
How do you think of and make decisions for charitable giving?
Effective Altruism is a popular way to think about this question. The book Doing Good Better: How Effective Altruism Can Help You Help Others, Do Work that Matters, and Make Smarter Choices about Giving Back by William MacAskill is a well-known book on the subject. (#1 best seller in its very small niche, according to Amazon.)

There is a related website that contains a lot of the same information: https://www.effectivealtruism.org/

SimonJester
Posts: 1999
Joined: Tue Aug 16, 2011 12:39 pm

Re: Charity vs. Scrooge- how do you think of things?

Post by SimonJester » Sat Nov 30, 2019 9:42 am

Swansea wrote:
Sat Nov 30, 2019 9:15 am
If you find a charity that you wish to support, read their IRS 990 form first so you can see where the money goes. It is not unusual to see very little spent on actual programs that they purport to support.
This for sure, if the charity doesn't publish a 990 then no go... Read the 990 to see what is really going on.

My wife found a charity she wanted to donate to, we pulled their 990... They have been loosing money for the past 5 years, only the staff were getting paid (generously I might add). They are draining down their assets and surviving off of re payments from bonds they issued 5 years before. Seemed like a total scam. They hadn't spend anything on their program in 5 years... But their flashy web site sure didn't indicate any of this...
"They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety." - Benjamin Franklin

User avatar
Kenkat
Posts: 5360
Joined: Thu Mar 01, 2007 11:18 am
Location: Cincinnati, OH

Re: Charity vs. Scrooge- how do you think of things?

Post by Kenkat » Sat Nov 30, 2019 9:50 am

I would say get to know some local charities. Find something you can connect with. We don’t connect with organizations, we connect with the people that run them and the people they serve. Organizations need money, but they need people to help out even more. If you can find some time to volunteer somewhere, you will see first hand what that organization does and feel good about the help you provide in both time and money. I’ve moved dirt, dug holes and planted plants, cleared brush, painted, unpacked toys, put up siding, installed flashing on a roof, etc. It was hard work but I felt really good about it when I was done and the people who run the charity are always so thankful. Sometimes you see the people the charity serves and sometimes you don’t, but you do see what the organization is really about.
Last edited by Kenkat on Sat Nov 30, 2019 10:04 am, edited 1 time in total.

Saving$
Posts: 1791
Joined: Sat Nov 05, 2011 8:33 pm

Re: Charity vs. Scrooge- how do you think of things?

Post by Saving$ » Sat Nov 30, 2019 10:01 am

While money can have a huge impact, so can relationships.

There is some great advice above regarding making decisions on charitable giving of monetary resources.

Your comment above about helping a college student makes me think you may also be willing to help via relationships - help people help themselves. Many people don't realize how much their experiences and relationships help with success. A young person who may be the first in her/his family to attend college may benefit most from a relationship - they need exposure to business situations, business meetings, knowing people who know other people, learning how to ask for information through their networks, etc. This takes a lot more work than just giving money, and I can assure you that whomever you chose to help will make financial decisions you don't always agree with, but you can make a difference. The Cristo Rey schools, present in many large cities throughout the US, have formalized this, and have an official mentor program with which you could get involved. In fact the mentor program won't allow you to give the kid money as long as both of you are in the program, but you will be giving the kid knowledge and experience, which can be far more beneficial than money. And you can always help monetarily a few years down the road - ie laptop for college, interview clothes, etc.

student
Posts: 4142
Joined: Fri Apr 03, 2015 6:58 am

Re: Charity vs. Scrooge- how do you think of things?

Post by student » Sat Nov 30, 2019 10:06 am

I stop giving to charities other than a couple of hundred dollars a year. One reason is that for many charities, the overhead is too high and I want to give money to those who are truly in need. Also, I want to save more so that there is a better chance I can give a more substantial sum for a project (like a endowed scholarship) later.

shell921
Posts: 344
Joined: Fri Jul 06, 2018 5:13 pm

Re: Charity vs. Scrooge- how do you think of things?

Post by shell921 » Sat Nov 30, 2019 10:12 am

In 2007 our home and all possessions burned in a wildfire firestorm.

Samaritan's purse helped us sift through rubble. 6 volunteers of various ages worked 6 hours sifting. They refused to accept
any $$. We were not religious but that didn't matter to them. I sent them a donation and I like giving to them as almost 90%
of their revenue goes to program delivery. This organization also helped many of our neighbors - 14 homes on our street
burned to the ground in that firestorm.


"Most charity watchdog organizations expect charities to use an average of 70percent or more of its annual revenue for program delivery. In 2015, Samaritan's Purse used 89.5 percent of its revenue for program delivery".

planetmike
Posts: 17
Joined: Thu Mar 28, 2019 8:00 am

Re: Charity vs. Scrooge- how do you think of things?

Post by planetmike » Sat Nov 30, 2019 10:20 am

My wife and I give two things: (1) money. To our church, and to groups we've investigated and agree with their mission. We have an annual giving budget planned. (2) our time and work. We volunteer with various groups. Local rescue squad. Food bank. Crisis pregnancy center.

Anyone who cold calls us gets ignored and a complaint filed (for all the good it does). University (who we paid multiple thousand dollars already) get yelled at (sorry, not sorry to the poor student calling) (they have finally stopped calling). Private high school only mails, those get ignored. Junk postal mail from anyone we don't currently support gets shredded without a second thought. My company's annual solicitation letter gets shredded.

This sounds harsh, but we can't support everything. And with all the ripoff artists out there, it is safer to only support groups that we have vetted.

BradJ
Posts: 333
Joined: Sun Jan 21, 2018 6:06 pm

Re: Charity vs. Scrooge- how do you think of things?

Post by BradJ » Sat Nov 30, 2019 10:40 am

The greatest person who ever lived once said “ Therefore be as shrewd as snakes and as innocent as doves.” Giving should be done generously but shrewdly. My advice, find one thing you care deeply about and focus on that. When it comes to individuals, don’t expect them to be as gracious or wise with them money as they should be, but continue seeing your gift as a blessing.
For those who are against giving, please allow me to tell you a deeply personal story:
My toddler son is fighting cancer and so many people from church, my work, our friends and family have provided gifts and money (luckily we don’t need it but they are giving to my son, not me). While I struggle with taking the gifts, I know that I have given generously to those in need, and will continue to do so. All that being said, I would feel terrible if people were giving so much and I never gave a dime to anything.

User avatar
jabberwockOG
Posts: 1828
Joined: Thu May 28, 2015 7:23 am

Re: Charity vs. Scrooge- how do you think of things?

Post by jabberwockOG » Sat Nov 30, 2019 10:52 am

If possible give some of your time and labor to a local good cause that you care about. It is very rewarding to directly see and feel the positive aspect of your work.

I'll put in a shameless plug for Habitat for Humanity - In terms of monetary giving I can personally vouch for Habitat for Humanity. They are very careful with money and work hard to use it wisely in building houses for people that desperately need them.

Find a local HFH chapter and give regularly or you can just help fund a specific house. By building low cost super well built houses, HFH can drastically improve a family's life literally for generations. People/families who get qualified for a HFH home typically would have had no chance to qualify for a conventional mortgage to own their own home. In our area, many that qualify are single mothers working multiple minimum wage jobs with 2-3 kids and living in run down way too small apartments or moldy trailers.

btw - HFH homes are not given away free and clear, the homeowner must pass several life and budgeting classes, volunteer significant hours on previous homes (including 200hrs on their own home), and then most importantly, pay back a HFH funded loan that essentially reflects the building cost minus volunteer labor for their home. This discounted cost loan is what makes a HFH home affordable for the average low income family (in addition to the very low cost utilities and insurance fees as a result of the energy certified as well as wind/storm gold rated build by HFH).

I have attended several HFH handover ceremonies. When the new homeowner gets a turn to say a few words, its a pretty special experience, with usually apprx a hundred or more people standing around weeping tears of joy.
Last edited by jabberwockOG on Sat Nov 30, 2019 10:53 am, edited 1 time in total.

BradJ
Posts: 333
Joined: Sun Jan 21, 2018 6:06 pm

Re: Charity vs. Scrooge- how do you think of things?

Post by BradJ » Sat Nov 30, 2019 10:53 am

jabberwockOG wrote:
Sat Nov 30, 2019 10:52 am
If possible give some of your time and labor to a local good cause that you care about. It is very rewarding to directly see and feel the positive aspect of your work.

I'll put in a shameless plug for Habitat for Humanity - In terms of monetary giving I can personally vouch for Habitat for Humanity. They are very careful with money and work hard to use it wisely in building houses for people that desperately need them.

Find a local HFH chapter and give regularly or you can just help fund a specific house. By building low cost super well built houses, HFH can drastically improve a family's life literally for generations. People/families who get qualified for a HFH home typically would have had no chance to qualify for a conventional mortgage to own their own home. In our area, many that qualify are single mothers working multiple minimum wage jobs with 2-3 kids and living in run down way too small apartments or moldy trailers.

btw - HFH homes are not given away free and clear, the homeowner must pass several life and budgeting classes, volunteer significant hours on previous homes including 200hrs on their own home, and then most importantly, pay back a HFH funded loan that essentially reflects the building cost minus volunteer labor for their home. This discounted cost loan is what makes a HFH home affordable for the average low income family (in addition to the very low cost utilities and insurance fees as a result of the energy certified as well as wind/storm gold rated build by HFH).

I have attended several HFH handover ceremonies. When the new homeowner gets a turn to say a few words, its a pretty special experience, with usually apprx a hundred or more people standing around weeping tears of joy.

Thank you for sharing this, very interesting and relieving to hear.

KlangFool
Posts: 14171
Joined: Sat Oct 11, 2008 12:35 pm

Re: Charity vs. Scrooge- how do you think of things?

Post by KlangFool » Sat Nov 30, 2019 10:56 am

OP,

I donate to our local food bank. I believe that it is an embarrassment to have starvation in our local community.

KlangFool

BradJ
Posts: 333
Joined: Sun Jan 21, 2018 6:06 pm

Re: Charity vs. Scrooge- how do you think of things?

Post by BradJ » Sat Nov 30, 2019 11:00 am

When it comes to local charities, often times it better to give mid-year when donations are down. Also, St. Jude is a great organization, sadly I know just how good it is.

Dottie57
Posts: 7176
Joined: Thu May 19, 2016 5:43 pm
Location: Earth Northern Hemisphere

Re: Charity vs. Scrooge- how do you think of things?

Post by Dottie57 » Sat Nov 30, 2019 11:02 am

I split money between U.S. and 3rd world. This time of year I give money to churches who feed homeless for the holidays.
The food shelves and homeless shelters.

Third world charities that help people help themselves and simple medical assistance (vaccines ,mosquito netting).

criticalmass
Posts: 1339
Joined: Wed Feb 12, 2014 10:58 pm

Re: Charity vs. Scrooge- how do you think of things?

Post by criticalmass » Sat Nov 30, 2019 11:16 am

4nursebee wrote:
Sat Nov 30, 2019 8:54 am
We are employed in a service business and regularly feel like people get too much and give too little. Holiday time is upon us and emotional factors pull at heart strings to give to the less fortunate. We "struggle" with what to do and how to do it, perhaps have hardened hearts. Perhaps some explanations would help.
....

Veterans asking directly for money? We pay our taxes, they seem to get many benefits for life.
....
People that seek handouts seem to not do enough to help themselves.

How do you think of and make decisions for charitable giving?
I understand where you are coming from with most of this, especially the family members. However I think you missing the truth about veterans. There is a huge difference between someone who retired from the military, minimum service 20 years. (19 years, 11 months, 27 days doesn’t count) and someone who served, maybe was deployed to the desert or other combat environment but separated from the military without retiring. There is no military retirement benefit (no pension, no 401k, no TSP, etc.) for veterans without 20 years of service.

Retired military service is a small minority of veterans. There’s not a whole lot of benefits for separated veterans, compared to retirement benefits. Sure there may be some healthcare benefits, particularly for folks who lost a leg and/or arm in combat. And there are some GI bill benefits for taking courses, and the option to buy a home with no down payment.

But don’t confuse this with a huge population of veterans who suffer from the effects of combat trauma, or return with disabilities and disorders related to their service.

Charities like Fisher House allow family members to have hotel-like space at no charge near where their loved ones are being treated in the hospital after losing a leg or suffering from the effects of an IED exploding, etc. Fisher House has very very little overhead, due to its volunteer nature and is highly rated as a charitable organization. There are some others, but beware many “charities” that claim to help veterans without checking them out.

Other charities like Salvation Army, St Jude Hospital, some of the pancreatic cancer and other cancer research charities, are excellent in terms of efficient money use and low overhead. Use charity review sites before donating.
Last edited by criticalmass on Sun Dec 01, 2019 3:39 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Wricha
Posts: 501
Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2012 10:33 am

Re: Charity vs. Scrooge- how do you think of things?

Post by Wricha » Sat Nov 30, 2019 11:24 am

I also struggle with this.

We have a large segment of the population that is increasingly convinced that the government is in the best position to provide most social social services. As result people are paying more in taxes or tax like instruments.

Then there are regional and local organizations that are in need of funds for various causes

It is hard for the average person to discern if there are gaps in needed services, redundant services, or just wasted resources.

From where I sit I am paying more in taxes, regional and local charities are claiming loss of funding, and the news tells us more and more people are falling through the cracks. And I want make donations to worthwhile charities but where?

I guess the first place to begin is with yourself. Your contribution is not so important that “your dollars” must be used only by the most needy or the most efficient organization. If you see someone or event in need help them directly. If you find out they drank the money away later or the money was misused that’s their issue not yours. Lately I have been giving money directly to people (not panhandlers) or situations that appear in need and hope for the best. I try not to become invested in the outcome.
It’s kinda of working.

nguy44
Posts: 200
Joined: Sun Jul 09, 2017 1:52 pm

Re: Charity vs. Scrooge- how do you think of things?

Post by nguy44 » Sat Nov 30, 2019 11:35 am

My philosophy - just as I am careful in spending what has been provided to me, I am careful in giving.

We give to local organizations that we are very familiar with, we have volunteered with them or have trustworthy friends who have.

We give to a few national/worldwide organizations trying to help or better the lives of others, who show high standards of stewardship in how they use funds.

Several times of year we do a "random act of kindness" giving. We might read of someone in a plight, or someone who is pushing to succeed against a set of odds, who is not asking for help, and decide to give to them, as long as we can do this anonymously. In some cases our "cove" was blown, with surprisingly nice results. But we prefer to not call attention to ourselves.

We never give to phone solicitors. The only time we have given to anyone set up outside of a store is when we asked them to send us more details about their organization and how the funds were used and they provided s with satisfactory information. This has happened maybe 6 six times in 30+ years.

We no longer give to our university alma mater. They are no longer needy. Their endowment is now in the tens of billions, and they seem to be expanding in every area other than providing a solid education.

Over the years we have given year between 8-15% of our gross income to charity (including giving we could not claim for tax deductions), along with volunteering time. I am comfortable in being able to say no to many requests, knowing that I am still helping somewhere.

sport
Posts: 8558
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 3:26 pm
Location: Cleveland, OH

Re: Charity vs. Scrooge- how do you think of things?

Post by sport » Sat Nov 30, 2019 11:57 am

We give larger donations to the United Way for local needs and a local religious umbrella organization for needs related to our faith. We also give a large donation to an organization that addresses needs related to our special needs grandchild. It gives third world children the benefit he was able to get in our country. We then give smaller, donations to other health related charities that are meaningful to us.

A reminder: QCD donations can help with your income taxes if you are older than 70.5.

stoptothink
Posts: 6542
Joined: Fri Dec 31, 2010 9:53 am

Re: Charity vs. Scrooge- how do you think of things?

Post by stoptothink » Sat Nov 30, 2019 12:05 pm

We've had WAY too many bad personal experiences with charities and people with their hands' out who are unwilling to help themselves. My wife and I both worked in "public service" jobs for 5+ years and saw the insane amount of inefficiency, fraud, and flat out waste. We tithe 10% of income to our church, which does a way better job of helping out those in need than any charity. We also help family out, for instance we paid for my sister (who is a single mom) and my niece to fly out from California so they could have Thanksgiving with us.

Caduceus
Posts: 2104
Joined: Mon Sep 17, 2012 1:47 am

Re: Charity vs. Scrooge- how do you think of things?

Post by Caduceus » Sat Nov 30, 2019 1:18 pm

Maybe just outsource your giving. Warren Buffett says that giving is actually not an easy task. It takes intelligence to decide what causes to devote money to, and he believes the Gates Foundation is the best at this, so he's leaving his fortune to them.

If you'd prefer not to deal with people issues, you can donate to the environment instead. I've heard great things about the World Land Trust and am thinking of making a donation end of the year to them. They conserve important parcels of land that are particularly significant in terms of preserving biodiversity. It seems nice to have your donation have a permanent impact - in terms of how many dollars buying how many acres of land, etc. I like the idea of permanently reclaiming important land - it's like an inter-generational gift as your gift will keep giving to future generations.

I'm sure there are many other environmental charities that don't require to worry about whether the people are behaving in ways that you'd like them to behave in terms of self-help, etc.

carolinaman
Posts: 3889
Joined: Wed Dec 28, 2011 9:56 am
Location: North Carolina

Re: Charity vs. Scrooge- how do you think of things?

Post by carolinaman » Sat Nov 30, 2019 1:40 pm

There are many worthwhile charities to give to that serve the needy and other worthwhile causes. While there are some with heavier administrative costs, many operate on very lean budgets. Per cent of funds toward admin expense can be a misleading statistic and some charities play games with that. There are websites that rate the charities and provide info about them. This is just one of those: https://www.charitynavigator.org/index. ... ew&cpid=48

I always think those that rationalize their non giving because of high administrative costs as just an excuse not to give. Shame on them.

I focus upon what they give funds and resources to first and foremost. I find far more I would like to give to than I am able to give to. It does take some time to figure this out if you want to contribute to good causes.

Shallowpockets
Posts: 1425
Joined: Fri Nov 20, 2015 10:26 am

Re: Charity vs. Scrooge- how do you think of things?

Post by Shallowpockets » Sat Nov 30, 2019 2:30 pm

I just gave $5 to a fellow standing at the exit ramp in the snow this morning. Should have gave more, but I was scrambling with my wallet before the light was to change. He was the tip of the spear. Who knows what filters down from an organization to him.

oldfatguy
Posts: 368
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2018 1:38 pm

Re: Charity vs. Scrooge- how do you think of things?

Post by oldfatguy » Sat Nov 30, 2019 2:44 pm

4nursebee wrote:
Sat Nov 30, 2019 8:54 am
... people get too much and give too little.
... They get fed well, contribute little.
... not employed and seemingly on just survivor benefits and state checks.
... they do little to nothing to help themselves
... don't communicate and make bad decisions.
...The bell ringers have issues in our town, seemingly heroin for some.
... We pay our taxes, they seem to get many benefits for life.
... People that seek handouts seem to not do enough to help themselves.
You do not seem like someone who should be donating to charity. Save your money.

Saving$
Posts: 1791
Joined: Sat Nov 05, 2011 8:33 pm

Re: Charity vs. Scrooge- how do you think of things?

Post by Saving$ » Sat Nov 30, 2019 3:14 pm

jabberwockOG wrote:
Sat Nov 30, 2019 10:52 am
If possible give some of your time and labor to a local good cause that you care about. It is very rewarding to directly see and feel the positive aspect of your work.

I'll put in a shameless plug for Habitat for Humanity - In terms of monetary giving I can personally vouch for Habitat for Humanity. They are very careful with money and work hard to use it wisely in building houses for people that desperately need them.

Find a local HFH chapter and give regularly or you can just help fund a specific house. By building low cost super well built houses, HFH can drastically improve a family's life literally for generations. People/families who get qualified for a HFH home typically would have had no chance to qualify for a conventional mortgage to own their own home. In our area, many that qualify are single mothers working multiple minimum wage jobs with 2-3 kids and living in run down way too small apartments or moldy trailers.

btw - HFH homes are not given away free and clear, the homeowner must pass several life and budgeting classes, volunteer significant hours on previous homes (including 200hrs on their own home), and then most importantly, pay back a HFH funded loan that essentially reflects the building cost minus volunteer labor for their home. This discounted cost loan is what makes a HFH home affordable for the average low income family (in addition to the very low cost utilities and insurance fees as a result of the energy certified as well as wind/storm gold rated build by HFH).

I have attended several HFH handover ceremonies. When the new homeowner gets a turn to say a few words, its a pretty special experience, with usually apprx a hundred or more people standing around weeping tears of joy.
+1000
BTW, for those looking at those "how efficient is this charity" guides, remember that since HFH issues mortgages, they have an entire slew of regulations they are required to comply with, and this compliance has a significant administrative burden...added to everything else they do to ensure their programs success.

Sconie
Posts: 762
Joined: Sun Feb 07, 2010 10:23 am
Location: Arizona

Re: Charity vs. Scrooge- how do you think of things?

Post by Sconie » Sat Nov 30, 2019 3:27 pm

I'm not a real good "giver" when it comes to charities, however, I do donate to the Girls Scouts of America by purchasing their wickedly delicious cookies every time I get the opportunity. :wink:
I know you think you understand what you thought I said but I'm not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant. - Alan Greenspan

RetiredArtist
Posts: 104
Joined: Wed Aug 26, 2015 4:38 pm

Re: Charity vs. Scrooge- how do you think of things?

Post by RetiredArtist » Sat Nov 30, 2019 3:34 pm

My favorite charity is my local food bank. They give out $5 of food for every dollar donated.
My local newspaper runs a charity that makes one time grants to people with a financial emergency- often people in danger of losing housing due to medical expenses.
I volunteer and donate at my local animal shelter; it seems pretty well run.
I guess I mostly favor local, and efficient. I do research on Charity Navigator.
I wish I could donate to a well run, efficient, local housing bank, to shelter the people living on the streets in our city on this cold & rainy Saturday.

I saw this tweet yesterday:
https://twitter.com/gabriel_zucman/stat ... 7649148929
Only two of the top twenty richest Americans, Bill Gates & Warren Buffet, donated more than 2% of wealth in 2018.

clip651
Posts: 482
Joined: Thu Oct 02, 2014 11:02 am

Re: Charity vs. Scrooge- how do you think of things?

Post by clip651 » Sat Nov 30, 2019 4:14 pm

Sconie wrote:
Sat Nov 30, 2019 3:27 pm
however, I do donate to the Girls Scouts of America by purchasing their wickedly delicious cookies every time I get the opportunity. :wink:
This sort of thing is my exception to saying no to all people that come soliciting donations ... I will support local kids groups like the Girl Scouts or kids fundraising for the school band, etc with small purchases or donations when the kids are out fundraising. I prefer when they have their parents along. We only see a handful of these a year where we live. If we were seeing three or more a week I'd need to re-evaluate how to handle that.

User avatar
Summit111
Posts: 309
Joined: Sun Mar 17, 2013 6:32 pm

Re: Charity vs. Scrooge- how do you think of things?

Post by Summit111 » Sat Nov 30, 2019 6:42 pm

During my career at Mega Corp, we were routinely subjected to the annual United Way Campaign employee shakedown. After carefully orchestrated presentations, we would meet privately with our manager who would explain the amount of donation we were expected to give.

After the company wide solicitation was complete, corporate executives would attend the regional United Way Gala with tuxedos on and wives on their arms, and present the ceremonial check from 100% employee participation. That continued for many years until one brave employee said enough and refused to donate. That employee was put under extreme pressure to keep the 100% participation facade, but he never faltered, and wasn’t fired or demoted....

In the next few years, participation fell greatly. The majority of the employees resented being pressured to donate, and how much to donate. A local newspaper published the local United Way agency CEO salaries, and it was obscene.

Since then, I donate Only to needy individuals, never to organized charities....

Summit
“Got my mind on my money, and my money on my mind!” Snoop Dog

Sconie
Posts: 762
Joined: Sun Feb 07, 2010 10:23 am
Location: Arizona

Re: Charity vs. Scrooge- how do you think of things?

Post by Sconie » Sun Dec 01, 2019 10:14 am

Summit111 wrote:
Sat Nov 30, 2019 6:42 pm
.......we were routinely subjected to the annual United Way Campaign employee shakedown.
Well said! You nailed it!
I know you think you understand what you thought I said but I'm not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant. - Alan Greenspan

student
Posts: 4142
Joined: Fri Apr 03, 2015 6:58 am

Re: Charity vs. Scrooge- how do you think of things?

Post by student » Sun Dec 01, 2019 10:34 am

Summit111 wrote:
Sat Nov 30, 2019 6:42 pm
During my career at Mega Corp, we were routinely subjected to the annual United Way Campaign employee shakedown. After carefully orchestrated presentations, we would meet privately with our manager who would explain the amount of donation we were expected to give.

After the company wide solicitation was complete, corporate executives would attend the regional United Way Gala with tuxedos on and wives on their arms, and present the ceremonial check from 100% employee participation. That continued for many years until one brave employee said enough and refused to donate. That employee was put under extreme pressure to keep the 100% participation facade, but he never faltered, and wasn’t fired or demoted....

In the next few years, participation fell greatly. The majority of the employees resented being pressured to donate, and how much to donate. A local newspaper published the local United Way agency CEO salaries, and it was obscene.

Since then, I donate Only to needy individuals, never to organized charities....

Summit
At my university, there was no pressure but they do try to increase the participation rate of donating to the university. The claim is this rate is important for them to ask donors for money. So I donate $20.

User avatar
tc101
Posts: 3213
Joined: Tue Feb 20, 2007 3:18 pm
Location: Atlanta - Retired in 2004 at age 54

Re: Charity vs. Scrooge- how do you think of things?

Post by tc101 » Sun Dec 01, 2019 10:51 am

Effective Altruism is a popular way to think about this question. The book Doing Good Better: How Effective Altruism Can Help You Help Others, Do Work that Matters, and Make Smarter Choices about Giving Back by William MacAskill is a well-known book on the subject. (#1 best seller in its very small niche, according to Amazon.)

There is a related website that contains a lot of the same information: https://www.effectivealtruism.org/
+1

This is important. So much charitable work and money is wasted. It makes sense to spend some time learning how to work and donate effectively.
. | The most important thing you should know about me is that I am not an expert.

Broken Man 1999
Posts: 3488
Joined: Wed Apr 08, 2015 11:31 am

Re: Charity vs. Scrooge- how do you think of things?

Post by Broken Man 1999 » Sun Dec 01, 2019 10:58 am

Summit111 wrote:
Sat Nov 30, 2019 6:42 pm
During my career at Mega Corp, we were routinely subjected to the annual United Way Campaign employee shakedown. After carefully orchestrated presentations, we would meet privately with our manager who would explain the amount of donation we were expected to give.

After the company wide solicitation was complete, corporate executives would attend the regional United Way Gala with tuxedos on and wives on their arms, and present the ceremonial check from 100% employee participation. That continued for many years until one brave employee said enough and refused to donate. That employee was put under extreme pressure to keep the 100% participation facade, but he never faltered, and wasn’t fired or demoted....

In the next few years, participation fell greatly. The majority of the employees resented being pressured to donate, and how much to donate. A local newspaper published the local United Way agency CEO salaries, and it was obscene.

Since then, I donate Only to needy individuals, never to organized charities....

Summit
Ha! You must have worked at my MegaCorp! Same M.O., and same outcome. I'm not sure that United Way even campaigns at my MegaCorp today.

Broken Man 1999
“If I cannot drink Bourbon and smoke cigars in Heaven than I shall not go. " -Mark Twain

getthatmarshmallow
Posts: 420
Joined: Mon Dec 04, 2017 9:43 am

Re: Charity vs. Scrooge- how do you think of things?

Post by getthatmarshmallow » Sun Dec 01, 2019 1:16 pm

I think it may help to separate the question of whether the poor are sufficiently, in your mind, deserving, from the question of whether the charity you choose to support does what it claims. The first question will turn you into a Scrooge faster than anything as the likelihood that anyone lives exactly the right life is low, but the second is good to ask if you care about helping people, and reputable charities are transparent about where the money goes.

I like the philosophy behind Givewell, which rates charities based on the most lives saved/improved per dollar. Tends to fund things like DeWorm the World or mosquito nets.

If you want to help a college student, see if you can fund a scholarship at your local public institution. You can set the parameters as a donor for eligible candidates however you like (within reason), and at my local school, the #1 reason otherwise qualified students drop out is due to a lack of funds.

krb
Posts: 197
Joined: Tue Nov 19, 2019 1:30 pm

Re: Charity vs. Scrooge- how do you think of things?

Post by krb » Sun Dec 01, 2019 1:31 pm

jabberwockOG wrote:
Sat Nov 30, 2019 10:52 am
If possible give some of your time and labor to a local good cause that you care about. It is very rewarding to directly see and feel the positive aspect of your work.

I'll put in a shameless plug for Habitat for Humanity - In terms of monetary giving I can personally vouch for Habitat for Humanity. They are very careful with money and work hard to use it wisely in building houses for people that desperately need them.

Find a local HFH chapter and give regularly or you can just help fund a specific house. By building low cost super well built houses, HFH can drastically improve a family's life literally for generations. People/families who get qualified for a HFH home typically would have had no chance to qualify for a conventional mortgage to own their own home. In our area, many that qualify are single mothers working multiple minimum wage jobs with 2-3 kids and living in run down way too small apartments or moldy trailers.

btw - HFH homes are not given away free and clear, the homeowner must pass several life and budgeting classes, volunteer significant hours on previous homes (including 200hrs on their own home), and then most importantly, pay back a HFH funded loan that essentially reflects the building cost minus volunteer labor for their home. This discounted cost loan is what makes a HFH home affordable for the average low income family (in addition to the very low cost utilities and insurance fees as a result of the energy certified as well as wind/storm gold rated build by HFH).

I have attended several HFH handover ceremonies. When the new homeowner gets a turn to say a few words, its a pretty special experience, with usually apprx a hundred or more people standing around weeping tears of joy.
My understanding with HFH is that the overall cost with all expenses included is pretty close to the cost of simply buying a cost in that area. Things might have changed but that was the case in the past. So it was more an opportunity for you to get your hands dirty and do hands on work rather than obtaining housing for significantly lower than market.

OP do you belong to a church? I am Jewish. We are obligated to give 10% of our net yearly to charity. It is said an average person should give 10% and a generous person 20%. I have relationships with organizations that feed the hungry and give free loans here in the USA and in Israel. Free loans are very helpful to people who aren't homeless but who need a bridge loan for a rent payment or to keep the business going. I would talk with Church leadership. A lot of my tzedekah dollars go through the Chabad, where costs are absolutely minimal. As religious organizations their goal is to do G-d's will, and the maximum amount of funds goes to that and the minimum for overhead.

KyleAAA
Posts: 7599
Joined: Wed Jul 01, 2009 5:35 pm
Contact:

Re: Charity vs. Scrooge- how do you think of things?

Post by KyleAAA » Sun Dec 01, 2019 1:33 pm

There are many great causes out there and many well-run charities worthy of your money. If you don’t like your current options, broaden your search. Charity Navigator mentioned above is a great resource.

krb
Posts: 197
Joined: Tue Nov 19, 2019 1:30 pm

Re: Charity vs. Scrooge- how do you think of things?

Post by krb » Sun Dec 01, 2019 1:33 pm

Summit111 wrote:
Sat Nov 30, 2019 6:42 pm
During my career at Mega Corp, we were routinely subjected to the annual United Way Campaign employee shakedown. After carefully orchestrated presentations, we would meet privately with our manager who would explain the amount of donation we were expected to give.

After the company wide solicitation was complete, corporate executives would attend the regional United Way Gala with tuxedos on and wives on their arms, and present the ceremonial check from 100% employee participation. That continued for many years until one brave employee said enough and refused to donate. That employee was put under extreme pressure to keep the 100% participation facade, but he never faltered, and wasn’t fired or demoted....

In the next few years, participation fell greatly. The majority of the employees resented being pressured to donate, and how much to donate. A local newspaper published the local United Way agency CEO salaries, and it was obscene.

Since then, I donate Only to needy individuals, never to organized charities....

Summit
At my University there was pressure but not huge. Then it turns out the United Way executives were flying all over the world in company jets, taking exotic vacations and enormous compensation packages and utterly abusing their positions. I was furious. I vowed I would never give to them.

mortfree
Posts: 1856
Joined: Mon Sep 12, 2016 7:06 pm

Re: Charity vs. Scrooge- how do you think of things?

Post by mortfree » Sun Dec 01, 2019 1:37 pm

In general I prefer to donate lightly worn clothing, canned goods and pet supplies.

I have donated money to March of Dimes in the past but otherwise I guess I’m not that generous with the money I worked for. Oh well

bugleheadd
Posts: 27
Joined: Fri Nov 29, 2019 11:25 am

Re: Charity vs. Scrooge- how do you think of things?

Post by bugleheadd » Sun Dec 01, 2019 1:43 pm

I give 25% of my paycheck for social programs and to fund other people's pensions. That's more than enough.

MathWizard
Posts: 3634
Joined: Tue Jul 26, 2011 1:35 pm

Re: Charity vs. Scrooge- how do you think of things?

Post by MathWizard » Sun Dec 01, 2019 1:45 pm

Op,

I give through my church, and have been on many if the boards, so I know how the money is used.

I also give to my alma mater. I needed a scholarship, and the school does s good job of allocating money to students who need it.
My way of paying it forward.

I give to our public library. One item was a bookmobile that goes to small nearby towns that don't have their own library. When I was young, I lived in such a town, and was not allowed to check out books from the library in the nearby large town. I thirsted for knowledge, but the fountain of knowledge was too far away.

My reasoning based on my experience s:

I grew up poor, and did see unwise decisions, and made some suboptimal decisions myself, nobody is perfect. However, bad decisions by s poor person can magnify themselves.

Back then, a DUI did not automatically cause you to lose your license. A poor person caught, who did not have money for bail lost their job because they did not show up for work. Someone with a bit of money bailed themselves out, and could get back on the right path.

I saw these events with older people, and tried to avoid those situations where I would not get a 2nd chance. Poor people are not always poor because they make bad decisions, sometimes they just don't have money.

I'm certainly fine now, but remember there but for the grace of God go I .

Quaestner
Posts: 195
Joined: Tue Jul 18, 2017 6:39 pm

Re: Charity vs. Scrooge- how do you think of things?

Post by Quaestner » Sun Dec 01, 2019 3:03 pm

AlohaJoe wrote:
Sat Nov 30, 2019 9:31 am
4nursebee wrote:
Sat Nov 30, 2019 8:54 am
How do you think of and make decisions for charitable giving?
Effective Altruism is a popular way to think about this question. The book Doing Good Better: How Effective Altruism Can Help You Help Others, Do Work that Matters, and Make Smarter Choices about Giving Back by William MacAskill is a well-known book on the subject. (#1 best seller in its very small niche, according to Amazon.)

There is a related website that contains a lot of the same information: https://www.effectivealtruism.org/
+1 This book helped me examine what I think is important and has changed how I give. I highly recommend the book.

User avatar
jabberwockOG
Posts: 1828
Joined: Thu May 28, 2015 7:23 am

Re: Charity vs. Scrooge- how do you think of things?

Post by jabberwockOG » Sun Dec 01, 2019 3:32 pm

krb wrote:
Sun Dec 01, 2019 1:31 pm
jabberwockOG wrote:
Sat Nov 30, 2019 10:52 am
If possible give some of your time and labor to a local good cause that you care about. It is very rewarding to directly see and feel the positive aspect of your work.

I'll put in a shameless plug for Habitat for Humanity - In terms of monetary giving I can personally vouch for Habitat for Humanity. They are very careful with money and work hard to use it wisely in building houses for people that desperately need them.

Find a local HFH chapter and give regularly or you can just help fund a specific house. By building low cost super well built houses, HFH can drastically improve a family's life literally for generations. People/families who get qualified for a HFH home typically would have had no chance to qualify for a conventional mortgage to own their own home. In our area, many that qualify are single mothers working multiple minimum wage jobs with 2-3 kids and living in run down way too small apartments or moldy trailers.

btw - HFH homes are not given away free and clear, the homeowner must pass several life and budgeting classes, volunteer significant hours on previous homes (including 200hrs on their own home), and then most importantly, pay back a HFH funded loan that essentially reflects the building cost minus volunteer labor for their home. This discounted cost loan is what makes a HFH home affordable for the average low income family (in addition to the very low cost utilities and insurance fees as a result of the energy certified as well as wind/storm gold rated build by HFH).

I have attended several HFH handover ceremonies. When the new homeowner gets a turn to say a few words, its a pretty special experience, with usually apprx a hundred or more people standing around weeping tears of joy.
My understanding with HFH is that the overall cost with all expenses included is pretty close to the cost of simply buying a cost in that area. Things might have changed but that was the case in the past. So it was more an opportunity for you to get your hands dirty and do hands on work rather than obtaining housing for significantly lower than market.

OP do you belong to a church? I am Jewish. We are obligated to give 10% of our net yearly to charity. It is said an average person should give 10% and a generous person 20%. I have relationships with organizations that feed the hungry and give free loans here in the USA and in Israel. Free loans are very helpful to people who aren't homeless but who need a bridge loan for a rent payment or to keep the business going. I would talk with Church leadership. A lot of my tzedekah dollars go through the Chabad, where costs are absolutely minimal. As religious organizations their goal is to do G-d's will, and the maximum amount of funds goes to that and the minimum for overhead.


Be aware that every local HFH chapter may be organized and run differently to better fit local conditions, demographics, regulations, etc. In our local region HFH homes are provided to the homeowner usually well below appraisal value. The HFH homeowner signs a HFH funded 0% interest primary 30 year loan that the homeowner must pay back on monthly basis like a conventional mortgage. They also sign a 0% interest "second" mortgage that equals the delta value of HFH's build cost versus the appraised value at time of home completion (usually 25-30% additional value). This "second" mortgage has no payments and is not required to be paid back unless the homeowner sells their home in less than 5 or 7 years (can't remember which it is). After 5 or 7 years the "second" loan is forgiven. This "second" loan arrangement is designed to stop people from selling immediately to pocket the actual market value over HFH build cost.

Broken Man 1999
Posts: 3488
Joined: Wed Apr 08, 2015 11:31 am

Re: Charity vs. Scrooge- how do you think of things?

Post by Broken Man 1999 » Sun Dec 01, 2019 4:20 pm

MathWizard wrote:
Sun Dec 01, 2019 1:45 pm
Op,

I give through my church, and have been on many if the boards, so I know how the money is used.

I also give to my alma mater. I needed a scholarship, and the school does s good job of allocating money to students who need it.
My way of paying it forward.

I give to our public library. One item was a bookmobile that goes to small nearby towns that don't have their own library. When I was young, I lived in such a town, and was not allowed to check out books from the library in the nearby large town. I thirsted for knowledge, but the fountain of knowledge was too far away.

My reasoning based on my experience s:

I grew up poor, and did see unwise decisions, and made some suboptimal decisions myself, nobody is perfect. However, bad decisions by s poor person can magnify themselves.

Back then, a DUI did not automatically cause you to lose your license. A poor person caught, who did not have money for bail lost their job because they did not show up for work. Someone with a bit of money bailed themselves out, and could get back on the right path.

I saw these events with older people, and tried to avoid those situations where I would not get a 2nd chance. Poor people are not always poor because they make bad decisions, sometimes they just don't have money.

I'm certainly fine now, but remember there but for the grace of God go I .
Well said! I certainly did some things my parents wouldn't have been very proud of. Still, I avoided doing anything totally stupid, and never faced any law issues.

Never needed any bail money...

Broken Man 1999
“If I cannot drink Bourbon and smoke cigars in Heaven than I shall not go. " -Mark Twain

Thegame14
Posts: 1298
Joined: Mon May 07, 2018 11:53 am

Re: Charity vs. Scrooge- how do you think of things?

Post by Thegame14 » Sun Dec 01, 2019 5:16 pm

Local Animal Shelter and food bank are good places to give.

krb
Posts: 197
Joined: Tue Nov 19, 2019 1:30 pm

Re: Charity vs. Scrooge- how do you think of things?

Post by krb » Sun Dec 01, 2019 5:47 pm

jabberwockOG wrote:
Sun Dec 01, 2019 3:32 pm
krb wrote:
Sun Dec 01, 2019 1:31 pm
jabberwockOG wrote:
Sat Nov 30, 2019 10:52 am
If possible give some of your time and labor to a local good cause that you care about. It is very rewarding to directly see and feel the positive aspect of your work.

I'll put in a shameless plug for Habitat for Humanity - In terms of monetary giving I can personally vouch for Habitat for Humanity. They are very careful with money and work hard to use it wisely in building houses for people that desperately need them.

Find a local HFH chapter and give regularly or you can just help fund a specific house. By building low cost super well built houses, HFH can drastically improve a family's life literally for generations. People/families who get qualified for a HFH home typically would have had no chance to qualify for a conventional mortgage to own their own home. In our area, many that qualify are single mothers working multiple minimum wage jobs with 2-3 kids and living in run down way too small apartments or moldy trailers.

btw - HFH homes are not given away free and clear, the homeowner must pass several life and budgeting classes, volunteer significant hours on previous homes (including 200hrs on their own home), and then most importantly, pay back a HFH funded loan that essentially reflects the building cost minus volunteer labor for their home. This discounted cost loan is what makes a HFH home affordable for the average low income family (in addition to the very low cost utilities and insurance fees as a result of the energy certified as well as wind/storm gold rated build by HFH).

I have attended several HFH handover ceremonies. When the new homeowner gets a turn to say a few words, its a pretty special experience, with usually apprx a hundred or more people standing around weeping tears of joy.
My understanding with HFH is that the overall cost with all expenses included is pretty close to the cost of simply buying a cost in that area. Things might have changed but that was the case in the past. So it was more an opportunity for you to get your hands dirty and do hands on work rather than obtaining housing for significantly lower than market.

OP do you belong to a church? I am Jewish. We are obligated to give 10% of our net yearly to charity. It is said an average person should give 10% and a generous person 20%. I have relationships with organizations that feed the hungry and give free loans here in the USA and in Israel. Free loans are very helpful to people who aren't homeless but who need a bridge loan for a rent payment or to keep the business going. I would talk with Church leadership. A lot of my tzedekah dollars go through the Chabad, where costs are absolutely minimal. As religious organizations their goal is to do G-d's will, and the maximum amount of funds goes to that and the minimum for overhead.


Be aware that every local HFH chapter may be organized and run differently to better fit local conditions, demographics, regulations, etc. In our local region HFH homes are provided to the homeowner usually well below appraisal value. The HFH homeowner signs a HFH funded 0% interest primary 30 year loan that the homeowner must pay back on monthly basis like a conventional mortgage. They also sign a 0% interest "second" mortgage that equals the delta value of HFH's build cost versus the appraised value at time of home completion (usually 25-30% additional value). This "second" mortgage has no payments and is not required to be paid back unless the homeowner sells their home in less than 5 or 7 years (can't remember which it is). After 5 or 7 years the "second" loan is forgiven. This "second" loan arrangement is designed to stop people from selling immediately to pocket the actual market value over HFH build cost.
Got it. Neat. I did not know that. I guess you need to look up for what does the average house in the area cost and make sure the HFH house is providing housing at a cheaper cost than simply buying a house.

krb
Posts: 197
Joined: Tue Nov 19, 2019 1:30 pm

Re: Charity vs. Scrooge- how do you think of things?

Post by krb » Sun Dec 01, 2019 5:49 pm

Thegame14 wrote:
Sun Dec 01, 2019 5:16 pm
Local Animal Shelter and food bank are good places to give.
How can you do better than feeding the hungry? I mean you are LITERALLY doing G-ds work. His agent in this existence. Honestly it’s hard to think of any better way to spend money and I bet the overhead is very low and there aren’t ceos taking extravagant paychecks at the food bank (contra United way)

krb
Posts: 197
Joined: Tue Nov 19, 2019 1:30 pm

Re: Charity vs. Scrooge- how do you think of things?

Post by krb » Sun Dec 01, 2019 6:05 pm

Shallowpockets wrote:
Sat Nov 30, 2019 2:30 pm
I just gave $5 to a fellow standing at the exit ramp in the snow this morning. Should have gave more, but I was scrambling with my wallet before the light was to change. He was the tip of the spear. Who knows what filters down from an organization to him.
Actually I keep a chest in the backseat
Of my car. It is filled with cliff bars and Gatorade. That way when there is someone needy at the expressway exit I don’t have to think about money or if it will be abused. I know that he is or will be hungry and thirsty so I give a Gatorade and two bars. I stock up at Costco every
Month to replenish.

9liner
Posts: 173
Joined: Wed Jan 18, 2017 1:03 pm

Re: Charity vs. Scrooge- how do you think of things?

Post by 9liner » Sun Dec 01, 2019 6:25 pm

The expectation of altruism has reached exhausting levels. GoFundMe and other such "charity sites" are prime examples. Couple this with the sheer amount of overhead some charities maintain and it's almost exhausting trying to figure out which causes are "worth it". Many people are looking for the easy way out. At the risk of sounding heartless, I very rarely donate to charities and oftentimes ignore GoFundMe posts on my FB feed. My DW and I work very hard for our money. While we live comfortably now, I have worked very hard to get to the level where we are now. We diligently save for life's inevitabilities and I would be extremely uncomfortable asking for handouts should a catastrophic event occur.

That being said, I have found ways to altruistically serve my community that doesn't necessarily involve a monetary commitment. I volunteer with my local fire department who not only responds to all fire and EMS emergencies, but also participates in charitable events such as toy drives, community gatherings, and such. The gratification I get from this far outweighs the gratification I would feel via a monetary donation. To this end, I suggest that "time" is a better use of one's altruism. My time spent donating to my community leads to tangible benefits for both myself and family.

Post Reply