Anyone had their house repiped?

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Jwulgaru
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Anyone had their house repiped?

Post by Jwulgaru » Mon Nov 11, 2019 2:36 pm

Long story short, I've had three leaks in the past 18 months, with the previous two under the subfloor in the crawl with the latest on Friday being in a wall resulting in water damage. The house is from the late 80s and has a combo of copper and CPVC piping. I can pay around $500 to fix this leak or $4100+ to repipe the whole house in pex. For ultimate monetary value and peace of mind we decided to repipe and are shopping around for quotes. Has anyone else repiped their house and have any take away advice from the experience?

Mr. Rumples
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Re: Anyone had their house repiped?

Post by Mr. Rumples » Mon Nov 11, 2019 2:48 pm

I am looking at having some work done to bring the house up to modern standards; I have copper at the present time. I have heard rodents chew on pex, and while hopefully this won't be an issue in areas where there is widespread destruction of homes due to fires, the pex melts and contaminates the soil. Even not in catastrophic conditions there may be issues with leaching. The industry will say its safe, but they are hardly impartial.

https://www.wateronline.com/doc/scienti ... water-0001

https://inspectapedia.com/plumbing/PEX_ ... cation.php

https://www.coengineers.com/preventable ... -with-pex/
Last edited by Mr. Rumples on Mon Nov 11, 2019 2:54 pm, edited 2 times in total.

CurledMoss
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Re: Anyone had their house repiped?

Post by CurledMoss » Mon Nov 11, 2019 2:49 pm

Yeah I redid most of my copper piping about 6 months ago. Mine was getting thin in at least one spot.... House from the 80's I believe. I decided instead of coming home to a flooded basement to drop some $ and redo it with PEX. That way I can sleep at night. I didn't spend much. Maybe $1,500. I don't remember. I didn't end up doing one of the bathrooms because it would have been really inconvenient and after cutting into it the pipe looked good and thick going over there. I suppose not NEARLY as much water flowing to the bathroom when compared to the main. At a glance it looked only the main was getting thin, where it fed the entire house and farm...

So far no negative experience. Just sleep like a baby.

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Bogle7
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Re: Anyone had their house repiped?

Post by Bogle7 » Mon Nov 11, 2019 3:00 pm


techrover
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Re: Anyone had their house repiped?

Post by techrover » Mon Nov 11, 2019 3:11 pm

You may find this recent thread relevant and informative for your situation - viewtopic.php?f=11&t=293341&p=4821265#p4821265
As you will find, repiping is very common esp. when homes plumbing reaches an age where it start breaking down. Doing spot repairs may be worth if overall system is in good shape, but usually is better off to replace with good quality system.

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lthenderson
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Re: Anyone had their house repiped?

Post by lthenderson » Mon Nov 11, 2019 3:24 pm

I have copper piping and have never had any problems even though it is now almost 50 years old at this point. I wouldn't be so quick though to jump on the PEX bandwagon and assume that it will last longer without problems. I have a buddy who is a plumber and he has already redone PEX piping from the earlier days when it was still fairly new. Most of his repairs are fixing nail and screw piercings of it within wall cavities but a significant portion are hot water couplings that fail with time. According to him, if you have really hot water, the PEX can swell enough over time to undo that connection points.

PEX has only been around for less than 20 years and even then wasn't used heavily until the last decade. I think the jury should still be out as to whether it will outperform 40 and 50 year old copper piping.

megabad
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Re: Anyone had their house repiped?

Post by megabad » Mon Nov 11, 2019 3:36 pm

Jwulgaru wrote:
Mon Nov 11, 2019 2:36 pm
Long story short, I've had three leaks in the past 18 months, with the previous two under the subfloor in the crawl with the latest on Friday being in a wall resulting in water damage. The house is from the late 80s and has a combo of copper and CPVC piping. I can pay around $500 to fix this leak or $4100+ to repipe the whole house in pex. For ultimate monetary value and peace of mind we decided to repipe and are shopping around for quotes. Has anyone else repiped their house and have any take away advice from the experience?
Had to do a repipe at one of my rentals that had PolyB piping years ago. Went to copper because I trust copper. My cost about a decade ago was about 2500 for copper on a two story and I thought that was a deal. Your quote seems on par for PEX if you have a large two story house. That said I am a bit surprised on your CPVC experience, I have seen a bunch of trailers in our area with CPVC for many years never had a leak or issue so that makes me think maybe you just have improperly installed piping. I would make sure if you get it redone that it is done properly this time. I currently live in a house with 40 year old copper supply lines that has never ever had an issue and that is normal where I live. I don't know enough about PEX other than all the low end volume home builders have started using it exclusively. If I had my choice it would always be copper, but maybe PEX will turn out ok as the years go by. It is, in my opinion, somewhat unproven at this point. That said, I think most of the city mains now are plastic of some kind so if it is bad in general, we are all screwed anyway. If you do go the PEX route, I would use 100% name brand pipe and fittings (like Uponor).

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Re: Anyone had their house repiped?

Post by retire2022 » Mon Nov 11, 2019 3:58 pm

op it depends on whether or not is prevention of pipes freezing is a priority

Supposedly PEX can deal with freezing better, here is a comparison of cooper pipe, PEX & CVPVC in a freezer test

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OOeBJ8mDr8Q

Housedoc
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Re: Anyone had their house repiped?

Post by Housedoc » Mon Nov 11, 2019 4:17 pm

My son looked at buying a house needing repiping due to polybutene plumbing in most of the house. Exposed basement pipes converted to copper. Plumbing quote was $400 per fixture. Each toilet, sink, hose bib, etc. Cost was going to be over 8K and that didn't include patching all the drywall walls and ceilings cut open. He passed on the house.

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Jwulgaru
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Re: Anyone had their house repiped?

Post by Jwulgaru » Mon Nov 11, 2019 4:49 pm

Thanks for the replies. The house is single story 1600sq ft. I'm getting another bid Thursday. Everyone else is hard to get. One place wanted to charge 75 bucks just to give an estimate. Currently the leak is controlled with a plastic cup in the wall catching the dripping while the fans blow. Going full copper for the repipe is cost prohibitive. Does anyone know if a repiping is recouped to any degree when you sell a house? Probably 10+ years out from moving on at this point.

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Re: Anyone had their house repiped?

Post by lthenderson » Mon Nov 11, 2019 6:08 pm

retire2022 wrote:
Mon Nov 11, 2019 3:58 pm
op it depends on whether or not is prevention of pipes freezing is a priority

Supposedly PEX can deal with freezing better, here is a comparison of cooper pipe, PEX & CVPVC in a freezer test

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OOeBJ8mDr8Q
Freezing is still an issue with PEX because it still connects to metal pipe fittings like shutoff valves, sits in porcelain toilets, etc. The only thing PEX will prevent is having a pipe burst inside a wall cavity.

michaeljc70
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Re: Anyone had their house repiped?

Post by michaeljc70 » Tue Nov 12, 2019 10:42 am

I'm surprised copper pipe failing after 20-30 years? Or is it the joints that may not have been properly soldered failing?

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Re: Anyone had their house repiped?

Post by RickBoglehead » Tue Nov 12, 2019 10:44 am

Jwulgaru wrote:
Mon Nov 11, 2019 4:49 pm
Thanks for the replies. The house is single story 1600sq ft. I'm getting another bid Thursday. Everyone else is hard to get. One place wanted to charge 75 bucks just to give an estimate. Currently the leak is controlled with a plastic cup in the wall catching the dripping while the fans blow. Going full copper for the repipe is cost prohibitive. Does anyone know if a repiping is recouped to any degree when you sell a house? Probably 10+ years out from moving on at this point.
Re-piping would have zero impact on selling value. Buyers assume piping is fine, because it is in 99% of homes on the market.
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Re: Anyone had their house repiped?

Post by IMO » Tue Nov 12, 2019 1:48 pm

lthenderson wrote:
Mon Nov 11, 2019 6:08 pm
retire2022 wrote:
Mon Nov 11, 2019 3:58 pm
op it depends on whether or not is prevention of pipes freezing is a priority

Supposedly PEX can deal with freezing better, here is a comparison of cooper pipe, PEX & CVPVC in a freezer test

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OOeBJ8mDr8Q
Freezing is still an issue with PEX because it still connects to metal pipe fittings like shutoff valves, sits in porcelain toilets, etc. The only thing PEX will prevent is having a pipe burst inside a wall cavity.
So is preventing a pipe from freeze bursting inside a wall cavity not a very highly desirable attribute vs. the alternative of having a pipe burst within a wall cavity? The video link is a pretty good demonstration of what happens to the various piping if a freeze were to occur.

Edit: I have PEX piping coming straight out of the wall connecting into fixtures directly. The stainless steel hoses could break on the fixture, but that is much less an issue of the pipe freezing/bursting behind the drywall. If that did occur in a single fixture, I could turn off that fixture via a centralized PEX plumbing manifold. The stainless steel hoses can be readily replaced and extra precaution can be done in some of them with burst protection technology built into the actual stainless steel hoses. The manifold seems to all be non-metal would help if a house freeze did occur.

But I do agree, only with time will the pro's/con's of various piping truly become apparent. I have been able to see how copper piping does in homes over 50 years old, but these were in areas without freeze concerns (some good things to say, but also some bad things like slab leaks).

I have always also wondered if flexible piping would be an advantage if a home was undergoing a larger earthquake?

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Re: Anyone had their house repiped?

Post by sergio » Tue Nov 12, 2019 3:26 pm

michaeljc70 wrote:
Tue Nov 12, 2019 10:42 am
I'm surprised copper pipe failing after 20-30 years? Or is it the joints that may not have been properly soldered failing?
Yeah I was going to say the same thing. Our place is over 50 years old and has all OG copper piping that has held up great despite hard water and very very cold winters.

I don't understand why people make such a big deal out of PEX being *somewhat* more freeze-proof. If you get to the point where your water supply lines are freezing, you probably screwed up. If you're going to be gone for more than a day or two in the winter, shut off the water and drain the pipes!!

In terms of re-piping or modification, I believe PEX is far preferred due to ease of installation.
Last edited by sergio on Tue Nov 12, 2019 3:37 pm, edited 1 time in total.

michaeljc70
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Re: Anyone had their house repiped?

Post by michaeljc70 » Tue Nov 12, 2019 3:35 pm

sergio wrote:
Tue Nov 12, 2019 3:26 pm
michaeljc70 wrote:
Tue Nov 12, 2019 10:42 am
I'm surprised copper pipe failing after 20-30 years? Or is it the joints that may not have been properly soldered failing?
Yeah I was going to say the same thing. Our place is over 50 years old and has all OG copper piping that has held up great despite hard water and very very cold winters.

I don't understand why people make such a big deal out of PEX being *somewhat* more freeze-proof. If you get to the point where your water supply lines are freezing, you probably screwed up. If you're going to be gone for more than a day or two in the winter, shut off the water and drain the pipes!!
Yep. PEX isn't to code where I live either. Though the pipe may expand because it is plastic I'd be surprised if the fittings don't expand during freezing on PEX causing future leakage problems.

Housedoc
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Re: Anyone had their house repiped?

Post by Housedoc » Tue Nov 12, 2019 4:05 pm

Plumbers like PEX cause it's easier and faster. That's the bottom line. In out make their cash.

ponyboy
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Re: Anyone had their house repiped?

Post by ponyboy » Tue Nov 12, 2019 4:08 pm

Copper doesnt deteriorate, unless you get that trash thin copper that is cheaper.

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Re: Anyone had their house repiped?

Post by Kagord » Tue Nov 12, 2019 4:47 pm

ponyboy wrote:
Tue Nov 12, 2019 4:08 pm
Copper doesnt deteriorate, unless you get that trash thin copper that is cheaper.
You mean Type M or ?

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Re: Anyone had their house repiped?

Post by renue74 » Tue Nov 12, 2019 5:00 pm

I have rental houses and do a lot of my on remodels. Earlier this year I repiped a house....drain and water supply lines.

I used PEX A and Uponor ProPex Expander fittings. It's a special kind of PEX. Instead of using a coper crimp ring on the PEX tube, this uses an expanding plastic and it closes on the pex pipe. I love it because it's easy to handle and I don't have to use manual force to crimp. I use a Milwaukee ProPex battery tool.

It's super cheap to repipe your own house if you are handy. I would say you could get away with about $1000 to $1500 in materials.

We had friends who had polybueteline pip and they constantly had pin holes. Last summer, they paid $6000 to repipe....they have a 2 story house and the plumbers had to cut about 100 holes in the ceiling/walls to run the PEX. It took about 2-3 days.

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Re: Anyone had their house repiped?

Post by wageoghe » Tue Nov 12, 2019 5:10 pm

RE copper... There are three types of copper supply pipe, M, L, and K. Type M has the thinnest wall, Type K the thickest. I don't know that M is necessarily any more likely to leak than L or K, but I did want to mention the different types.

Copper can be susceptible to pinhole leaks due to water chemistry. Copper can also be damaged due to excessive velocity/pressure (a new library in our town had copper pipe failures that were attributed to a hot water recirculating system).

Finally, the infamous Chinese drywall can cause copper pipe corrosion, although I don't know that that would necessarily lead to leaks.

If any of these situations apply to the OP, he/she is probably wise to consider replacement. If there have been 3 leaks in 18 months, I would guess there will be more leaks in the future (especially if these are pinhole leaks).

We had our house replumbed (replaced galvanized steel with cpvc) in the context of a full basement remodel. We live in a raised ranch (main floor over basement), so there was easy access to all plumbing. We did not have to cut holes in any drywall since we had easy access from underneath. We paid around $2400 in 2005. In our case, I think it was a good investment. I did not see a lot of obvious constriction (which can happen with galvanized steel), but our plumbing is quieter and the pressure seems better (we did not measure pressure before and after).

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Re: Anyone had their house repiped?

Post by G12 » Tue Nov 12, 2019 6:02 pm

wageoghe wrote:
Tue Nov 12, 2019 5:10 pm
Copper can be susceptible to pinhole leaks due to water chemistry.
Yes, we had to replace roughly a 10 foot span leading from the hot water heater about a year ago. House was built in 1986, all copper, but this span was put in place 10 years ago during a remodel. The plumber said they had seen a very large surge in copper failure the past 3 years due to some corrosive agent in the municipal water supply exacerbated by the hot water heater. It was easily replace, went with PEX as he said newer PEX is a very high quality product. True or not, rather go with it than copper that will corrode due to water issue.

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Re: Anyone had their house repiped?

Post by RogerWilco » Tue Nov 12, 2019 7:11 pm

Another option is reflowing the inside of the existing copper pipe system with epoxy (https://www.nuflowtechnologies.com/prod ... xy-lining/)

We have had a couple of slab leaks and have been lucky enough to be able to reroute from a manifold .

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Re: Anyone had their house repiped?

Post by travelnut11 » Tue Nov 12, 2019 11:23 pm

We just had our original 1957 galvanized pipes replaced in our 1800 square foot ranch last month. They mostly used copper but for long runs to the exterior hose bibs and to the kitchen they used PEX. It was $4500 in the Milwaukee suburbs. So far so good. Luckily our finished basement has drop ceilings so they could mostly do the work without cutting into the drywall. The only place they had to cut was in the main level bathroom and that was largely due to some crappy DIY plumbing the last owner did. We never had any leaks but there was corrosion on the main supply line and several other places where corrosion was evident so we decided to just do it before we had any issues. We also had our well pump and pressure tank replaced at the same time as we were having issues with those as well. It was an expensive month.
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Re: Anyone had their house repiped?

Post by lthenderson » Wed Nov 13, 2019 9:44 am

IMO wrote:
Tue Nov 12, 2019 1:48 pm
lthenderson wrote:
Mon Nov 11, 2019 6:08 pm
retire2022 wrote:
Mon Nov 11, 2019 3:58 pm
op it depends on whether or not is prevention of pipes freezing is a priority

Supposedly PEX can deal with freezing better, here is a comparison of cooper pipe, PEX & CVPVC in a freezer test

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OOeBJ8mDr8Q
Freezing is still an issue with PEX because it still connects to metal pipe fittings like shutoff valves, sits in porcelain toilets, etc. The only thing PEX will prevent is having a pipe burst inside a wall cavity.
So is preventing a pipe from freeze bursting inside a wall cavity not a very highly desirable attribute vs. the alternative of having a pipe burst within a wall cavity?
Of course preventing a pipe from bursting inside a wall cavity is desirable but that wasn't the point I wanted to make. I know someone whose house with PEX froze up and a fitting in an upper bathroom burst and did tens of thousands of dollars worth of damage to the house requiring a gut job to the bathroom and the rooms below. Yes the PEX line was still intact but nothing around it was.

My point is that if you let your house freeze, having PEX is not going to save you.

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Re: Anyone had their house repiped?

Post by IMO » Wed Nov 13, 2019 2:04 pm

lthenderson wrote:
Wed Nov 13, 2019 9:44 am
IMO wrote:
Tue Nov 12, 2019 1:48 pm
lthenderson wrote:
Mon Nov 11, 2019 6:08 pm
retire2022 wrote:
Mon Nov 11, 2019 3:58 pm
op it depends on whether or not is prevention of pipes freezing is a priority

Supposedly PEX can deal with freezing better, here is a comparison of cooper pipe, PEX & CVPVC in a freezer test

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OOeBJ8mDr8Q
Freezing is still an issue with PEX because it still connects to metal pipe fittings like shutoff valves, sits in porcelain toilets, etc. The only thing PEX will prevent is having a pipe burst inside a wall cavity.
So is preventing a pipe from freeze bursting inside a wall cavity not a very highly desirable attribute vs. the alternative of having a pipe burst within a wall cavity?
Of course preventing a pipe from bursting inside a wall cavity is desirable but that wasn't the point I wanted to make. I know someone whose house with PEX froze up and a fitting in an upper bathroom burst and did tens of thousands of dollars worth of damage to the house requiring a gut job to the bathroom and the rooms below. Yes the PEX line was still intact but nothing around it was.

My point is that if you let your house freeze, having PEX is not going to save you.
No understood. Time will tell on various materials/fittings. The video did show the non-copper pipe fittings actually did okay. I don't have any personal bias pro/against copper or any other piping, but do appreciate the discussion about pros/con's that people bring up.

Freezing pipes can occur in select areas of a home (vs the whole house freezing) where the builder did not take into consideration some potentially vulnerable areas during a more significant cold period. We found this out last winter at a certain fixture in an otherwise very modern/otherwise well built home. One of the PEX lines in the wall experienced very localized freezing. Fortunately, it did not burst behind the drywall (which would have been a big issues), and there was no connection on that line behind the drywall (straight Pex to faucet supply line connection). We now take steps on that one fixture (let it drip/open cupboard) as a precaution when it gets real cold.

In the event of a power failure/heating failure with rare but total house freeze when we one is away, I would suspect that a copper piped house would have the more potential for damage as it could get costly opening up potentially multiple walls to fix burst sections of piping. This would of course presume one had at least turned off their water main when they left (and did not drain the lines also), or one utilizes an automated whole house shut off (I have a device called WaterHero that will shut off the main at a pre-determined temperature or for a water leak that develops). That type of device is what really "saves you" if a pipe did freeze/burst. Keep in mind the water damage from a broken pipe would typically occur after the thaw out.

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Re: Anyone had their house repiped?

Post by jharkin » Wed Nov 13, 2019 3:02 pm

lthenderson wrote:
Mon Nov 11, 2019 3:24 pm
I have copper piping and have never had any problems even though it is now almost 50 years old at this point. I wouldn't be so quick though to jump on the PEX bandwagon and assume that it will last longer without problems. I have a buddy who is a plumber and he has already redone PEX piping from the earlier days when it was still fairly new. Most of his repairs are fixing nail and screw piercings of it within wall cavities but a significant portion are hot water couplings that fail with time. According to him, if you have really hot water, the PEX can swell enough over time to undo that connection points.

PEX has only been around for less than 20 years and even then wasn't used heavily until the last decade. I think the jury should still be out as to whether it will outperform 40 and 50 year old copper piping.
+1

Remember a lot of the new fads in home construction are popular because they make installation faster and cheaper... not because they last longer.

The ability to make every fixture a home run with its own shutoff at the manifold is an appealing idea... but not sure I'd want to rip out a house worth of sweated copper to do it.

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Re: Anyone had their house repiped?

Post by White Coat Investor » Wed Nov 13, 2019 3:57 pm

Jwulgaru wrote:
Mon Nov 11, 2019 2:36 pm
Long story short, I've had three leaks in the past 18 months, with the previous two under the subfloor in the crawl with the latest on Friday being in a wall resulting in water damage. The house is from the late 80s and has a combo of copper and CPVC piping. I can pay around $500 to fix this leak or $4100+ to repipe the whole house in pex. For ultimate monetary value and peace of mind we decided to repipe and are shopping around for quotes. Has anyone else repiped their house and have any take away advice from the experience?
I"m doing a major home renovation on a late 80s home including new pipes. $4000 to do anything seems like a bargain. I think I've paid that much for what seems like a far smaller deal.
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Re: Anyone had their house repiped?

Post by Info_Hound » Wed Nov 13, 2019 4:19 pm

Yup. 1980's two story 3,400 sq house. The copper pipes developed pinhole leaks. We were on well water as everyone else in the neighborhood. Most everyone begin to develop leaks about the same time so there was a lot of pipe replacement going on. Apparently the water acidity corroded copper over time. The neighbors who had pvc piping had no issues.

Unfortunately for me, I was just about to put the house on the market when my leaks began. Had a company come in and they used the white pvc type piping for all the water runs. They cut small holes in the walls in order to make the runs, drywall repair was not part of their contract. Without pulling out papers the cost you quoted seems to be in the ballpark of what I paid.

Once everything was market ready again, the fact it had just been repiped with a lifetime warranty that transferred with the sale, it in fact did help sway buyers. Bidding war yielded me far above asking and at the settlement table I handed over the warranty along with everything else associated with the sale.

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Re: Anyone had their house repiped?

Post by sergio » Wed Nov 13, 2019 5:43 pm

IMO wrote:
Wed Nov 13, 2019 2:04 pm
lthenderson wrote:
Wed Nov 13, 2019 9:44 am
IMO wrote:
Tue Nov 12, 2019 1:48 pm
lthenderson wrote:
Mon Nov 11, 2019 6:08 pm
retire2022 wrote:
Mon Nov 11, 2019 3:58 pm
op it depends on whether or not is prevention of pipes freezing is a priority

Supposedly PEX can deal with freezing better, here is a comparison of cooper pipe, PEX & CVPVC in a freezer test

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OOeBJ8mDr8Q
Freezing is still an issue with PEX because it still connects to metal pipe fittings like shutoff valves, sits in porcelain toilets, etc. The only thing PEX will prevent is having a pipe burst inside a wall cavity.
So is preventing a pipe from freeze bursting inside a wall cavity not a very highly desirable attribute vs. the alternative of having a pipe burst within a wall cavity?
Of course preventing a pipe from bursting inside a wall cavity is desirable but that wasn't the point I wanted to make. I know someone whose house with PEX froze up and a fitting in an upper bathroom burst and did tens of thousands of dollars worth of damage to the house requiring a gut job to the bathroom and the rooms below. Yes the PEX line was still intact but nothing around it was.

My point is that if you let your house freeze, having PEX is not going to save you.
No understood. Time will tell on various materials/fittings. The video did show the non-copper pipe fittings actually did okay. I don't have any personal bias pro/against copper or any other piping, but do appreciate the discussion about pros/con's that people bring up.

Freezing pipes can occur in select areas of a home (vs the whole house freezing) where the builder did not take into consideration some potentially vulnerable areas during a more significant cold period. We found this out last winter at a certain fixture in an otherwise very modern/otherwise well built home. One of the PEX lines in the wall experienced very localized freezing. Fortunately, it did not burst behind the drywall (which would have been a big issues), and there was no connection on that line behind the drywall (straight Pex to faucet supply line connection). We now take steps on that one fixture (let it drip/open cupboard) as a precaution when it gets real cold.

In the event of a power failure/heating failure with rare but total house freeze when we one is away, I would suspect that a copper piped house would have the more potential for damage as it could get costly opening up potentially multiple walls to fix burst sections of piping. This would of course presume one had at least turned off their water main when they left (and did not drain the lines also), or one utilizes an automated whole house shut off (I have a device called WaterHero that will shut off the main at a pre-determined temperature or for a water leak that develops). That type of device is what really "saves you" if a pipe did freeze/burst. Keep in mind the water damage from a broken pipe would typically occur after the thaw out.
After carefully studying the plumbing in our house (built in the late 60s) it's obvious they went out of their way to not put a single copper water supply line in an exterior wall cavity. At first I wondered why the hell they were running the water lines in such a strange way but with the harsh winters we have here, it makes perfect sense. Really makes me feel better about buying an "older" home.

One thing I've also learned is that it takes quite a bit to get frozen/burst pipes. Shutting off the heat for a few hours when it's 28F outside ain't gonna even come close to doing it - it needs to be something like 10F for a few days.

nguy44
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Re: Anyone had their house repiped?

Post by nguy44 » Wed Nov 13, 2019 6:35 pm

We also repiped our house, as we had a similar situation as }b]Info_Hound[/b] mentioned above. Our house was built in 1977 and on well water. In 1996 we began to get pinhole leaks. We actually replaced it in three phases. The first was in lieu of fixing several pinhole leaks, and it was cheaper to replace those runs with pvc pipe. The about 4 years ago we decided to renovate the upstairs bathrooms at the same time we dealt with a few leaks, so as part of that renovation all the copper piping on the 2nd floor down to the first was replaced. Then a few months ago we replaced all of the copper pipe runs up from the basement into the first floor(bathroom, laundry room, kitchen connections). One benefit was that we added additional shutoff valves along the way, to make it easier to stop waterflow to various areas as needed.

IMO
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Re: Anyone had their house repiped?

Post by IMO » Thu Nov 14, 2019 10:51 pm

sergio wrote:
Wed Nov 13, 2019 5:43 pm
One thing I've also learned is that it takes quite a bit to get frozen/burst pipes. Shutting off the heat for a few hours when it's 28F outside ain't gonna even come close to doing it - it needs to be something like 10F for a few days.
We had a previous home that had a frozen copper pipe that occurred when the garage door accidentally got left open overnight. Don't recall the temperature but probably around mid 20's. It was just this small exposed copper section abut 4 inches long. Luckily, it didn't burst, but just froze.

I do think there are many homes that areas of localized freeze concerns, even with an otherwise normally heated home. People will use heat tape and wrap pipes that are known to be in the localized areas of concern. It is also good practice to put hose bibb covers on in freezing temperatures because hose bibs can be an localized area of freeze concern.

When it comes to how cold and how long it's cold is always an unknown because of those potentially high concern areas. They say the same thing about boats and engine blocks with the concern about cracking one's engine block in an unwinterized boat, needs to be a deep freeze for a couple of days. Boats or house plumbing, don't think it's worth the risk of not taking precautions.

Dude2
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Re: Anyone had their house repiped?

Post by Dude2 » Thu Nov 14, 2019 11:06 pm

Housedoc wrote:
Tue Nov 12, 2019 4:05 pm
Plumbers like PEX cause it's easier and faster. That's the bottom line. In out make their cash.
Same for DIYers. I'm an electrical engineer, and when I heard that you can run PEX and understand it just like electrical circuits, I thought, "sign me up." Assuming that's true, the design work becomes more manageable. Similar to the duct work in the house, calculations should have been done to determine the optimal air flow, i.e larger ducts go into smaller ducts, sizes of rooms are considered, number of cubic feet per minute, etc. Plumbing should have had similar design work behind it. You shouldn't get slow filling toilets, hot water that takes forever, pressure issues. The question really comes down to if a proper job was done on the house to begin with -- whether that comes from trial and error or a paper and pencil. PEX concept allows more "normal" people to design a working system. I'm sure there are trade-offs, but I'm a believer.

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