Living life post smart phone

Questions on how we spend our money and our time - consumer goods and services, home and vehicle, leisure and recreational activities
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BradJ
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Living life post smart phone

Post by BradJ »

Has anyone here devolved and went back to using a regular phone after years of using a smart phone? If so, which phone did you get.
I’m interested in removing the temptation of always being on my iPhone by removing the phone all together. I would love to find a phone that could still check e-mail and have gps, if possible. Thank you.
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tooluser
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Re: Living life post smart phone

Post by tooluser »

Couldn't you do that with a smart phone that you remove all the superfluous apps from?
I think it's more about self control. (No one is immune from that.)
Simple yet difficult.
Are you sure you want email? That seems like a "gateway drug" to me. By definition, emails are less urgent and could be viewed at only a few set times during the day.
stoptothink
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Re: Living life post smart phone

Post by stoptothink »

tooluser wrote: Sun Oct 20, 2019 8:12 pm Couldn't you do that with a smart phone that you remove all the superfluous apps from?
I think it's more about self control. (No one is immune from that.)
Simple yet difficult.
+1
runner3081
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Re: Living life post smart phone

Post by runner3081 »

Agree, just turn off email sync and don't check it.
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BradJ
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Re: Living life post smart phone

Post by BradJ »

Apps are not my problem, I’m not even sure I have one that’s beyond the basic ones installed on the phone. Browsing the internet, circling the same old sites, etc. But yes, I could always drop it in a box when I get home and leave it be.
mortfree
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Re: Living life post smart phone

Post by mortfree »

Are you posting here from your phone?
tibbitts
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Re: Living life post smart phone

Post by tibbitts »

BradJ wrote: Sun Oct 20, 2019 7:55 pm Has anyone here devolved and went back to using a regular phone after years of using a smart phone? If so, which phone did you get.
I’m interested in removing the temptation of always being on my iPhone by removing the phone all together. I would love to find a phone that could still check e-mail and have gps, if possible. Thank you.
I don't understand the point. Really all I do with my smart phone is make a phone call (probably five or six a year) and check mail when wifi is available (I have data turned off since it costs starting at the first byte.) I use a computer for almost all internet use, because... it's easier to use. I have a GPS in my car with lifetime maps and traffic that I take with me when I travel. What does "being on my iPhone" mean?
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tennisplyr
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Re: Living life post smart phone

Post by tennisplyr »

Sounds like you need a behavioral change...look into topics like "curing cell phone addiction"
Those who move forward with a happy spirit will find that things always work out.
prd1982
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Re: Living life post smart phone

Post by prd1982 »

How about turning off your data plan? Then you could browse while home, but no web/email while outside your house. Getting a dog might help as well!
Momus
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Re: Living life post smart phone

Post by Momus »

Zen mode

Whoops you don't have it. 8-)
stoptothink
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Re: Living life post smart phone

Post by stoptothink »

tibbitts wrote: Sun Oct 20, 2019 9:13 pm
BradJ wrote: Sun Oct 20, 2019 7:55 pm Has anyone here devolved and went back to using a regular phone after years of using a smart phone? If so, which phone did you get.
I’m interested in removing the temptation of always being on my iPhone by removing the phone all together. I would love to find a phone that could still check e-mail and have gps, if possible. Thank you.
I don't understand the point. Really all I do with my smart phone is make a phone call (probably five or six a year) and check mail when wifi is available (I have data turned off since it costs starting at the first byte.) I use a computer for almost all internet use, because... it's easier to use. I have a GPS in my car with lifetime maps and traffic that I take with me when I travel. What does "being on my iPhone" mean?
Phone calls, texts, spotify, uber (rarely) and GPS (rarely); I can probably count on one hand the number of times I've browsed the internet on my phone. Just physically put it away. My wife has a serious issue with this so we have a rule in our house: when you get home, the phone goes upstairs in your nightstand.
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dual
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Re: Living life post smart phone

Post by dual »

BradJ wrote: Sun Oct 20, 2019 7:55 pm Has anyone here devolved and went back to using a regular phone after years of using a smart phone? If so, which phone did you get.
I’m interested in removing the temptation of always being on my iPhone by removing the phone all together. I would love to find a phone that could still check e-mail and have gps, if possible. Thank you.
My motivation for getting rid of my smart phone is to reduce spying on my daily activities. What functions do I want from the phone? For me it is just making and receiving phone calls. If I want to do text messages I need a cell phone with a full alphabet keyboard.

As for GPS, I think any phone with GPS can be used to track you so I do not want that feature. Since I only use GPS in my car I will just dust off my old NUVI 1350 GPS unit and keep it in the car again. Those are the only functions I want.

A quick search on Amazon shows a problem. Most of the dumb phones are 2G so they may be phased out soon.

I did find this 4G dumb phone on HSN with one year of service for $60. And no GPS!
https://www.hsn.com/products/doro-flip- ... is/9161739#
TN_Boy
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Re: Living life post smart phone

Post by TN_Boy »

BradJ wrote: Sun Oct 20, 2019 7:55 pm Has anyone here devolved and went back to using a regular phone after years of using a smart phone? If so, which phone did you get.
I’m interested in removing the temptation of always being on my iPhone by removing the phone all together. I would love to find a phone that could still check e-mail and have gps, if possible. Thank you.
You want maps and you want email. So I think you need a smartphone.

I am not trying to be snarky, but I think you need to look at ways to modify your behavior. The problem is not the phone.

If you google phrases like "phone over use apps" there are apps and resources to help people manage their screen time.
UpperNwGuy
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Re: Living life post smart phone

Post by UpperNwGuy »

I rarely use the telephone feature of my smart phone. I use my smart phone primarily for its data features, and I use those heavily. An old fashioned cell phone would be useless.
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MilburnJr
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Re: Living life post smart phone

Post by MilburnJr »

You may want to check out this one (just came out this month) - https://www.t-mobile.com/cell-phone/alcatel-go-flip-3 (surprisingly it also has google assistant and gps / stripped down version of Google Maps /email / facebook/whatsapp if needed AND supports wifi / hotspot). I got it as a backup phone...
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KlangFool
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Re: Living life post smart phone

Post by KlangFool »

Momus wrote: Mon Oct 21, 2019 11:21 am Zen mode

Whoops you don't have it. 8-)
It is called airplane mode on the phone.

KlangFool
MotoTrojan
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Re: Living life post smart phone

Post by MotoTrojan »

You can set daily time limits for apps and I believe even certain web pages.
megabad
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Re: Living life post smart phone

Post by megabad »

BradJ wrote: Sun Oct 20, 2019 7:55 pm Has anyone here devolved and went back to using a regular phone after years of using a smart phone? If so, which phone did you get.
I’m interested in removing the temptation of always being on my iPhone by removing the phone all together. I would love to find a phone that could still check e-mail and have gps, if possible. Thank you.
Iphone with parental controls. I literally just did exactly what you want with my nieces and nephews. Lock down safari and allow maps. Done. Never had to do this for an adult but I can understand some might need it.
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steve roy
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Re: Living life post smart phone

Post by steve roy »

1) Morning: check smart phone. Then put on airplane mode.

2). Lunch: Take off airplane mode. Check new voice mails and texts. Respond as necessary or desired. Put back on airplane mode.

3). Evening: repeat lunch routine.

This approach is little different than having a landline with voice mail that you check 2 or 3 times per day. (Except also texts).

And yes, this might be a horrifying and unpalatable approach, but in 1969 my teenage brother and I bummed around Europe for the summer and OUR PARENTS DIDN’T SPEAK TO US FOR MONTHS!!

Eek.
CMD1
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Re: Living life post smart phone

Post by CMD1 »

There are actually a lot of stories out there about people doing just this.

https://www.independent.co.uk/life-styl ... 99086.html
Sales of “dumbphones” are on the rise as consumers increasingly seek ways to disconnect from the technology so many of us rely upon for work and everyday life.

https://www.marketwatch.com/story/move- ... 2017-09-12

https://www.businessinsider.com/ben-cru ... one-2019-5
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windaar
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Re: Living life post smart phone

Post by windaar »

I got a flip-phone and a cheap plan from T-Mobile. Most of the time it is in my car's console. When I'm in a waiting room, I look at the old magazines. When waiting for someone downtown I people watch. I don't need the expense, surveillance, and constant temptation in my pocket. Just my choice and 2 cents.
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novemberrain
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Re: Living life post smart phone

Post by novemberrain »

I had cell phone addiction too and bought a GPS+Cellular Apple watch a year back. Sure I pay $10 per month extra for my watch, but I now barely use my iPhone. I don't carry my phone around at all. All the important calls get routed to my watch and I answer it there. Same with iMessages and email/WhatsApp if needed. But my overall cell phone use is now trivially low. If I do really need to use my phone , say for Uber or maps, that is the only time I use my iPhone.
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Tamarind
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Re: Living life post smart phone

Post by Tamarind »

I occasionally need a little help staying off the phone. There are a number of apps which allow you to limit your own screen time, set a "budget", or ban certain apps (for instance, the browser) during certain times of day.

For me at least there would be no point in reverting to a dumb phone as 90% of my personal and business communication is by email or Slack.
gd
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Re: Living life post smart phone

Post by gd »

BradJ wrote: Sun Oct 20, 2019 7:55 pm ... I would love to find a phone that could still check e-mail ...
Seems inconsistent. I think you need to dig a little deeper into your behaviors, or be clearer about what the problem is.
Caduceus
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Re: Living life post smart phone

Post by Caduceus »

It doesn't seem very hard to not always be on your Iphone. Just check your phone only at intervals. I'm essentially unreachable via my Iphone these days. My colleagues know that they should call me at my office. My family and friends know that I can only talk after 8 p.m. and my phone is switched on to audible at that time (it's silent the entire day otherwise). I don't have a data plan.

To be honest, I don't understand the number of hours people spend on their phones. I do not know what they are doing. My day isn't so exciting that I have a lot of things to update people about. I'm terrible at small talk, so I don't spend hours on the phone chit-chatting. No data, so no videos.
arsenalfan
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Re: Living life post smart phone

Post by arsenalfan »

I hear you OP.
I use Waze and texting for work, but otherwise find myself with games/finance/surfing distraction.
In my ideal world there would be an old school keyboard Blackberry with Waze, or a GPS system like a Garmin with free realtime traffic routing.
Once a month some random phone app is useful though: ParkMobile, eTickets, etc.
Just have to be more mindful and increase airplane mode time/have an accountability partner for ScreenTime app?
Last edited by arsenalfan on Tue Oct 22, 2019 7:21 am, edited 1 time in total.
Dave55
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Re: Living life post smart phone

Post by Dave55 »

steve roy wrote: Mon Oct 21, 2019 3:48 pm 1) Morning: check smart phone. Then put on airplane mode.

2). Lunch: Take off airplane mode. Check new voice mails and texts. Respond as necessary or desired. Put back on airplane mode.

3). Evening: repeat lunch routine.

This approach is little different than having a landline with voice mail that you check 2 or 3 times per day. (Except also texts).

And yes, this might be a horrifying and unpalatable approach, but in 1969 my teenage brother and I bummed around Europe for the summer and OUR PARENTS DIDN’T SPEAK TO US FOR MONTHS!!

Eek.
+1.

A friend of mine always leaves his phone in his car when he is out of his house, running errands or meeting us for a meal or card game. I always put my phone on airplane mode by 7pm every night.

Dave
Revision17
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Re: Living life post smart phone

Post by Revision17 »

novemberrain wrote: Tue Oct 22, 2019 1:10 am I had cell phone addiction too and bought a GPS+Cellular Apple watch a year back. Sure I pay $10 per month extra for my watch, but I now barely use my iPhone. I don't carry my phone around at all. All the important calls get routed to my watch and I answer it there. Same with iMessages and email/WhatsApp if needed. But my overall cell phone use is now trivially low. If I do really need to use my phone , say for Uber or maps, that is the only time I use my iPhone.
I got the bluetooth version since my cell carrier doesn't support apple watches. Still I look at my screen time pre and post apple watch. It was 2.5 hours per day before, and now it averaging to around 1.5 hour. The temptation to check social media when I get a notification is gone since the friction to go grab the phone is higher.

No wonder apple is so big.. "You like your phone so much you use it way too much? Buy the apple watch so you use your phone less :sharebeer "
stoptothink
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Re: Living life post smart phone

Post by stoptothink »

Caduceus wrote: Tue Oct 22, 2019 7:10 amTo be honest, I don't understand the number of hours people spend on their phones. I do not know what they are doing. My day isn't so exciting that I have a lot of things to update people about. I'm terrible at small talk, so I don't spend hours on the phone chit-chatting. No data, so no videos.
I'm with you, but it's very real. I recently banned phones from all my department's meetings. I've watched someone walk right into the middle of a busy street while looking at their phone, I watched from my office as the young lady who handles my business social media walk off a bridge and into a small stream, and on Saturday a young lady ran a red light and nearly killed us (but she noticed at the last minute and swerved and hit another car).
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JoMoney
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Re: Living life post smart phone

Post by JoMoney »

dual wrote: Mon Oct 21, 2019 1:24 pm...
As for GPS, I think any phone with GPS can be used to track you so I do not want that feature...
Regardless of whether or not you use a GPS Navigation app, just about every mobile phone has some sort of GPS or tracking ability, and ALL of them will be required to in the U.S. going forward
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enhanced_ ... quirements
Even if you didn't have GPS, a lower resolution of tracking has always been a thing by way of identifying which cell towers you're connected to.
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BradJ
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Re: Living life post smart phone

Post by BradJ »

Thank you all for your helpful responses. My struggle is not checking e-mails, like GPS , e-mail is something I would like to have so I could use it if needed. My struggle is that I find myself looking at my phone during boring business meetings (faux pas) and relaxing at the house when the kids go to bed. I do not like TV or movies, so my phone is the gateway to mentally relax at the end of the day.
stoptothink
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Re: Living life post smart phone

Post by stoptothink »

BradJ wrote: Tue Oct 22, 2019 9:00 am Thank you all for your helpful responses. My struggle is not checking e-mails, like GPS , e-mail is something I would like to have so I could use it if needed. My struggle is that I find myself looking at my phone during boring business meetings (faux pas) and relaxing at the house when the kids go to bed. I do not like TV or movies, so my phone is the gateway to mentally relax at the end of the day.
Just put it physically away in a place where you can't get to it easily. Phones are not allowed in my department's meetings (I asked HR and they said it was OK); my employees have to leave them at their desks. My wife puts her phone upstairs in her nightstand immediately when getting home. There have been studies showing that even when it is not within arms-length but simply visible, like on a table across the room, that people have a difficult time not going and picking it up.
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BradJ
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Re: Living life post smart phone

Post by BradJ »

stoptothink wrote: Tue Oct 22, 2019 9:07 am
BradJ wrote: Tue Oct 22, 2019 9:00 am Thank you all for your helpful responses. My struggle is not checking e-mails, like GPS , e-mail is something I would like to have so I could use it if needed. My struggle is that I find myself looking at my phone during boring business meetings (faux pas) and relaxing at the house when the kids go to bed. I do not like TV or movies, so my phone is the gateway to mentally relax at the end of the day.
Just put it physically away in a place where you can't get to it easily. Phones are not allowed in my department's meetings (I asked HR and they said it was OK); my employees have to leave them at their desks. My wife puts her phone upstairs in her nightstand immediately when getting home. There have been studies showing that even when it is not within arms-length but simply visible, like on a table across the room, that people have a difficult time not going and picking it up.
I agree, at times I feel like I can sympathize with Gollum and his relationship to the ring. One caveat to all of this is that my family is currently dealing with a huge health crisis (my young son has cancer), so having the phone close by is a must and we find ourselves having the challenge of killing time in the hospital during his visits and overnight stays. That being said, this is a behavior that I need to change to have a better life, in my opinion. It is ironic that I do not watch Youtube, visit Facebook....it is pure news and finance sites.
mptfan
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Re: Living life post smart phone

Post by mptfan »

steve roy wrote: Mon Oct 21, 2019 3:48 pm 1) Morning: check smart phone. Then put on airplane mode.

2). Lunch: Take off airplane mode. Check new voice mails and texts. Respond as necessary or desired. Put back on airplane mode.

3). Evening: repeat lunch routine.
This would make little difference to me since the majority of time I am using my phone on wifi, either at home or at work or somewhere else with wifi, and my phone works on wifi while in airplane mode. And almost all of my phone apps work over wifi, including emails and texts, and I get phone calls while on wifi. There is really only one thing that I can think of that does not work over wifi...regular SMS texts that are sent to my carrier phone number...everything else works on wifi.
Last edited by mptfan on Tue Oct 22, 2019 9:45 am, edited 1 time in total.
Katietsu
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Re: Living life post smart phone

Post by Katietsu »

Instead of a flip phone, would a really cheap smartphone (think burner phone) with a poor quality dim screen provide a lousy enough browsing experience to be less of a distraction?

On the other hand, with the exception of using the phone during work meetings, does your current use really present a problem? It sounds like you are browsing when others might be reading a book or watching a TV show. What will you do with that time instead? I think the iPad was the best thing for my sanity while spending a lot of time at the hospital with a sick relative a few years back.
Last edited by Katietsu on Tue Oct 22, 2019 9:42 am, edited 1 time in total.
novemberrain
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Re: Living life post smart phone

Post by novemberrain »

Revision17 wrote: Tue Oct 22, 2019 7:31 am
novemberrain wrote: Tue Oct 22, 2019 1:10 am I had cell phone addiction too and bought a GPS+Cellular Apple watch a year back.
No wonder apple is so big.. "You like your phone so much you use it way too much? Buy the apple watch so you use your phone less :sharebeer "
Lol. Unfortunate, but true.

I do like my Apple watch by itself though. I walk an extra mile a day just because of apple watch. And an extra 7 flights of stairs a day. That adds up to some 40000 calories a year.
novemberrain
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Re: Living life post smart phone

Post by novemberrain »

stoptothink wrote: Tue Oct 22, 2019 9:07 am
BradJ wrote: Tue Oct 22, 2019 9:00 am Thank you all for your helpful responses. My struggle is not checking e-mails, like GPS , e-mail is something I would like to have so I could use it if needed. My struggle is that I find myself looking at my phone during boring business meetings (faux pas) and relaxing at the house when the kids go to bed. I do not like TV or movies, so my phone is the gateway to mentally relax at the end of the day.
Just put it physically away in a place where you can't get to it easily. Phones are not allowed in my department's meetings (I asked HR and they said it was OK); my employees have to leave them at their desks. My wife puts her phone upstairs in her nightstand immediately when getting home. There have been studies showing that even when it is not within arms-length but simply visible, like on a table across the room, that people have a difficult time not going and picking it up.
What happens when an employee gets a call during your meeting from his child's school that their child was involved in an accident and has been hospitalized ? It has legal ramifications as well if that call was missed because of your HR policies. That (or similar) is the reason many adults need to carry a reachable device at all times.
mak1277
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Re: Living life post smart phone

Post by mak1277 »

tibbitts wrote: Sun Oct 20, 2019 9:13 pm
BradJ wrote: Sun Oct 20, 2019 7:55 pm Has anyone here devolved and went back to using a regular phone after years of using a smart phone? If so, which phone did you get.
I’m interested in removing the temptation of always being on my iPhone by removing the phone all together. I would love to find a phone that could still check e-mail and have gps, if possible. Thank you.
I don't understand the point. Really all I do with my smart phone is make a phone call (probably five or six a year) and check mail when wifi is available (I have data turned off since it costs starting at the first byte.) I use a computer for almost all internet use, because... it's easier to use. I have a GPS in my car with lifetime maps and traffic that I take with me when I travel. What does "being on my iPhone" mean?
I'm the opposite. Unless I'm at work, I never use a computer. 100% of my internet browsing is done on my iPhone when I'm away from my desk at work. I'd absolutely go computer-free before I went iPhone-free.
stoptothink
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Re: Living life post smart phone

Post by stoptothink »

novemberrain wrote: Tue Oct 22, 2019 9:46 am
stoptothink wrote: Tue Oct 22, 2019 9:07 am
BradJ wrote: Tue Oct 22, 2019 9:00 am Thank you all for your helpful responses. My struggle is not checking e-mails, like GPS , e-mail is something I would like to have so I could use it if needed. My struggle is that I find myself looking at my phone during boring business meetings (faux pas) and relaxing at the house when the kids go to bed. I do not like TV or movies, so my phone is the gateway to mentally relax at the end of the day.
Just put it physically away in a place where you can't get to it easily. Phones are not allowed in my department's meetings (I asked HR and they said it was OK); my employees have to leave them at their desks. My wife puts her phone upstairs in her nightstand immediately when getting home. There have been studies showing that even when it is not within arms-length but simply visible, like on a table across the room, that people have a difficult time not going and picking it up.
What happens when an employee gets a call during your meeting from his child's school that their child was involved in an accident and has been hospitalized ? It has legal ramifications as well if that call was missed because of your HR policies. That (or similar) is the reason many adults need to carry a reachable device at all times.
In that case, is a few minutes going to make a difference? BTW, as I think, I have 1 single employee (out of 21) who has a child and they have a SAHM wife. You can think of a million theoretical situations, none of them change the fact that phones are a considerable distraction (not in a good way) in almost every contemporary environment.

FWIW, my boss, one of the owners of the company, makes anybody who comes into his office leave their phone in a basket by the front door.
TheOscarGuy
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Re: Living life post smart phone

Post by TheOscarGuy »

BradJ wrote: Sun Oct 20, 2019 7:55 pm Has anyone here devolved and went back to using a regular phone after years of using a smart phone? If so, which phone did you get.
I’m interested in removing the temptation of always being on my iPhone by removing the phone all together. I would love to find a phone that could still check e-mail and have gps, if possible. Thank you.
Have a 'cellphone free' times in your day. For example when you get back home and are with your family turn airplane mode on for say until after dinner, after having spent few hours with family.
protagonist
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Re: Living life post smart phone

Post by protagonist »

BradJ wrote: Tue Oct 22, 2019 9:00 am Thank you all for your helpful responses. My struggle is not checking e-mails, like GPS , e-mail is something I would like to have so I could use it if needed. My struggle is that I find myself looking at my phone during boring business meetings (faux pas) and relaxing at the house when the kids go to bed. I do not like TV or movies, so my phone is the gateway to mentally relax at the end of the day.
That really does not seem like much of a problem to me.
Your phone probably is more interesting than a boring business meeting. *laughing* Maybe it keeps you awake.
Others might use TV or movies or read books to "mentally relax" at the end of the day. You use your phone. Maybe meditation would help you relax more, but let's face it, we are not all monks.
The thing that may help you relax more than anything is learning not to beat yourself up for things like wasting a little time (if you call "mentally relaxing" wasting time).
rich126
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Re: Living life post smart phone

Post by rich126 »

I don't understand the need to avoid a smartphone, email or whatever, unless it is a budget thing. In most cases smartphones, credit cards, etc. are convenience items and make life easier. If you are traveling somewhere and need to quickly make a reservation or a flight change, it is almost always faster to go online rather than call and potentially wait minutes or hours (yeah, when weather hits, the phone delays can be huge). If you are stuck somewhere it can be a tool to kill time via games, entertainment, etc. If you need to get somewhere quickly you can use the maps/traffic apps, etc.

I can understand some people have jobs and their employers/coworkers may abuse email, text, etc. but then you either need to ignore the distractions, turn off the phone or get a new job. The phone isn't the problem, its you and/or your situation.
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dual
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Re: Living life post smart phone

Post by dual »

JoMoney wrote: Tue Oct 22, 2019 8:14 am
dual wrote: Mon Oct 21, 2019 1:24 pm...
As for GPS, I think any phone with GPS can be used to track you so I do not want that feature...
Regardless of whether or not you use a GPS Navigation app, just about every mobile phone has some sort of GPS or tracking ability, and ALL of them will be required to in the U.S. going forward
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enhanced_ ... quirements
Even if you didn't have GPS, a lower resolution of tracking has always been a thing by way of identifying which cell towers you're connected to.
So, what is your point? Is it that because I do not get perfect security I should not do anything at all? As they say in politics, you are letting the perfect get in the way of good enough.

The phone from HSN I linked in my post:
  • 1. does not have GPS
    2. AFAIK does not use an android operating system with the Google or iOS with Apple spyware features
    3. Is a 4G phone so I should be able to use it for a number of years even if the government requires GPS for new phone
So yes, if I am on the lam and I do not want the authorities to track me, I would not carry any cellphone. But the phone I linked is a heck of a lot more private than a smartphone.
Last edited by dual on Tue Oct 22, 2019 11:18 am, edited 1 time in total.
mak1277
Posts: 1562
Joined: Fri Jan 09, 2015 4:26 pm

Re: Living life post smart phone

Post by mak1277 »

stoptothink wrote: Tue Oct 22, 2019 10:09 am
novemberrain wrote: Tue Oct 22, 2019 9:46 am
stoptothink wrote: Tue Oct 22, 2019 9:07 am
BradJ wrote: Tue Oct 22, 2019 9:00 am Thank you all for your helpful responses. My struggle is not checking e-mails, like GPS , e-mail is something I would like to have so I could use it if needed. My struggle is that I find myself looking at my phone during boring business meetings (faux pas) and relaxing at the house when the kids go to bed. I do not like TV or movies, so my phone is the gateway to mentally relax at the end of the day.
Just put it physically away in a place where you can't get to it easily. Phones are not allowed in my department's meetings (I asked HR and they said it was OK); my employees have to leave them at their desks. My wife puts her phone upstairs in her nightstand immediately when getting home. There have been studies showing that even when it is not within arms-length but simply visible, like on a table across the room, that people have a difficult time not going and picking it up.
What happens when an employee gets a call during your meeting from his child's school that their child was involved in an accident and has been hospitalized ? It has legal ramifications as well if that call was missed because of your HR policies. That (or similar) is the reason many adults need to carry a reachable device at all times.
In that case, is a few minutes going to make a difference? BTW, as I think, I have 1 single employee (out of 21) who has a child and they have a SAHM wife. You can think of a million theoretical situations, none of them change the fact that phones are a considerable distraction (not in a good way) in almost every contemporary environment.

FWIW, my boss, one of the owners of the company, makes anybody who comes into his office leave their phone in a basket by the front door.
I don't need to ban phones from my department's meetings. If my employees aren't smart and respectful enough to keep them in their pockets, then I've done a bad job of hiring and it's on me to fix it.
tesuzuki2002
Posts: 1115
Joined: Fri Dec 11, 2015 12:40 pm

Re: Living life post smart phone

Post by tesuzuki2002 »

tooluser wrote: Sun Oct 20, 2019 8:12 pm Couldn't you do that with a smart phone that you remove all the superfluous apps from?
I think it's more about self control. (No one is immune from that.)
Simple yet difficult.
Are you sure you want email? That seems like a "gateway drug" to me. By definition, emails are less urgent and could be viewed at only a few set times during the day.
This!!! I deleted all my apps last month and I have saved hours and hours each week of not bogging myself down doing pointless things...

I hit the email once a day and surf the news for about 15 minutes..
hilink73
Posts: 476
Joined: Tue Sep 20, 2016 3:29 pm

Re: Living life post smart phone

Post by hilink73 »

BradJ wrote: Sun Oct 20, 2019 8:26 pm Apps are not my problem, I’m not even sure I have one that’s beyond the basic ones installed on the phone. Browsing the internet, circling the same old sites, etc. But yes, I could always drop it in a box when I get home and leave it be.
Does not matter if it's checking for new posts on this site here, browsing reddit/popular /all, etc or anything else.
It's the reward mechanism (new news, likes, whatever it is) which your are feeding.
Silicone valley app developers have implemented mechanism to make the user dependend on their apps:
- indefinite scroll -> just doesn't end, news, news, news
- reload on pull down -> similar to a slot machine in an casino (there could be a reward (new news) or not (recent articles being shown again

If you do not use your smartphone, a habit will find it's way (better an urge finds it way to get scratched)... e. g. surfing on the PC instead (= nothing won with tossing the phone).

What situations are you browsing the web?
- waiting for the bus
- waiting for ...
And what could you do instead?
- even, if it's just counting your breath (a little mindfulness meditation)
- read a book (may a Stoic with some interesting insights..)
- each of them better for your mental health than staring on this screen
Not even mentioning the blue light of the screen suppressing the release of melatonine in the evening hours, worsening your sleep quality/shortening your sleep...

It's a habit which should be tackled consciously! Otherwise, it will find a way to get back to you..
(Just talking from experience...)
stoptothink
Posts: 8284
Joined: Fri Dec 31, 2010 9:53 am

Re: Living life post smart phone

Post by stoptothink »

mak1277 wrote: Tue Oct 22, 2019 12:24 pm
stoptothink wrote: Tue Oct 22, 2019 10:09 am
novemberrain wrote: Tue Oct 22, 2019 9:46 am
stoptothink wrote: Tue Oct 22, 2019 9:07 am
BradJ wrote: Tue Oct 22, 2019 9:00 am Thank you all for your helpful responses. My struggle is not checking e-mails, like GPS , e-mail is something I would like to have so I could use it if needed. My struggle is that I find myself looking at my phone during boring business meetings (faux pas) and relaxing at the house when the kids go to bed. I do not like TV or movies, so my phone is the gateway to mentally relax at the end of the day.
Just put it physically away in a place where you can't get to it easily. Phones are not allowed in my department's meetings (I asked HR and they said it was OK); my employees have to leave them at their desks. My wife puts her phone upstairs in her nightstand immediately when getting home. There have been studies showing that even when it is not within arms-length but simply visible, like on a table across the room, that people have a difficult time not going and picking it up.
What happens when an employee gets a call during your meeting from his child's school that their child was involved in an accident and has been hospitalized ? It has legal ramifications as well if that call was missed because of your HR policies. That (or similar) is the reason many adults need to carry a reachable device at all times.
In that case, is a few minutes going to make a difference? BTW, as I think, I have 1 single employee (out of 21) who has a child and they have a SAHM wife. You can think of a million theoretical situations, none of them change the fact that phones are a considerable distraction (not in a good way) in almost every contemporary environment.

FWIW, my boss, one of the owners of the company, makes anybody who comes into his office leave their phone in a basket by the front door.
I don't need to ban phones from my department's meetings. If my employees aren't smart and respectful enough to keep them in their pockets, then I've done a bad job of hiring and it's on me to fix it.
Don't disagree at all, I'd love to only hire people who don't have this issue, but that isn't realistic. Just read this thread; the OP is a successful professional who openly admits to playing around on his phone in meetings and he isn't the only one admitting it (in this thread). If you have managed to never hire someone who is on their phone when they should not be, then you are the best interviewer on the planet and need to write a book. I'd buy it.
User avatar
JoMoney
Posts: 9761
Joined: Tue Jul 23, 2013 5:31 am

Re: Living life post smart phone

Post by JoMoney »

dual wrote: Tue Oct 22, 2019 11:17 am
JoMoney wrote: Tue Oct 22, 2019 8:14 am
dual wrote: Mon Oct 21, 2019 1:24 pm...
As for GPS, I think any phone with GPS can be used to track you so I do not want that feature...
Regardless of whether or not you use a GPS Navigation app, just about every mobile phone has some sort of GPS or tracking ability, and ALL of them will be required to in the U.S. going forward
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enhanced_ ... quirements
Even if you didn't have GPS, a lower resolution of tracking has always been a thing by way of identifying which cell towers you're connected to.
So, what is your point? Is it that because I do not get perfect security I should not do anything at all? As they say in politics, you are letting the perfect get in the way of good enough.

The phone from HSN I linked in my post:
  • 1. does not have GPS
    2. AFAIK does not use an android operating system with the Google or iOS with Apple spyware features
    3. Is a 4G phone so I should be able to use it for a number of years even if the government requires GPS for new phone
So yes, if I am on the lam and I do not want the authorities to track me, I would not carry any cellphone. But the phone I linked is a heck of a lot more private than a smartphone.
My point was simply a response to your statement that you did not want GPS and were concerned about tracking.
The phone you linked does have GPS, it may not have a navigation app, but it does have GPS, which for any new phone is a federal requirement in the U.S.
https://support.tracfone.com/devicehome ... 17&lang=en
Image
You will have to make your own determination as to what the right amount of "security" is you're looking for.
"To achieve satisfactory investment results is easier than most people realize; to achieve superior results is harder than it looks." - Benjamin Graham
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whodidntante
Posts: 9084
Joined: Thu Jan 21, 2016 11:11 pm
Location: outside the echo chamber

Re: Living life post smart phone

Post by whodidntante »

Change your usage. The tool is not the issue

I cancelled my Facebook account. That was a fantastic idea. Facebook reminded me of Hunger Games in terms of civility. My real friends found ways to talk to me anyway. I could not go a single day without seeing an inflammatory political comment, proselytizing, hate speech, trolling, and divisiveness. My interactions are now more meaningful. And I don't want to see what my ex had for dinner. I didn't announce that I was leaving. I just left. People who care noticed.

I've found that Reddit more than satisfies my need for anonymous discussions. No one cares if you create a throwaway account to discuss something you don't want linked to you inextricably. It's far more civil than Facebook in my experience. And there is signal in the noise. If my opinion changes I'll retreat deeper into my hole.

OP, could your issue he primarily due to boredom or anxiety? I've noticed that when I have a good balance of genuine face to face interactions I'm generally happier. And I don't think I could ever fully retire, because I can't sit still for long.
mak1277
Posts: 1562
Joined: Fri Jan 09, 2015 4:26 pm

Re: Living life post smart phone

Post by mak1277 »

stoptothink wrote: Tue Oct 22, 2019 4:22 pm
mak1277 wrote: Tue Oct 22, 2019 12:24 pm
stoptothink wrote: Tue Oct 22, 2019 10:09 am
novemberrain wrote: Tue Oct 22, 2019 9:46 am
stoptothink wrote: Tue Oct 22, 2019 9:07 am

Just put it physically away in a place where you can't get to it easily. Phones are not allowed in my department's meetings (I asked HR and they said it was OK); my employees have to leave them at their desks. My wife puts her phone upstairs in her nightstand immediately when getting home. There have been studies showing that even when it is not within arms-length but simply visible, like on a table across the room, that people have a difficult time not going and picking it up.
What happens when an employee gets a call during your meeting from his child's school that their child was involved in an accident and has been hospitalized ? It has legal ramifications as well if that call was missed because of your HR policies. That (or similar) is the reason many adults need to carry a reachable device at all times.
In that case, is a few minutes going to make a difference? BTW, as I think, I have 1 single employee (out of 21) who has a child and they have a SAHM wife. You can think of a million theoretical situations, none of them change the fact that phones are a considerable distraction (not in a good way) in almost every contemporary environment.

FWIW, my boss, one of the owners of the company, makes anybody who comes into his office leave their phone in a basket by the front door.
I don't need to ban phones from my department's meetings. If my employees aren't smart and respectful enough to keep them in their pockets, then I've done a bad job of hiring and it's on me to fix it.
Don't disagree at all, I'd love to only hire people who don't have this issue, but that isn't realistic. Just read this thread; the OP is a successful professional who openly admits to playing around on his phone in meetings and he isn't the only one admitting it (in this thread). If you have managed to never hire someone who is on their phone when they should not be, then you are the best interviewer on the planet and need to write a book. I'd buy it.
I have a different view. Once you're successful, you can play on your phone in boring meetings. I do. I'm talking about setting the tone for people who work for me.
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