College for real life use [Practical knowledge about investing]

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robbmann297
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College for real life use [Practical knowledge about investing]

Post by robbmann297 » Mon Oct 14, 2019 6:40 pm

I have found myself in a unique position. I was medically retired from my fire department job at the age of 48. My disability income is enough where I don’t need to work a part time job, and I am limited in the amount I’m able to earn above my current salary due to state law. Personal investments are not counted toward this number, though.

The other part of my position is that I would be able to have 100% of any student loans waved. I have never used student loans and I have no debt at the moment except $2500 in my wife’s student loans, car, and mortgage. I live in western Massachusetts within driving range of a bunch of great schools.

I am looking to use college for practical knowledge about trading, options, and other investment opportunities. I currently have an Associate’s in Fire Science and a Bachelor’s in Business Administration (with an emergency management major).

What’s my best course of action from here out? I’ll have enough income to slowly build a portfolio and time to do it after I’m properly educated.

WhyNotUs
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Re: College for real life use

Post by WhyNotUs » Mon Oct 14, 2019 8:40 pm

You could pursue CPA program. Investing in the context of Bogleheads is pretty simple. Dealing with taxes, what money to put where, and estate planning can be covered in a CPA program.
For just investing, the wiki here is a pretty cheap grad degree :D
I own the next hot stock- VTSAX

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arcticpineapplecorp.
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Re: College for real life use

Post by arcticpineapplecorp. » Mon Oct 14, 2019 8:58 pm

why do you think that college will provide you with:

"practical knowledge about trading, options, and other investment opportunities"?

Why do you believe that trading, options or other investment opportunities will be superior to just owning the market?

Do you believe that you are entitled to investment opportunities that others shouldn't have? And if so, why?

People think they want to be part of an exclusive club. Madoff's club was pretty exclusive (he turned people away, which made them want to give him their money all the more). And how did that turn out?

There are people with advanced degrees from prestigious colleges who get paid millions of dollars who try to beat the market and you know what? In any given year 80% of them underperform just owning the market.

source: https://us.spindices.com/spiva/#/reports

The underperformance of traders, active fund managers, etc. gets even worse the longer they try to beat the market.

Do you think you'll do better than them? If so, why?

but e-trade tells us buying stock is so easy even a baby can do it:
https://adage.com/videos/etrade-talking-baby-part-1/507

The stock market has given a fair, decent, generous return to anyone who just buys and held it. For some reason, that's just not good enough for some people and they want to do better or think they deserve more. Most people don't even get the return of the market, but they could if they just bought and held the market instead of playing with their money.
Last edited by arcticpineapplecorp. on Mon Oct 14, 2019 9:02 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Jags4186
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Re: College for real life use

Post by Jags4186 » Mon Oct 14, 2019 9:00 pm

In college there was a club in the commerce school which did trading with faculty advisors. There was no “how to trade stocks and options” class.

retired@50
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Re: College for real life use

Post by retired@50 » Mon Oct 14, 2019 10:45 pm

If you go back to college to learn about finance and investments, you'll most likely have assigned reading, and one of those assigned books will almost assuredly be "A Random Walk Down Wall Street" by Burton G. Malkiel. This was assigned reading during my own finance classes.

My suggestion is to go get a public library card, and check out Dewey decimal section 332.x There, you'll find all sorts of interesting titles, but I'd start with Malkiel's book. This should cure you of any desire whatsoever to try and trade anything but baseball cards. Regards,

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Stinky
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Re: College for real life use

Post by Stinky » Tue Oct 15, 2019 5:56 am

robbmann297 wrote:
Mon Oct 14, 2019 6:40 pm

What’s my best course of action from here out? I’ll have enough income to slowly build a portfolio and time to do it after I’m properly educated.
I believe that your best education on investing topics can be found in the Wiki and in the books listed there as recommended reading.

Going to college about investing topics won’t prepare you to consistently “beat” the broad markets. In fact, those who actively trade will likely underperform the market over time, due to trading costs and taxes.

It sounds like you can attend college classes at little or no cost. I’d encourage you to follow your passion in choosing your classes. If your passion happens to be finance and investing topics, that’s fine - just don’t think that your class work will prepare you to consistently beat the broad market.
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smitcat
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Re: College for real life use

Post by smitcat » Tue Oct 15, 2019 7:35 am

robbmann297 wrote:
Mon Oct 14, 2019 6:40 pm
I have found myself in a unique position. I was medically retired from my fire department job at the age of 48. My disability income is enough where I don’t need to work a part time job, and I am limited in the amount I’m able to earn above my current salary due to state law. Personal investments are not counted toward this number, though.

The other part of my position is that I would be able to have 100% of any student loans waved. I have never used student loans and I have no debt at the moment except $2500 in my wife’s student loans, car, and mortgage. I live in western Massachusetts within driving range of a bunch of great schools.

I am looking to use college for practical knowledge about trading, options, and other investment opportunities. I currently have an Associate’s in Fire Science and a Bachelor’s in Business Administration (with an emergency management major).

What’s my best course of action from here out? I’ll have enough income to slowly build a portfolio and time to do it after I’m properly educated.
"My disability income is enough where I don’t need to work a part time job, and I am limited in the amount I’m able to earn above my current salary due to state law."
I am sure that if you find something you really like and it pays well that your state laws will allow a larger salary but just limit the amount of benefits you receive.
Good luck with whatever you do.

rascott
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Re: College for real life use

Post by rascott » Tue Oct 15, 2019 7:57 am

robbmann297 wrote:
Mon Oct 14, 2019 6:40 pm
I have found myself in a unique position. I was medically retired from my fire department job at the age of 48. My disability income is enough where I don’t need to work a part time job, and I am limited in the amount I’m able to earn above my current salary due to state law. Personal investments are not counted toward this number, though.

The other part of my position is that I would be able to have 100% of any student loans waved. I have never used student loans and I have no debt at the moment except $2500 in my wife’s student loans, car, and mortgage. I live in western Massachusetts within driving range of a bunch of great schools.

I am looking to use college for practical knowledge about trading, options, and other investment opportunities. I currently have an Associate’s in Fire Science and a Bachelor’s in Business Administration (with an emergency management major).

What’s my best course of action from here out? I’ll have enough income to slowly build a portfolio and time to do it after I’m properly educated.

Finance in college doesn't teach you a thing about trading options or any such things you are talking about. In fact, it will teach you instead that such things are foolish endeavors. The closest you'll get to that is some 400 level finance classes that will teach you the math behind option pricing models, which will then just prove to you that they are generally fairly priced at all times.

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firebirdparts
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Re: College for real life use

Post by firebirdparts » Tue Oct 15, 2019 8:05 am

I never studied business, but it couldn't hurt. In a lot of areas of finance I think they prefer to get somebody that doesn't know anything and just teach him. Have you ever seen "Back to School" with Rodney Dangerfield?

If I go back to school it'll be the machine shop for me.
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Re: College for real life use

Post by Grt2bOutdoors » Tue Oct 15, 2019 8:38 am

The best way to learn is through experience. Apply for a job as a trader, if you get it, you'll learn quickly how fast you can lose money.
No college, no MBA is going to teach you how to trade.
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a_movable_life
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Re: College for real life use

Post by a_movable_life » Tue Oct 15, 2019 8:53 am

This board is pretty solidly against day trading/options/etc. You may need to go to a different site to get more information.

When I was a staff RN we as part of the union got a hour of advising from a CFP. She was a social worker who went back to school. Part of the deal with the union is she couldn't sell anything. I didn't know about Bogleheads, FIRE, or much about finance in general. It was bread and butter save 10-15% with an S&P 500/Broad Bond and a small cap tilt plan.

Maybe your union has a few guys like this? I trusted her a lot more since she "Came from the trenches."

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Re: College for real life use

Post by barnaclebob » Tue Oct 15, 2019 9:14 am

You don't go to college to learn how to stock pick. You go to college to be a top tier mathematician or programmer who goes to work for some investment company and invents new super fast trading algorithms that generate an extra .0000001 cents per transaction for your employer.

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robbmann297
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Re: College for real life use

Post by robbmann297 » Tue Oct 15, 2019 10:46 am

Wow guys, I’m just looking for some friendly advice! I’m not looking to beat the system because I’m an entitled jerk, I’m just looking to not get killed while trying to learn a new trade (as in occupation).

I don’t know if some of you took my post the wrong way or you’re just bitter about something else, but I’ll be sure not to bother anyone on this board again! I thought this was a good site for help, I guess it’s just degenerating into another place to spew anger towards someone different than you.

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Re: College for real life use

Post by djpeteski » Tue Oct 15, 2019 11:41 am

One route, you could go, is to bootstrap a business. I would pour profits back into the business, with the purpose of expanding it, so my income was limited. Once it grows large enough you could take the profits/salary that you wish and leave the disability income behind. The key here is to start a business that you can manage. Where I am from many fire fighters start something like a carpet cleaning business that they work when not on shift. Sure you can start something like that, but you have to hire people to do the work, not do the work yourself. I assume that your disability precludes manual labor.

A scheme where they pay off student loans, and not just directly pay tuition costs sound silly. However, if advancing your education will help you start the business, then by all means take some classes.

Something that may be lost in the previous posts is that trading options or whatever is a losing game. Going to college to learn how to be less profitable in the market has a high cost in time, risk, and income. Forget it. There are other places on the internet that will support you if that is the route you choose. That is not here.

I am sorry for your disability, I have a slight one myself and have been called "lucky, because I get a good parking spot". I almost throat punched that guy. Make this about what you can do, not what you can't.

Disabled or not, you can't time the market consistently which makes trading options and the like a losing game.
Last edited by djpeteski on Tue Oct 15, 2019 12:02 pm, edited 2 times in total.

barnaclebob
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Re: College for real life use

Post by barnaclebob » Tue Oct 15, 2019 11:47 am

robbmann297 wrote:
Tue Oct 15, 2019 10:46 am
Wow guys, I’m just looking for some friendly advice! I’m not looking to beat the system because I’m an entitled jerk, I’m just looking to not get killed while trying to learn a new trade (as in occupation).

I don’t know if some of you took my post the wrong way or you’re just bitter about something else, but I’ll be sure not to bother anyone on this board again! I thought this was a good site for help, I guess it’s just degenerating into another place to spew anger towards someone different than you.
First none of the responses said anything about you being an entitled jerk or even implied it.

It sounds like you just don't want to hear the truth or don't understand what this board is about. There isn't a college degree that teaches you how to be a successful stock trader anymore than there is a degree that teaches you to be a good poker player or blackjack player. A quick google search can tell you how to stock trade in a way that you wont get scammed. People here could easily say to build a portfolio of 20 or so big companies and see what happens. You'll probably closely track the SP500 index but whats the point of that? Just buy the index fund instead as its much less work.

Sure you can go get a degree that might teach you how to value a company or learn about business in general but that doesn't necessarily make you a good stock picker. Your every day run of the mill stock picking retail investor is competing against giant companies with access to insane amounts of data, analytics, cutting edge mathematics and programming. Stock pickers are fooling themselves if they thing they are doing anything better than gambling relative to an index fund as baseline just because they read some articles, stare at graphs to find nonexistent patterns, and read the companies 10k's.

As far as this board being friendly, go try to ask your question on stock picking board. See what useful information you get there. Threads on those boards are infinite amounts of useless drivel on how Tesla is going to do after its next earnings call or what people think about a company called something like "Extra Advanced Biogenetics". You could replace do a find and replace Tesla with Patriots, Elon Musk to Tom Brady, and Earnings to Offense and you'll think you are on a sports forum. The fact that nobody told you to do anything that is likley to be worse than index investing speaks to the friendliness of the people here. Other forums will encourage you to take uncompensated risk without a second thought.
Last edited by barnaclebob on Tue Oct 15, 2019 12:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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climber2020
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Re: College for real life use

Post by climber2020 » Tue Oct 15, 2019 11:59 am

robbmann297 wrote:
Tue Oct 15, 2019 10:46 am
Wow guys, I’m just looking for some friendly advice! I’m not looking to beat the system because I’m an entitled jerk, I’m just looking to not get killed while trying to learn a new trade (as in occupation).

I don’t know if some of you took my post the wrong way or you’re just bitter about something else, but I’ll be sure not to bother anyone on this board again! I thought this was a good site for help, I guess it’s just degenerating into another place to spew anger towards someone different than you.
You are getting help; everyone is saying the same thing for a good reason. Your goal is based on a false premise (more education = skill at picking winning stocks), and what you are looking for has not yet been shown to exist.

And most importantly: if it did exist, the person who discovered it would not be publishing newsletters or at a university teaching her secrets to thousands of students. She would keep that information to herself, not tell a soul, and retain her enormous competitive advantage.

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Re: College for real life use

Post by Valuethinker » Tue Oct 15, 2019 12:08 pm

robbmann297 wrote:
Mon Oct 14, 2019 6:40 pm
I have found myself in a unique position. I was medically retired from my fire department job at the age of 48. My disability income is enough where I don’t need to work a part time job, and I am limited in the amount I’m able to earn above my current salary due to state law. Personal investments are not counted toward this number, though.

The other part of my position is that I would be able to have 100% of any student loans waved. I have never used student loans and I have no debt at the moment except $2500 in my wife’s student loans, car, and mortgage. I live in western Massachusetts within driving range of a bunch of great schools.

I am looking to use college for practical knowledge about trading, options, and other investment opportunities. I currently have an Associate’s in Fire Science and a Bachelor’s in Business Administration (with an emergency management major).

What’s my best course of action from here out? I’ll have enough income to slowly build a portfolio and time to do it after I’m properly educated.
I am sorry that you have been the target of unfriendly or hostile comments, here.

I read "medically retired" and "fireman" and think not nice thoughts about what that could mean. I hope that you are not in constant, chronic pain. (If you are, I can recommend The Great Courses course on pain management, by a psychologist & clinician at the Mayo Clinic).

Over to your education goals:

- investing is a difficult business. What John Bogle, the guiding spirit of these boards, realised decades ago was that a simple indexing formula beat all the active managers out there, pretty much (over 90% on a 30 year view). Hence what mattered was low cost indexation, not seeking to beat the index.

- a second consideration is that most fund managers and traders trade other peoples money, not their own. To trade your own money is to risk losing it - and I know plenty who have. That's why options & futures, which are leveraged products, are not generally recommended for the individual investor. Ditto any kind of short term stock trading.

You are probably too old to go into a firm and run portfolios for them. People typically start that kind of work in their late 20s, post MBA, and retire in their mid 50s. With the rise and rise of indexation, which does not require large teams of fund managers and analysts, the industry is in a downsizing phase. Artificial Intelligence offers huge opportunities for further job reductions (across financial services).

The gold standard of education in the world of investing is the Chartered Financial Analyst designation cfainstitute.com I believe. I cannot overstate how tough this is - the workload is killing, and you need to be working in a related field (but you can do the exams anyways). It is enormously rewarding, but each of the 3 exams requires hundreds of hours of study and is graded to ensure a pass rate of less than 50%. You will learn more about ERISA, and about pension accounting, than you ever knew you did not know ;-).

In truth, I would look at the relevant courses from The Great Courses, on investing, plus what's available on Coursera etc. (Robert Shiller at Yale's Financial markets course, for example). Your local library system often has TGC.

There's about 10-20 books on investing that everyone should read. There have been lists here. Besides everything that John Bogle wrote, I would read everything William Bernstein has written on investing. And classics like "Where are the Customers' Yachts?". Roger Lowenstein "When Genius Failed". I have also found Larry Swedroe's books to be eminently practical and sensible (and his columns, which are available on the web) - even when I do not agree with them.

And also books on behavioural finance and investing. Thomas Gilovich "Why Smart People Make Big Money Mistakes". Michael Lewis The Undoing Project. Daniel Kahneman THinking Fast and Slow. Dan Ariely Predictably Irrational (he got his first big insights lying in a hospital bed, badly burned from an flare in the Israeli Army). Richard Thaler Misbehaving. Robert Shiller "Irrational Exuberance".

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Re: College for real life use

Post by garlandwhizzer » Tue Oct 15, 2019 1:06 pm

I believe there is substantial non-financial value in getting an education especially a liberal arts education which hones mental skills and develops background knowledge in science, art, math, history, literature, culture, etc, and deepens ones understanding of the world around them. Whether getting a CPA improves your personal investing results is an entirely different matter. I do not believe that getting a CPA automatically improves investing results but it does teach you something about tailoring your asset allocation to your specific circumstances. If your prime motivation is simply to increase risk adjusted investment returns there are many excellent books out there which will quickly broaden your knowledge of investing. I particularly recommend Bogle's books, all of which are excellent, Bernstein's books, and if you're interested in factor approaches, Larry Swedroe's books. In addition there is a lot of investing knowledge available for free on this Forum.

Whatever approach you take, be aware that It takes time to develop a deep knowledge background in investing. Patience is necessary. Also investing experience, learning from your mistakes, is potent teacher. Education is not the panacea for investment success. As Warren Buffett suggests, temperament is more critical to investing results than either knowledge or intelligence, the ability not to panic sell stock when the market tanks and not to buy stock because the market has been booming for years, the exact opposite of what your emotions tell you to do. Emotions are a bigger hurdle to investment success than lack of knowledge.

Until you get a knowledge background in the presence of a monthly income check that allows disposable income, I suggest you dollar cost average (invest the same sum of money from each monthly paycheck, as much as you can afford) into a 3 or 4 fund portfolio attuned to your risk tolerance. Vanguard Life Strategy Growth Fund is an excellent widely diversified fund to achieve this with the classic 60/40 bond mix, both US and INTL. You could invest in this one fund (or the Vanguard Balanced Fund) on a monthly basis until such time as you are motivated to switch if it ever occurs. Most investors in the long run will not outperform this simple cheap strategy. This approach is a no-brainer in my opinion with or without a deep investing knowledge background. As one of the greatest investors of all time, Ben Graham, advised: It is very easy to get satisfactory investment returns with index funds, much easier than people think, and very difficult to get better than market returns, much more difficult than most people think. You have a built in good monthly income for life which means that you are in a position that allows you to assume significant equity risk if you can emotionally handle the associated volatility. Know yourself and choose wisely.

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Re: College for real life use

Post by garlandwhizzer » Tue Oct 15, 2019 5:43 pm

rj432 wrote:

P.S. I would also add that it is a mistake to think that STEM cannot inculcate "critical thinking".
I totally agree. There are plenty of the highly educated liberal arts folks who are not very good at critical thinking which I sometimes think is becoming a lost art. There are plenty of highly educated and very intelligent people, both liberal arts and STEM, who are not IMO effective investors. For many of us, emotions are stronger drivers of investment decisions, political persuasions, and major life choices than rational objective analysis, regardless of our education level.

Garland Whizzer

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robbmann297
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Re: College for real life use

Post by robbmann297 » Tue Oct 15, 2019 7:34 pm

And yet another a dig at me, this place is becoming more like 4chan every time I log on. I don’t want to get into the how’s or why’s about my education benefits, let’s just leave it that I have the ability to go to college for very little cost out of pocket thanks to legal and non-immoral federal programs. I’m just looking for guidance for a course of study to learn practical economics. I feel like I asked for fashion advice on a Kardashian twitter feed.

I’ll try real hard to be polite and not start swearing when I respond to this. I’m a 3rd generation war veteran and I had a heart attack inside of a burning building during my 24th year of civil service as a city firefighter. Is that enough for me to become a leech on society? You can go ahead and blame me and other union members for the downfall of the economy if that will make you feel better about your choices in life, but I guarantee that insulting others won’t fill any void you have.

For the people actually giving me heartfelt advice as to how I can improve my life, thank you.

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Re: College for real life use

Post by HEDGEFUNDIE » Tue Oct 15, 2019 8:25 pm

arcticpineapplecorp. wrote:
Mon Oct 14, 2019 8:58 pm
why do you think that college will provide you with:

"practical knowledge about trading, options, and other investment opportunities"?
Colleges do have Finance majors, and they have entire courses on things like Derivatives. There were two courses on that topic alone in my MBA program.
The stock market has given a fair, decent, generous return to anyone who just buys and held it. For some reason, that's just not good enough for some people and they want to do better or think they deserve more. Most people don't even get the return of the market, but they could if they just bought and held the market instead of playing with their money.
I think my Excellent Adventure has pretty definitively proven that market returns are indeed “not good enough” for a risk-tolerant investor.

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Re: College for real life use [Practical knowledge about investing]

Post by LadyGeek » Tue Oct 15, 2019 10:33 pm

This thread is now in the Personal Consumer Issues forum (college course). I retitled the thread for clarity.

I removed some off-topic posts regarding (1) liberal arts and (2) student loans. Please stay on-topic. Also see: General Etiquette
We expect this forum to be a place where people can feel comfortable asking questions and where debates and discussions are conducted in civil tones.

At all times we must conduct ourselves in a respectful manner to other posters.
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Re: College for real life use

Post by Valuethinker » Wed Oct 16, 2019 2:40 am

garlandwhizzer wrote:
Tue Oct 15, 2019 1:06 pm
Whether getting a CPA improves your personal investing results is an entirely different matter. I do not believe that getting a CPA automatically improves investing results but it does teach you something about tailoring your asset allocation to your specific circumstances. I
I cannot think how becoming a Certified Public Accountant improves one as an an investor.

CPA is all about how to construct financial statements for financial reporting. From the debits and credits into the General Ledger on up through audit. Usually qualification requires the equivalent of a masters degree in accounting, plus several years in the public audit practice.

The Chartered Financial Analyst designation (CFA) is the gold standard for working sell side or buy side in the investments business. It's hard work, but it is all directly relevant to investing - both the Efficient Markets/ Modern Portfolio Theory stuff of Bogleheads, and more fundamental based approaches (ratio analysis of companies, digging into company accounts, etc.).
Last edited by Valuethinker on Wed Oct 16, 2019 2:46 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: College for real life use

Post by Valuethinker » Wed Oct 16, 2019 2:43 am

WhyNotUs wrote:
Mon Oct 14, 2019 8:40 pm
You could pursue CPA program. Investing in the context of Bogleheads is pretty simple. Dealing with taxes, what money to put where, and estate planning can be covered in a CPA program.
For just investing, the wiki here is a pretty cheap grad degree :D
CPA has relatively little to do with investing. It's about construction of Financial Statements for Financial Reporting?

From debit and credit into the General Ledger down to US GAAP presentation standards (example - where to put the commas - Europeans put the commas where we put the decimal point; and yes there's an accounting standard for that).

The CFA covers the analysis of financial statements for investment purposes.

Most investment industry employers view the completed CFA as worth more than a masters in finance (exception might be on the Financial Engineering side of things - stochastic calculus, methods of finite numeric computation etc.).

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Re: College for real life use

Post by Valuethinker » Wed Oct 16, 2019 2:46 am

robbmann297 wrote:
Tue Oct 15, 2019 7:34 pm
And yet another a dig at me, this place is becoming more like 4chan every time I log on. I don’t want to get into the how’s or why’s about my education benefits, let’s just leave it that I have the ability to go to college for very little cost out of pocket thanks to legal and non-immoral federal programs. I’m just looking for guidance for a course of study to learn practical economics. I feel like I asked for fashion advice on a Kardashian twitter feed.

I’ll try real hard to be polite and not start swearing when I respond to this. I’m a 3rd generation war veteran and I had a heart attack inside of a burning building during my 24th year of civil service as a city firefighter. Is that enough for me to become a leech on society? You can go ahead and blame me and other union members for the downfall of the economy if that will make you feel better about your choices in life, but I guarantee that insulting others won’t fill any void you have.

For the people actually giving me heartfelt advice as to how I can improve my life, thank you.
It's a minority here who are speaking to you so - and there's a complaint button ! by every post, and you can report a poster for abusive or denigrating language or personal attack/ trolling.

The general tone here is to speak to the problem, not the person, as best we can. Sometimes we are overly analytic in tone and "blunt" - there's a lot of high functioning Autistic Spectrum Disorder going on on this Forum ;-).

But generally our comments are not meant to be personal or unsympathetic.

If someone uses them as a launch pad for a political attack, that's forbidden under the forum rules.

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Re: College for real life use

Post by Stinky » Wed Oct 16, 2019 8:09 am

Valuethinker wrote:
Wed Oct 16, 2019 2:40 am

The Chartered Financial Analyst designation (CFA) is the gold standard for working sell side or buy side in the investments business. It's hard work, but it is all directly relevant to investing - both the Efficient Markets/ Modern Portfolio Theory stuff of Bogleheads, and more fundamental based approaches (ratio analysis of companies, digging into company accounts, etc.).
I like the CFA idea, based on OP's original desires.

That will allow OP to have much deeper knowledge of investment topics. He will then be equipped to decide if he wants to become an active trader, or to follow the Boglehead approach.
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bottlecap
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Joined: Tue Mar 06, 2007 11:21 pm
Location: Tennessee

Re: College for real life use [Practical knowledge about investing]

Post by bottlecap » Wed Oct 16, 2019 8:12 am

If college professors could tell you how and where to make lucrative investments, they wouldn’t be college professors.

JT

smitcat
Posts: 4353
Joined: Mon Nov 07, 2016 10:51 am

Re: College for real life use

Post by smitcat » Wed Oct 16, 2019 8:25 am

robbmann297 wrote:
Tue Oct 15, 2019 7:34 pm
And yet another a dig at me, this place is becoming more like 4chan every time I log on. I don’t want to get into the how’s or why’s about my education benefits, let’s just leave it that I have the ability to go to college for very little cost out of pocket thanks to legal and non-immoral federal programs. I’m just looking for guidance for a course of study to learn practical economics. I feel like I asked for fashion advice on a Kardashian twitter feed.

I’ll try real hard to be polite and not start swearing when I respond to this. I’m a 3rd generation war veteran and I had a heart attack inside of a burning building during my 24th year of civil service as a city firefighter. Is that enough for me to become a leech on society? You can go ahead and blame me and other union members for the downfall of the economy if that will make you feel better about your choices in life, but I guarantee that insulting others won’t fill any void you have.

For the people actually giving me heartfelt advice as to how I can improve my life, thank you.
"And yet another a dig at me, this place is becoming more like 4chan every time I log on."
Your posts from April 2017 were similar to this one - each time folks were attempting to help.
Based on your limited posts and the consistency of both of them this site may not be a good fit for your needs.
Perhaps research other venues that more clearly fit your goals and needs.
Good luck with whatever you do.

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LadyGeek
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Re: College for real life use [Practical knowledge about investing]

Post by LadyGeek » Wed Oct 16, 2019 9:28 am

This thread has run its course and is locked (contentious). See: Personal Consumer Issues
Note that this subforum has a much lower threshold for locking or removing posts than the financial and investing subforums. In general, controversial, offensive, pointless, divisive or mean-spirited posts or topics may be locked, edited or deleted (with or without notice) at the discretion of the moderating staff even if they do not otherwise violate forum policies.
Wiki To some, the glass is half full. To others, the glass is half empty. To an engineer, it's twice the size it needs to be.

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