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Airline compensation

Posted: Sat Oct 12, 2019 5:05 pm
by boater07
Do airlines owe compensation for flight delays over 6 hours?

Re: Airline compensation

Posted: Sat Oct 12, 2019 5:09 pm
by welderwannabe
Depends on where.

In the US, no...not for a delay.

Re: Airline compensation

Posted: Sat Oct 12, 2019 5:50 pm
by chevca
What was the cause of the delay? They can't control the weather. And, if something broke, wouldn't you rather they fix it first?

Re: Airline compensation

Posted: Sat Oct 12, 2019 7:21 pm
by neilpilot
welderwannabe wrote:
Sat Oct 12, 2019 5:09 pm
Depends on where.

In the US, no...not for a delay.
Actually, yes even in the USA so long as it's an EU carrier. We had a flight cancelled leaving JFK for the UK, and were delayed about 10 hours before getting on the next flight. We only paid about $225 each for the OW ticket, but it was Norwegian Air so they paid for a hotel & dinner near JFK but we still ended up collecting about $700 each.

Re: Airline compensation

Posted: Sun Oct 13, 2019 3:20 am
by Klewles
The rules for compensation on EU carriers are in EC Regulation 261. Google it and you'll find plenty of articles as well as the regulation itself. It's worth being aware of whenever you fly to, from, or within Europe.

Re: Airline compensation

Posted: Sun Oct 13, 2019 5:15 am
by GDBryan
We were suddenly delayed leaving Europe earlier this year on a US carrier. While looking up possible compensation, I came across AirHelp, which filed on our behalf. We received a significant amount even though they retained 25%.

I did the whole filing over their website.

Re: Airline compensation

Posted: Sun Oct 13, 2019 7:18 am
by welderwannabe
neilpilot wrote:
Sat Oct 12, 2019 7:21 pm
Actually, yes even in the USA so long as it's an EU carrier. We had a flight cancelled leaving JFK for the UK, and were delayed about 10 hours before getting on the next flight. We only paid about $225 each for the OW ticket, but it was Norwegian Air so they paid for a hotel & dinner near JFK but we still ended up collecting about $700 each.
That isnt a flight to/from the US, which is what I was trying to convey. International flights have all sorts of additional regulations ranging from baggage compensation on up.

Re: Airline compensation

Posted: Sun Oct 13, 2019 8:54 am
by NewMoneyMustBeSmart
boater07 wrote:
Sat Oct 12, 2019 5:05 pm
Do airlines owe compensation for flight delays over 6 hours?
https://www.transportation.gov/airconsumer/fly-rights
Contrary to popular belief, for domestic itineraries airlines are not required to compensate passengers whose flights are delayed or canceled. As discussed in the chapter on overbooking, compensation is required by law on domestic trips only when you are "bumped" from a flight that is oversold. On international itineraries, passengers may be able to recover reimbursement under Article 19 of the Montreal Convention for expenses resulting from a delayed or canceled flight by filing a claim with the airline. If the claim is denied, you may pursue the matter in court if you believe that the carrier did not take all measures that could reasonably be required to avoid the damages caused by the delay.




Re: Airline compensation

Posted: Sun Oct 13, 2019 10:04 am
by neilpilot
GDBryan wrote:
Sun Oct 13, 2019 5:15 am
We were suddenly delayed leaving Europe earlier this year on a US carrier. While looking up possible compensation, I came across AirHelp, which filed on our behalf. We received a significant amount even though they retained 25%.

I did the whole filing over their website.
Actually it's relatively easy to file directly with your airline, and do the whole thing over the airline's website. The gross compensation, which is fixed by the EU, will be the same either way but the airline will not withhold AirHelp's 25%. We collected about $1400, and AirHelp would have taken $350 of that claim had I filed thru them.

So file first with the airline, and then if the claim is denied file with AirHelp or one of the other claim service companies. Depending on the EU country, you have 4-6 years to file that claim.