Gas Stove

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AtlBoglehead
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Gas Stove

Post by AtlBoglehead »

I need a gas stove brand recommendation. This one is not for my rentals, but for my personal home. I plan to keep cost under $1,000. Now have electric, but stove area is plumbed for gas, too. Going to gas so we'll have an extra heat source when power is out (keeping 100-yr-old MIL). Just wonder if anyone has experience with gas, brand recommendatios, or brands to avoid. Any other thoughts on this move welcomed, as well.
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Kenkat
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Re: Gas Stove

Post by Kenkat »

A gas range / oven is not really meant to be used as an alternate heat source if that’s what you mean. There’s a risk of carbon monoxide poisoning. It should only be used for cooking.
gehrig
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Re: Gas Stove

Post by gehrig »

I think the answer to this question depends upon how you use a stove. If you are preparing very fancy meals that require "chef" skills then you might want a higher end stove. If you are just a regular home cook then just about any gas stove will do. Flame is flame. I have owned a Kenmore for over 20 years. It is self cleaning which is the only special requirement I need. It seems to me that many people over spend on gas stoves to impress their guests. Figure out how much you want to spend and then find a stove in that price range. Just about any brand will cook your food. It's nice to be able to provide hot food during a power outage.
adamthesmythe
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Re: Gas Stove

Post by adamthesmythe »

Kenkat wrote: Fri Jul 26, 2019 8:03 am A gas range / oven is not really meant to be used as an alternate heat source if that’s what you mean. There’s a risk of carbon monoxide poisoning. It should only be used for cooking.
Agree, do NOT do this.

"Do not use as a heat source" is just about the first thing in the warnings section of the instruction manual.

There exist ventless gas logs that, using a CO monitor in addition to the built-in interlock, would be a possible emergency heat source.
Alf 101
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Re: Gas Stove

Post by Alf 101 »

I definitely agree that it's a very bad idea to run your gas stove for warmth. On the other hand, if the power goes out, it's nice to still be able to boil water. If the house was cold, a hot drink is helpful; plus you could always fill water bottles with hot water, and tuck it in among blankets or a sleeping back to stay warmer. Old school, for sure, but it will give you options, and makes live more livable if you experience frequent power outages.

As for specific model, I just looked on the Home Depot site, and practically every single make and model had 4.5 stars, with hundred or thousands of reviews. So my take:

1. If you have specific cooking needs, and see a feature that matters to you, this may be where you spend more. Would I buy a Viking or Miele range? No. I'm sure they're nice, but you will never see the return in value if you see your house. Some people may want a double oven, for the 1-2 times each year it's needed. This doesn't seem to describe the OP. But some have four burners and some five burners, some have a griddle, so you have to think about how you use it.

2. If you have a specific aesthetic, that also narrows the choice. Maybe you need something to go with the rest of your appliances -- stainless, white, or black. Some may just have the look you like.

3. Failing that, just wait until Memorial Day, 4th of July, or Labor Day and buy one on sale at a big box hardware store. There may be a few other holidays where you see large appliance sales too.

I think I've had a GE and a Frigidaire. They both worked -- heated water and cooked food. Good luck!
fposte
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Re: Gas Stove

Post by fposte »

In many modern gas stoves, you can't use the oven when the electricity is out; the glow-bar ignition system isn't manually by-passable. You can, however, still manually light the burners on many such models.
MrMojoRisin
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Re: Gas Stove

Post by MrMojoRisin »

My suggestion would be decide what features are desired and choose the one that best fits.

I purchased a double oven General Electric Profile with the following options and why I chose that option.

1) Double oven. For holiday cooking this allows me to better stage when things are done and what items can just be kept warm.

2) High output main burner. I home brew beer and having a high output burner helps me heat my wort up quickly but then hold it to temp easily.

3) Simmer setting on smaller burner. I can make some sauce and put it on the back burner on "simmer" and it will not scorch the sauce.

4) Convection Bake/Roast. I can make beef jerky with the convection feature easier.

5) Front mounted burner controls. A convenience item.

6) Temp sensing oven option. I can cook a roast to the prefect temp and then have it shut off. Great for expensive cuts of meat.

7) Griddle in the middle. Great for cheese sandwiches.

I have been satisfied with my GE oven. I had to replace the meat thermometer once but it was inexpensive. I purchased it online though an appliance retailer, AJ Madison.

In another house I owned I purchased a stove at a "Dent and ding" center for a large retailer. Since the stove had cabinets on both sides of it I was not concerned about the damage. It always worked well.
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Tyler Aspect
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Re: Gas Stove

Post by Tyler Aspect »

I always open windows ajar when using gas range.
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ohai
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Re: Gas Stove

Post by ohai »

I would guess that gas stoves and ovens probably have some of the most stringent testing of all appliances, since dangerous failures could be very costly to the companies. So, I don't know if reliability is a concern for most people.

Things that have mattered to me are:
1) Quality of hardware and fixings that you touch, pot stands, and racks in the stove.
2) Power and size or burners, and range of fire size; smallest size is useful for slow simmering, big fire is important for high temperature cooking.
3) Fast pre heat time of the oven, and also the oven that shows you the current temperature, including while preheating.
4) Aesthetics.
5) Size of oven and possible features like double oven.
6) Powerful broiler.

I don't know if someone has reviewed oven temperature accuracy, as I find that some ovens are wrong by 10-20 degrees.

I would bet that quality of appliance aligns closely with cost in this segment, other than ultra high end, which have some unique stuff that only certain people need. Also, a lot of Samsung or brands like that have weird internet or digital functions. I don't know if this us useful, but if it is, please let me know. Someone I know has some weird $50k French brand gas range. I don't know what he gets out of that.
fru-gal
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Re: Gas Stove

Post by fru-gal »

If I were building a house from scratch I would have as many of the appliances gas as possible. The power goes out, you still have hot water, can cook, take baths, etc. With a restored old fashioned gas stove you can use the oven as well as the burners if you have matches around to start them.

I think you can probably get gas wall heaters that are vented to use as a backup heat source. If I were going overboard with contingency planning, I'd have that as well as an automatic on off generator.

With your elderly MIL, I think I would fork out for a generator regardless.
123
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Re: Gas Stove

Post by 123 »

Others may differ with me on this but the best gas stoves are the ones with pilot lights and the only reason for an electric connection is for the clock. I don't think they've made any new ones like that for maybe 30 - 40 years. The more electronics you have on a gas stove the higher the chance the electronics will get fried from the heat, especially when the self-cleaning cycle gets used.
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fru-gal
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Re: Gas Stove

Post by fru-gal »

123 wrote: Fri Jul 26, 2019 2:14 pm Others may differ with me on this but the best gas stoves are the ones with pilot lights and the only reason for an electric connection is for the clock. I don't think they've made any new ones like that for maybe 30 - 40 years. The more electronics you have on a gas stove the higher the chance the electronics will get fried from the heat, especially when the self-cleaning cycle gets used.
You can buy restored ones, though.
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Kenkat
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Re: Gas Stove

Post by Kenkat »

fru-gal wrote: Fri Jul 26, 2019 2:06 pm If I were building a house from scratch I would have as many of the appliances gas as possible. The power goes out, you still have hot water, can cook, take baths, etc. With a restored old fashioned gas stove you can use the oven as well as the burners if you have matches around to start them.

I think you can probably get gas wall heaters that are vented to use as a backup heat source. If I were going overboard with contingency planning, I'd have that as well as an automatic on off generator.

With your elderly MIL, I think I would fork out for a generator regardless.
Most gas appliances still need AC power. Hot water heater plugs in to power the pilotless ignition (which is far better than a pilot light unless your electric is really unreliable). Gas dry needs electric to turn the drum. Gas oven needs electric to power the glow plug that opens and ignites the gas. The gas burners do work without power which beats a blank.
VaR
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Re: Gas Stove

Post by VaR »

I will echo the calls to not use your gas range for heating. If you're concerned about heat during a power outage, get a battery backup system for your gas furnace or a generator to power it.
dmhslib
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Re: Gas Stove

Post by dmhslib »

I bought a double oven whirlpool a few years ago, switching from electric, after the Sandy hurricane. I wanted to be able to cook without electricity. I learned to never assume! It turns out that Whirlpool, and all their affiliate brands, have a system that closes off the gas when power is off. This is apart from the ignitor. You cannot even light the stove/burners with a match!
The only place to learn this is in the bowels of the manual. I was ready to call a repair person, ubtil I saw this. I then googled, and found that this is so on all the brands for which Whirlpool builds stoves (Maytag, KitchenAid, Jenn-Air, Amana, etc.) .
Yooper16
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Re: Gas Stove

Post by Yooper16 »

dmhslib wrote: Sat Jul 27, 2019 9:21 am I bought a double oven whirlpool a few years ago, switching from electric, after the Sandy hurricane. I wanted to be able to cook without electricity. I learned to never assume! It turns out that Whirlpool, and all their affiliate brands, have a system that closes off the gas when power is off. This is apart from the ignitor. You cannot even light the stove/burners with a match!
The only place to learn this is in the bowels of the manual. I was ready to call a repair person, ubtil I saw this. I then googled, and found that this is so on all the brands for which Whirlpool builds stoves (Maytag, KitchenAid, Jenn-Air, Amana, etc.) .
Holy crap---- we just purchased a KitchenAid gas range to make coffee on, should the power go out. Better go read up on that.

Truth be told, tho, we are in the midst of a house reno, kitchen is almost next and we were converting to gas anyway. Rest of the story is that our 4 year old electric caught fire. Thanks GE.

Time to go check the manual.
Starfish
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Re: Gas Stove

Post by Starfish »

Kenkat wrote: Fri Jul 26, 2019 8:03 am A gas range / oven is not really meant to be used as an alternate heat source if that’s what you mean. There’s a risk of carbon monoxide poisoning. It should only be used for cooking.
What would be the difference between heat source and cooking (except of course is not efficient as a heat source)?
Plenty of foods take 2-6h of cooking.
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Kenkat
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Re: Gas Stove

Post by Kenkat »

If you keep the oven door closed, using the oven for multiple hours to cook is ok. The gas oven does not burn constantly with the door closed. If you open the oven door to heat your house in a power outage, it will burn continuously which can lead to CO poisoning.
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Bogle7
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Re: Asphyxiation

Post by Bogle7 »

Dear AtlBoglehead,
Based upon all the other replies, you may want to prepay your funeral expenses.
,bogle7
gold99xx
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Re: Gas Stove

Post by gold99xx »

One that fits?
ncbill
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Re: Gas Stove

Post by ncbill »

123 wrote: Fri Jul 26, 2019 2:14 pm Others may differ with me on this but the best gas stoves are the ones with pilot lights and the only reason for an electric connection is for the clock. I don't think they've made any new ones like that for maybe 30 - 40 years. The more electronics you have on a gas stove the higher the chance the electronics will get fried from the heat, especially when the self-cleaning cycle gets used.
There are still new manufacture gas ranges that use battery ignition for the burners and for a pilot light for the oven.
(the pilot light extinguishes when you turn off the oven)

Both the burners & oven pilot light can be lit with a match if the battery ignition fails.

No AC-powered electronics like a clock, of course...buy a battery-powered timer instead.

https://www.homedepot.com/s/gas%2520range%2520battery
MrMojoRisin
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Re: Gas Stove

Post by MrMojoRisin »

Many ovens have the ability to enter an offset into the controls so that you can adjust the oven temp.

The best way I have found to adjust an oven is to cook a few biscuits, the type that are sold in the refrigerator section and you "pop" the seam.

Set the oven to the temp specified on the package and allow 15 minute pre heat. Put a couple of the biscuits into the oven on a cookie sheet.

Set the time for the desire time, I usually use the midrange of the cook time given. When time has finished if biscuits are under or overcooked adjuste the offset by 5 degrees up or down to tune it in.
SteveinMN
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Re: Gas Stove

Post by SteveinMN »

Our gas stove purchases have been in this price range. We're not often gourmet cooks at home. Here are the things I look for:

- a simmer burner; typically smaller than the others, that can be adjusted to keep a low flame on a pot
- a "power" burner (or two); these have higher BTU ratings and are useful for quickly heating large pots of water to boil or cooking with woks or large frying pans
- burner control knobs that turn at least 3/4 of the way around from off to full; this allows finer graduations of flame adjustment
- burner grates that cover the surface of the range; it makes it easier to move pots around (off the flame, etc.) and I think it looks nicer
- sealed burners are pretty much a given at this price point, though the physics of an open burner make them more efficient; I have to say I cannot recall the last time I had a pot boil over.

You can decide if you want four burners or five; I find five get a little crowded, but you know your pot and pan inventory best. Same for one oven or two, though I think that matters mostly on whether you cook items that would need a large oven (like super-big turkeys). One "feature" I would think about long and hard the next time is burner grates that aren't black. Our grey ones are a pain you-know-where to keep clean and even being able to toss them into the self-cleaning oven won't do the trick.

Our current range is a Frigidaire that was specially manufactured for Lowe's. It's coming on 15 years old now and hasn't required service; just keeps chugging along. Whirlpool/KitchenAid would be a good alternative in this space. Lots of people like GE but I would not buy them out of principle; now I'm interested to see what Haier does with the brand. Samsung/LG, I hear, are good, but depending on where you live, parts and service may be an issue, so make sure you know who will do that if your range needs attention.
adamthesmythe
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Re: Gas Stove

Post by adamthesmythe »

Starfish wrote: Sat Jul 27, 2019 5:50 pm
Kenkat wrote: Fri Jul 26, 2019 8:03 am A gas range / oven is not really meant to be used as an alternate heat source if that’s what you mean. There’s a risk of carbon monoxide poisoning. It should only be used for cooking.
What would be the difference between heat source and cooking (except of course is not efficient as a heat source)?
Plenty of foods take 2-6h of cooking.
The oven is very efficient as a heat source, unless you have a vent running all of the heat eventually gets into the room. It wouldn't provide as much (total) heat as a furnace however.

The difference is between using it intermittently (as in cooking or baking) vs. almost continually (as a heat source). Also, when cooking one would not be sleeping and would be likely to run a vent fan.

The are, as I noted, unvented gas logs. My understanding (could be wrong) is that there is a temperature sensor that detects a decrease in flame temperature than happens when CO increases. This provides some safety. Even so, I would want to have a separate CO detector if I had such a gas log.
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