St. Louis Travel/Tourism

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psteinx
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St. Louis Travel/Tourism

Post by psteinx » Mon Jul 08, 2019 1:00 pm

For a recent trip to Boston, I had posted and gotten advice from others here on the area/city. One commenter in that thread asked me for thoughts on my own city, and I did so, somewhat briefly. Now I'm going to expand my thoughts for the benefit of others who might be visiting or considering a trip to the St. Louis area, now or in the future.

I've lived in St. Louis (County, mostly) most of my life, though I've lived elsewhere, too, and visited a lot of places. I'm married with kids - the kids are now mid-to-late teens. So I've experienced St. Louis from many perspectives - as a youngster myself, through young adulthood and then parenting.

IMO, St. Louis has a lot of worthwhile attractions for visitors, and could easily fill a 3 day weekend, and perhaps longer, for most visitors.

Why St. Louis?
St. Louis is an old city. It was, I think, the 3rd most populated/important city in the US, ca. 1900. It has of course lagged significantly since then, but the population and wealth of the older era has left a legacy of strong cultural institutions, and, of particular note to the thrifty visitor, St. Louis has a lot of top-notch attractions that are free.

Geography
St. Louis consists of a relatively underpopulated ST. LOUIS CITY (~300K population), a politically separate ST. LOUIS COUNTY (~1M population), and surrounding exurbs bringing the regional (MSA) population up close to 3M. The first two are generally abbreviated as simply the "city" and the "county". Most of the key attractions are in the city or the county.

For tourist-y type stuff, the key locations are downtown (from the Arch/riverfront to about 18 blocks out), Forest Park (in and around which many attractions are located), city neighborhoods, county attractions (a bit further out), and area attractions (further still). Any hotel from downtown, west to about I-270, should be favorably located.

Getting Around
You'll very likely want a car. St. Louis has a modest light rail system, but it has limited lines, and isn't all that heavily used (I've never been on it). You could rely on taxis/Uber/etc. If you stayed close to Forest Park, and the weather was OK, you could probably make due walking, possibly using the Metro a bit, and filling in with taxis/Uber. But realistically, you want a car/vehicle of some sort. Traffic is not too bad. Parking is readily available, and often free.

==================================
Attractions

This list is in my rough order of how appealing things should be to the typical tourist. Of course, some things are particularly geared towards young kids, older kids, or those without kids. My information is based on my personal recollection/understanding - in some cases a few years out of date, and in particular, if you're concerned about the cost, you should double check websites or the like rather than relying on my info.

Zoo
Yes, you've probably been to various zoos before. But our zoo is quite good - generally ranked ~#2 in the country, and I personally prefer it to San Diego's Zoo. Also, it's free. Parking does cost $$$, but, especially on non-peak days, you can street park perhaps ~500' away for free. Childrens' Zoo and a few other sub-elements are extra.

Art Museum
Sits just up a hill from the zoo (easily walkable). No, we don't have the Mona Lisa or American Gothic. But there's a wide variety of art, from many locales and eras, including lots of big name artists, attractively displayed. And, like the zoo, it's free (very, very low pressure donation box(es) by the doors).

Botanical Gardens (aka Shaw's Garden)
In the right time of year (spring/summer) these can be truly outstanding. Peaceful setting, attractive, fairly large garden. Lots of types of stuff. Of particular appeal are the Japanese garden and the Climatron. Cost around $5/person.

Magic House
Excellent childrens' museum. Target age around 4-11. Cost around $10/person or so, I think.

City Museum
Funky hard to describe thing. Not really a "museum". More like a kids/adults indoor playground. Check the website for details. Cost around $10/person, I think.

Science Center/Planetarium (they're linked)
Mostly kid-geared, but stuff that appeals to adults too, especially the space stuff. Free.

Anheuser Busch Brewery
Free brewery tours and tastings. See cool old brewery, plus Clydesdales (the big horses in their commercials), plus free beer tasting.

Grant's Farm
Family estate of the Busch's, largely converted into an animal preserve/childrens' zoo/beer garden (yes, that's an odd combination). You start by taking a tram tour of the animal preserve, then are emptied into the area by the childrens' zoo (but it will appeal to most adults, too). Then stroll to a mock Bavarian town center/beer garden. Free beer for the adults. Bratwursts and the like for all (alas, these aren't free). Free admission, but you basically have to park at their pricey parking lot (~$15/car). Also, Clydesdales, again...

Forest Park
Many of the key attractions of the area are in and around Forest Park, broadly comparable to Manhattan's Central Park. But I haven't listed everything, and if the weather is nice, exploring Forest Park (and its attractions and nearby neighborhoods), is appealing on its own. Also, Tower Grove Park, somewhat south/southeast of Forest Park, is a nice park, too...

The Arch
Not all that high on my list, frankly. Recently renovated museum underneath (documenting westward expansion over last ~2 centuries) is merely OK in my book (but free). Take weird capsule elevator to top of Arch on a nice day for good views (this costs a bit, and reservations can be tricky on crowded days).

Six Flags
OK, perhaps this shouldn't go on the list - lots of places have amusement parks. But it's a fun one, not overly crowded, and our kids got a lot of enjoyment out of it over the years. Main park and water park on single ticket admission. Consider two days there (one focused on each side), if your kids are in the sweet spot for this (ages 5-15 or so).

Old and New Cathedrals
Old Cathedral is near the Arch, New Cathedral is in Central West End (~4 miles west of downtown). Pretty, old, somewhat historic churches, if that's your thing.

Cahokia Indian Mounds
In Illinois, a few miles east of downtown. Mound-building, advanced Indian culture, collapsed ca. 1300 AD, IIRC. Pretty neat displays.

Quick hits
OK, my list above was already getting long. I'll go faster. We also have Busch Stadium (Cardinals), Enterprise Center (Blues), assorted casinos, assorted areas with nightlife, restaurants, shopping, etc. In season, Apple picking (Eckert's) is fun. St. Louis History Museum is OK (and free, excepting some exhibits). We have a bit of "high culture" - a good symphony, a very pretty theater focused on traveling Broadway shows (Fox Theatre), assorted smaller theaters and performing arts venues, etc.

Regional stuff (if you're driving in)
To the west/southwest, we have Hermann (folksy German town with wineries), and Meramec Caverns (large cave complex - I've never been). Also, there are many parks in this area, with good camping. It's mostly pretty countryside. Hunters and fishers may find this area attractive, too.

To the south, Lambert's (weird but fun restaurant, worth a stop, "throwed rolls").

To the north, Hannibal (Mark Twain town).

To the northeast, Springfield, IL (IL capital, lots of Lincoln focus).

Neighborhoods
If you want to focus on interesting neighborhoods, to explore, consider:

- The Loop (Delmar north of Washington University) - funky college/young adult area.
- Central West End (east of Forest Park) - young, hip area. Also home to chess-oriented attractions.
- The Hill - Italian area a bit further south of Forest Park, west of Tower Grove Park
- South Grand - From Tower Grove Park, south for about 6-8 blocks. Lots of exotic restaurants, mostly Asian. Some other funky shops and the like. I like Cafe Natasha's (Persian, I think - try the beef kabobs).
- Cherokee Street - Antiquing area
- Washington Avenue - I think this is the new downtown hangout for young folks and startups, but I don't know it well.

==================================
Food

- St. Louis style pizza - Super thin crust, provel (or provel blend) cheese. Interesting taste. Seems preferred more by locals than visitors, but worth a try. Available at Imo's (local chain, many locations), and many mom and pop pizzerias/italian restaurants
- Toasted raviolis - Deep fried raviolis. Very good. Most visitors DO seem to like these, if they try them. Appetizer at most local pizza places/italian restaurants, plus many other restaurants
- Gooey Butter cake - A sort of super-rich cheese cake. I'm not a big fan, but it's a local dish

Chain Restaurants:
Imo's (St. Louis style pizza)
Lion's Choice (Outstanding fast food roast beef sandwiches)

Food styles:
Barbeque - this has probably been a national trend, but I think St. Louis is among the leaders. Various choices. I like Salt 'n Smoke, in the Loop (on Delmar).
Last edited by psteinx on Mon Jul 08, 2019 2:29 pm, edited 1 time in total.

terran
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Re: St. Louis Travel/Tourism

Post by terran » Mon Jul 08, 2019 1:31 pm

Wow, tough crowd. I enjoyed my stop in St. Louis on a cross country move. And I made it out alive. I' enjoyed my more recent time in Baltimore (also on the list above) somewhat less, but also made it out alive.

Topic Author
psteinx
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Re: St. Louis Travel/Tourism

Post by psteinx » Mon Jul 08, 2019 1:31 pm

The crime stats for St. Louis are generally misleading, because they're generally reported as a ratio of CRIMES / POPULATION.

The city of St. Louis itself (the city proper) represents an unusually small percentage of the metro area. About 300K out of about 2.9M, I think, so about 10-11%. Comparable cities generally have political boundaries such that the core city is a much higher % of the overall metro area, and thus the higher crime rates usually associated with urban cores are diluted by a bigger share of the overall city.

Use your head when in an unfamiliar area, of course, but I don't think the typical tourist areas of St. Louis (including those I listed) represent an undue violent crime risk.
Last edited by psteinx on Mon Jul 08, 2019 1:35 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Watty
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Re: St. Louis Travel/Tourism

Post by Watty » Mon Jul 08, 2019 1:33 pm

Another thing some people might find interesting is to take a tour of the Fox Theater.

It is a well restored over the top 1929 arguably overdone huge "movie palace" from that era that was built near the peak of the 1920 euphoria just before the stock market crash and Great Depression.

https://www.fabulousfox.com/visit/tours

There are also lots of plays, concerts, and events at the Fox Theater so it is more than just a musume so it is worth checking out if there is something of interest when you would be in town.

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psteinx
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Re: St. Louis Travel/Tourism

Post by psteinx » Mon Jul 08, 2019 1:34 pm

Here's a list of metro areas by violent crime rate. St. Louis is not in the top 50.

fposte
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Re: St. Louis Travel/Tourism

Post by fposte » Mon Jul 08, 2019 1:36 pm

Another lover of St. Louis here. The botanical gardens are just glorious, and there's also some really beautiful architecture. I still haven't been to the City Museum, but many friends love it--I mean, a ten-story interior slide is worthy of note.

Mike Scott
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Re: St. Louis Travel/Tourism

Post by Mike Scott » Mon Jul 08, 2019 1:39 pm

We make day trips into St Louis often and there are some fantastic places to visit. The crime rates are lower than in our rural county.

rj342
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Re: St. Louis Travel/Tourism

Post by rj342 » Mon Jul 08, 2019 2:01 pm

As a smart kid a long time ago I really enjoyed the underground museum under the Arch, I guess partly because I had no such idea it existed.

Other thing I remember we laughed about was how horribly mangled the modern local anglicized pronunciation of some of the historic French place names were. By contrast New Orleans locals are in the ballpark.

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Watty
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Re: St. Louis Travel/Tourism

Post by Watty » Mon Jul 08, 2019 2:04 pm

psteinx wrote:
Mon Jul 08, 2019 1:31 pm
The crime stats for St. Louis are generally misleading, because they're generally reported as a ratio of CRIMES / POPULATION.

The city of St. Louis itself (the city proper) represents an unusually small percentage of the metro area. About 300K out of about 2.9M, I think, so about 10-11%. Comparable cities generally have political boundaries such that the core city is a much higher % of the overall metro area, and thus the higher crime rates usually associated with urban cores are diluted by a bigger share of the overall city.

Use your head when in an unfamiliar area, of course, but I don't think the typical tourist areas of St. Louis (including those I listed) represent an undue crime risk.
This is very true but East St. Louis across the river in Illinois has a whole soap opera of problems and would best be avoided.

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Artful Dodger
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Re: St. Louis Travel/Tourism

Post by Artful Dodger » Mon Jul 08, 2019 2:18 pm

psteinx wrote:
Mon Jul 08, 2019 1:34 pm
Here's a list of metro areas by violent crime rate. St. Louis is not in the top 50.
Haters gonna hate :x

To your point above, the small population size of the city itself skews the stats. There are three or four neighborhoods with most of the reported crimes. When you look at SMAs, St. Louis is pretty far down.

I'm a big fan of the area. Regularly visit Forest Park (member of Forest Park Forever), Art Museum (member), Botanical Gardens (member), Fox Theater, Powell Hall (Symphony)(subscriber), Jazz at the Bistro (sometimes subscriber), Busch Stadium (Cardinals), MUNY Opera, plus lots more that don't immediately come to mind.

My wife takes classes at Third Degree Glass and Craft Alliance.

Lots of great restaurants both in the city and close suburbs.

And our hockey club just took home the Stanley Cup :sharebeer

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Artful Dodger
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Re: St. Louis Travel/Tourism

Post by Artful Dodger » Mon Jul 08, 2019 2:27 pm

Watty wrote:
Mon Jul 08, 2019 2:04 pm
psteinx wrote:
Mon Jul 08, 2019 1:31 pm
The crime stats for St. Louis are generally misleading, because they're generally reported as a ratio of CRIMES / POPULATION.

The city of St. Louis itself (the city proper) represents an unusually small percentage of the metro area. About 300K out of about 2.9M, I think, so about 10-11%. Comparable cities generally have political boundaries such that the core city is a much higher % of the overall metro area, and thus the higher crime rates usually associated with urban cores are diluted by a bigger share of the overall city.

Use your head when in an unfamiliar area, of course, but I don't think the typical tourist areas of St. Louis (including those I listed) represent an undue crime risk.
This is very true but East St. Louis across the river in Illinois has a whole soap opera of problems and would best be avoided.
As someone who regularly spends time in East St. Louis for business, I would concur. But, with the exception of the casino, it's not really a tourist destination.

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ObliviousInvestor
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Re: St. Louis Travel/Tourism

Post by ObliviousInvestor » Mon Jul 08, 2019 2:56 pm

As another native St Louis resident, the Botanical Garden is my favorite thing in the metro area by a wide margin. We live (roughly) down the street and stop in regularly. Great place to go, rain or shine, hot weather or cold. The Japanese Garden on a rainy day is a delight.
Mike Piper, author/blogger

PSUSteve
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Re: St. Louis Travel/Tourism

Post by PSUSteve » Mon Jul 08, 2019 6:20 pm

Hard to have a St. Louis tourist thread without mentioning going to Ted Drewes for custard.

Chicago60
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Re: St. Louis Travel/Tourism

Post by Chicago60 » Mon Jul 08, 2019 9:02 pm

psteinx wrote:
Mon Jul 08, 2019 1:00 pm
For a recent trip to Boston, I had posted and gotten advice from others here on the area/city. One commenter in that thread asked me for thoughts on my own city, and I did so, somewhat briefly. Now I'm going to expand my thoughts for the benefit of others who might be visiting or considering a trip to the St. Louis area, now or in the future.

I've lived in St. Louis (County, mostly) most of my life, though I've lived elsewhere, too, and visited a lot of places. I'm married with kids - the kids are now mid-to-late teens. So I've experienced St. Louis from many perspectives - as a youngster myself, through young adulthood and then parenting.

IMO, St. Louis has a lot of worthwhile attractions for visitors, and could easily fill a 3 day weekend, and perhaps longer, for most visitors.

Why St. Louis?
St. Louis is an old city. It was, I think, the 3rd most populated/important city in the US, ca. 1900. It has of course lagged significantly since then, but the population and wealth of the older era has left a legacy of strong cultural institutions, and, of particular note to the thrifty visitor, St. Louis has a lot of top-notch attractions that are free.

Geography
St. Louis consists of a relatively underpopulated ST. LOUIS CITY (~300K population), a politically separate ST. LOUIS COUNTY (~1M population), and surrounding exurbs bringing the regional (MSA) population up close to 3M. The first two are generally abbreviated as simply the "city" and the "county". Most of the key attractions are in the city or the county.

For tourist-y type stuff, the key locations are downtown (from the Arch/riverfront to about 18 blocks out), Forest Park (in and around which many attractions are located), city neighborhoods, county attractions (a bit further out), and area attractions (further still). Any hotel from downtown, west to about I-270, should be favorably located.

Getting Around
You'll very likely want a car. St. Louis has a modest light rail system, but it has limited lines, and isn't all that heavily used (I've never been on it). You could rely on taxis/Uber/etc. If you stayed close to Forest Park, and the weather was OK, you could probably make due walking, possibly using the Metro a bit, and filling in with taxis/Uber. But realistically, you want a car/vehicle of some sort. Traffic is not too bad. Parking is readily available, and often free.

==================================
Attractions

This list is in my rough order of how appealing things should be to the typical tourist. Of course, some things are particularly geared towards young kids, older kids, or those without kids. My information is based on my personal recollection/understanding - in some cases a few years out of date, and in particular, if you're concerned about the cost, you should double check websites or the like rather than relying on my info.

Zoo
Yes, you've probably been to various zoos before. But our zoo is quite good - generally ranked ~#2 in the country, and I personally prefer it to San Diego's Zoo. Also, it's free. Parking does cost $$$, but, especially on non-peak days, you can street park perhaps ~500' away for free. Childrens' Zoo and a few other sub-elements are extra.

Art Museum
Sits just up a hill from the zoo (easily walkable). No, we don't have the Mona Lisa or American Gothic. But there's a wide variety of art, from many locales and eras, including lots of big name artists, attractively displayed. And, like the zoo, it's free (very, very low pressure donation box(es) by the doors).

Botanical Gardens (aka Shaw's Garden)
In the right time of year (spring/summer) these can be truly outstanding. Peaceful setting, attractive, fairly large garden. Lots of types of stuff. Of particular appeal are the Japanese garden and the Climatron. Cost around $5/person.

Magic House
Excellent childrens' museum. Target age around 4-11. Cost around $10/person or so, I think.

City Museum
Funky hard to describe thing. Not really a "museum". More like a kids/adults indoor playground. Check the website for details. Cost around $10/person, I think.

Science Center/Planetarium (they're linked)
Mostly kid-geared, but stuff that appeals to adults too, especially the space stuff. Free.

Anheuser Busch Brewery
Free brewery tours and tastings. See cool old brewery, plus Clydesdales (the big horses in their commercials), plus free beer tasting.

Grant's Farm
Family estate of the Busch's, largely converted into an animal preserve/childrens' zoo/beer garden (yes, that's an odd combination). You start by taking a tram tour of the animal preserve, then are emptied into the area by the childrens' zoo (but it will appeal to most adults, too). Then stroll to a mock Bavarian town center/beer garden. Free beer for the adults. Bratwursts and the like for all (alas, these aren't free). Free admission, but you basically have to park at their pricey parking lot (~$15/car). Also, Clydesdales, again...

Forest Park
Many of the key attractions of the area are in and around Forest Park, broadly comparable to Manhattan's Central Park. But I haven't listed everything, and if the weather is nice, exploring Forest Park (and its attractions and nearby neighborhoods), is appealing on its own. Also, Tower Grove Park, somewhat south/southeast of Forest Park, is a nice park, too...

The Arch
Not all that high on my list, frankly. Recently renovated museum underneath (documenting westward expansion over last ~2 centuries) is merely OK in my book (but free). Take weird capsule elevator to top of Arch on a nice day for good views (this costs a bit, and reservations can be tricky on crowded days).

Six Flags
OK, perhaps this shouldn't go on the list - lots of places have amusement parks. But it's a fun one, not overly crowded, and our kids got a lot of enjoyment out of it over the years. Main park and water park on single ticket admission. Consider two days there (one focused on each side), if your kids are in the sweet spot for this (ages 5-15 or so).

Old and New Cathedrals
Old Cathedral is near the Arch, New Cathedral is in Central West End (~4 miles west of downtown). Pretty, old, somewhat historic churches, if that's your thing.

Cahokia Indian Mounds
In Illinois, a few miles east of downtown. Mound-building, advanced Indian culture, collapsed ca. 1300 AD, IIRC. Pretty neat displays.

Quick hits
OK, my list above was already getting long. I'll go faster. We also have Busch Stadium (Cardinals), Enterprise Center (Blues), assorted casinos, assorted areas with nightlife, restaurants, shopping, etc. In season, Apple picking (Eckert's) is fun. St. Louis History Museum is OK (and free, excepting some exhibits). We have a bit of "high culture" - a good symphony, a very pretty theater focused on traveling Broadway shows (Fox Theatre), assorted smaller theaters and performing arts venues, etc.

Regional stuff (if you're driving in)
To the west/southwest, we have Hermann (folksy German town with wineries), and Meramec Caverns (large cave complex - I've never been). Also, there are many parks in this area, with good camping. It's mostly pretty countryside. Hunters and fishers may find this area attractive, too.

To the south, Lambert's (weird but fun restaurant, worth a stop, "throwed rolls").

To the north, Hannibal (Mark Twain town).

To the northeast, Springfield, IL (IL capital, lots of Lincoln focus).

Neighborhoods
If you want to focus on interesting neighborhoods, to explore, consider:

- The Loop (Delmar north of Washington University) - funky college/young adult area.
- Central West End (east of Forest Park) - young, hip area. Also home to chess-oriented attractions.
- The Hill - Italian area a bit further south of Forest Park, west of Tower Grove Park
- South Grand - From Tower Grove Park, south for about 6-8 blocks. Lots of exotic restaurants, mostly Asian. Some other funky shops and the like. I like Cafe Natasha's (Persian, I think - try the beef kabobs).
- Cherokee Street - Antiquing area
- Washington Avenue - I think this is the new downtown hangout for young folks and startups, but I don't know it well.

==================================
Food

- St. Louis style pizza - Super thin crust, provel (or provel blend) cheese. Interesting taste. Seems preferred more by locals than visitors, but worth a try. Available at Imo's (local chain, many locations), and many mom and pop pizzerias/italian restaurants
- Toasted raviolis - Deep fried raviolis. Very good. Most visitors DO seem to like these, if they try them. Appetizer at most local pizza places/italian restaurants, plus many other restaurants
- Gooey Butter cake - A sort of super-rich cheese cake. I'm not a big fan, but it's a local dish

Chain Restaurants:
Imo's (St. Louis style pizza)
Lion's Choice (Outstanding fast food roast beef sandwiches)

Food styles:
Barbeque - this has probably been a national trend, but I think St. Louis is among the leaders. Various choices. I like Salt 'n Smoke, in the Loop (on Delmar).
I would agree with all of the above. Watch out for possibly very hot summer days. Have visited St Louis several times for college visits. I would add that St Louis has reasonably priced downtown hotels (compared to other major cities), and would recommend you catch a baseball game with some of the best and smartest fans in the US. Catch a game when the Cubs are in town, and watch the Cubs beat the Cards. A perfect day or night.

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wintermute
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Re: St. Louis Travel/Tourism

Post by wintermute » Mon Jul 08, 2019 10:04 pm

The City Museum is great, if you're an able bodied adult (can/will crawl thru things) and/or have kids. I came across it while I was in the area to see the 2017 summer eclipse. It was the most fun I've had since I was a kid. It would've blown my mind as a kid. It's sort of a post apocalyptic playground. Gutted airplanes, a school bus, a construction crane, a Ferris wheel, multi-story slides, you can crawl thru the building, and many other things. It's open til midnight on weekends and has a couple bars. (The roof is closed in winter and when it's too windy.) I've travelled around much of the US and some of Europe, and it's my favorite attraction.

Mickey7
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Re: St. Louis Travel/Tourism

Post by Mickey7 » Mon Jul 08, 2019 11:59 pm

I really cannot say enough good things about your ballpark! Good park, good fans.

Enjoy

daheld
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Re: St. Louis Travel/Tourism

Post by daheld » Tue Jul 09, 2019 7:59 am

Fellow Missourian/current St. Louisan here. I grew up in a rural Missouri but have been in STL for 6 years or so with no plans to go anywhere.

I've lived in four states and two other metro areas very comparable in size and feel to STL. St. Louis has a lot to offer and the above is a great synopsis.

I will add that while we're famous for Anheuser Busch, STL is a fantastic craft beer city. For a town of it's size, you will not find more quality craft breweries.

BogleLearner
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Re: St. Louis Travel/Tourism

Post by BogleLearner » Tue Jul 09, 2019 8:20 am

Since we grew up there - we have to make a pitch for our hometown:

For neighborhoods:
Lafayette Square - very unique to St Louis via Park Avenue, around a fabulous Victorian square

Park near the MO Botanical Garden:
Tower Grove Park - fabulous collection of Victorian Style pavilions - very unique, not to be seen elsewhere

Farmer's Market:
Soulard's Market - Saturday morning, with jazz musicians serenading shoppers

Old Neighborhood near the river:
Soulards - very scenic, brick sidewalks, oldest residential structures in the city (some of which
survived the New Madrid earthquake - worst recorded quake in our nation (1811-1812), which caused
churchbells to ring on the east coast

St Genevieve, Missouri:
Oldest settlement west of the Mississippi River - where the Mississippi River reversed course
during the New Madrid earthquake

Food - Ice Cream:
Sorry - Ted Drewes does not really cut it - The Crown Candy Kitchen makes fabulous homemade ice cream
Restaurants on The Hill - the Italian section of St Louis - Giovanni's, Gittos - check Tripadvisor for thie sestion of town

Summer Theater:
Muny Opera - Forest Park - Broadway class show productions

Music:
St Louis Symphony - Powell Hall - Leonard Slatkin made recordings with this fabulous orchestra

We could go on and on - 'Meet me in St Louis'!

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lthenderson
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Re: St. Louis Travel/Tourism

Post by lthenderson » Tue Jul 09, 2019 9:40 am

psteinx wrote:
Mon Jul 08, 2019 1:00 pm
Food styles:
Barbeque - this has probably been a national trend, but I think St. Louis is among the leaders. Various choices. I like Salt 'n Smoke, in the Loop (on Delmar).
We travel to St. Louis fairly frequently for weekend vacations and no trip there would be complete without some BBQ from Pappy's Smokehouse. Because the lines usually stretch outside well into the parking lot, we always call ahead for takeout (has a separate place to enter) and take it back to our motel room for consumption... or just eat at odd hours like 2:30 in the afternoon.

P.S. Our two kids love the zoo so we usually hit that up too.

Hikes_With_Dogs
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Re: St. Louis Travel/Tourism

Post by Hikes_With_Dogs » Tue Jul 09, 2019 10:57 am

Hah, I lived in STL for many years and didn't get murdered.

St Louis really is a great place to visit and tour around. Also any of the sporting events are a blast. You can take the train into downtown, watch the blues, go to a jazz club, etc. Or maybe you like baseball instead. It's a very sports-centric town.

Also, the tower grove south asian/indian/multi-cultural influence is not to be missed. One of the best in the mid west if you ask me.

Just stay away from the provel cheese and the toasted ravioli. It's really not worth it.

jbranx
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Re: St. Louis Travel/Tourism

Post by jbranx » Tue Jul 09, 2019 2:29 pm

{I deleted off-topic comments about murder rates in other cities. The topic is visiting St. Louis; please stay on topic.}

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