Are you a serious DIYer?

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Cody6136
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Re: Are you a serious DIYer?

Post by Cody6136 » Tue Jul 02, 2019 9:30 am

Glockenspiel wrote:
Tue Jul 02, 2019 9:14 am
simplesimon wrote:
Tue Jul 02, 2019 8:36 am

How do you prioritize what to do first?
I'd prioritize like this:
1. Items that are a safety hazard
2. Items that are a neighborhood eyesore
3. Items that will improve your day-to-day life and make things easier
4. Cosmetic items that improve the rooms you spend the most time in (living room, bathrooms, kitchen)
5. Cosmetic items in rooms you don't spend much time in.

At some point, you weigh the cost versus the benefit. I look at what things can be done that will make me happy and I can easily afford. Then the other items that are more expensive, make a plan to save for it.
MASTER PLUS PRIORITIZER

renue74
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Re: Are you a serious DIYer?

Post by renue74 » Tue Jul 02, 2019 9:57 am

tadamsmar wrote:
Tue Jul 02, 2019 9:17 am
renue74 wrote:
Mon Jul 01, 2019 1:42 pm
I take the time to learn the building codes, pull permits, and get inspections.
Someone had a contract to sell there home in Florida in 2008. It was a contract with a relatively long duration before closing. During the contract, the housing market and the price of this home crashed. The buyer sent in an inspector and the inspector identified some unpermitted work, so the buyer was able to get out of the contract and leave the seller holding the bag.

I know of a case in LA where a disgruntled buyer who had their offer rejected informed the city of code violations.

I wonder how many DIYers take the time to figure out when they are required and get them when required?

In my state, it appears that a permit is required to install a ceiling fan:

https://www.ncrec.gov/Pdfs/bicar/Permits.pdf
There are a number of house flippers in my town. Buy a house for $40K, put $30K into it and sell for $150K. Happens all the time here.

I often will search my city's online permit database to see what "new" houses actually had permits pulled. It's not very often.

A lot of times, buyers will hire private inspectors and catch "some" deficiencies.

I'm watching a flip house now where the flipper didn't permit his work. Also had some stupid stuff like duct tape over vinyl siding and then paint over that. The house has been on the market for about 1 year with various offers....only to fail at closing after private inspections.

iamlucky13
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Location: Western Washington

Re: Are you a serious DIYer?

Post by iamlucky13 » Tue Jul 02, 2019 3:51 pm

Glockenspiel wrote:
Tue Jul 02, 2019 9:14 am
simplesimon wrote:
Tue Jul 02, 2019 8:36 am

How do you prioritize what to do first?
I'd prioritize like this:

1. Items that are a safety hazard (or risk of significant damage)
2. Items that are a neighborhood eyesore
3. 2. Items that will improve your day-to-day life and make things easier
4. 3. Cosmetic items that improve the rooms you spend the most time in (living room, bathrooms, kitchen)
4. Cosmetic Items that are a neighborhood eyesore visible to neighbors
5. Cosmetic items in rooms you don't spend much time in.
I like your general categories, although my order is different, partially because I see "eyesore" as a primarily subjective judgement. I like to be a good neighbor, but we bought our home for our benefit, and I recognize that others do the same. My concern for what my neighbors see is placed accordingly.

My neighbor doesn't think I mow my lawn frequently enough, has suggested I remove native trees and bushes and plant trendier species like he has, and no doubt wishes I would finish repainting my trim, and that my kids would put their outdoor toys away (so do I, on the last one). Oh well. He had the opportunity (and the money, it turns out) to buy this property and didn't.

I, in turn, think the gigantic, angular, custom-designed house he built is a bit off-putting geometrically, and downright ugly when factoring the paint scheme he chose. He's more outspoken about his thoughts than I am.

Besides, we've significantly improved it compared to how it was - my priorities 1, 2, and 3 3 each had some overlap with priority 4.

Spirit Rider
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Re: Are you a serious DIYer?

Post by Spirit Rider » Tue Jul 02, 2019 6:19 pm

tadamsmar wrote:
Tue Jul 02, 2019 9:17 am
In my state, it appears that a permit is required to install a ceiling fan:
In many jurisdictions an electrical permit is required to repair or replace any electrical item. Even in my laissez faire state most jurisdictions require a permit for anything except for a one for one light fixture replacement.

Like anyone actually pulls a permit to add a dimmer, replace an outlet, etc... I also don't pull a permit to add something that is already wired in with a switch; ceiling fan/lights, garbage disposal, etc... I might pull a permit when adding an outlet, switch/light to an existing circuit, etc... I do draw the line and pull a permit when replacing breakers, new circuits and major equipment replacement (water heater, HVAC, etc...) However, I don't pull a permit even though it is required to repair major equipment. I'm not pulling a permit to replace a heating element in a water heater, (replace a start/run capacitor, contactor or fan motor) in a split AC, etc...

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Chicken lady
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Re: Are you a serious DIYer?

Post by Chicken lady » Tue Jul 02, 2019 9:03 pm

Both of my parents were very handy. They didn't build a house but between the two of them they fixed everything from landscaping, outdoor watering systems, household machines/equipment, replacing flooring, fixing leaks, and so on.

My husband and I've renovated several residences and know what we're willing to do and what we are not (even if we have the skills to do the job). For those things in the latter category - sheetrock finishing, plumbing anyone? We hire those tasks out. We have a division of labor - I do the things I like (painting, laying tile, laying flooring, landscaping, demolition, yardwork) while my spouse does the stuff he likes (electrical, windows, roofing light tunnels, doors). Between the two of us, I'm probably about a 6 - my husband is closer to an 8.

Why do we do this? For years I worked in a role that I sat at a desk and thought about things. Great job but being a DIY'er connected me with the real, tangible world. We're particular. We've hired people to do that tasks that we can't or don't want to but the quality of most contractors just isn't usually good enough to satisfy us - so, we're still DIY'ers and probably always will.

Willingness to be a DIY'er has saved us a lot of money with rental homes that needed work. :happy

alfaspider
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Re: Are you a serious DIYer?

Post by alfaspider » Wed Jul 03, 2019 7:24 am

tadamsmar wrote:
Tue Jul 02, 2019 9:17 am
renue74 wrote:
Mon Jul 01, 2019 1:42 pm
I take the time to learn the building codes, pull permits, and get inspections.
Someone had a contract to sell there home in Florida in 2008. It was a contract with a relatively long duration before closing. During the contract, the housing market and the price of this home crashed. The buyer sent in an inspector and the inspector identified some unpermitted work, so the buyer was able to get out of the contract and leave the seller holding the bag.

I know of a case in LA where a disgruntled buyer who had their offer rejected informed the city of code violations.

I wonder how many DIYers take the time to figure out when they are required and get them when required?

In my state, it appears that a permit is required to install a ceiling fan:

https://www.ncrec.gov/Pdfs/bicar/Permits.pdf
I seriously doubt too many people actually get a permit for a ceiling fan install unless its part of a larger renovation. I even more doubt that an unpermitted ceiling fan install is going to be flagged in an inspection unless it was obviously wired incorrectly (and the permits would have little to do with that). On the other hand, it is absolutely true that unpermitted work can be a major risk if it is significant in nature (sq footage additions, structural changes, etc.).

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tadamsmar
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Re: Are you a serious DIYer?

Post by tadamsmar » Wed Jul 03, 2019 7:56 am

alfaspider wrote:
Wed Jul 03, 2019 7:24 am
tadamsmar wrote:
Tue Jul 02, 2019 9:17 am
renue74 wrote:
Mon Jul 01, 2019 1:42 pm
I take the time to learn the building codes, pull permits, and get inspections.
Someone had a contract to sell there home in Florida in 2008. It was a contract with a relatively long duration before closing. During the contract, the housing market and the price of this home crashed. The buyer sent in an inspector and the inspector identified some unpermitted work, so the buyer was able to get out of the contract and leave the seller holding the bag.

I know of a case in LA where a disgruntled buyer who had their offer rejected informed the city of code violations.

I wonder how many DIYers take the time to figure out when they are required and get them when required?

In my state, it appears that a permit is required to install a ceiling fan:

https://www.ncrec.gov/Pdfs/bicar/Permits.pdf
I seriously doubt too many people actually get a permit for a ceiling fan install unless its part of a larger renovation. I even more doubt that an unpermitted ceiling fan install is going to be flagged in an inspection unless it was obviously wired incorrectly (and the permits would have little to do with that). On the other hand, it is absolutely true that unpermitted work can be a major risk if it is significant in nature (sq footage additions, structural changes, etc.).
The ceiling fan thing seems to be about the junction box. If you replace a light fixture with a ceiling fan, then the existing junction box may not be rated for the weight of the fan. Also, those NC regs seem to require a licensed electrician even when a permit is not required, but that would be harder to detect or enforce.

The issue in Florida seemed to involve a buyer who was deliberately trying to use the inspection to void the contract. Not sure how far one could go with that into inexpensive-to-fix violations, but it might work simply because the seller would have to sue.

The other cases raised seem to involve expensive-to-fix code violations.
Last edited by tadamsmar on Wed Jul 03, 2019 8:04 am, edited 1 time in total.

alfaspider
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Re: Are you a serious DIYer?

Post by alfaspider » Wed Jul 03, 2019 8:04 am

tadamsmar wrote:
Wed Jul 03, 2019 7:56 am
alfaspider wrote:
Wed Jul 03, 2019 7:24 am
tadamsmar wrote:
Tue Jul 02, 2019 9:17 am
renue74 wrote:
Mon Jul 01, 2019 1:42 pm
I take the time to learn the building codes, pull permits, and get inspections.
Someone had a contract to sell there home in Florida in 2008. It was a contract with a relatively long duration before closing. During the contract, the housing market and the price of this home crashed. The buyer sent in an inspector and the inspector identified some unpermitted work, so the buyer was able to get out of the contract and leave the seller holding the bag.

I know of a case in LA where a disgruntled buyer who had their offer rejected informed the city of code violations.

I wonder how many DIYers take the time to figure out when they are required and get them when required?

In my state, it appears that a permit is required to install a ceiling fan:

https://www.ncrec.gov/Pdfs/bicar/Permits.pdf
I seriously doubt too many people actually get a permit for a ceiling fan install unless its part of a larger renovation. I even more doubt that an unpermitted ceiling fan install is going to be flagged in an inspection unless it was obviously wired incorrectly (and the permits would have little to do with that). On the other hand, it is absolutely true that unpermitted work can be a major risk if it is significant in nature (sq footage additions, structural changes, etc.).
The ceiling fan thing seems to be about the junction box. If you replace a light fixture with a ceiling fan, then the existing junction box may not be rated for the weight of the fan.

The issue in Florida seemed to involve a buyer who was deliberately trying to use the inspection to void the contract. Not sure how far one could go with that into inexpensive-to-fix violations, but it might work simply because the seller would have to sue.

The other cases raised seem to involve expensive-to-fix code violations.
Not sure about other states, but typically in Texas, there is an option period where the buyer puts down a relatively nominal amount ($100-$500) and can walk away from the contract for any reason or no reason at all having lost only that money. This period is typically long enough to allow inspection and enough time to negotiate any amendments. So there's rarely a scenario where a code violation would be used as a pretense for walking away- such violations would be discovered during the option period if at all and there is no need for pretense if the buyer wants to walk.

getthatmarshmallow
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Re: Are you a serious DIYer?

Post by getthatmarshmallow » Wed Jul 03, 2019 8:42 am

Can I piggyback on my spouse's DIY skills? We redid the entire kitchen last year. He built all the cabinetry, rerouted plumbing and electrical, cut a hole in the roof for the new range hood We laid cement board and tile for the flooring, and did a backsplash that surrounds the entire kitchen. I'd put myself at willing 2 and him at a 10.

And we didn't divorce, which is the real accomplishment of any kitchen remodel.

Findourway1
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Re: Are you a serious DIYer?

Post by Findourway1 » Wed Jul 03, 2019 9:55 am

This thread is very educational.

I am not a DIYer and not too handy either. If I want to do plumbing, electrical, and other minor repairs on my own - what path or school should I search for? I tried calling Tech/Vocational schools in my area. They seem geared towards licensing & skilled step-by-step trades rather than a single course covering basic "how-to". I tried YouTube and it usually takes me 10x as much time especially with electrical stuff.

Car signals, lights, basic mechanical stuff etc is easy for me with YouTube. It is either a mental block/fear or just too many connections when it comes to electric stuff.

Thanks.

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Chicken lady
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Re: Are you a serious DIYer?

Post by Chicken lady » Thu Jul 04, 2019 1:16 pm

I am not a DIYer and not too handy either. If I want to do plumbing, electrical, and other minor repairs on my own - what path or school should I search for? I tried calling Tech/Vocational schools in my area. They seem geared towards licensing & skilled step-by-step trades rather than a single course covering basic "how-to".
These places are training people for the licensed workforce.

Though old fashioned, you might try studying some books that address the topics you're interested in. Quite a few have excellent illustrations and narrative. Take your time to really look carefully at what is shown in the book and how complete the directions are - there's a lot of variability. While you're at it check out the local building codes requirements so you don't waste your time on work that can't pass an inspection.

Once you brush up on this information and learn about what is actually involved, you may change your mind about wanting to get into home improvement.

YouTube makes it look easy with the time editing - zip - zip - a whole house is wired in 30 minutes instead of the 5 solid days of two people it takes amateurs.

Be informed, get armed with information. Cultivate pro's who may need to bail you out if you get into something and can't finish the job. Just know you'll pay more for someone to rescue you from yourself. :happy

tesuzuki2002
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Re: Are you a serious DIYer?

Post by tesuzuki2002 » Thu Jul 04, 2019 1:18 pm

I'm a 9.5.

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Sandtrap
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Re: Are you a serious DIYer?

Post by Sandtrap » Thu Jul 04, 2019 4:10 pm

Findourway1 wrote:
Wed Jul 03, 2019 9:55 am
This thread is very educational.

I am not a DIYer and not too handy either. If I want to do plumbing, electrical, and other minor repairs on my own - what path or school should I search for? I tried calling Tech/Vocational schools in my area. They seem geared towards licensing & skilled step-by-step trades rather than a single course covering basic "how-to". I tried YouTube and it usually takes me 10x as much time especially with electrical stuff.

Car signals, lights, basic mechanical stuff etc is easy for me with YouTube. It is either a mental block/fear or just too many connections when it comes to electric stuff.

Thanks.
Trade and Tech schools are vocational schools for those that want a career in the Trades Industry. Not DIY.

YouTube. And. . . . Google Searches for tech manuals.
Start small.

I just figured out how to troubleshoot and program my new Garage Door Opener (liftmaster) using YouTube.
It's a handy thing.

j :happy
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Sandtrap
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Re: Are you a serious DIYer?

Post by Sandtrap » Thu Jul 04, 2019 4:11 pm

tesuzuki2002 wrote:
Thu Jul 04, 2019 1:18 pm
I'm a 9.5.
What is a nine-point-five-point ???
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Sandtrap
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Re: Are you a serious DIYer?

Post by Sandtrap » Thu Jul 04, 2019 4:14 pm

getthatmarshmallow wrote:
Wed Jul 03, 2019 8:42 am
Can I piggyback on my spouse's DIY skills? We redid the entire kitchen last year. He built all the cabinetry, rerouted plumbing and electrical, cut a hole in the roof for the new range hood We laid cement board and tile for the flooring, and did a backsplash that surrounds the entire kitchen. I'd put myself at willing 2 and him at a 10.

And we didn't divorce, which is the real accomplishment of any kitchen remodel.
Sure.
My spouse piggybacks on my trade skills all the time. Later, it's we did this. . . we did that. . . .
Our "date days/nights" are at Home Depot!

You folks have some serious skills.
Cement board and tile?
That's tech talk. . . . . . :D :D

The family that DIY together stays glued together. . . :D

j :happy
Wiki Bogleheads Wiki: Everything You Need to Know

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Sandtrap
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Re: Are you a serious DIYer?

Post by Sandtrap » Thu Jul 04, 2019 4:20 pm

iamlucky13 wrote:
Tue Jul 02, 2019 3:51 pm
Glockenspiel wrote:
Tue Jul 02, 2019 9:14 am
simplesimon wrote:
Tue Jul 02, 2019 8:36 am

How do you prioritize what to do first?
I'd prioritize like this:

1. Items that are a safety hazard (or risk of significant damage)
2. Items that are a neighborhood eyesore
3. 2. Items that will improve your day-to-day life and make things easier
4. 3. Cosmetic items that improve the rooms you spend the most time in (living room, bathrooms, kitchen)
4. Cosmetic Items that are a neighborhood eyesore visible to neighbors
5. Cosmetic items in rooms you don't spend much time in.
I like your general categories, although my order is different, partially because I see "eyesore" as a primarily subjective judgement. I like to be a good neighbor, but we bought our home for our benefit, and I recognize that others do the same. My concern for what my neighbors see is placed accordingly.

My neighbor doesn't think I mow my lawn frequently enough, has suggested I remove native trees and bushes and plant trendier species like he has, and no doubt wishes I would finish repainting my trim, and that my kids would put their outdoor toys away (so do I, on the last one). Oh well. He had the opportunity (and the money, it turns out) to buy this property and didn't.

I, in turn, think the gigantic, angular, custom-designed house he built is a bit off-putting geometrically, and downright ugly when factoring the paint scheme he chose. He's more outspoken about his thoughts than I am.

Besides, we've significantly improved it compared to how it was - my priorities 1, 2, and 3 3 each had some overlap with priority 4.
My neighbor, (since divorced moved away, we got along well), once asked me when I was going to mow my "lawn" (20 acre pastures) because it was getting long. I asked him if it bothered him. He said "No". I said, shucks. . if I knew it bothered you I'd let it grow really tall. :happy
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6miths
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Re: Are you a serious DIYer?

Post by 6miths » Thu Jul 04, 2019 5:41 pm

Probably a 7 or 8. Plumbing, electrical, framing, rough carpentry, painting, yard/garden, small engine but not drywall (at least not good), finish carpentry or automotive.
'It ain't what you don't know that gets you into trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so!' Mark Twain

tesuzuki2002
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Re: Are you a serious DIYer?

Post by tesuzuki2002 » Thu Jul 04, 2019 7:07 pm

Sandtrap wrote:
Thu Jul 04, 2019 4:11 pm
tesuzuki2002 wrote:
Thu Jul 04, 2019 1:18 pm
I'm a 9.5.
What is a nine-point-five-point ???
I will fix or reppair anything!! Born and raised on a farm; you learn to make anything and everything work when necessary.

Became an electrical mechanical engineer...

The other 0.5... I youtube it, if I have to.

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Sandtrap
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Re: Are you a serious DIYer?

Post by Sandtrap » Thu Jul 04, 2019 8:33 pm

tesuzuki2002 wrote:
Thu Jul 04, 2019 7:07 pm
Sandtrap wrote:
Thu Jul 04, 2019 4:11 pm
tesuzuki2002 wrote:
Thu Jul 04, 2019 1:18 pm
I'm a 9.5.
What is a nine-point-five-point ???
I will fix or reppair anything!! Born and raised on a farm; you learn to make anything and everything work when necessary.

Became an electrical mechanical engineer...

The other 0.5... I youtube it, if I have to.
Oh. Ok. I get it.

Also grew up on a farm. Yes. We did everything. No choice.
j :D
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whodidntante
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Re: Are you a serious DIYer?

Post by whodidntante » Thu Jul 04, 2019 9:07 pm

Maybe.

I would gladly hire people for terrible jobs at my house, but by the time I identify OK looking companies, get a reasonable number of quotes befitting the job, give the go head, meet, pay them half, maybe it falls through somehow, review the work, and pay them, I could have already finished most jobs myself.

To me this is part of life in America, like it or not. There are countries where someone with my tiny slice of wealth wouldn't be able to pick a wrench in a tool lineup. They use servants and skilled workers for everything. Hiring help in the USA is time consuming and expensive. Although I guess the contractor administrator work of hiring help is less physically demanding and you don't have to think too much.

mancich
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Re: Are you a serious DIYer?

Post by mancich » Fri Jul 05, 2019 5:58 am

This is a great thread.
I hire a contractor to do things I don't feel confident doing and/or that take too much time. Serious plumbing or electrical I would hire out. HVAC I would hire out. Simple electrical, like putting in a dimmer switch, I'll do myself. Other mundane things we do ourselves (like housecleaning, cutting the grass, etc).

getthatmarshmallow
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Re: Are you a serious DIYer?

Post by getthatmarshmallow » Fri Jul 05, 2019 10:02 am

Sandtrap wrote:
Thu Jul 04, 2019 4:14 pm
getthatmarshmallow wrote:
Wed Jul 03, 2019 8:42 am
Can I piggyback on my spouse's DIY skills? We redid the entire kitchen last year. He built all the cabinetry, rerouted plumbing and electrical, cut a hole in the roof for the new range hood We laid cement board and tile for the flooring, and did a backsplash that surrounds the entire kitchen. I'd put myself at willing 2 and him at a 10.

And we didn't divorce, which is the real accomplishment of any kitchen remodel.
Sure.
My spouse piggybacks on my trade skills all the time. Later, it's we did this. . . we did that. . . .
Our "date days/nights" are at Home Depot!

You folks have some serious skills.
Cement board and tile?
That's tech talk. . . . . . :D :D

The family that DIY together stays glued together. . . :D

j :happy
He grew up on a farm and worked as a finishing carpenter for a while. The tile portion of the project was newish to both of us (we did a small bathroom a few years back) but I watched a lot of YouTube videos and grilled the guy at the local tile shop.

j0nnyg1984
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Re: Are you a serious DIYer?

Post by j0nnyg1984 » Sat Jul 06, 2019 11:51 am

Yes, I try to do most things myself. It’s not for cost but because I trust that I will do a higher quality job than someone that I would pay. I have found evidence in this on everything - home repairs, automotive service, lawn care, financial planning.

I have paid for quite a few services lately related to my home remodel and I’ve been pretty unhappy with the results. Low quality painting and trim work installation, mistakes made with relocating gas and electrical lines, etc. I take pride in my professional career and it’s almost insulting when I have to chase down other professionals to ensure they fix their mistakes.

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Sandtrap
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Re: Are you a serious DIYer?

Post by Sandtrap » Sat Jul 06, 2019 12:47 pm

j0nnyg1984 wrote:
Sat Jul 06, 2019 11:51 am
Yes, I try to do most things myself. It’s not for cost but because I trust that I will do a higher quality job than someone that I would pay. I have found evidence in this on everything - home repairs, automotive service, lawn care, financial planning.

I have paid for quite a few services lately related to my home remodel and I’ve been pretty unhappy with the results. Low quality painting and trim work installation, mistakes made with relocating gas and electrical lines, etc. I take pride in my professional career and it’s almost insulting when I have to chase down other professionals to ensure they fix their mistakes.
+1
Unfortunately, this does seem to be the trend.
Don't know why.
j
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JediMisty
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Re: Are you a serious DIYer?

Post by JediMisty » Sat Jul 06, 2019 2:00 pm

investingdad wrote:
Tue Jul 02, 2019 7:51 am
I like riding the lawn tractor, I don't enjoy trimming.

I don't mind painting, other than the 2 story foyer I painted our entire house including our finished basement which was bare drywall. Last house, same. I'm pretty good at it.

Drywall repair is fine.

Simple electrical is ok, like replacing a switch.

Unblocking drains is fine.

Car work? Nope.
Hedge trimming? Nope.
Appliance repair? Nope.
+1. Add oak trim work - stained, urethaned, cut, and installed baseboard, door and window casing. Refinished oak cabinets and furniture. More tools than many of the men I know.

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Sandtrap
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Re: Are you a serious DIYer?

Post by Sandtrap » Sat Jul 06, 2019 6:28 pm

JediMisty wrote:
Sat Jul 06, 2019 2:00 pm
investingdad wrote:
Tue Jul 02, 2019 7:51 am
I like riding the lawn tractor, I don't enjoy trimming.

I don't mind painting, other than the 2 story foyer I painted our entire house including our finished basement which was bare drywall. Last house, same. I'm pretty good at it.

Drywall repair is fine.

Simple electrical is ok, like replacing a switch.

Unblocking drains is fine.

Car work? Nope.
Hedge trimming? Nope.
Appliance repair? Nope.
+1. Add oak trim work - stained, urethaned, cut, and installed baseboard, door and window casing. Refinished oak cabinets and furniture. More tools than many of the men I know.
There's something called "Tool Therapy".
A new cool power tool, trim saw, Dremel, etc, will brighten the day. :D
j
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Spirit Rider
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Re: Are you a serious DIYer?

Post by Spirit Rider » Sat Jul 06, 2019 6:34 pm

Sandtrap wrote:
Sat Jul 06, 2019 6:28 pm
There's something called "Tool Therapy".
A new cool power tool, trim saw, Dremel, etc, will brighten the day.
He who dies with the most tools wins. Any DIY project that saves you enough money to by more tools is a win-win.

JediMisty
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Re: Are you a serious DIYer?

Post by JediMisty » Sat Jul 06, 2019 7:38 pm

Sandtrap wrote:
Sat Jul 06, 2019 6:28 pm
JediMisty wrote:
Sat Jul 06, 2019 2:00 pm
investingdad wrote:
Tue Jul 02, 2019 7:51 am
I like riding the lawn tractor, I don't enjoy trimming.

I don't mind painting, other than the 2 story foyer I painted our entire house including our finished basement which was bare drywall. Last house, same. I'm pretty good at it.

Drywall repair is fine.

Simple electrical is ok, like replacing a switch.

Unblocking drains is fine.

Car work? Nope.
Hedge trimming? Nope.
Appliance repair? Nope.
+1. Add oak trim work - stained, urethaned, cut, and installed baseboard, door and window casing. Refinished oak cabinets and furniture. More tools than many of the men I know.
There's something called "Tool Therapy".
A new cool power tool, trim saw, Dremel, etc, will brighten the day. :D
j
True that. :sharebeer

michaeljc70
Posts: 5404
Joined: Thu Oct 15, 2015 3:53 pm

Re: Are you a serious DIYer?

Post by michaeljc70 » Sat Jul 06, 2019 10:55 pm

j0nnyg1984 wrote:
Sat Jul 06, 2019 11:51 am
Yes, I try to do most things myself. It’s not for cost but because I trust that I will do a higher quality job than someone that I would pay. I have found evidence in this on everything - home repairs, automotive service, lawn care, financial planning.

I have paid for quite a few services lately related to my home remodel and I’ve been pretty unhappy with the results. Low quality painting and trim work installation, mistakes made with relocating gas and electrical lines, etc. I take pride in my professional career and it’s almost insulting when I have to chase down other professionals to ensure they fix their mistakes.
+1. When I do the work, I know what I am getting. Thinking that because someone has more experience (and paid by the job) will do a better job is being oblivious. Most jobs have "hidden" parts that aren't easily evaluated.

investingdad
Posts: 1630
Joined: Fri Mar 15, 2013 10:41 pm

Re: Are you a serious DIYer?

Post by investingdad » Sun Jul 07, 2019 7:57 am

JediMisty wrote:
Sat Jul 06, 2019 2:00 pm
investingdad wrote:
Tue Jul 02, 2019 7:51 am
I like riding the lawn tractor, I don't enjoy trimming.

I don't mind painting, other than the 2 story foyer I painted our entire house including our finished basement which was bare drywall. Last house, same. I'm pretty good at it.

Drywall repair is fine.

Simple electrical is ok, like replacing a switch.

Unblocking drains is fine.

Car work? Nope.
Hedge trimming? Nope.
Appliance repair? Nope.
+1. Add oak trim work - stained, urethaned, cut, and installed baseboard, door and window casing. Refinished oak cabinets and furniture. More tools than many of the men I know.
Trim work! Forgot about that. We did a lot of ornamental trim at the first house, less at this one. It's pretty easy once you've picked up a few tricks. Angled corner crown moulding aren't so bad once you know how to cut them.

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Sandtrap
Posts: 8288
Joined: Sat Nov 26, 2016 6:32 pm
Location: Hawaii No Ka Oi , N. Arizona

Re: Are you a serious DIYer?

Post by Sandtrap » Sun Jul 07, 2019 8:19 am

investingdad wrote:
Sun Jul 07, 2019 7:57 am
JediMisty wrote:
Sat Jul 06, 2019 2:00 pm
investingdad wrote:
Tue Jul 02, 2019 7:51 am
I like riding the lawn tractor, I don't enjoy trimming.

I don't mind painting, other than the 2 story foyer I painted our entire house including our finished basement which was bare drywall. Last house, same. I'm pretty good at it.

Drywall repair is fine.

Simple electrical is ok, like replacing a switch.

Unblocking drains is fine.

Car work? Nope.
Hedge trimming? Nope.
Appliance repair? Nope.
+1. Add oak trim work - stained, urethaned, cut, and installed baseboard, door and window casing. Refinished oak cabinets and furniture. More tools than many of the men I know.
Trim work! Forgot about that. We did a lot of ornamental trim at the first house, less at this one. It's pretty easy once you've picked up a few tricks. Angled corner crown moulding aren't so bad once you know how to cut them.
+1
I did a complete tear out and reno on a 4500 sf. multi level home about 8 years ago. My last project that size.
Found this inexpensive compact sliding compound mitre saw that was easy to move around. Worked better than all the big heavy pro level stuff I've been using for decades.
Nothing like having the right tools, or the right cool new tools. :D
j
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Sandtrap
Posts: 8288
Joined: Sat Nov 26, 2016 6:32 pm
Location: Hawaii No Ka Oi , N. Arizona

Re: Are you a serious DIYer?

Post by Sandtrap » Sun Jul 07, 2019 8:24 am

A "serious" DIY has to have "bags" and a good belt, suspenders are great.
Electrician's bags for doing that.
Carpenter's bags for doing that.
I've never seen plumber's bags. . . . . :oops:

j
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Jack FFR1846
Posts: 9891
Joined: Tue Dec 31, 2013 7:05 am

Re: Are you a serious DIYer?

Post by Jack FFR1846 » Sun Jul 07, 2019 8:36 am

Yes, for car repairs and maintenance. Most general car repairs are well within my ability and I've got most every tool known to man, including air tools and a 4 post lift.

On to non-car stuff, I'm reluctant to do them, but do. Why? Because it seems that there's always something that gets screwed up. We spent very good money last summer on some very nice, built in place granite tread stairs using stone from our property with built to the stairs iron railings. Well, the railings have rusted and are staining the nice, light granite, so I pulled them off, ground down the steel, properly primed and painted the lower mounting tabs. The nuts and washers holding these are all regular steel and are also all rusted. I don't get it. We spent thousands on the stairs and they don't up the quality to stainless or something else that won't rust? So I go to the hardware store and get stainless nuts and washers. Some of the nuts are very difficult to get on so I test the thread pattern. Most of them are wrong. Supposed to be 1/4 20 and 9 out of 12 are 1/4 28. The guy at the store picked these out of the box for me. So back to the store and I use the little thread checker on the wall and about 3/4 of all the nuts in the box are 28 tpi. There isn't even a box for 28. So now, having checked every single nut, I now have all stainless hardware. Had the installer used stainless to begin with, I'd have had nothing to do, which would have been nice.
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JediMisty
Posts: 288
Joined: Tue Aug 07, 2018 7:06 am
Location: Central NJ

Re: Are you a serious DIYer?

Post by JediMisty » Sun Jul 07, 2019 11:13 am

investingdad wrote:
Sun Jul 07, 2019 7:57 am
JediMisty wrote:
Sat Jul 06, 2019 2:00 pm
investingdad wrote:
Tue Jul 02, 2019 7:51 am
I like riding the lawn tractor, I don't enjoy trimming.

I don't mind painting, other than the 2 story foyer I painted our entire house including our finished basement which was bare drywall. Last house, same. I'm pretty good at it.

Drywall repair is fine.

Simple electrical is ok, like replacing a switch.

Unblocking drains is fine.

Car work? Nope.
Hedge trimming? Nope.
Appliance repair? Nope.
+1. Add oak trim work - stained, urethaned, cut, and installed baseboard, door and window casing. Refinished oak cabinets and furniture. More tools than many of the men I know.
Trim work! Forgot about that. We did a lot of ornamental trim at the first house, less at this one. It's pretty easy once you've picked up a few tricks. Angled corner crown moulding aren't so bad once you know how to cut them.
Haven't tackled crown moulding. Respect!! However, I soaked and reformed the trim for the inside of a palladium window. Turns out a couple of days clamped to the lawn furniture table was just the right arched angle. Had to stain and urethane it in place after attaching it. Also routed my own window sills from nice oak pieces. Compliments the window casing nicely....

FI4LIFE
Posts: 167
Joined: Sun Apr 28, 2019 9:27 am

Re: Are you a serious DIYer?

Post by FI4LIFE » Sun Jul 07, 2019 12:55 pm

I'm a 10 and enjoy it about a 2.

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