Tire Pressure Monitoring System failed: Replace or Ignore?

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Hoosier CPA
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Re: Tire Pressure Monitoring System failed: Replace or Ignore?

Post by Hoosier CPA » Fri Jun 28, 2019 9:36 am

I had one fail because it rusted out or was corroded and as a result the seal went bad and the tire wouldn't hold air. I was late to a job interview as a result (they understood but still it was unnecessary - luckily the car was in my garage so I was able to change clothes before dealing with the tire). I had that one fixed but I'd much prefer to just remove them all and be done with it. Not worth the aggravation. This is not comparable to seat belts, airbags, etc. - it's not that hard to check your tires periodically just like checking fluids.

chevca
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Re: Tire Pressure Monitoring System failed: Replace or Ignore?

Post by chevca » Fri Jun 28, 2019 10:13 am

Hoosier CPA wrote:
Fri Jun 28, 2019 9:36 am
I had one fail because it rusted out or was corroded and as a result the seal went bad and the tire wouldn't hold air. I was late to a job interview as a result (they understood but still it was unnecessary - luckily the car was in my garage so I was able to change clothes before dealing with the tire). I had that one fixed but I'd much prefer to just remove them all and be done with it. Not worth the aggravation. This is not comparable to seat belts, airbags, etc. - it's not that hard to check your tires periodically just like checking fluids.
Uh, the TPMS simply reads the tire pressure. It has nothing to do with holding air. Hence, why some of us are saying not to worry about it now.

mmmodem
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Re: Tire Pressure Monitoring System failed: Replace or Ignore?

Post by mmmodem » Fri Jun 28, 2019 10:28 am

Kenkat wrote:
Fri Jun 28, 2019 9:21 am
chevca wrote:
Fri Jun 28, 2019 8:28 am
No one in here is talking about WANTING to bypass TPMS. The issue is wanting to pay for parts and labor or not on a non-mandatory item. It can wait, or one can pay for it to be fixed. Personal preference on the TPMS, IMO.

Definitely no need to go to extreme examples to try and scare the OP into getting it fixed though.
If you choose not to fix it, aren’t you in effect bypassing it? I can see waiting a bit until you replace tires if that is happening in the not too distant future, but otherwise I don’t get it.
Bypassing TPMS is disabling the warning light in the ECU through the OBD port or placing 4 TPMS sensors in a pressured PVC pipe to throw in the trunk. Ignoring TPMS allows it to be fully functional. It is always warning you of a low tire pressure or failed sensor.

I would equate ignoring the TPMS sensor to willfully ignoring to purchase a new car with active safety sensors. Yes, you can press the brakes yourself or look over your shoulder at your blind spot. But collision detection systems and blind spot monitoring are actively scanning at all times and will brake or steer you out of a collision with lightning reflexes.

Why would someone do this? Because the additional safety and hassle is not worth the cost. Some see the additional safety is negligible. Some see the safety is signifcant. Some see the cost is negligible. Some see the cost is significant.

Hoosier CPA
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Re: Tire Pressure Monitoring System failed: Replace or Ignore?

Post by Hoosier CPA » Fri Jun 28, 2019 10:32 am

chevca wrote:
Fri Jun 28, 2019 10:13 am
Hoosier CPA wrote:
Fri Jun 28, 2019 9:36 am
I had one fail because it rusted out or was corroded and as a result the seal went bad and the tire wouldn't hold air. I was late to a job interview as a result (they understood but still it was unnecessary - luckily the car was in my garage so I was able to change clothes before dealing with the tire). I had that one fixed but I'd much prefer to just remove them all and be done with it. Not worth the aggravation. This is not comparable to seat belts, airbags, etc. - it's not that hard to check your tires periodically just like checking fluids.
Uh, the TPMS simply reads the tire pressure. It has nothing to do with holding air. Hence, why some of us are saying not to worry about it now.
Many of them are connected to the valve stem, so uh, a failure can result in losing air.

https://www.tirerack.com/tires/tiretech ... techid=152

chevca
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Re: Tire Pressure Monitoring System failed: Replace or Ignore?

Post by chevca » Fri Jun 28, 2019 11:30 am

Then the valve stem failed. The TPMS is a sensor, nothing more.

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snackdog
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Re: Tire Pressure Monitoring System failed: Replace or Ignore?

Post by snackdog » Fri Jun 28, 2019 11:41 am

In the old days with normal tires you could visually assess tire pressure. Steel-belted radial tires made that a little more difficult but still feasible. However, in the 90s we saw many highway deaths due to tires blowing out (including a rash of Ford Exploders with Firestone tires). Today, if you have run flats, it is very difficult to estimate the tire pressure visually, even when flat. Then, when they overheat on the freeway (at say 85mph) and disintegrate, you end up in a fiery crash. So, without TMPS I suggest checking runflat pressures frequently and before every fast freeway run over 10 minutes or so.

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Re: Tire Pressure Monitoring System failed: Replace or Ignore?

Post by Afty » Fri Jun 28, 2019 11:57 am

chevca wrote:
Fri Jun 28, 2019 1:09 am
RetiredAL wrote:
Thu Jun 27, 2019 9:35 pm
Edited to remove what someone may consider crude language.

TPM's are there to minimize a slow leak from causing a blow-out, especially if it's a front tire which could cause loss of control. Blow-outs usually occur at high speeds, like on the freeway/highway, where the low pressure leads to tire over-heating until it bursts. Loss of control at speed often results in a roll-over. Do you really want to risk your ( and/or your family's ) life by not replacing a $70 safety item?

My system recently activated for a very small leak at 27psi. Although not an ideal operating pressure, it's more than enough to keep the tire from overheating and blowing-out.
Man, it's a good thing us humans survived all those flat tires before TPMS was involved with our car tires!

Good ole BHs taking things to extremes to make their point.... :oops:
271 people died at least partially because of low tire pressure in Ford Explorers with Firestone tires: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Firestone ... ontroversy

That led to Congress passing the TREAD act, which mandated TPMS in new cars.

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Re: Tire Pressure Monitoring System failed: Replace or Ignore?

Post by Hoosier CPA » Fri Jun 28, 2019 12:39 pm

chevca wrote:
Fri Jun 28, 2019 11:30 am
Then the valve stem failed. The TPMS is a sensor, nothing more.
Yes, but it's a system with additional seals, etc that aren't part of a simple valve stem, so the system failed. The TPMS didn't work either but that didn't cause the leak.

chevca
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Re: Tire Pressure Monitoring System failed: Replace or Ignore?

Post by chevca » Fri Jun 28, 2019 2:17 pm

Afty wrote:
Fri Jun 28, 2019 11:57 am
chevca wrote:
Fri Jun 28, 2019 1:09 am
RetiredAL wrote:
Thu Jun 27, 2019 9:35 pm
Edited to remove what someone may consider crude language.

TPM's are there to minimize a slow leak from causing a blow-out, especially if it's a front tire which could cause loss of control. Blow-outs usually occur at high speeds, like on the freeway/highway, where the low pressure leads to tire over-heating until it bursts. Loss of control at speed often results in a roll-over. Do you really want to risk your ( and/or your family's ) life by not replacing a $70 safety item?

My system recently activated for a very small leak at 27psi. Although not an ideal operating pressure, it's more than enough to keep the tire from overheating and blowing-out.
Man, it's a good thing us humans survived all those flat tires before TPMS was involved with our car tires!

Good ole BHs taking things to extremes to make their point.... :oops:
271 people died at least partially because of low tire pressure in Ford Explorers with Firestone tires: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Firestone ... ontroversy

That led to Congress passing the TREAD act, which mandated TPMS in new cars.
So one particular set of tires back in the top heavy, tipsy SUV days warrants a shock and awe story to scare the OP in 2019? Got it. Now I know what the qualifications are to post extreme example and scary stories on BHs. :happy

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Re: Tire Pressure Monitoring System failed: Replace or Ignore?

Post by RetiredAL » Fri Jun 28, 2019 5:27 pm

Did a hornet's nest get whacked or what?

A nail in-out puncture is not likely to cause a blow-out, just a routine flat tire. Blow-outs are usually caused by tire overheating, which is what happens when run a tire on really low air pressure for long period of time, such as what you see with a small leak.

A blow-out is a catastrophic tire failure which can result in loss of directional control, especially if the blow-out is on a steering tire.

In a regular flat, the tire remains intact, and the driver can usually maintain control and get the car off the road.

These are two radically different scenarios with different safety implications.

Although the TPM will detect a regular flat air loss, its greatest value is in detecting the slow leak which could lead to a blow-out. IE, the tire that had fine pressure this morning but 4 hours later as leaked down to a dangerous level.

Is a TPM not working an emergency, no. But don't just tape over the light and ignore it as several posters said to do. Get it fixed in a prudent time frame.

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SlowMovingInvestor
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Re: Tire Pressure Monitoring System failed: Replace or Ignore?

Post by SlowMovingInvestor » Fri Jun 28, 2019 6:06 pm

Kenkat wrote:
Fri Jun 28, 2019 7:46 am
Again, we also survived without crash avoidance systems, electronic stability control, traction control, anti-lock brakes, air bags, crumple zones, seat belts, radial tires, etc. Unless we didn’t.
A lot of us still have cars without some of a lot of those features (although seat belts are likely found in almost all running cars). Even with air bags, there may be only one air bag (driver side) in slightly older cars.

My car has a TPMS light (which is actually a bit flaky these days), but it also has one indicating severe underinflation. I don't know if that's also driven by the TPMS sensor.

Personally, I think the risk of a non functioning TPMS is minimal. But everyone has their own risk tolerance.

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SlowMovingInvestor
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Re: Tire Pressure Monitoring System failed: Replace or Ignore?

Post by SlowMovingInvestor » Fri Jun 28, 2019 6:21 pm

To add to this tread/thread :)

How much would approx. costs be for the typical OEM TPMS (including install at a non dealer shop) ? $70 was cited above, but checking to see which sensor is gone may add a little if one takes it to a shop ? I don't know if it's possible to check with a multimeter or some other device , or whether they have to attach an underinflated tire to each wheel and see if the light comes on ?

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Re: Tire Pressure Monitoring System failed: Replace or Ignore?

Post by Ged » Fri Jun 28, 2019 6:25 pm

mmmodem wrote:
Thu Jun 27, 2019 5:54 am
I've always checked my tires regularly and continue to do so now that the TPMS has failed on my 2009. I was also quoted north of $250 to replace all 4. That's nearly the cost of 3 new replacement tires. No thanks. DW has the aftermarket TPMS sensors on her winter tires. They work pretty well.
I certainly would not pay $250. My independent tire service place quotes $150 to replace a set of TPMS as part of mounting 4 new tires.

A lot depends on who you are. Some people are diligent about checking tire pressure as a matter of habit. Others are not. It is a safety issue. I have seen someone neglect it to the point where they had a tire separate from the rim. For that person TPMS is a very good feature.

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TimeRunner
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Re: Tire Pressure Monitoring System failed: Replace or Ignore?

Post by TimeRunner » Fri Jun 28, 2019 8:18 pm

So I think this thread has been beaten to death. OP, what did you do? Call Costco? Get a price at Rock Auto? Tape over your light? Dude, it's all on you now. :beer
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Re: Tire Pressure Monitoring System failed: Replace or Ignore?

Post by 7eight9 » Fri Jun 28, 2019 8:29 pm

Since I was the first to toss out the idea of electrical tape --- viewtopic.php?f=11&t=284303#p4613134 --- maybe I can close this down.

It wasn't until the Ford/Firestone SUV fiasco that our fine legislators in Washington felt the urge to require TPMS on new cars. If the OP is driving a Ford Explorer with Firestone tires then they may want to replace their TPMS sensor. :?

Otherwise I personally don't see the need to replace a defective sensor. Let the next owner replace it if they wish. The car's value won't increase by $70 nor unless it is a Ford Explorer driving on Firestone tires is there necessarily much value in replacing either.
I guess it all could be much worse. | They could be warming up my hearse.

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Re: Tire Pressure Monitoring System failed: Replace or Ignore?

Post by Kenkat » Fri Jun 28, 2019 9:17 pm

7eight9 wrote:
Fri Jun 28, 2019 8:29 pm
Since I was the first to toss out the idea of electrical tape --- viewtopic.php?f=11&t=284303#p4613134 --- maybe I can close this down.

It wasn't until the Ford/Firestone SUV fiasco that our fine legislators in Washington felt the urge to require TPMS on new cars. If the OP is driving a Ford Explorer with Firestone tires then they may want to replace their TPMS sensor. :?

Otherwise I personally don't see the need to replace a defective sensor. Let the next owner replace it if they wish. The car's value won't increase by $70 nor unless it is a Ford Explorer driving on Firestone tires is there necessarily much value in replacing either.
This raises an interesting question actually. Would you buy a car that had an active TPMS warning light that won’t go away?

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snackdog
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Re: Tire Pressure Monitoring System failed: Replace or Ignore?

Post by snackdog » Fri Jun 28, 2019 11:02 pm

Would you buy a car without working seat belts? After all, we all survived decades without seatbelts.

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Re: Tire Pressure Monitoring System failed: Replace or Ignore?

Post by 7eight9 » Fri Jun 28, 2019 11:11 pm

Kenkat wrote:
Fri Jun 28, 2019 9:17 pm
7eight9 wrote:
Fri Jun 28, 2019 8:29 pm
Since I was the first to toss out the idea of electrical tape --- viewtopic.php?f=11&t=284303#p4613134 --- maybe I can close this down.

It wasn't until the Ford/Firestone SUV fiasco that our fine legislators in Washington felt the urge to require TPMS on new cars. If the OP is driving a Ford Explorer with Firestone tires then they may want to replace their TPMS sensor. :?

Otherwise I personally don't see the need to replace a defective sensor. Let the next owner replace it if they wish. The car's value won't increase by $70 nor unless it is a Ford Explorer driving on Firestone tires is there necessarily much value in replacing either.
This raises an interesting question actually. Would you buy a car that had an active TPMS warning light that won’t go away?
Absolutely. To pass inspection in my state the only warning light that would disqualify me from registering a car is the CEL (check engine light). I couldn't care less about the TPMS light. On or off makes no difference to me.
I guess it all could be much worse. | They could be warming up my hearse.

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Re: Tire Pressure Monitoring System failed: Replace or Ignore?

Post by neilpilot » Sat Jun 29, 2019 7:08 am

SlowMovingInvestor wrote:
Fri Jun 28, 2019 6:21 pm
To add to this tread/thread :)

How much would approx. costs be for the typical OEM TPMS (including install at a non dealer shop) ? $70 was cited above, but checking to see which sensor is gone may add a little if one takes it to a shop ? I don't know if it's possible to check with a multimeter or some other device , or whether they have to attach an underinflated tire to each wheel and see if the light comes on ?
Neither method works. A bad sensor almost always is due to a discharged battery. There’s a handheld radio receiver designed for this. Takes a minute. Just hold it near each wheel. Remember that you can have more than 1 sensor out.

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Kenkat
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Re: Tire Pressure Monitoring System failed: Replace or Ignore?

Post by Kenkat » Sat Jun 29, 2019 9:11 am

7eight9 wrote:
Fri Jun 28, 2019 11:11 pm
Kenkat wrote:
Fri Jun 28, 2019 9:17 pm
7eight9 wrote:
Fri Jun 28, 2019 8:29 pm
Since I was the first to toss out the idea of electrical tape --- viewtopic.php?f=11&t=284303#p4613134 --- maybe I can close this down.

It wasn't until the Ford/Firestone SUV fiasco that our fine legislators in Washington felt the urge to require TPMS on new cars. If the OP is driving a Ford Explorer with Firestone tires then they may want to replace their TPMS sensor. :?

Otherwise I personally don't see the need to replace a defective sensor. Let the next owner replace it if they wish. The car's value won't increase by $70 nor unless it is a Ford Explorer driving on Firestone tires is there necessarily much value in replacing either.
This raises an interesting question actually. Would you buy a car that had an active TPMS warning light that won’t go away?
Absolutely. To pass inspection in my state the only warning light that would disqualify me from registering a car is the CEL (check engine light). I couldn't care less about the TPMS light. On or off makes no difference to me.
Fair enough. I’d probably think twice; what other maintenance has been deferred?

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Re: Tire Pressure Monitoring System failed: Replace or Ignore?

Post by Nowizard » Sat Jun 29, 2019 9:28 am

Why spend the money unless you have just become so used to the monitors that it would be a challenge to check tires yourself? Perfect example of technology being beneficial when it works but not the time saver advertised since it often does not work as well as a little personal attention.

Tim

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Re: Tire Pressure Monitoring System failed: Replace or Ignore?

Post by Broken Man 1999 » Sat Jun 29, 2019 9:36 am

Ged wrote:
Fri Jun 28, 2019 6:25 pm
mmmodem wrote:
Thu Jun 27, 2019 5:54 am
I've always checked my tires regularly and continue to do so now that the TPMS has failed on my 2009. I was also quoted north of $250 to replace all 4. That's nearly the cost of 3 new replacement tires. No thanks. DW has the aftermarket TPMS sensors on her winter tires. They work pretty well.
I certainly would not pay $250. My independent tire service place quotes $150 to replace a set of TPMS as part of mounting 4 new tires.

A lot depends on who you are. Some people are diligent about checking tire pressure as a matter of habit. Others are not. It is a safety issue. I have seen someone neglect it to the point where they had a tire separate from the rim. For that person TPMS is a very good feature.
$250 might not be too bad. I scouted around for pricing for my replacement TPMS sensor and the lowest I found was $45.00. So that is $180 just for parts.

Broken Man 1999
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Re: Tire Pressure Monitoring System failed: Replace or Ignore?

Post by tibbitts » Sat Jun 29, 2019 9:47 am

Nowizard wrote:
Sat Jun 29, 2019 9:28 am
Why spend the money unless you have just become so used to the monitors that it would be a challenge to check tires yourself? Perfect example of technology being beneficial when it works but not the time saver advertised since it often does not work as well as a little personal attention.

Tim
You're still not addressing what to me is the main point of TPMS: a tire starts losing several pounds per hour as you're driving on the interstate. By the time the tire gets so low that a typical driver (oh, sorry, I forgot that true Bogleheads aren't "typical" drivers - so let's say the population as a whole) will notice this, the tire is overheating, and continuing to drive is maybe damaging to the tire and maybe unsafe for you. Today you're somewhat likely to not even have a spare to change to, but even if you do maybe there's nowhere safe or convenient to change it. If you get a warning when the tire has only lost a little pressure, you probably have a lot more options to deal with the problem before damaging the tire or worse. This isn't an unusual scenario - it's happened to me several times.

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Re: Tire Pressure Monitoring System failed: Replace or Ignore?

Post by Nowizard » Sat Jun 29, 2019 10:00 am

Tibbits: Your comment is certainly true, but in terms of risk and aggravation, I am fine with a monitoring system being present, so long as it works. If it quits, the cost and aggravation of fixing it is not compensated for by the risk of what you say occurring. That could change if there was ever an occurrence such as you describe, however.

Tim

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Re: Tire Pressure Monitoring System failed: Replace or Ignore?

Post by chevca » Sat Jun 29, 2019 10:07 am

Contrary to popular BH beliefs, you can visually see if a tire is low nowadays. I see folks driving with one or more low tires often. Keep an eye out and see if you can spot one.

Also contrary to BH belief, they can drive that way for a while. They don't just blow a tire, roll over, and burst into flames because they didn't have perfect tire pressure in all four tires.

Disclaimer, I have no experience at all with run flats, so those may be different. But regular tires are still regular tires.

What's it like to live in worst case scenario world all the time??

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Re: Tire Pressure Monitoring System failed: Replace or Ignore?

Post by Ged » Sat Jun 29, 2019 10:31 am

Broken Man 1999 wrote:
Sat Jun 29, 2019 9:36 am

I certainly would not pay $250. My independent tire service place quotes $150 to replace a set of TPMS as part of mounting 4 new tires.

A lot depends on who you are. Some people are diligent about checking tire pressure as a matter of habit. Others are not. It is a safety issue. I have seen someone neglect it to the point where they had a tire separate from the rim. For that person TPMS is a very good feature.
$250 might not be too bad. I scouted around for pricing for my replacement TPMS sensor and the lowest I found was $45.00. So that is $180 just for parts.

Broken Man 1999
[/quote]

Prices do vary tremendously.

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Re: Tire Pressure Monitoring System failed: Replace or Ignore?

Post by neilpilot » Sat Jun 29, 2019 11:24 am

chevca wrote:
Sat Jun 29, 2019 10:07 am
Contrary to popular BH beliefs, you can visually see if a tire is low nowadays. I see folks driving with one or more low tires often. Keep an eye out and see if you can spot one.

Also contrary to BH belief, they can drive that way for a while. They don't just blow a tire, roll over, and burst into flames because they didn't have perfect tire pressure in all four tires.

Disclaimer, I have no experience at all with run flats, so those may be different. But regular tires are still regular tires.

What's it like to live in worst case scenario world all the time??
I also often see low tires, but those tire are the ones that are extremely low. I'd wager that for every low tire you see, there are dozens that are significantly below recommended pressure but not to the extreme that it becomes visually obvious.

As to how long you can drive before the tire becomes dangerous, I would think that would depend to a large extent on the rate of leakage. Even though both of my 2 cars have a functional TPMS, I still manually check tire pressure monthly, at the same time I check oil, brake and coolant fluid levels.

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Re: Tire Pressure Monitoring System failed: Replace or Ignore?

Post by tibbitts » Sat Jun 29, 2019 11:48 am

Nowizard wrote:
Sat Jun 29, 2019 10:00 am
Tibbits: Your comment is certainly true, but in terms of risk and aggravation, I am fine with a monitoring system being present, so long as it works. If it quits, the cost and aggravation of fixing it is not compensated for by the risk of what you say occurring. That could change if there was ever an occurrence such as you describe, however.

Tim
As you point out, maybe the point really is that people who've experienced this situation yourself a few times would put more priority on repairing the TPMS. It's certainly not an emergency repair, but something I would try to get to before too long. Maybe if I just drove the car short distances around town in familiar areas I'd put less priority on the repair.

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Re: Tire Pressure Monitoring System failed: Replace or Ignore?

Post by Jack FFR1846 » Sat Jun 29, 2019 2:07 pm

Afty wrote:
Fri Jun 28, 2019 11:57 am

271 people died at least partially because of low tire pressure in Ford Explorers with Firestone tires: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Firestone ... ontroversy

That led to Congress passing the TREAD act, which mandated TPMS in new cars.
I would argue that 271 people died because Ford let marketing weenies over-ride engineering decisions. Both Firestone and Ford's own engineers recommended a higher air pressure than the marketing weenies wanted. Why did the weenies want the lower pressure? Because the ride is smoother and more cushy with lower pressure. But handling suffers and tires heat up much more. So people with properly inflated tires (according to the sticker on the Explorer) could very well be in danger.
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Re: Tire Pressure Monitoring System failed: Replace or Ignore?

Post by SlowMovingInvestor » Sat Jun 29, 2019 3:07 pm

neilpilot wrote:
Sat Jun 29, 2019 7:08 am
SlowMovingInvestor wrote:
Fri Jun 28, 2019 6:21 pm
To add to this tread/thread :)

How much would approx. costs be for the typical OEM TPMS (including install at a non dealer shop) ? $70 was cited above, but checking to see which sensor is gone may add a little if one takes it to a shop ? I don't know if it's possible to check with a multimeter or some other device , or whether they have to attach an underinflated tire to each wheel and see if the light comes on ?
Neither method works. A bad sensor almost always is due to a discharged battery. There’s a handheld radio receiver designed for this. Takes a minute. Just hold it near each wheel. Remember that you can have more than 1 sensor out.
That's with newer sensors, right ? One of my cars with TPMS systems is nearly 15 years old, and I think it may be using an older system. I guess my question is whether a competent shop can do it, or whether I would have to go to a dealer for an old car ?

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Re: Tire Pressure Monitoring System failed: Replace or Ignore?

Post by Broken Man 1999 » Sat Jun 29, 2019 3:35 pm

SlowMovingInvestor wrote:
Sat Jun 29, 2019 3:07 pm
neilpilot wrote:
Sat Jun 29, 2019 7:08 am
SlowMovingInvestor wrote:
Fri Jun 28, 2019 6:21 pm
To add to this tread/thread :)

How much would approx. costs be for the typical OEM TPMS (including install at a non dealer shop) ? $70 was cited above, but checking to see which sensor is gone may add a little if one takes it to a shop ? I don't know if it's possible to check with a multimeter or some other device , or whether they have to attach an underinflated tire to each wheel and see if the light comes on ?
Neither method works. A bad sensor almost always is due to a discharged battery. There’s a handheld radio receiver designed for this. Takes a minute. Just hold it near each wheel. Remember that you can have more than 1 sensor out.
That's with newer sensors, right ? One of my cars with TPMS systems is nearly 15 years old, and I think it may be using an older system. I guess my question is whether a competent shop can do it, or whether I would have to go to a dealer for an old car ?
I can't imagine you would need to involve the dealer for this activity. Just go to Amazon and price out the parts. Any decent tire source, such as Costco, could easily do the job when you are purchasing new tires. Certainly would be cheapest to do the replacements all at once, as the sensors will continue to fail as the batteries die.

For the DIYers, one can buy a piece of equipment you could use to safely break the bead if you wanted to do so. I have seen such equipment at Harbor Freight, it doesn't have to be all that expensive, as you wouldn't be using it frequently like a tire place or dealer would.

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Re: Tire Pressure Monitoring System failed: Replace or Ignore?

Post by RobLyons » Sat Jun 29, 2019 3:47 pm

It's my belief that TPMS generally causes more nuisance warnings than important notifications.
Some are 28 to 35, others are 35 to 40, etc.. there is nothing dangerous about having tires 1psi over or under inflated.
You can generally see when a tire is a little under inflated and yes a tire pressure gauge is a cheap necessity


But to address OP, for $70 I would just do it...
"Great parenting sets the foundation for a better world"

Broken Man 1999
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Re: Tire Pressure Monitoring System failed: Replace or Ignore?

Post by Broken Man 1999 » Sat Jun 29, 2019 4:06 pm

RobLyons wrote:
Sat Jun 29, 2019 3:47 pm
It's my belief that TPMS generally causes more nuisance warnings than important notifications.
Some are 28 to 35, others are 35 to 40, etc.. there is nothing dangerous about having tires 1psi over or under inflated.
You can generally see when a tire is a little under inflated and yes a tire pressure gauge is a cheap necessity


But to address OP, for $70 I would just do it...
I can tell you the good/not good air pressure TPMS sensors aren't the wide range of 5-7 pounds PSI at all, for my particular vehicle's TPMS. I am only one data point, but that is what I have noticed. Your experience must be widely different than mine.

Broken Man 1999
“If I cannot drink Bourbon and smoke cigars in Heaven than I shall not go. " -Mark Twain

JackoC
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Re: Tire Pressure Monitoring System failed: Replace or Ignore?

Post by JackoC » Sat Jun 29, 2019 4:55 pm

tibbitts wrote:
Thu Jun 27, 2019 6:38 am
You're sure it costs $70 to replace even if you are replacing the tires at the same time? How old are the tires?
If replacing the tires at Costco I believe it's $45/wheel for TPMS sensors and installation and their prices are generally pretty similar to cheaper tire stores. Although like anything with car repair there would certainly be somebody somewhere (like a new car dealer) charging a lot more, and OTOH somebody who found the cheapest sensor and could remove the tire, install sensor and replace tire DIY it would be less, even without new tires. But assuming general good prices, non-DIY, it somewhat depends how much longer you're keeping the car, and assuming that's long enough to get new tires, how soon are you getting those?

miles monroe
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Re: Tire Pressure Monitoring System failed: Replace or Ignore?

Post by miles monroe » Sat Jun 29, 2019 4:57 pm

my dear grandmother used to say that people who don't fix their TPMS are "penny wise and pound foolish".

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SlowMovingInvestor
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Re: Tire Pressure Monitoring System failed: Replace or Ignore?

Post by SlowMovingInvestor » Sat Jun 29, 2019 5:12 pm

Broken Man 1999 wrote:
Sat Jun 29, 2019 3:35 pm
I can't imagine you would need to involve the dealer for this activity. Just go to Amazon and price out the parts. Any decent tire source, such as Costco, could easily do the job when you are purchasing new tires. Certainly would be cheapest to do the replacements all at once, as the sensors will continue to fail as the batteries die.
I didn't get a TPMS failure (light on permanently) on my car until it reached 13 years and 180K miles recently. That's why wonder if my sensors are battery based -- surely I would have had problems much earlier if they were since the batteries likely wouldn't have lasted that long ?
Last edited by SlowMovingInvestor on Sat Jun 29, 2019 5:13 pm, edited 1 time in total.

RobLyons
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Re: Tire Pressure Monitoring System failed: Replace or Ignore?

Post by RobLyons » Sat Jun 29, 2019 5:12 pm

Broken Man 1999 wrote:
Sat Jun 29, 2019 4:06 pm
RobLyons wrote:
Sat Jun 29, 2019 3:47 pm
It's my belief that TPMS generally causes more nuisance warnings than important notifications.
Some are 28 to 35, others are 35 to 40, etc.. there is nothing dangerous about having tires 1psi over or under inflated.
You can generally see when a tire is a little under inflated and yes a tire pressure gauge is a cheap necessity


But to address OP, for $70 I would just do it...
I can tell you the good/not good air pressure TPMS sensors aren't the wide range of 5-7 pounds PSI at all, for my particular vehicle's TPMS. I am only one data point, but that is what I have noticed. Your experience must be widely different than mine.

Broken Man 1999

The numbers provided were based on industry wide standards/averages
"Great parenting sets the foundation for a better world"

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Doom&Gloom
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Re: Tire Pressure Monitoring System failed: Replace or Ignore?

Post by Doom&Gloom » Sat Jun 29, 2019 5:33 pm

The TPMS on my 2004 (270,000+ miles) auto (that DS was driving) began malfunctioning last year. I told him to ignore it--not going to put any unnecessary money into a car that I will probably be donating later this year. Now DW is using that vehicle as her daily driver until Fall/Winter when it will be donated and she will get a new vehicle. DS is in a newer vehicle of his own.

If my 2014 vehicle develops a malfunctioning TPMS in the foreseeable future, I will have it fixed. My stance is obviously: it depends.

Broken Man 1999
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Re: Tire Pressure Monitoring System failed: Replace or Ignore?

Post by Broken Man 1999 » Sat Jun 29, 2019 6:08 pm

SlowMovingInvestor wrote:
Sat Jun 29, 2019 5:12 pm
Broken Man 1999 wrote:
Sat Jun 29, 2019 3:35 pm
I can't imagine you would need to involve the dealer for this activity. Just go to Amazon and price out the parts. Any decent tire source, such as Costco, could easily do the job when you are purchasing new tires. Certainly would be cheapest to do the replacements all at once, as the sensors will continue to fail as the batteries die.
I didn't get a TPMS failure (light on permanently) on my car until it reached 13 years and 180K miles recently. That's why wonder if my sensors are battery based -- surely I would have had problems much earlier if they were since the batteries likely wouldn't have lasted that long ?
Not necessarily. My van is a 2008, three of the sensors are still working fine. So they are 10-11 years old, depending on the build date of my van. I have read that extended battery life is possible in cooler areas.

BTW, back when I was looking for a replacement, I noticed an after-market TPMS system that had a small readout panel you could put on your dashboard that was charged by solar. The sensors were via valve stem caps. IIRC, the whole system was about $40-$50.

Might look for it on Amazon, as that is where I saw it. No idea whether it is good/bad/indifferent. Take a look, might work for you.

Broken Man 1999
“If I cannot drink Bourbon and smoke cigars in Heaven than I shall not go. " -Mark Twain

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