Sports classes in Universities

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NotWhoYouThink
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Joined: Fri Dec 26, 2014 4:19 pm

Re: Sports classes in Universities

Post by NotWhoYouThink » Thu Jun 13, 2019 9:36 am

BuckyBadger wrote:
Thu Jun 13, 2019 9:16 am
deikel wrote:
Thu Jun 13, 2019 8:20 am
BuckyBadger wrote:
Fri Jun 07, 2019 4:57 pm
There's a large sub set of universities that have a pledge that all their students have to know how to swim well enough so as to not drown! I remember having to take a swim test at freshman orientation and those who failed had to take swim classes.

I think you had to just tread water for a few minutes and make it from one end of the pool to the other. Skill and grace were not required.
Not trying to derail the post, but this seems odd to me. Its certainly nice if you can swim and at a time with rampant obesity forcing students to some physical exercise is a good idea for sure. But being able to swim in a pool might help you not to drown in a puddle of water maybe. But seriously, when you go overboard at sea your chances of surviving in the water for more than a couple of minutes are pretty independent of swimming lessons in a pool (clothes, temperature, waves, weather, panic and exhaustion).

I once was a decent swimmer and had the opportunity to partake in a rescue class - dragging someone from one end to the pool to the other - I was shocked how difficult that is, how exhausted I was and what a difference it makes to wear clothes (not even having the challenge of temperature or waves)....being able to swim is no marker for drowning survival as far as I am concerned, if you don't wear a 'flotation device' you are toast...
Well, since testing is in the ocean would be difficult in Indiana I'm sure they did the best that they could ☺️

My experience swimming in open water during triathlons versus training in a pool definitely tracks with your statement that it's easier to swim in a pool.

However, I'm sure you would agree that someone who can tread water in a pool is at at least a bit of an advantage over someone who drowns in a pool.

And until they put us through Army Ranger training and dump us in the water fully clothed and with 50 pounds of gear strapped to us i think the pool is better that nothing.

It was a real risk in previous wars. And not a bad life skill for anyone.
If you wanted to learn how to survive in the water, Georgia Tech had just the course for you. From 1940 until 1987, drownproofing, a method for surviving in the water for long periods of time, was a required course for Georgia Tech students. Coach Freddy Lanoue, who taught the class until the mid-1960s, developed the drownproofing technique in response to events happening in the world at that time. He indicated that more navy sailors had drowned during World War II than were killed by artillery fire because they could not survive in the water for long periods of time if their ship was sunk.

The objective of the course was for the student to be able to float in deep water for as long as he could stay awake. For most, this could be well over 24 hours. The key to survival is to be able to vertically lie in the water with only the top of your head exposed. It’s possible to float this way because most individuals’ body density is 98% water. The process is to take a deep breath, let your body go limp while 98% of it is submerged, let out about a third of your breath, and allow yourself to “hang” in the water. When you are ready for another breath, exhale, and move one arm or leg enough so that you can lift your head out of the water and take another deep breath. Again, let your head submerge with only the top back part of it above the water line. By repeating this procedure, you can float in the water as long as you can stay awake.

oldfatguy
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Re: Sports classes in Universities

Post by oldfatguy » Thu Jun 13, 2019 9:59 am

NotWhoYouThink wrote:
Mon Jun 10, 2019 12:08 pm
If you are paying for college, you can set requirements like making his grades available, and taking PE classes or joining an intramural team. My parents required 2 years of a foreign language, even though my degree didn't require that. I figured it out.
How can the OP require that? Maybe you mean that he can refuse the pay for college if the son doesn't meet his demands?

Personally, I wouldn't recommend that. YMMV.

NotWhoYouThink
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Re: Sports classes in Universities

Post by NotWhoYouThink » Thu Jun 13, 2019 10:15 am

I think it is fair to put limits on what you will and won't pay for. The president of the college my son attended recommended to students at orientation that they take at least one class that makes their parents say "I'm paying $XXXXX for you to take THAT?????" So there will be some back and forth. But at 18 students are old enough to make a decision about whether to accept their parents' money and play by their rules, or whether to strike out on their own.

It helps if in the previous 18 years the parents have established a track record of
- not being petty tyrants imposing their will on every little decision
- not making ultimatums they aren't willing to back up

CheCha54
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Re: Sports classes in Universities

Post by CheCha54 » Thu Jun 13, 2019 10:20 am

Many years ago Georgia Tech required two classes for all students, Swimming and Aerobics. The Swimming class was actually drown proofing modeled after the Naval Aviator survival training. It was actually taught in the Naval Armory pool on campus. The Aerobics class was modeled after the Army fitness test. As soon as you could run the distance in the required time, etc. you had completed the course. For some these classes were an obstacle to graduation. I don't think they have these requirements today.

oldfatguy
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Re: Sports classes in Universities

Post by oldfatguy » Thu Jun 13, 2019 10:58 am

NotWhoYouThink wrote:
Thu Jun 13, 2019 10:15 am
I think it is fair to put limits on what you will and won't pay for.
I think it is reasonable (and necessary for most) to put limits on how much one is willing to pay for college, but I don't think parents should meddle in things like course selection or choice of program/major.

stoptothink
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Re: Sports classes in Universities

Post by stoptothink » Thu Jun 13, 2019 11:04 am

Thank heavens I was a college athlete. I would have had a hard time paying the ridiculous fee and wasting a lot of time to satisfy my university's PE requirements.

NotWhoYouThink
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Re: Sports classes in Universities

Post by NotWhoYouThink » Thu Jun 13, 2019 12:46 pm

Some colleges require the PE course even for varsity athletes. Not much standardization out there, it depends on the school.

NotWhoYouThink
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Re: Sports classes in Universities

Post by NotWhoYouThink » Thu Jun 13, 2019 12:48 pm

CheCha54 wrote:
Thu Jun 13, 2019 10:20 am
Many years ago Georgia Tech required two classes for all male students, Swimming and Aerobics. The Swimming class was actually drown proofing modeled after the Naval Aviator survival training. It was actually taught in the Naval Armory pool on campus. The Aerobics class was modeled after the Army fitness test. As soon as you could run the distance in the required time, etc. you had completed the course. For some these classes were an obstacle to graduation. I don't think they have these requirements today.
Even after women were admitted to GT, the drownproofing course was required only for the men.

Topic Author
an_asker
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Re: Sports classes in Universities

Post by an_asker » Thu Jun 13, 2019 1:49 pm

NotWhoYouThink wrote:
Thu Jun 13, 2019 9:36 am
[...]
[...]The key to survival is to be able to vertically lie in the water with only the top of your head exposed. It’s possible to float this way because most individuals’ body density is 98% water. The process is to take a deep breath, let your body go limp while 98% of it is submerged, let out about a third of your breath, and allow yourself to “hang” in the water. When you are ready for another breath, exhale, and move one arm or leg enough so that you can lift your head out of the water and take another deep breath. Again, let your head submerge with only the top back part of it above the water line. By repeating this procedure, you can float in the water as long as you can stay awake.
DW has not learned swimming yet. She has tried - and abandoned - local YMCA classes. She cannot float on her front or back.

However, a couple of weeks back, we were at this lazy river at a local resort and I tried to get her to do my - what I call The Frog Position (for lack of a better term) - technique. It involves bending your body back and holding on to your toes behind your back (so you essentially look like a wheel if you have the right figure - I confess I don't LOL) and keeping your upper face out of the water. With a little support from me, that worked like a charm. The first time, she drank a bit of water through her nose, but after that was able to keep the position and keep her nose and mouth out of the water. So, that's a start. Now we need to go the lazy river once more ;-)

I've done the "hang" thing as well - works very well for me! I don't even move my head to take those breaths. My Frog Position technique is just an extension of this (which I figured out after doing the "hang").

That said, I am not sure this technique would work in open water (at all) - especially in the seas where you'll get hit with waves which'll thrust water into your nose and mouth.

Topic Author
an_asker
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Re: Sports classes in Universities

Post by an_asker » Thu Jun 13, 2019 1:52 pm

stoptothink wrote:
Thu Jun 13, 2019 11:04 am
Thank heavens I was a college athlete. I would have had a hard time paying the ridiculous fee and wasting a lot of time to satisfy my university's PE requirements.
As far as I recall, I had to pay somewhere between $100-$200 (which will likely be double that in today's $$s), but thought it was well worth it for the friends I made and the time I spent on the courts (or the pool). Unfortunately, I don't have their contact information - needless to say, had it been today, I would have them all as my contacts. So a good way to make contacts as well. I am of the opinion that someone who plays hard and plays fair on the field would do the same in real life as well and would be a great friend to have.

quantAndHold
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Re: Sports classes in Universities

Post by quantAndHold » Thu Jun 13, 2019 1:54 pm

stoptothink wrote:
Thu Jun 13, 2019 11:04 am
Thank heavens I was a college athlete. I would have had a hard time paying the ridiculous fee and wasting a lot of time to satisfy my university's PE requirements.
My school charged the same tuition for 12-18 hours. Taking a 1 credit PE class was basically free, unless I had already masochistically signed up for 18 units.

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