Santa Fe real estate

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Valuethinker
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Re: Santa Fe real estate

Post by Valuethinker » Mon Jun 03, 2019 5:47 pm

BBQ Nut wrote:
Mon Jun 03, 2019 4:12 pm
Valuethinker wrote:
Mon Jun 03, 2019 12:18 pm
The summer heat, of course. Poisonous snakes. Wild animals taking down domestic pets etc. Water use restrictions....
You just described San Diego inland areas (about 30 minutes from the coast). :oops:
Did the OP say that he already lived in an alpine desert climatic zone?

I missed it if he did.

BBQ Nut
Posts: 129
Joined: Sun Jun 22, 2014 9:19 am

Re: Santa Fe real estate

Post by BBQ Nut » Mon Jun 03, 2019 6:04 pm

Valuethinker wrote:
Mon Jun 03, 2019 5:47 pm
BBQ Nut wrote:
Mon Jun 03, 2019 4:12 pm
Valuethinker wrote:
Mon Jun 03, 2019 12:18 pm
The summer heat, of course. Poisonous snakes. Wild animals taking down domestic pets etc. Water use restrictions....
You just described San Diego inland areas (about 30 minutes from the coast). :oops:
Did the OP say that he already lived in an alpine desert climatic zone?

I missed it if he did.
No, was just commenting on the negative connotations of what Santa Fe is *really* like.

What you described is not exclusive to an 'alpine desert climatic zone'.

Topic Author
SC Anteater
Posts: 225
Joined: Thu Jan 10, 2019 6:50 pm

Re: Santa Fe real estate

Post by SC Anteater » Mon Jun 03, 2019 6:38 pm

Valuethinker wrote:
Mon Jun 03, 2019 5:47 pm
BBQ Nut wrote:
Mon Jun 03, 2019 4:12 pm
Valuethinker wrote:
Mon Jun 03, 2019 12:18 pm
The summer heat, of course. Poisonous snakes. Wild animals taking down domestic pets etc. Water use restrictions....
You just described San Diego inland areas (about 30 minutes from the coast). :oops:
Did the OP say that he already lived in an alpine desert climatic zone?

I missed it if he did.
OP lives in the inland side of the Bay Area. Tomorrow's high is going to be 90 and the next day 91.

OP also grew up in the Pasadena area without A/C. Santa Fe weather seems delightful by comparison.

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jabberwockOG
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Re: Santa Fe real estate

Post by jabberwockOG » Mon Jun 03, 2019 7:41 pm

We looked hard at SF for retirement. We had visited many times over the years, loved it, seemed like a good fit for us checking a lot of boxes. Three factors ultimately weighed against it for us to choose a different retirement location. Strongly agree with folks posting to rent for a full year first before buying if possible.

1. We were both negatively affected by the extreme dryness of the air, especially when visiting for more than a few days. For us the SF air quickly drys out skin and nasal/sinus passages bad enough to cause frequent nose bleeds.

2. Because of the altitude, winters in SF can be very cold, and we want little to no ice and snow to deal with as we aged over time.

3. Over the years the average number of tourists in town and the resultant auto traffic and crowds in restaurants, etc has significantly increased to the point where we felt it would be intrusive to daily living.

IMO
Posts: 477
Joined: Fri May 05, 2017 6:01 pm

Re: Santa Fe real estate

Post by IMO » Mon Jun 03, 2019 7:54 pm

GingerandPiper wrote:
Mon Jun 03, 2019 5:14 pm
I am a SF local. I know many people who live in the area you're looking at. They happen to live at Las Campanas but my husband and I also rented a home in La Tierra. I play pickleball with a realtor who is familiar with 'higher end" homes and lives in that area.

As for living full time in SF, it took me the second year before I really felt at home - like knew the short cuts - where to go for this and that - found friends - and generally felt at home. People love its "smallness" - easy to get anywhere, neighborhood ski area (really good this year!) the incredible hiking available and of course the cuisine. While I love art, I don't "gallery hop" but appreciate art popping up in odd places - like I was at an intersection and there was a bronze horse tucked behind a tree. Charming.

This year I played in the Senior Olympics at Chavez Rec center and played with people who've lived in SF for generations. I also belong to the Santa Fe Tennis and Swim Club on Museum Hill. One of the most beautiful tennis clubs I've seen. I also play bridge at the Leonard Helman Bridge Center - an amazing facility for a town of this size. It's close to Marty Sanchez links that is the local "neighborhood" golf course. There's also Hipico - a world class center for equestrians.

Santa Fe is close to ABQ and only a 6 hour drive to Denver. I find I like to get out every few months and go to the "big city" for shopping primarily.

The only reason I've heard people leaving (other than wanting to be close to family) is because of health care - specialists primarily. They aren't compensated as well (I've been told) as other markets and after a while they leave. However, one hospital has just been designated as associated with the Mayo Clinic which is good.

Education: Public schools not the best, although private schools are terrific. But most residents I meet are highly educated. Many have migrated down from LANL.

Entertainment - lots of live entertainment and then of course, there's Meow Wolf but that's a yearly kind of thing. Good movie theaters and live theater. Also the world famous SF Opera - and you don't even have to like opera to appreciate what's out there. They've actually branched out and now in late August there's some concerts by popular entertainers.

Oh! Google Santa Fe Reporter. It's a local weekly paper that has tons of info.

Hope this helps. PM me if you have more questions.

Good luck!

Ginger
OP this is your best post on the topic. Had lived SF for over a decade recently. Some of the other posts, just seem a bit odd on the post topic in my opinion. As Ginger noted, it can take a year or two to have things feel like home, but can't see how that is different than any other relocation?

The area you are looking at is very nice, and within 5-10 minutes you can be in the historic downtown plaza. That area is well insulated from any of the negative aspects of Santa Fe, and the mentioned the public school issue would not be a problem for a retiree. A real estate agent could tell you why there's no hurry on those high end home sales, but I suspect they are 2nd homes of well-to-do individuals who aren't in a hurry to sell. While that price range would be unheard of in San Francisco, that is definitively higher end in for most professionals in Santa Fe.

I'll add in for weather, since you're familiar with Flagstaff summers:
Both Santa Fe (SF)/Flag are at about the same 7,000 ft elevation. Flagstaff is a bit cooler in the summer as most don't have AC there, and SF does tend to be relatively a bit hotter and swamp coolers and AC are the norm for the area. But like Flagstaff, one gets regular monsoons that can cool off the area, keep the air cleaned out, and any dust down. Both those areas have some of the highest ranking air quality in the country, and both areas can get smoke from fires, but that's not actually usually a big impact (because of the monsoons). I would contrast that to another locale you noted (Auburn) which can be significantly impacted by NoCal fires where one does not get the cleansing effect of monsoons (except rarely). For winters, there is no appreciable difference in winter temperatures. Flagstaff does get about 3x the snow as SF, but SF can get it's periods of snow but they do tend to clear quicker. SF commonly has 50+ mile visibility with some of the bluest skies I've experienced along with outstanding sunsets. A huge plus, there are hardly any flying bugs in the state.

Landscaping is xeroscaping and a few aspens typically. Water costs were mentioned by someone, not sure why that even would be mentioned? I think we spent $50-60 on water and sewer bills combined. I know areas in PHX that are way more expensive on water (should one not move to PHX because of the water cost?)

Sounds like your an outdoors person. SF really has it all (and I'm definitely below pickleball age). The local mountain is alot of fun and is underrated because Taos in nearby. Most of the town doesn't even ski, the crowds come from Texan's vacationing there (winter/summer). Plus there's a number of other small mountains that all have something positive to them. Mountain biking, hiking, river rafting (Taos Gorge/and near Abiquiu), boating (ie. Abiquiu Resevoir), golfing, and other things. I don't know if I qualify Denver being close, but for further activities one can go north to Taos/Red River/Angel Fire/Los Alamos quickly and a bit further out is Pagosa Springs and Durango.

There is the famous opera if that's one's thing (not my thing), and there are a few casino's that are in easy driving distance for other concerts (personally recommend heading to Sandia Casino in ABQ for great outdoor venue). There's obviously ongoing art viewing. Plenty of restaurants be it for locals or for tourists.

Whenever people criticize an area like Santa Fe for lack of things to do , I must admit I'm a bit confused on what type of lifestyle they lead? I suspect it's not outdoor oriented?

Healthcare is improving with a newly added 2nd hospital (Presbyterian) and if something isn't available in SF, it is likely available in ABQ. There can be exceptions, but that would be for some very uncommon specialties/services.

There's pretty much all the big box stores like Home Depot, Lowe's, Best Buy, Walmart, etc.

SF has an airport, but doesn't work for most people as the flights are limited and it's always less expensive to drive to ABQ (or take the Roadrunner train). Parking is very cheap next to airport. Airport is great EXCEPT for early morning flights that head east, when possible take afternoon and evening flights.

Not personally a fan of ABQ, but should something not be in SF, it's an easy drive to get there/back.

You can always PM if have questions about anything else. But bottom line, there are many much much worse places one can retire to in the country.

gogleheads.orb
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Re: Santa Fe real estate

Post by gogleheads.orb » Tue Jun 04, 2019 8:13 am

Have you considered Taos?

Valuethinker
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Re: Santa Fe real estate

Post by Valuethinker » Tue Jun 04, 2019 9:16 am

BBQ Nut wrote:
Mon Jun 03, 2019 6:04 pm
Valuethinker wrote:
Mon Jun 03, 2019 5:47 pm
BBQ Nut wrote:
Mon Jun 03, 2019 4:12 pm
Valuethinker wrote:
Mon Jun 03, 2019 12:18 pm
The summer heat, of course. Poisonous snakes. Wild animals taking down domestic pets etc. Water use restrictions....
You just described San Diego inland areas (about 30 minutes from the coast). :oops:
Did the OP say that he already lived in an alpine desert climatic zone?

I missed it if he did.
No, was just commenting on the negative connotations of what Santa Fe is *really* like.

What you described is not exclusive to an 'alpine desert climatic zone'.
My apologies. I was trying to be more precise than just saying "a desert". There's lots of merits to living in a desert climate - but like all these things the tolerance for, and suitedness to, varies by person.

I wasn't aware that the OP lived in San Diego inland areas, or equivalent?

Topic Author
SC Anteater
Posts: 225
Joined: Thu Jan 10, 2019 6:50 pm

Re: Santa Fe real estate

Post by SC Anteater » Tue Jun 04, 2019 10:44 am

IMO wrote:
Mon Jun 03, 2019 7:54 pm
GingerandPiper wrote:
Mon Jun 03, 2019 5:14 pm
I am a SF local. I know many people who live in the area you're looking at. They happen to live at Las Campanas but my husband and I also rented a home in La Tierra. I play pickleball with a realtor who is familiar with 'higher end" homes and lives in that area.

As for living full time in SF, it took me the second year before I really felt at home - like knew the short cuts - where to go for this and that - found friends - and generally felt at home. People love its "smallness" - easy to get anywhere, neighborhood ski area (really good this year!) the incredible hiking available and of course the cuisine. While I love art, I don't "gallery hop" but appreciate art popping up in odd places - like I was at an intersection and there was a bronze horse tucked behind a tree. Charming.

This year I played in the Senior Olympics at Chavez Rec center and played with people who've lived in SF for generations. I also belong to the Santa Fe Tennis and Swim Club on Museum Hill. One of the most beautiful tennis clubs I've seen. I also play bridge at the Leonard Helman Bridge Center - an amazing facility for a town of this size. It's close to Marty Sanchez links that is the local "neighborhood" golf course. There's also Hipico - a world class center for equestrians.

Santa Fe is close to ABQ and only a 6 hour drive to Denver. I find I like to get out every few months and go to the "big city" for shopping primarily.

The only reason I've heard people leaving (other than wanting to be close to family) is because of health care - specialists primarily. They aren't compensated as well (I've been told) as other markets and after a while they leave. However, one hospital has just been designated as associated with the Mayo Clinic which is good.

Education: Public schools not the best, although private schools are terrific. But most residents I meet are highly educated. Many have migrated down from LANL.

Entertainment - lots of live entertainment and then of course, there's Meow Wolf but that's a yearly kind of thing. Good movie theaters and live theater. Also the world famous SF Opera - and you don't even have to like opera to appreciate what's out there. They've actually branched out and now in late August there's some concerts by popular entertainers.

Oh! Google Santa Fe Reporter. It's a local weekly paper that has tons of info.

Hope this helps. PM me if you have more questions.

Good luck!

Ginger
OP this is your best post on the topic. Had lived SF for over a decade recently. Some of the other posts, just seem a bit odd on the post topic in my opinion. As Ginger noted, it can take a year or two to have things feel like home, but can't see how that is different than any other relocation?

The area you are looking at is very nice, and within 5-10 minutes you can be in the historic downtown plaza. That area is well insulated from any of the negative aspects of Santa Fe, and the mentioned the public school issue would not be a problem for a retiree. A real estate agent could tell you why there's no hurry on those high end home sales, but I suspect they are 2nd homes of well-to-do individuals who aren't in a hurry to sell. While that price range would be unheard of in San Francisco, that is definitively higher end in for most professionals in Santa Fe.

I'll add in for weather, since you're familiar with Flagstaff summers:
Both Santa Fe (SF)/Flag are at about the same 7,000 ft elevation. Flagstaff is a bit cooler in the summer as most don't have AC there, and SF does tend to be relatively a bit hotter and swamp coolers and AC are the norm for the area. But like Flagstaff, one gets regular monsoons that can cool off the area, keep the air cleaned out, and any dust down. Both those areas have some of the highest ranking air quality in the country, and both areas can get smoke from fires, but that's not actually usually a big impact (because of the monsoons). I would contrast that to another locale you noted (Auburn) which can be significantly impacted by NoCal fires where one does not get the cleansing effect of monsoons (except rarely). For winters, there is no appreciable difference in winter temperatures. Flagstaff does get about 3x the snow as SF, but SF can get it's periods of snow but they do tend to clear quicker. SF commonly has 50+ mile visibility with some of the bluest skies I've experienced along with outstanding sunsets. A huge plus, there are hardly any flying bugs in the state.

Landscaping is xeroscaping and a few aspens typically. Water costs were mentioned by someone, not sure why that even would be mentioned? I think we spent $50-60 on water and sewer bills combined. I know areas in PHX that are way more expensive on water (should one not move to PHX because of the water cost?)

Sounds like your an outdoors person. SF really has it all (and I'm definitely below pickleball age). The local mountain is alot of fun and is underrated because Taos in nearby. Most of the town doesn't even ski, the crowds come from Texan's vacationing there (winter/summer). Plus there's a number of other small mountains that all have something positive to them. Mountain biking, hiking, river rafting (Taos Gorge/and near Abiquiu), boating (ie. Abiquiu Resevoir), golfing, and other things. I don't know if I qualify Denver being close, but for further activities one can go north to Taos/Red River/Angel Fire/Los Alamos quickly and a bit further out is Pagosa Springs and Durango.

There is the famous opera if that's one's thing (not my thing), and there are a few casino's that are in easy driving distance for other concerts (personally recommend heading to Sandia Casino in ABQ for great outdoor venue). There's obviously ongoing art viewing. Plenty of restaurants be it for locals or for tourists.

Whenever people criticize an area like Santa Fe for lack of things to do , I must admit I'm a bit confused on what type of lifestyle they lead? I suspect it's not outdoor oriented?

Healthcare is improving with a newly added 2nd hospital (Presbyterian) and if something isn't available in SF, it is likely available in ABQ. There can be exceptions, but that would be for some very uncommon specialties/services.

There's pretty much all the big box stores like Home Depot, Lowe's, Best Buy, Walmart, etc.

SF has an airport, but doesn't work for most people as the flights are limited and it's always less expensive to drive to ABQ (or take the Roadrunner train). Parking is very cheap next to airport. Airport is great EXCEPT for early morning flights that head east, when possible take afternoon and evening flights.

Not personally a fan of ABQ, but should something not be in SF, it's an easy drive to get there/back.

You can always PM if have questions about anything else. But bottom line, there are many much much worse places one can retire to in the country.
Thanks, this is all great!

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SC Anteater
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Re: Santa Fe real estate

Post by SC Anteater » Tue Jun 04, 2019 10:45 am

gogleheads.orb wrote:
Tue Jun 04, 2019 8:13 am
Have you considered Taos?
Looked at it, and thought it was a little too small for me.

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SC Anteater
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Re: Santa Fe real estate

Post by SC Anteater » Tue Jun 04, 2019 10:48 am

jabberwockOG wrote:
Mon Jun 03, 2019 7:41 pm
We looked hard at SF for retirement. We had visited many times over the years, loved it, seemed like a good fit for us checking a lot of boxes. Three factors ultimately weighed against it for us to choose a different retirement location. Strongly agree with folks posting to rent for a full year first before buying if possible.

1. We were both negatively affected by the extreme dryness of the air, especially when visiting for more than a few days. For us the SF air quickly drys out skin and nasal/sinus passages bad enough to cause frequent nose bleeds.

2. Because of the altitude, winters in SF can be very cold, and we want little to no ice and snow to deal with as we aged over time.

3. Over the years the average number of tourists in town and the resultant auto traffic and crowds in restaurants, etc has significantly increased to the point where we felt it would be intrusive to daily living.
Yeah, my hands were pretty dry after our trip. Would definitely have to take preventative measure there.

Tourists put me off the square area. I felt kind of like I was at Pier 39 (for those Bay Areans). We stayed away from the square and ate elsewhere.

IMO
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Re: Santa Fe real estate

Post by IMO » Tue Jun 04, 2019 11:07 am

Valuethinker wrote:
Tue Jun 04, 2019 9:16 am
BBQ Nut wrote:
Mon Jun 03, 2019 6:04 pm
Valuethinker wrote:
Mon Jun 03, 2019 5:47 pm
BBQ Nut wrote:
Mon Jun 03, 2019 4:12 pm
Valuethinker wrote:
Mon Jun 03, 2019 12:18 pm
The summer heat, of course. Poisonous snakes. Wild animals taking down domestic pets etc. Water use restrictions....
You just described San Diego inland areas (about 30 minutes from the coast). :oops:
Did the OP say that he already lived in an alpine desert climatic zone?

I missed it if he did.
No, was just commenting on the negative connotations of what Santa Fe is *really* like.

What you described is not exclusive to an 'alpine desert climatic zone'.
My apologies. I was trying to be more precise than just saying "a desert". There's lots of merits to living in a desert climate - but like all these things the tolerance for, and suitedness to, varies by person.

I wasn't aware that the OP lived in San Diego inland areas, or equivalent?
Having lived in multiple areas SoCal and Santa Fe, I'm confused about people's perception of Santa Fe in the summer? Here's a google summary: How hot does it get in Santa Fe?
In Santa Fe, the summers are warm, the winters are freezing and snowy, and it is mostly clear year round. Over the course of the year, the temperature typically varies from 18°F to 83°F and is rarely below 7°F or above 90°F.


It's located at 7,000 ft and the summer temperatures are lower at that altitude (think Big Bear vs. LA) We personally NEVER used AC or a swamp cooler in the summer, just our ceiling fans and we had no pool. When a monsoon comes in the summer (and this is a very common experience) the weather cools off quickly and putting on a jacket is common when that happens. SoCal in contrast in the summer often goes above 90 degrees and very very rarely do you get rain. SoCal summers everything is brown and all the brush dries out, Santa Fe summers things are green and one can turn off any irrigation because of the monsoons. It's also a dry heat when their isn't a monsoon (that's why swamp coolers are common) and the only humidity that occurs is during the actual monsoons, but the clouds/rain compensate and cool it off significantly so there is no uncomfortable humidity like one would find in PHX summer monsoon season. Asides from living on the actual beach communities in SoCal, the summer weather in Santa Fe is superior to pretty much all anything 10 miles inland. And as I've noted, the air quality is night and day different and you don't have to worry/wonder what damage you're lungs are getting from smog, and there are not mosquitos (which is misery in itself).

Based on many areas of the mainland country I've visited in the summer, family experience living in other areas of the country, Santa Fe summers would be ranked in the top tier.

Just want to clear up these misperceptions...

Regarding Taos, our family has lived there also. For someone from CA, I'd say it's overall too small, lacks significant healthcare/services, and is too far from an airport for most people. It does provide a great alternative ski mountain and other outdoor activity that is an easy 75 mile drive.

IMO
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Re: Santa Fe real estate

Post by IMO » Tue Jun 04, 2019 11:14 am

SC Anteater wrote:
Tue Jun 04, 2019 10:48 am
jabberwockOG wrote:
Mon Jun 03, 2019 7:41 pm
We looked hard at SF for retirement. We had visited many times over the years, loved it, seemed like a good fit for us checking a lot of boxes. Three factors ultimately weighed against it for us to choose a different retirement location. Strongly agree with folks posting to rent for a full year first before buying if possible.

1. We were both negatively affected by the extreme dryness of the air, especially when visiting for more than a few days. For us the SF air quickly drys out skin and nasal/sinus passages bad enough to cause frequent nose bleeds.

2. Because of the altitude, winters in SF can be very cold, and we want little to no ice and snow to deal with as we aged over time.

3. Over the years the average number of tourists in town and the resultant auto traffic and crowds in restaurants, etc has significantly increased to the point where we felt it would be intrusive to daily living.
Yeah, my hands were pretty dry after our trip. Would definitely have to take preventative measure there.

Tourists put me off the square area. I felt kind of like I was at Pier 39 (for those Bay Areans). We stayed away from the square and ate elsewhere.
Dryness can be an issue for some, as can allergies from various plants (but that is very person specific).

There is cold/snow which is another misperception people don't realize.

Traffic/tourists? Are you comparing this to anywhere in SoCal or NoCal cities? This one made me laugh! :D
What's a fun contrast, fly out of ABQ airport Friday night and there will be almost no one there and then fly into LAX. Traffic/crowds hah hah ....
(due to traffic just took me 1/2 hr to go from rental car return at LAX to 1st terminal (Southwest) and it was for a midnight flight on a Monday)

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SC Anteater
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Re: Santa Fe real estate

Post by SC Anteater » Tue Jun 04, 2019 12:32 pm

IMO wrote:
Tue Jun 04, 2019 11:14 am
SC Anteater wrote:
Tue Jun 04, 2019 10:48 am
jabberwockOG wrote:
Mon Jun 03, 2019 7:41 pm
We looked hard at SF for retirement. We had visited many times over the years, loved it, seemed like a good fit for us checking a lot of boxes. Three factors ultimately weighed against it for us to choose a different retirement location. Strongly agree with folks posting to rent for a full year first before buying if possible.

1. We were both negatively affected by the extreme dryness of the air, especially when visiting for more than a few days. For us the SF air quickly drys out skin and nasal/sinus passages bad enough to cause frequent nose bleeds.

2. Because of the altitude, winters in SF can be very cold, and we want little to no ice and snow to deal with as we aged over time.

3. Over the years the average number of tourists in town and the resultant auto traffic and crowds in restaurants, etc has significantly increased to the point where we felt it would be intrusive to daily living.
Yeah, my hands were pretty dry after our trip. Would definitely have to take preventative measure there.

Tourists put me off the square area. I felt kind of like I was at Pier 39 (for those Bay Areans). We stayed away from the square and ate elsewhere.
Dryness can be an issue for some, as can allergies from various plants (but that is very person specific).

There is cold/snow which is another misperception people don't realize.

Traffic/tourists? Are you comparing this to anywhere in SoCal or NoCal cities? This one made me laugh! :D
What's a fun contrast, fly out of ABQ airport Friday night and there will be almost no one there and then fly into LAX. Traffic/crowds hah hah ....
(due to traffic just took me 1/2 hr to go from rental car return at LAX to 1st terminal (Southwest) and it was for a midnight flight on a Monday)
No, not traffic. Just the tourists wandering around the square and the perception that most of the businesses right on the square existed to serve the tourist trade (like Pier 39).

Had an excellent dinner at Paloma and hung out at the brewput at the Railyards and felt the folks in both places were more likely to be locals than all the folks I saw wandering around the square.

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JMacDonald
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Re: Santa Fe real estate

Post by JMacDonald » Tue Jun 04, 2019 1:14 pm

SC Anteater wrote:
Tue Jun 04, 2019 12:32 pm
IMO wrote:
Tue Jun 04, 2019 11:14 am
SC Anteater wrote:
Tue Jun 04, 2019 10:48 am
jabberwockOG wrote:
Mon Jun 03, 2019 7:41 pm
We looked hard at SF for retirement. We had visited many times over the years, loved it, seemed like a good fit for us checking a lot of boxes. Three factors ultimately weighed against it for us to choose a different retirement location. Strongly agree with folks posting to rent for a full year first before buying if possible.

1. We were both negatively affected by the extreme dryness of the air, especially when visiting for more than a few days. For us the SF air quickly drys out skin and nasal/sinus passages bad enough to cause frequent nose bleeds.

2. Because of the altitude, winters in SF can be very cold, and we want little to no ice and snow to deal with as we aged over time.

3. Over the years the average number of tourists in town and the resultant auto traffic and crowds in restaurants, etc has significantly increased to the point where we felt it would be intrusive to daily living.
Yeah, my hands were pretty dry after our trip. Would definitely have to take preventative measure there.

Tourists put me off the square area. I felt kind of like I was at Pier 39 (for those Bay Areans). We stayed away from the square and ate elsewhere.
Dryness can be an issue for some, as can allergies from various plants (but that is very person specific).

There is cold/snow which is another misperception people don't realize.

Traffic/tourists? Are you comparing this to anywhere in SoCal or NoCal cities? This one made me laugh! :D
What's a fun contrast, fly out of ABQ airport Friday night and there will be almost no one there and then fly into LAX. Traffic/crowds hah hah ....
(due to traffic just took me 1/2 hr to go from rental car return at LAX to 1st terminal (Southwest) and it was for a midnight flight on a Monday)
No, not traffic. Just the tourists wandering around the square and the perception that most of the businesses right on the square existed to serve the tourist trade (like Pier 39).

Had an excellent dinner at Paloma and hung out at the brewput at the Railyards and felt the folks in both places were more likely to be locals than all the folks I saw wandering around the square.
My first trip to Santa Fe was in 1982 for Santa Fe Opera. I went off and on for many years, but have been going very August for the past 15 years or so. I find it amusing that a tourist in Santa Fe is complaining about tourists. It is a great city, both for the opera and everything else Santa Fe offers. I am going again in August.
Best Wishes, | Joe

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SC Anteater
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Re: Santa Fe real estate

Post by SC Anteater » Tue Jun 04, 2019 1:52 pm

JMacDonald wrote:
Tue Jun 04, 2019 1:14 pm
SC Anteater wrote:
Tue Jun 04, 2019 12:32 pm
IMO wrote:
Tue Jun 04, 2019 11:14 am
SC Anteater wrote:
Tue Jun 04, 2019 10:48 am
jabberwockOG wrote:
Mon Jun 03, 2019 7:41 pm
We looked hard at SF for retirement. We had visited many times over the years, loved it, seemed like a good fit for us checking a lot of boxes. Three factors ultimately weighed against it for us to choose a different retirement location. Strongly agree with folks posting to rent for a full year first before buying if possible.

1. We were both negatively affected by the extreme dryness of the air, especially when visiting for more than a few days. For us the SF air quickly drys out skin and nasal/sinus passages bad enough to cause frequent nose bleeds.

2. Because of the altitude, winters in SF can be very cold, and we want little to no ice and snow to deal with as we aged over time.

3. Over the years the average number of tourists in town and the resultant auto traffic and crowds in restaurants, etc has significantly increased to the point where we felt it would be intrusive to daily living.
Yeah, my hands were pretty dry after our trip. Would definitely have to take preventative measure there.

Tourists put me off the square area. I felt kind of like I was at Pier 39 (for those Bay Areans). We stayed away from the square and ate elsewhere.
Dryness can be an issue for some, as can allergies from various plants (but that is very person specific).

There is cold/snow which is another misperception people don't realize.

Traffic/tourists? Are you comparing this to anywhere in SoCal or NoCal cities? This one made me laugh! :D
What's a fun contrast, fly out of ABQ airport Friday night and there will be almost no one there and then fly into LAX. Traffic/crowds hah hah ....
(due to traffic just took me 1/2 hr to go from rental car return at LAX to 1st terminal (Southwest) and it was for a midnight flight on a Monday)
No, not traffic. Just the tourists wandering around the square and the perception that most of the businesses right on the square existed to serve the tourist trade (like Pier 39).

Had an excellent dinner at Paloma and hung out at the brewput at the Railyards and felt the folks in both places were more likely to be locals than all the folks I saw wandering around the square.
My first trip to Santa Fe was in 1982 for Santa Fe Opera. I went off and on for many years, but have been going very August for the past 15 years or so. I find it amusing that a tourist in Santa Fe is complaining about tourists. It is a great city, both for the opera and everything else Santa Fe offers. I am going again in August.
Oh no doubt that's funny! Probably why I don't like to go to tourist hotspots though.

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