Island life?

Questions on how we spend our money and our time - consumer goods and services, home and vehicle, leisure and recreational activities
HIinvestor
Posts: 1833
Joined: Tue Apr 08, 2014 3:23 am

Re: Island life?

Post by HIinvestor » Fri May 10, 2019 4:03 am

I’ve lived on Oahu all but 6 years of my life. My siblings also live on Oahu, as do my parents. It’s home. I like it because my family all live here and most people are pretty friendly.

I don’t like the traffic so I try to minimize my driving during rush hour. Allergens are pretty fierce here for many people, including our young adult offspring who live on both coasts—CA & VA.

I would definitely advise trying things out for an extended period and having an exit plan if you decide it isn’t for you. The high cost of living & real estate are huge for many folks. It is also tough to find great healthcare. Many folks send their kids to private school which can cost $20K/year, last time I checked. Many of the jobs here pay considerably less than comparable jobs elsewhere.

Other than that, the climate is temperate, can do outdoor activities most of the year and no snakes! In general, our weather doesn’t have severe hurricanes often, not tidal waves.

Valuethinker
Posts: 39069
Joined: Fri May 11, 2007 11:07 am

Re: Island life?

Post by Valuethinker » Fri May 10, 2019 4:43 am

HIinvestor wrote:
Fri May 10, 2019 4:03 am
I’ve lived on Oahu all but 6 years of my life. My siblings also live on Oahu, as do my parents. It’s home. I like it because my family all live here and most people are pretty friendly.

I don’t like the traffic so I try to minimize my driving during rush hour. Allergens are pretty fierce here for many people, including our young adult offspring who live on both coasts—CA & VA.

I would definitely advise trying things out for an extended period and having an exit plan if you decide it isn’t for you. The high cost of living & real estate are huge for many folks. It is also tough to find great healthcare. Many folks send their kids to private school which can cost $20K/year, last time I checked. Many of the jobs here pay considerably less than comparable jobs elsewhere.

Other than that, the climate is temperate, can do outdoor activities most of the year and no snakes! In general, our weather doesn’t have severe hurricanes often, not tidal waves.
I gulped when you said "no tidal waves".

Not sure about the plate tectonics but Hawaii is a series of volcanic islands, some still active - this is very new land. That says to me there's a plate boundary there of some form.

That means that quakes are more than possible and therefore a tsunami must be possible?

"Men make plans. God laughs". Is a good way of summarizing the relationship between tectonics and the human race.

Winston19
Posts: 196
Joined: Mon Jan 21, 2019 5:42 pm

Re: Island life?

Post by Winston19 » Fri May 10, 2019 6:07 am

There definitely can be tsunamis. Just have not been all that frequent recent. https://www.civilbeat.org/2011/03/9558- ... in-hawaii/

Valuethinker
Posts: 39069
Joined: Fri May 11, 2007 11:07 am

Re: Island life?

Post by Valuethinker » Fri May 10, 2019 6:47 am

Winston19 wrote:
Fri May 10, 2019 6:07 am
There definitely can be tsunamis. Just have not been all that frequent recent. https://www.civilbeat.org/2011/03/9558- ... in-hawaii/
Historical Records List At Least 85 Tsunamis
The earliest tsunami on record in Hawaii was reported in 1813 or 1814, according to the Catalogue of Tsunamis in the Hawaiian Islands by George Pararas-Carayannis. At least 85 tsunamis have hit the islands since then, including 15 that caused significant damage. Only four originated near Hawaii — most came from the northwest Pacific and near South American coasts.

Famously, 62 people in Hilo were killed in 1837, many lured out onto the exposed reef by the fish that had been stranded by receding waters. Most drowned as soon as the 20-foot waves hit.
Thank you.

Very short historical record and at least 15 significant ones in that 200 year period. That to me is fairly significant.

At least via the warning system, Hawaii is alerted. I understand that the revelation -- that "the Big One" is not so much the San Andreas fault in California but the likely quake & associated tsunami off Oregon/ Washington State -- is taking a while to sink in. The plates appear to be locked in that locale so when the shocks do come they are big shocks whereas with the San Andreas the plates sliding releases accumulated energy. From what I read in the New Yorker, local authorities were not reacting (political and cost implications of relocating schools etc.).

The wave will come. The First Peoples knew of it, the Japanese had written records of it (of a tsunami without the accompanying earthquake) - but there was no European to record the last big wave in that part of the world. But it came (in the early 1700s) and it will come again.

Perhaps Hawaii by virtue of location will be less affected and/or will have a longer warning period.

But the wave will come.

smitcat
Posts: 4362
Joined: Mon Nov 07, 2016 10:51 am

Re: Island life?

Post by smitcat » Fri May 10, 2019 6:57 am

Valuethinker wrote:
Fri May 10, 2019 6:47 am
Winston19 wrote:
Fri May 10, 2019 6:07 am
There definitely can be tsunamis. Just have not been all that frequent recent. https://www.civilbeat.org/2011/03/9558- ... in-hawaii/
Historical Records List At Least 85 Tsunamis
The earliest tsunami on record in Hawaii was reported in 1813 or 1814, according to the Catalogue of Tsunamis in the Hawaiian Islands by George Pararas-Carayannis. At least 85 tsunamis have hit the islands since then, including 15 that caused significant damage. Only four originated near Hawaii — most came from the northwest Pacific and near South American coasts.

Famously, 62 people in Hilo were killed in 1837, many lured out onto the exposed reef by the fish that had been stranded by receding waters. Most drowned as soon as the 20-foot waves hit.
Thank you.

Very short historical record and at least 15 significant ones in that 200 year period. That to me is fairly significant.

At least via the warning system, Hawaii is alerted. I understand that the revelation -- that "the Big One" is not so much the San Andreas fault in California but the likely quake & associated tsunami off Oregon/ Washington State -- is taking a while to sink in. The plates appear to be locked in that locale so when the shocks do come they are big shocks whereas with the San Andreas the plates sliding releases accumulated energy. From what I read in the New Yorker, local authorities were not reacting (political and cost implications of relocating schools etc.).

The wave will come. The First Peoples knew of it, the Japanese had written records of it (of a tsunami without the accompanying earthquake) - but there was no European to record the last big wave in that part of the world. But it came (in the early 1700s) and it will come again.

Perhaps Hawaii by virtue of location will be less affected and/or will have a longer warning period.

But the wave will come.
I believe the likelihood of a Tsunami in that area will come from the Aleutian islands. About a 6% chance of a significant wave event - the quakes and volcanic activity are separate issues.

Post Reply