Denver in August

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akhilsam
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Denver in August

Post by akhilsam » Sat May 04, 2019 5:17 pm

Hi All,

I have about 8 nights avl. to travel with 2 boys(10 & 8) an and wife.
What can be covered in terms of National Parks - I mean circular trip starting form Denver and ending there.
Besides National Parks other suggestions are welcome too.

Appreciate feedback!

Dave55
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Location: Colorado

Re: Denver in August

Post by Dave55 » Sat May 04, 2019 5:35 pm

Rocky Mountain National Park at Estes Park, Mesa Verde, Great Sand Dunes, Black Canyon, Maroon Bells (near Aspen), Telluride, Durango and much more.

See More here:

https://www.colorado.com/articles/quick ... onal-parks

https://www.colorado.com

Dave

WildBill
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Re: Denver in August

Post by WildBill » Sat May 04, 2019 5:39 pm

Howdy

Lots and lots

Off the top of my head some of the greatest hits, sort of counterclockwise starting from Denver, and all great for kids

Mt Evans

Colorado Springs and Air Force Academy and Pikes Peak

Salida and river rafting

Montrose and Black Canyon of the Gunnison

Leadville and museums

Durango and Durango Siverton railway

Mesa Verde

Ouray and Telluride

Rocky Mountain National Park

Lots more
"Through chances various, through all vicissitudes, we make our way." Virgil, The Aeneid

GreenGrowTheDollars
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Re: Denver in August

Post by GreenGrowTheDollars » Sat May 04, 2019 6:45 pm

Dave55 wrote:
Sat May 04, 2019 5:35 pm
Rocky Mountain National Park at Estes Park, Mesa Verde, Great Sand Dunes, Black Canyon, Maroon Bells (near Aspen), Telluride, Durango and much more.

See More here:

https://www.colorado.com/articles/quick ... onal-parks

https://www.colorado.com

Dave
Drive from Denver through Boulder and up to Estes Park. I like Highway 7 - if you stop by Lily Lake, you can make an easy trek around the lake even before you get into the main National Park. Lots of ice cream and fudge in Estes. BRING JACKETS/SWEATSHIRTS, even in August. If you go into the Fall River entrance to Rocky Mountain National Park, you can easily go by Sheep Lake -- decent chance to see bighorn sheep. You can take either Fall River Road (twisty!, no RV's!) or Trail Ridge Road to get up over the divide. Stop up top to huff and puff up the small trails, look at marmots and pikas and admire the snowfields still there in August. The chilli at the visitor center is pretty decent. Head down towards Grand Lake (great place to stay) -- before you hit town, there is the Holzwarth Historic Site (Never Summer Ranch) with original buildings from the era of one of the early families, including lots of stuff kids can touch and play with while visiting. Grand Lake is one of the prettiest Colorado lakes, and a cute little town. You can get to the headwaters of the Colorado, and then enjoy how big it becomes as you head south and west.

From there you could work your way down to Granby and eventually to I-70 -- take it west. Some of the most beautiful highway territory in the country. Stopping in Glenwood Springs for a few hours in the huge pool is always a treat. Marble, Colorado is amazing (and more my style than Aspen) -- a hike along the Marble River is a wonder.

We like to pop up to the Grand Mesa and over the Mesa to Cedaredge. We had a blast at https://www.cedaredgelodge.com/ -- a funky motel with an incredible collection of games (skeeball, pinball, ...) for guests to play. Kids would love it. From there off to Palisade -- and August is peach season. Yum.

Maybe down to Black Canyon of the Gunnison. The town of Gunnison is cute, and just up the hill is Crested Butte -- more fun in the summer than the winter, imo. A bit east of Gunnison you can take Highway 76 -- a rather non-descript turnoff, but head up and you eventually pass the old town of Ohio City and then on to the old mining town of Pitkin. Great ice cream stop, old school house and quite a few old buildings.

A few things I'd skip: Mesa Verde is too hot in August. The Durango-Silverton railroad is a classic, but I'm not so into trains. YMMV.
I'd avoid Great Sand Dunes NP in August. There is no shade. It is tremendously hot.

Lots more of Colorado's mountain terrain to explore in the summer, depending on your interests. Rafting is available on many rivers.

radiowave
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Re: Denver in August

Post by radiowave » Sat May 04, 2019 6:57 pm

In addition to the great recommendations above, maybe Moab - yeah it's hot but very dry so bring plenty of water and rent a jeep or jeep tour. A couple hours further is Capital Reef NP south to Bryce, then back maybe to Grand Canyon north rim, but that is really stretching things.

Another option is to stay in a condo at one of the ski resorts (e.g. Breckenridge, Winter Park, etc, and hike, etc. Some of the resorts have mountain biking down the slopes, which can be a real treat. A bit south CO near Canyon City has rafting trips. At Rocky Mtn NP, take Trail Ridge Rd, over 11,000 ft, If you're coming from the airport Estes Park is under 2 hours, stay in town or the YMCA (very kid friendly) drive over Trail Ridge and head west to Steamboat Spring (hot springs) could be a good route. I agree Grand Mesa would be a good stay over. Cabins on one of the lakes and the Crags Crest trail takes you up over 10K but not too strenuous. And yes Cedaridge is an interesting town and several local farms have stores right out front with local fruits and wines. Colorado National Monument is also interesting east of Grand Junction but it's really hot and probably not a good time of year to go there, stay at altitude.
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HawkeyePierce
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Re: Denver in August

Post by HawkeyePierce » Sat May 04, 2019 7:50 pm

With eight days I'd probably split it in thirds if the goal is primarily outdoor adventures.

A couple days exploring Rocky Mountain National Park—base yourself in either Estes Park or Grand Lake (the western side of the park). Note that it will be very crowded in August.

From there, head down to Salida for a couple days. Lots to do in the area in terms of biking and hiking. You can mountain bike the Monarch Crest, raft the Arkansas River, hike the Collegiate Peaks, soak in the Mt. Princeton hot springs.

Finally I'd wrap up in Crested Butte. Great mountain town and the best place to view summer wildflowers in the whole state. You can day-trip from CB to Black Canyon of the Gunnison. Tons of great hiking and fly fishing in the surrounding area.

From CB back to the Denver Airport is about a five hour drive.

I'd probably spend two nights at Rocky, two in Salida and three in Crested Butte, but you'll have to decide for yourself based on the activities in each of them.

This itinerary keeps you at altitude to avoid the heat and avoids the worst of the crowds and expense at the major resort towns along I-70.

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fortfun
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Re: Denver in August

Post by fortfun » Sat May 04, 2019 8:40 pm

Here are a few suggestions.
1. Catch a baseball game at Coors Field. Hopefully, the Rockies are in town. Tour the Denver Mint (where they make US coins). Check out 16th st mall and the state capitol building.
2. You and your kids would have a great time spending one day at Water World. A really amazing water park. Get the Tube Valet pass.
3. For Rocky Mtn. National Park, you should basecamp in Estes Park. Hit Trail Ridge Road one day. Drive the entire road. Do some day hikes up around Bear Lake (Sprague Lake, Loch Lake, Mirror Lake, etc.)
4. Drive down to Colorado Springs. Visit Garden of the Gods. Drive to the top of Pikes Peak or better yet take the Cog Rail train.
5. Possibly drive to Aspen and over Independence Pass. There's a beautiful hike to an old mill just outside of Marble, Colorado (you've probably seen famous pictures.)
6. If there's time, visit Black Canyon National Park and then Crested Butte (may be too far out of the way).
7. Kids might be too young to raft the Arkansas River (Buena Vista to Salida) OR the Poudre River outside of Fort Collins. Water could be low in August but they should still be running both rivers. We've had good snow and spring run off so far.

Due to heat and the Medano Creek not running, Sand Dunes ntl park might not be great (too hot). However, if you can get there early, you can probably beat the heat--it's definitely worth seeing! I think Mesa Verde is a bit too far to drive for the time, but it is worth seeing.
Last edited by fortfun on Sun May 05, 2019 8:42 am, edited 2 times in total.

grainne
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Re: Denver in August

Post by grainne » Sat May 04, 2019 9:03 pm

Last August many parts of Colorado were dealing with heavy smoke and airborne particulates due to forest fires. If you have asthmatics on the trip, make sure to plan some indoor options like the Denver Museum of Nature and Science. There are lots of mining museums scattered in the mountains, which might interesting if you have any history buffs in the family.

Hope you enjoy trip!

adamthesmythe
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Re: Denver in August

Post by adamthesmythe » Sat May 04, 2019 9:34 pm

Expect afternoon thunderstorms.

Horsefly
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Re: Denver in August

Post by Horsefly » Sat May 04, 2019 10:24 pm

GreenGrowTheDollars wrote:
Sat May 04, 2019 6:45 pm
Dave55 wrote:
Sat May 04, 2019 5:35 pm
Rocky Mountain National Park at Estes Park, Mesa Verde, Great Sand Dunes, Black Canyon, Maroon Bells (near Aspen), Telluride, Durango and much more.

See More here:

https://www.colorado.com/articles/quick ... onal-parks

https://www.colorado.com

Dave
Drive from Denver through Boulder and up to Estes Park. I like Highway 7 - if you stop by Lily Lake, you can make an easy trek around the lake even before you get into the main National Park. Lots of ice cream and fudge in Estes. BRING JACKETS/SWEATSHIRTS, even in August. If you go into the Fall River entrance to Rocky Mountain National Park, you can easily go by Sheep Lake -- decent chance to see bighorn sheep. You can take either Fall River Road (twisty!, no RV's!) or Trail Ridge Road to get up over the divide. Stop up top to huff and puff up the small trails, look at marmots and pikas and admire the snowfields still there in August. The chilli at the visitor center is pretty decent. Head down towards Grand Lake (great place to stay) -- before you hit town, there is the Holzwarth Historic Site (Never Summer Ranch) with original buildings from the era of one of the early families, including lots of stuff kids can touch and play with while visiting. Grand Lake is one of the prettiest Colorado lakes, and a cute little town. You can get to the headwaters of the Colorado, and then enjoy how big it becomes as you head south and west.

From there you could work your way down to Granby and eventually to I-70 -- take it west. Some of the most beautiful highway territory in the country. Stopping in Glenwood Springs for a few hours in the huge pool is always a treat. Marble, Colorado is amazing (and more my style than Aspen) -- a hike along the Marble River is a wonder.

We like to pop up to the Grand Mesa and over the Mesa to Cedaredge. We had a blast at https://www.cedaredgelodge.com/ -- a funky motel with an incredible collection of games (skeeball, pinball, ...) for guests to play. Kids would love it. From there off to Palisade -- and August is peach season. Yum.

Maybe down to Black Canyon of the Gunnison. The town of Gunnison is cute, and just up the hill is Crested Butte -- more fun in the summer than the winter, imo. A bit east of Gunnison you can take Highway 76 -- a rather non-descript turnoff, but head up and you eventually pass the old town of Ohio City and then on to the old mining town of Pitkin. Great ice cream stop, old school house and quite a few old buildings.

A few things I'd skip: Mesa Verde is too hot in August. The Durango-Silverton railroad is a classic, but I'm not so into trains. YMMV.
I'd avoid Great Sand Dunes NP in August. There is no shade. It is tremendously hot.

Lots more of Colorado's mountain terrain to explore in the summer, depending on your interests. Rafting is available on many rivers.
+1, with a couple of exceptions:

Black Canyon of the Gunnison is actually closest to Montrose. Go there (Montrose, and to Black Canyon).

Like the man said, skip Mesa Verde this time of year, but drive down the "Million Dollar Highway" from Montrose to Durango. Incredible views of the San Juans. Then from Durango go east through Pagosa Springs and through the Great Sand Dunes National Park (only hot if you try to hike for hours), then back to I-25 at Walsenburg. Then you have an easy drive back to Denver to finish your loop.

Topic Author
akhilsam
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Re: Denver in August

Post by akhilsam » Sat May 04, 2019 10:51 pm

Thank you all for so many wonderful recommendations!
Let me do my maths :) !

jbranx
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Re: Denver in August

Post by jbranx » Sat May 04, 2019 11:05 pm

akhilsam wrote:
Sat May 04, 2019 5:17 pm
Hi All,

I have about 8 nights avl. to travel with 2 boys(10 & 8) an and wife.
What can be covered in terms of National Parks - I mean circular trip starting form Denver and ending there.
Besides National Parks other suggestions are welcome too.

Appreciate feedback!
You already have some good suggestions. I lived in Colorado for 15 years and traveled there for work over 20 more years. I would not miss the opportunity to see both the "Front Slope" area around Denver, but some of the greatest natural beauty is on the Western Slope. The state has 53 mountains that are over 14K feet, with most of those in the San Juan Mtns. in the west. Visiting Montrose, Ouray, Telluride, Durango etc. is just a great experience. I wouldn't miss the Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Park. Not too crowded and pretty awesome. Do some planning around driving on the San Juan Skyway https://www.colorado.com/articles/color ... uan-skyway. Your sons will never forget a drive over the "Million Dollar Highway" from Ouray to Silverton.

Just a precaution that the sun at altitude is very hot and not kind to the skin. Nights can be very chilly. Acclimate slowly if you are from the flatlands and be aware of ways to prevent altitude sickness. If you are a family of hikers and like to climb peaks, go early in the day because summer thunderstorms on the high peaks can be dangerous by afternoon. Expect to have a great vacation in one of our most beautiful states!

baritone
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Re: Denver in August

Post by baritone » Sun May 05, 2019 12:21 am

At altitude, drink lots and lots of water! You've gotten a lot of great ideas in these responses. Enjoy!
If you go to Pikes Peak area, maybe check Cripple Creek and Victor.

Sconie
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Re: Denver in August

Post by Sconie » Sun May 05, 2019 7:39 am

FWIW, the Pikes Peak Cog Railway is closed. Supposedly, it will be reconstructed, with a possible reopening date of 2021.

https://kdvr.com/2018/11/29/pikes-peak- ... struction/
I know you think you understand what you thought I said but I'm not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant. - Alan Greenspan

Shallowpockets
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Re: Denver in August

Post by Shallowpockets » Sun May 05, 2019 8:42 am

One day in a place equals two nights to do it. Factor in driving time, which should include stops, making it longer. It is easy to stop at overlooks and such in Colorado if you have not ever been in such a place.
You have eight days. Do your math.
August is high season. You had better plan now for your lodging. So get your time and places to visit and book your rooms.
Day 1 you can drive to Rocky Mountain park. That is your easiest destination unless you go up I 70 to Frisco area. This first destination will determine your course of travel afterwards.
Estes Park is your gateway town to RMNP. A very very touristy town with horrible traffic.
Could be 2 nights in Estes because there is a lot of hiking in the park you could do.
Day 2/3 - drive over Trail Ridge road which will be spectacular, especially if you have never been in such terrain before. Your night could be in Grand Lake or Winter Park. Unless you press on the next morning, you could do two nights here.
Now you are up to Day4/5.
So you can see that the days go by and that 8 days is not enough to cover Colorado.
There are long distances involved, over passes and such. Unless you have a late afternoon flight out of Denver, you would need to be in Denver the night before your return. From my house near where I70 exits the mountains is about 45 minutes to the airport. Worse if traffic, which could be anytime. I would not really want to drive back from Crested Butte on the same day of departure.
Practically speaking your best destinations would be loop through Estes Park and thence into Frisco/Breckenridge area. or reverse that. Look at a map. Further afield is further distance, time, crunching your enjoyment. You will see all the mountains in those places and there is a lot to do for several days in each area.

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Shackleton
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Re: Denver in August

Post by Shackleton » Sun May 05, 2019 9:06 am

jbranx wrote:
Sat May 04, 2019 11:05 pm
I would not miss the opportunity to see both the "Front Slope" area around Denver, but some of the greatest natural beauty is on the Western Slope.
I think you mean the "Front Range" which is the eastern side of the Rocky Mountains and runs from Casper WY to Pueblo CO. The OP should also be aware that getting to the Western Slope (the west side of Colorado, generally considered around the Grand Junction area) can be a long drive. I haven't driven it since I lived down in the Springs (Co Springs) and it took over 5 hours on a summer Friday afternoon. So that is probably 4+ hours from the airport.

I live in one of the small towns on the western side of Rocky Mountain National Park, and I think you could spend an incredible week using Grand Lake or Granby as a base -- hiking in RMNP or other local trails; boating or paddleboarding on Grand Lake or Lake Granby; fly fishing lessons for the family, mountain biking, horseback riding and ziplining at Devil's Thumb Ranch (www.devilsthumbranch.com); lots of activities at Snow Mountain Ranch (www.snowmountainranch.org, which is actually the YMCA and has locations in both Estes Park and Granby); downhill mountain biking at Winter Park Resort, known as Trestle Bike Park (www.trestlebikepark.com, get a lesson to learn how to properly do downhill mountain biking which is different than regular cross country MTB and you'll have more fun!) There is more I'm forgetting... I love this area.
“Superhuman effort isn't worth a damn unless it achieves results.” ~Ernest Shackleton

WS1
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Re: Denver in August

Post by WS1 » Sun May 05, 2019 4:23 pm

I’ve visited Colorado about a dozen times over the last 20 years, everything from a two week road trip, a 3 day ski trip, and visiting friends all over the mountains part of the state.

I’d encourage you to only sleep in one or two places during your 8 day trip. A few visits ago a we had a fairly aggressive week long schedule (Grand Mesa, Durango, Glenwood Springs, Denver) the whirlwind nature was sort of ok because my SO had never been to the state, but with so many travel days it was difficult to really do outdoorsy stuff. Either we had “get there itis” and just wanted to get to the next hotel(brewery) and explore the town or hitting the trail early to beat the heat, hiking, and the driving seemed daunting.

I second the previous posters RMNP ideas. I spent 5 days a few september’s ago in Estes Park but liked the west side, Granby and Grand Lake even more. You can do “lake stuff” and I’ve heard entering the park on the Estes side during summer can be rough.

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fortfun
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Re: Denver in August

Post by fortfun » Sun May 05, 2019 4:36 pm

WS1 wrote:
Sun May 05, 2019 4:23 pm
I’ve visited Colorado about a dozen times over the last 20 years, everything from a two week road trip, a 3 day ski trip, and visiting friends all over the mountains part of the state.

I’d encourage you to only sleep in one or two places during your 8 day trip. A few visits ago a we had a fairly aggressive week long schedule (Grand Mesa, Durango, Glenwood Springs, Denver) the whirlwind nature was sort of ok because my SO had never been to the state, but with so many travel days it was difficult to really do outdoorsy stuff. Either we had “get there itis” and just wanted to get to the next hotel(brewery) and explore the town or hitting the trail early to beat the heat, hiking, and the driving seemed daunting.

I second the previous posters RMNP ideas. I spent 5 days a few september’s ago in Estes Park but liked the west side, Granby and Grand Lake even more. You can do “lake stuff” and I’ve heard entering the park on the Estes side during summer can be rough.
Yes, Bear Lake parking fills early. Once it is full, you have to ride a shuttle in from Estes Park, which isn't terrible but it adds a lot of extra time onto your day. My advice is when you visit the Bear Lake area, try to arrive by 7AM so you can drive all the way to the Bear Lake lot. This will save you several hours of park shuttle transfers/buses. This is definitely the most crowded part of the park, but it includes some of the most beautiful hikes (Alberta Falls, etc). If you are looking to get away from the crowds, drive up Trail Ridge road a bit further and hike to LuLu City (old abandoned mountain town in RMNP) or another more remote destination (towards the west side of the park).

jebmke
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Re: Denver in August

Post by jebmke » Sun May 05, 2019 5:07 pm

baritone wrote:
Sun May 05, 2019 12:21 am
At altitude, drink lots and lots of water! You've gotten a lot of great ideas in these responses. Enjoy!
If you go to Pikes Peak area, maybe check Cripple Creek and Victor.
I'm a flatlander. I try to take a couple of days in Denver/environs to get some adjustment prior to going significantly higher (my sister lives at 9,000 feet - above but near Steamboat.) I can tell the difference from going from zero (home) to 9,000+ in one jump.
When you discover that you are riding a dead horse, the best strategy is to dismount.

MarkBarb
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Re: Denver in August

Post by MarkBarb » Sun May 05, 2019 5:23 pm

In addition to the other suggestions, I would include some rock climbing. I'm not sure if the kids are old enough, but we loved http://flycoloradoultralights.com/ in Colorado Springs.

A Rockies baseball game could be fun.

We enjoyed zip lines near Salida and a 150 foot tall swing over the Royal Gorge (which is about 1,000 feet tall itself).

Hot air ballooning in Boulder is also fun, but not cheap.

I'll repeat the suggestion that you spend a few days at Denver-like altitudes before going up in the RMNP and hiking.

I also second the suggestion about ski resorts in the summer. We spent a day at Winter Park and the kids had a blast. It was almost like an alpine carnival - bungee trampolines, mountainside flume ride, rock climbing, mini-golf....lot's of fun stuff.

I recommend against Durango and Moab. They are both awesome, but that's a lot of driving. I'd spend more time doing stuff and less time on the road.

radiowave
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Re: Denver in August

Post by radiowave » Tue May 07, 2019 8:28 pm

fortfun wrote:
Sun May 05, 2019 4:36 pm

Yes, Bear Lake parking fills early. Once it is full, you have to ride a shuttle in from Estes Park, which isn't terrible but it adds a lot of extra time onto your day. My advice is when you visit the Bear Lake area, try to arrive by 7AM so you can drive all the way to the Bear Lake lot. This will save you several hours of park shuttle transfers/buses. This is definitely the most crowded part of the park, but it includes some of the most beautiful hikes (Alberta Falls, etc). If you are looking to get away from the crowds, drive up Trail Ridge road a bit further and hike to LuLu City (old abandoned mountain town in RMNP) or another more remote destination (towards the west side of the park).
One strategy at RMNP is to park in the shuttle lot on the way to bear lake, take the shuttle bus up top to bear lake, then hike down to the shuttle lot, I think its about 4 something miles but mostly all down hill and you'll start just shy of 10,000 ft and get down to around 8 and a half K. Beatiful trail, tall snow cover mountains surrounding you, deer and elk possibly, and the best part is you don't have the hassel of trying to get a parking spot at bear lake.

Also and FYI, on route 36 from Estes to the park entrance, there is a very nice hiking and camping supply store called the warming hut, worth a visit.

Enjoy your trip!
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IMO
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Re: Denver in August

Post by IMO » Thu May 09, 2019 3:01 am

Shackleton wrote:
Sun May 05, 2019 9:06 am
jbranx wrote:
Sat May 04, 2019 11:05 pm
I would not miss the opportunity to see both the "Front Slope" area around Denver, but some of the greatest natural beauty is on the Western Slope.
I think you mean the "Front Range" which is the eastern side of the Rocky Mountains and runs from Casper WY to Pueblo CO. The OP should also be aware that getting to the Western Slope (the west side of Colorado, generally considered around the Grand Junction area) can be a long drive. I haven't driven it since I lived down in the Springs (Co Springs) and it took over 5 hours on a summer Friday afternoon. So that is probably 4+ hours from the airport.

I live in one of the small towns on the western side of Rocky Mountain National Park, and I think you could spend an incredible week using Grand Lake or Granby as a base -- hiking in RMNP or other local trails; boating or paddleboarding on Grand Lake or Lake Granby; fly fishing lessons for the family, mountain biking, horseback riding and ziplining at Devil's Thumb Ranch (www.devilsthumbranch.com); lots of activities at Snow Mountain Ranch (www.snowmountainranch.org, which is actually the YMCA and has locations in both Estes Park and Granby); downhill mountain biking at Winter Park Resort, known as Trestle Bike Park (www.trestlebikepark.com, get a lesson to learn how to properly do downhill mountain biking which is different than regular cross country MTB and you'll have more fun!) There is more I'm forgetting... I love this area.
OP, you are talking about 8 and 10 year old boys on the trip, correct?

This is obviously a personal thing, but I just don't think 8/10 year old kids will find as much "enjoyment" from sightseeing as teenagers that are older, even with the great views of the Rocky Mountains. I think Shackleton's post regarding activities seems to most likely to be enjoyable for kids that age.

We've had great fun taking kids that age to Winter Park Resort, both to do the downhill biking, as well as the outdoor adventure activities at Winter Park that someone else mentioned (alpine slide, bungee trampolining, etc). If you are an active outdoors type person, the green and some blue trails are fun for younger kids on the biking. There are kid camps for this, but it is unlikely you'd be there for the exact dates. One can look into private instruction also. A day ticket can be purchased for the bungee trampoline/alpine slide activities or one can purchase a season pass for this and/or to include the bike lifts. We would mix up some time biking and some time doing the other activities which was a good balance for multiple days.
https://www.winterparkresort.com/plan-y ... son-passes

Near Winter Park, Grandby Ranch ski area also has some easy green/blue downhill mountain bike trails that kids of that age can do if you are capable of riding a mountain bike (?) or one could call and see about possible lessons. This bike park is much more "laid back" without the crowd of Winter Park which can make the biking feel less intimidating to younger kids.
https://www.granbyranch.com/things-to-do/bike/

Again, just not sure how much "sightseeing" 8/10 year old boys really enjoy from my experience, but maybe it was just my spoiled kid who was constantly exposed to very scenic mountain areas ...

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