Gardening 2019

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Earl Lemongrab
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Gardening 2019

Post by Earl Lemongrab » Thu Apr 11, 2019 2:02 pm

With warm temps locally (and snowstorms to the north and west!!) I thought I'd get the year's thread going.

I put in pea seeds in mid-March, a bit later than last year because it was extremely cold in the early part. Snowpeas and snap peas again. The plants have started to poke through, so it's officially on.

I'm going to head out this afternoon to see what tomato plants are available.

I will be trying a new staking method, called the "Florida Weave":

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UWGNCuGO-78

I am also going to try brutally pruning the pepper plants as this video suggests:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=syhPPONJDKY&t=566s

p14175
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Location: Now in southeast Arizona

Re: Gardening 2019

Post by p14175 » Thu Apr 11, 2019 3:03 pm

I moved to SE AZ 1.5 years ago and am finally getting around to setting up my garden. This time, instead of raised beds like I had when I lived in the Phoenix metro area I am going to try the "Weedless Gardening" method.

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Earl Lemongrab
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by Earl Lemongrab » Thu Apr 11, 2019 4:11 pm

p14175 wrote:
Thu Apr 11, 2019 3:03 pm
I moved to SE AZ 1.5 years ago and am finally getting around to setting up my garden. This time, instead of raised beds like I had when I lived in the Phoenix metro area I am going to try the "Weedless Gardening" method.
Any details or links?

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TheGreyingDuke
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by TheGreyingDuke » Thu Apr 11, 2019 4:30 pm

I have used the Florida weave for tomatoes after spending a summer on an organic farm in PA. Works well, itis important to give the plays 30' and prune them regularly. And use a biodegradable twine (sisal, hemp) so you can throw the lot into the compost at year's end.
"Every time I see an adult on a bicycle, I no longer despair for the future of the human race." H.G. Wells

50/50
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by 50/50 » Thu Apr 11, 2019 4:31 pm

Picking radishes. Carrots are up and looking good. Beets are just breaking ground. Cabbage doing well. Spinach and lettuce did not germinate well at all. I'm using old seed stored in the refrigerator and probably too old now. Tomatoes up in their cups and under grow lights indoors and doing well.

Squash and cucumber seed did not germinate (again old seed) in their cups. Now I have some of each in a wet paper towel in a plastic bag to see if they will sprout. If so I'll transfer to grow cups. If not I'll have to buy those this year.

Looking forward to the new season.

jdv01
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Trying Grow Bags for Tomatoes

Post by jdv01 » Thu Apr 11, 2019 4:38 pm

Started 9 different heirloom varieties of Tomatoes from Seed. We had snow yesterday so it will be a while before I get them in. Planted a Purple Snow pea from the Netherlands about 3 weeks ago in the raised beds I built last year from pine that I treated by scorching the wood in a Japanese technique called Shou Sugi Ban. Only time will tell if that works for raised beds but I like the look. Treated the outside with boiled linseed oil.

Bought 20 gallon grow bags to compare them to the tomatoes in raised beds. I expect as long as I can keep the bags watered they should do well.
I'm guessing I will have to convert to a drip system to keep them moist. Also bought a couple of emco raised bed gardens good for about two plants. They are made of resin and the plants grow above with self watering built in to the bottom so I can skip a day or two of adding water since there should be water for the plants in the reservoir. I will compare them to the grow bags and the wooden raised beds.

I enjoyed coming home from work and watering in the evenings but I will still have the entire front yard to water since I do that by hand and it is all drought tolerant perennials. No grass. I live in the desert even if it is cold version in the fall/winter/spring months. So keeping the bags moist will be a challenge.

Most of the tomatoes plants and probably a lot of the fruit will be given to neighbors or friends just having fun starting them from seed in the dark days of winter.

I think the tomatoes and my flowers and keeping my the hummingbirds happy should keep me busy this summer. I have lots of flowers to start but haven't gotten to those yet. Need to do that. Strawberries from seed too. They are in the freezer getting in prep for planting.

My wife has a new Little Library waiting for me to put it in to the front yard among the flowers so have to move some more plants and build a place for it with a bench.

Need to get back to my photography too. Have lots of images on the hard drives waiting for my attention.

Guess I have more work than I have time for so maybe it is time to press that Retire Now button I see when I check my Pension and 401K balances :D

likegarden
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by likegarden » Thu Apr 11, 2019 4:39 pm

I am gardening all year in the Northeast, from April to October outside, from November to end of April in my basement under 24 hrs fluorescent lights. In about 2 weeks I will bring 3 trays of hosta hybrids on our deck- they will get planted into the garden in August. Thanks to Global Warming I no longer have to fear night frosts in May. Most of those hybrids are from seeds I harvested from my own hybridizing. I never need to stop gardening all year.

Ping Pong
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by Ping Pong » Thu Apr 11, 2019 4:39 pm

How do you keep squirrels, birds, and other animals from destroying your garden? I guess the obvious solution is to put the garden inside a cage. Are there any other options?

mrsbetsy
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by mrsbetsy » Thu Apr 11, 2019 4:43 pm

I spent all last weekend weeding because the rains here made everything get out of control and it rained so much I think our drought is officially over!

Zone 9A. I just put 8 tomato seedlings in the raised planter bed. They are a variety of heirloom slicers and cherry tomatoes. If I can keep half of them alive, that's a win. :D

First week of May, I'll be planting loads of peppers, cucumbers, and strawberries.

I harvested quite a bit of broccoli, cauliflower, kale, and lettuce this year. The spring onions are about ready and I'm patiently waiting on the garlic.

barnaclebob
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by barnaclebob » Thu Apr 11, 2019 4:45 pm

Ping Pong wrote:
Thu Apr 11, 2019 4:39 pm
How do you keep squirrels, birds, and other animals from destroying your garden? I guess the obvious solution is to put the garden inside a cage. Are there any other options?
Get a dog that likes to chase things? We are lucky and have minimal animal problems. A couple rabbits were going after stuff last year but I think the hawks got them at some point. It only took a short fence on one bed to keep them out of what they were going after. Squirrels are harder but bird netting can work for them as well as birds. The hard part is keeping the plants from growing through it.

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Earl Lemongrab
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by Earl Lemongrab » Thu Apr 11, 2019 5:10 pm

Ping Pong wrote:
Thu Apr 11, 2019 4:39 pm
How do you keep squirrels, birds, and other animals from destroying your garden? I guess the obvious solution is to put the garden inside a cage. Are there any other options?
My tomato setup is small, usually four plants. I have bird netting (20x20 ~$5) that goes up over the stakes and is attacted to the chicken-wire fence around the patch.

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happyisland
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by happyisland » Thu Apr 11, 2019 5:59 pm

Several of our mango trees are going nuts right now, covered in flowers and fruitlets. Varietals: Alphonso, Edward, Valencia Pride, Nam Doc Mai.
No flowers yet: Po Pyu Kalay, Coconut Cream, Fruit Punch, Sweet Tart.

Mike Scott
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by Mike Scott » Thu Apr 11, 2019 6:16 pm

We did all the pots on the front porch last weekend and now need to buy a few more pots to finish up. The garden is still as muddy as can be and we have another 3 or 4 weeks of possible frost anyway so it's too early to put anything in the garden.

kacang
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by kacang » Thu Apr 11, 2019 7:10 pm

The last few months of rain ended our years-long drought. Key goal this year will be rehab our front yard, planting more drought tolerant natives and more of the survivors. Remarkably, the roses did better than the lavenders. All my roses made it vs only 1 out of 10+ lavenders.

Nasturtiums, my favorite local weed, are blooming. Great for pretty salads. Our Meyer lemon finally gave us some fruits. Also planted a Meiwa kumquat and Eversweet pomegranate this spring and crossing fingers for fruits in 1-2 years.

Something I have always wanted to try is espaliering. Trying to decide if I should try this with a fig or apricot tree.

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baconavocado
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by baconavocado » Thu Apr 11, 2019 8:16 pm

I'm jealous of all you vegetable gardeners. I decided I have too much on my to-do list to take on a garden this summer. Even so, I still have to put in a couple tomatoes and some basil. I might try that Florida weave thing, but the stakes she was using look waaaaay too short for my tomatoes.

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LiveSimple
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by LiveSimple » Fri Apr 12, 2019 1:42 am

happyisland wrote:
Thu Apr 11, 2019 5:59 pm
Several of our mango trees are going nuts right now, covered in flowers and fruitlets. Varietals: Alphonso, Edward, Valencia Pride, Nam Doc Mai.
No flowers yet: Po Pyu Kalay, Coconut Cream, Fruit Punch, Sweet Tart.
Which zone are you in ?

mancich
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by mancich » Fri Apr 12, 2019 3:42 am

We're taking down the kids' swing set this year (getting too old for it) and are going to use the space to build one or two raised bed gardens. I've been watching some YouTube videos and it all looks pretty simple. Mostly going to use for lettuce and tomatoes, of which we eat a ton. Now I just have to figure an inexpensive way to put some kind of fencing around it to keep out the critters and deer.

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LiveSimple
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by LiveSimple » Fri Apr 12, 2019 4:44 am

mancich wrote:
Fri Apr 12, 2019 3:42 am
We're taking down the kids' swing set this year (getting too old for it) and are going to use the space to build one or two raised bed gardens. I've been watching some YouTube videos and it all looks pretty simple. Mostly going to use for lettuce and tomatoes, of which we eat a ton. Now I just have to figure an inexpensive way to put some kind of fencing around it to keep out the critters and deer.
Planning raised bed as well. Looking at tractor supply for cattle panels, for the fencing.
https://www.tractorsupply.com/tsc/produ ... _vc=-10005

Rus In Urbe
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by Rus In Urbe » Fri Apr 12, 2019 5:56 am

Wooohooo. So happy to find Bogleheaded Gardeners! (why did I never think to search this site for garden? :oops: )

In the N.E. Snowdrops (galanthus) just finished; daffodils and forsythia just opening up; tulips on the way. We are still raking up leaves and adding to the compost pile.

This year we are re-doing the Potager with a new fence (woodchucks and rabbits in the 'hood). And that will entail digging up and moving around some raised beds we've had for fifteen years or so, so we'll planting late this season. We grow lots of greens (lettuces, kales, collards), cherry tomatoes, herbs, Asian cukes, as well as all the garlic we can consume. An astonishing Farmers' Market (the largest in NY State) supplies us year-round with almost everything else.

Our backyard is deer-proofed thanks to a surrounding wooden fence and a "deer gate" (6' tall netting we string between cup hooks across the brick driveway----the deer could jump it but apparently they are near-sighted and if they can't see the top of something, they won't leap it----this has worked for us for the past decade----yay, safe hostas).

We'll get our geraniums and some flowering pots out this weekend. And turn on the fountain. Welcome Spring!
I'd like to live as a poor man with lots of money. ~Pablo Picasso

mancich
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by mancich » Fri Apr 12, 2019 6:06 am

LiveSimple wrote:
Fri Apr 12, 2019 4:44 am
mancich wrote:
Fri Apr 12, 2019 3:42 am
We're taking down the kids' swing set this year (getting too old for it) and are going to use the space to build one or two raised bed gardens. I've been watching some YouTube videos and it all looks pretty simple. Mostly going to use for lettuce and tomatoes, of which we eat a ton. Now I just have to figure an inexpensive way to put some kind of fencing around it to keep out the critters and deer.
Planning raised bed as well. Looking at tractor supply for cattle panels, for the fencing.
https://www.tractorsupply.com/tsc/produ ... _vc=-10005
Those look pretty good, thanks

likegarden
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by likegarden » Fri Apr 12, 2019 6:16 am

I am not gardening in human food crops, but mainly in perennials (mostly hostas), rhododendrons and conifers (60). I prevent damage by rabbits and other animals by spraying with Liquid Fence several times in the year. My backyard is fully fenced in.

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happyisland
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by happyisland » Fri Apr 12, 2019 7:17 am

13+ (Southern Caribbean)
Forgot to mention my Dot tree too (it's flowering).
LiveSimple wrote:
Fri Apr 12, 2019 1:42 am

Which zone are you in ?

50/50
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by 50/50 » Fri Apr 12, 2019 8:13 am

:confused
Ping Pong wrote:
Thu Apr 11, 2019 4:39 pm
How do you keep squirrels, birds, and other animals from destroying your garden? I guess the obvious solution is to put the garden inside a cage. Are there any other options?
I have a 3ft chicken wire fence. Above that I have two strands of monofilament fishing line about a foot apart to keep the deer out. So total height around 5 feet which deer probably could jump easily but have not since I went to this system three years ago. For birds I have netting.

My biggest problem is voles. I have not been successful with anything I have tried for them. :confused

forgeblast
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by forgeblast » Fri Apr 12, 2019 8:16 am

Zone 5b here.

Redoing our garden. Building (almost done) with our movable gothic arch greenhouse. This will let us open up the ground and plant all year long in NE PA. We are going to be following elliot colemans winter harvest handbook.

This has required fencing in an area 20x30. We bought critterguard fencing which has 1/4'' holes to keep out the voles.
We also relocated two small pear trees and and are doing a pear tree guild around them (bands of plants to naturally repel, replenish, and cover the ground..permiculture technique).

Once the garden is set up, we will be also planting 50 elderberry bushes in our old garden area.

We started from seed our onions, tomatoes and will be starting a few other plants this weekend.

We also planted ginseng last year, hoping the plants sprout in two years we will move them to the woods. Planting ramps (wild leeks) this year too.

Also did a morel kit and hoping those mushrooms sprout.

In between that its a lot of pruning of old overgrown apple trees, and working in our woods.
I love being in the garden!!!!

letsgobobby
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by letsgobobby » Fri Apr 12, 2019 8:57 am

Deleted
Last edited by letsgobobby on Thu Apr 18, 2019 12:15 am, edited 1 time in total.

harvestbook
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by harvestbook » Fri Apr 12, 2019 8:59 am

Zone 6b in NC mountains, have lettuce and peas coming up. Kale, spinach, chinese cabbage, turnips should come up after current rain. Onion sets in. The rest of the stuff is in the picture window under grow lights. Have a dump truck load of chicken manure next door I'm moving in five-gallon buckets. All organic here, worked by hand.

My garden has a four-feet-high wire weld fence (2"x 4") that keeps out deer and most rabbits, groundhogs, etc. We also have a dog, although its yard is fenced separately. Never had deer in my garden even though they are plentiful here. I also urinate in my garden and I think the smell helps ward them off.

I always try something exotic every year--this year it's bitter melons that grow in Asia. Because of our climate (deciduous rain forest) and relatively short season, it's hard to grow hot crops like melons. Peppers work best here with smaller or banana varieties instead of full bells. Pears, plums, peaches are blooming and gooseberries and blueberries are budding. Might be a good year if we don't get a sneaky May frost.

I've tried using a version of the Florida weave with tomatoes, using bamboo stalks instead of twine, but it ended up not being much of an upgrade for me, so now I am back to stake-and-cage.
I'm not smart enough to know, and I can't afford to guess.

p14175
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by p14175 » Fri Apr 12, 2019 2:11 pm


Cunobelinus
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by Cunobelinus » Fri Apr 12, 2019 2:29 pm

The "Florida Weave" technique is something I'll have to try (thank you). This was our first time growing 'maters and the metal trellises that we used held up, mostly. I have some twine and ratcheting strap holding the trellises up because the 'maters become too big/heavy and started to topple the metal trellises. I suspect being a little more diligent with a Florida weave will keep the stalks/branches from taking too much weight and breaking.

I'm living presently in a tropical climate where you can start growing any time of year. I was surprised at how fast the tomatoes grew. They ended up crowding out and killing our kale very quickly. Perhaps we'll be more thoughtful of the size and growth of the plants and direction of the sun when we plant again.

DrGoogle2017
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by DrGoogle2017 » Fri Apr 12, 2019 3:02 pm

I’m currently have tomato, zucchini, beans, cucumber, and fava beans(crop enhancement). Just planted 8 fruit trees in our tiny yard, I even have bacon avocado. This year the garden is doing well because of the rain. All is good.

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Earl Lemongrab
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by Earl Lemongrab » Fri Apr 12, 2019 3:38 pm

I put three tomato plants in the ground today. The place where I got them didn't have my favorite early variety, "Fourth of July". Last year those were late to arrive so I'll check back.

DrGoogle2017
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by DrGoogle2017 » Fri Apr 12, 2019 4:09 pm

@Earl, you give me an idea what to buy next year. I already bought enough seeds this year. A few types of cherry tomatoes. But this year, I’m back to grow big humongous tomatoes for kicks. I had my husband double digging our veg bed so I can grow big tomatoes. Wish me luck.
Last edited by DrGoogle2017 on Fri Apr 12, 2019 7:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.

michaeljc70
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by michaeljc70 » Fri Apr 12, 2019 4:29 pm

likegarden wrote:
Thu Apr 11, 2019 4:39 pm
I am gardening all year in the Northeast, from April to October outside, from November to end of April in my basement under 24 hrs fluorescent lights. In about 2 weeks I will bring 3 trays of hosta hybrids on our deck- they will get planted into the garden in August. Thanks to Global Warming I no longer have to fear night frosts in May. Most of those hybrids are from seeds I harvested from my own hybridizing. I never need to stop gardening all year.
I'm curious if you have compared the fluroescent's to LEDs in terms of how well they work, cost to maintain and electricity costs. I haven't done indoor growing in some years so I haven't looked into it.

likegarden
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by likegarden » Fri Apr 12, 2019 5:14 pm

I am using the lights also as heat. I use 2 40W fluorescent lights for 2 trays to keep at 80F during 2-3 weeks of germination, and then reduce temperature to 72F via opening the enclosure. Temperature in basement is 62F, is not heated, but finished.

3504PIR
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by 3504PIR » Fri Apr 12, 2019 11:30 pm

I won’t get to plant until it’s time to put in autumn vegetables, but I’m really excited to begin my new garden at our retirement home in late June. I’ll update the thread once I finally get things going. 2020 will be epic though!

RamblinDoc
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by RamblinDoc » Fri Apr 12, 2019 11:56 pm

Zone 8b

I planted sugar snap peas and a bush bean variety last month - both are sprouting well.

Rasberries, blueberries, and strawberries are starting to green up. Same with mint and parsley. The rosemary stayed green all winter.

Winter arugula is doing well. I’ll plant more at the end of the month. Same with several more bush beans (my family goes through beans fast).

Next month, the kale, spinach, basil, cucumbers, heirloom tomatoes, peppers and zucchini get started!

I will not do root vegetables this year - last year, we did beets, carrots and radish. I didn’t like how they turned out.

kacang
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by kacang » Sat Apr 13, 2019 1:38 am

likegarden wrote:
Fri Apr 12, 2019 5:14 pm
I am using the lights also as heat. I use 2 40W fluorescent lights for 2 trays to keep at 80F during 2-3 weeks of germination, and then reduce temperature to 72F via opening the enclosure. Temperature in basement is 62F, is not heated, but finished.
When I used to garden in zone 5, I would start the seeds outdoors in milk jugs. When the snow melt and weather warms up, the seedlings sprouts and hardens off naturally. I had fantastic germination and survival rates. These plants also seem hardier and grow more vigorously once we are past late spring than the ones that I started indoors. Once I discovered how easy this approach (winter sowing) is, I got rid of my indoor seed starting gear.

DrGoogle2017
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by DrGoogle2017 » Sat Apr 13, 2019 10:51 am

I like winter sowing too. Our winter is mild here though.

Frank Grimes
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by Frank Grimes » Sat Apr 13, 2019 1:11 pm

In NC we had some fairly cold weather up until a couple weeks ago, including a frost. So I only recently put out my tomatoes, cucumbers, basil and radish seeds. Fairly basic setup in a raised bed but the deer and moles are aggressive when the plants are small so I just have to cross my fingers till they get big enough.

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nativenewenglander
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by nativenewenglander » Sat Apr 13, 2019 5:35 pm

Our garden is still covered in snow. The barn has three feet of ice under it. We live in zone 4a, so planting frost free is seven weeks away. The skiing is still good, so there's that!. I love gardening, but like other parts of each season. My potatoes are in, but I don't know when they go in the ground. Onions plants come on 4/22/19, that's when I planted in 2018.

Pigeye Brewster
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by Pigeye Brewster » Sat Apr 13, 2019 6:00 pm

Vegetable: Collard greens and kale that were planted in February. Should be ready to start harvesting soon. Basil went into the ground a couple of weeks ago.

Landscape: Dogwood tree is blooming, Japanese maples are a brilliant deep red, azaleas and rhododendrons are starting to flower, hosta are in various stages of appearing, and the Bermuda (front yard) and Zoysia (backyard) grass is starting to green up nicely.

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Earl Lemongrab
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by Earl Lemongrab » Wed Apr 17, 2019 4:54 pm

p14175 wrote:
Thu Apr 11, 2019 3:03 pm
I moved to SE AZ 1.5 years ago and am finally getting around to setting up my garden. This time, instead of raised beds like I had when I lived in the Phoenix metro area I am going to try the "Weedless Gardening" method.
I looked into this a little. I will try putting down newspapers when I get some cut grass for mulching. Worth a try.

Thanks for the suggestion.

protagonist
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by protagonist » Thu Apr 18, 2019 12:47 am

barnaclebob wrote:
Thu Apr 11, 2019 4:45 pm
Ping Pong wrote:
Thu Apr 11, 2019 4:39 pm
How do you keep squirrels, birds, and other animals from destroying your garden? I guess the obvious solution is to put the garden inside a cage. Are there any other options?
Get a dog that likes to chase things? We are lucky and have minimal animal problems. A couple rabbits were going after stuff last year but I think the hawks got them at some point. It only took a short fence on one bed to keep them out of what they were going after. Squirrels are harder but bird netting can work for them as well as birds. The hard part is keeping the plants from growing through it.
I just plant enough so that the squirrels and birds and rabbits can enjoy their share. I still wind up with more than enough to eat.

MP173
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by MP173 » Thu Apr 18, 2019 3:37 pm

Location - NW Indiana Zone 5b

So far:
100 garlic plants planted last October - about 6" tall.
34 Leeks transplants - planted April 10th
100 onion transplants - planted since April 10th. Still have another 50 or so to plant.
Spinach - two plantings March 24 and April 7 - about 30 seedlings showing.
Snap peas - the March 24 planting have not germinated, whicl March 30th have....probably used old seeds for March 24th.
Carrots - March 24 - only 3 seedlings up.
Radish - about 60 up. Will harvest in a couple of weeks.
Asparagus - nothing yet. Usually the first appearance is April 10-12th. Last year it was April 30 due to cold weather.
Cauliflower, Broccoli, Cabbage, Brussel Sprouts - plants have been in a couple of weeks and are thriving.
lettuce - planted 4/14

Indoor seedlings - wife is in charge - Roma tomato, cucumbers, peppers...all are doing well.

Yet to be planted:
potato (reds, russets, golds), sweet potato, pole beans, Asian beans (18" long), peppercini peppers,kale, and a few others.

Our home garden was bothered by deer, rabbits, etc until we built Ft. Potato, a secure fortress (6 ft fence). Birds get as do the butterflies (which destroy the brussel sprouts, etc).

I am experimenting with seasonal seeds for lettuce and hope to have greens all summer. Will also plant late summer for fall harvest.

Retired wife is embracing the gardening and also canning/freezing of vegetables. She also grows numerous herbs.

Ed

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Conch55
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by Conch55 » Thu Apr 18, 2019 4:09 pm

Zone 7b reporting in. I am hardening vegetables, some from seed, some in pots from box store with a target plant date of the second week in May. Planting includes tomatoes, squash, cucumber, peppers and various herbs. All of the herbs are already in the ground. Recent weather pattern is encouraging after a wet winter and spring. Hoping for enough harvest for personal needs and contribution to local food bank.

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Earl Lemongrab
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by Earl Lemongrab » Thu Apr 18, 2019 5:06 pm

Conch55 wrote:
Thu Apr 18, 2019 4:09 pm
Zone 7b reporting in. I am hardening vegetables, some from seed, some in pots from box store with a target plant date of the second week in May. Planting includes tomatoes, squash, cucumber, peppers and various herbs. All of the herbs are already in the ground. Recent weather pattern is encouraging after a wet winter and spring. Hoping for enough harvest for personal needs and contribution to local food bank.
Whew, wet indeed. We had another round of storms last night, and off-and-on rain today. One soaker after another. The rivers are rising again, with snow-melt from up north to come.

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Michael Patrick
Posts: 65
Joined: Wed Dec 19, 2018 10:25 am
Location: Madison, WI

Re: Gardening 2019

Post by Michael Patrick » Thu Apr 18, 2019 7:05 pm

I'm in Zone 5a. I'll be planting the first of the early stuff this weekend. Not out of the woods for frost yet.

DrGoogle2017
Posts: 2528
Joined: Mon Aug 14, 2017 12:31 pm

Re: Gardening 2019

Post by DrGoogle2017 » Fri Apr 19, 2019 1:27 pm

The peony plant that I bought from Costco has about 13-14 flower buds, last year it only had 2 flower buds. Talk about dividends and compound interest. It will bloom around Mother’s day and I will cut some to bring to my mother’s grave. It’s worth about $20 a stem here if you can get it.

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Conch55
Posts: 228
Joined: Tue Mar 01, 2016 11:03 am

Re: Gardening 2019

Post by Conch55 » Tue Apr 30, 2019 2:13 pm

I decided to tackle my vegetable garden a week or so ahead of schedule based on forecasted warm temperatures and the need to get my container veggies into more growing space. Tomatoes, cucumbers, squash and basil all transplanted. Hoping for a good growing season and best of luck to other Boglehead gardeners.

Colorado13
Posts: 900
Joined: Thu Apr 07, 2011 4:58 pm
Location: Colorado

Re: Gardening 2019

Post by Colorado13 » Tue Apr 30, 2019 7:59 pm

I plan to plant the peas this weekend, I should have done it a week or two ago since we are receiving moisture this week... I'm going to skip the cucumbers and eggplant this year and focus on tomatoes, carrots, strawberries, beans and peas since those have done well in the past couple of years.

MP173
Posts: 1996
Joined: Fri Dec 07, 2007 6:03 pm

Re: Gardening 2019

Post by MP173 » Tue Apr 30, 2019 8:04 pm

I am concerned about my asparagus. So far, only 2 stalks.

Typically we are eating by now. Last year was late as is this year.

Ed

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