[On-going Scams - Post them here]

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dowse
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Re: Scam alert - USPS new feature playing a role

Post by dowse » Tue Apr 02, 2019 5:19 pm

GerryL wrote:
Tue Apr 02, 2019 5:10 pm
nalor511 wrote:
Tue Apr 02, 2019 4:12 pm
dowse wrote:
Tue Apr 02, 2019 3:42 pm
RickBoglehead wrote:
Tue Apr 02, 2019 3:38 pm
Agree that the Informed Delivery connection seems to be unfounded. And it is not new, started 2 years ago yesterday.
All I know is what the bank employee told me. She seemed to be quite concerned about the info they could use. Besides bank statements, I suppose they could figure out what health insurance plan you have. Perhaps building some kind of a profile helps them narrow the range of targets to those with a lot to lose.
How did the bank employee prove herself? I've never had a bank employee willing to give out my personal info (such as birth date) even to me (i.e. the fact that it was one day off), and I actually did have provable identity theft that I was trying to combat/fix. Is it possible she was a scammer fishing for information/confirmation? Just a thought.
This was my thought, too. Is this some sort of meta scam? OP, have you called your bank directly to verify?
I vetted as best I could, and was not asked for more personal info. Not sure what info my bank could verify. This was a bank in another part of the country that I have no accounts with. I called the number of that bank, which was on my caller ID, and it checked out. If it were being spoofed, the caller would have had to keep me on the line, but I didn't answer the call, I called back instead. In any case, credit is now frozen.

dknightd
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Re: Scam alert - USPS new feature playing a role

Post by dknightd » Tue Apr 02, 2019 5:21 pm

I don't think a credit freeze stops somebody who you already have a "relationship" with from getting your credit report.
But I could be wrong.
So a potential thief could have got your information from someplace else. Then used USPS notification to see which bills/statements you receive in the mail (perhaps from your bank), then used the information they got someplace else to open a new credit card at a place where you had already done business.
Perhaps convoluted, but that is the only way I can see that USPS delivery notification caused you a problem (assuming they did not use the information to know when to steal your mail)
We are basically doomed to have a thief try to take something from us one day. Aarg!

dowse
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Re: Scam alert - USPS new feature playing a role

Post by dowse » Tue Apr 02, 2019 5:29 pm

dknightd wrote:
Tue Apr 02, 2019 5:21 pm
I don't think a credit freeze stops somebody who you already have a "relationship" with from getting your credit report.
But I could be wrong.
So a potential thief could have got your information from someplace else. Then used USPS notification to see which bills/statements you receive in the mail (perhaps from your bank), then used the information they got someplace else to open a new credit card at a place where you had already done business.
Perhaps convoluted, but that is the only way I can see that USPS delivery notification caused you a problem (assuming they did not use the information to know when to steal your mail)
We are basically doomed to have a thief try to take something from us one day. Aarg!
In this case, they opened a credit card at a bank where I have never done business. Not sure what they may have gleaned form Informed Delivery, but they may have been able to make a good guess on the birth date based on happy birthday announcements on the outside of envelopes, cards, etc., and making a good guess at the year by noticing letters from Medicare. The bank person was convinced that in a majority of recent cases, some info was obtained that way. Not necessariy in my case, but in most cases, according to her.

yohac
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Re: Scam alert - USPS new feature playing a role

Post by yohac » Tue Apr 02, 2019 5:33 pm

dknightd wrote:
Tue Apr 02, 2019 5:21 pm
I don't think a credit freeze stops somebody who you already have a "relationship" with from getting your credit report.
They can get your report for their own internal purposes, but I know for a fact that Chase won't issue you a credit card if your credit is frozen, even if you have other cards with them. Seems like they'd be asking for fraud if they did that.

dknightd
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Re: Scam alert - USPS new feature playing a role

Post by dknightd » Tue Apr 02, 2019 5:50 pm

dowse wrote:
Tue Apr 02, 2019 3:11 pm

Besides credit freezes, what other steps should I be taking to try and protect my identity? I have two-factor authorization on bank accounts.
Use a different, unique, complex, password at every site you use.

It sounds like you were lucky and nipped this in the bud.

Edit: you've likely already been hacked. Change every password to anything that matters to you now!
I use a password manager.
I think when I have more time (after I retire) I'm going to go back to every important site and change my security questions and answers to random gibberish.

My mothers maiden name will be something like asit43YUN5%69g95Qa - again different for every site!
Last edited by dknightd on Tue Apr 02, 2019 5:58 pm, edited 4 times in total.

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Doom&Gloom
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Re: Scam alert - USPS new feature playing a role

Post by Doom&Gloom » Tue Apr 02, 2019 5:52 pm

downshiftme wrote:
Tue Apr 02, 2019 4:53 pm
I do not have informed delivery, but I did get a "confirmation" letter for someone else trying to sign up to get informed delivery for my address. I blocked that, but was told by USPS that anyone anywhere can sign up for informed delivery, up to 5 per address, and that the postal service can lock your address but cannot otherwise stop people from signing up if they can pass the verification tests. The postal agent I spoke to said that use of the service for fraud was not anticipated in the design of the system and the lock feature was the only way to prevent others from getting notification of my postal mail.

In my case, I can either lock my address or I can enroll in informed delivery. If my address is enrolled, then up to 4 more email addresses can enroll themselves if they can pass the verification test. I cannot both enroll in the service and lock others out.
It would be simple enough to sign up four additional email addresses of your own to fill the quota and effectively lock others out. I have enough email accounts that I may look into doing this myself in the next couple of days.

rgs92
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Re: Scam alert - USPS new feature playing a role

Post by rgs92 » Tue Apr 02, 2019 5:56 pm

But any credit card fraud is not really much of a problem for you. You would get the bill or be informed by mail or phone and then you just protest it and that's the end of it. I assume that's what happens. It's not like someone taking money from your bank account.

michaeljc70
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Re: Scam alert - USPS new feature playing a role

Post by michaeljc70 » Tue Apr 02, 2019 6:10 pm

rgs92 wrote:
Tue Apr 02, 2019 5:56 pm
But any credit card fraud is not really much of a problem for you. You would get the bill or be informed by mail or phone and then you just protest it and that's the end of it. I assume that's what happens. It's not like someone taking money from your bank account.
But don't we all pay for it one form or the other? The further it gets, the more the costs. Also, one credit card is probably fairly easy to clean up, but if they opened many fraudulently and it took you a while to notice, it could mess up your credit score temporarily. Imagine that happening at a bad time (middle of mortgage, refi, want new credit card, employment credit check, insurance credit check, etc).

batpot
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Re: Scam alert - USPS new feature playing a role

Post by batpot » Wed Apr 03, 2019 2:00 pm

The real question here is why don't you have your credit frozen?

Fallible
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Re: Scam alert - USPS new feature playing a role

Post by Fallible » Wed Apr 03, 2019 5:02 pm

dowse wrote:
Tue Apr 02, 2019 5:19 pm
GerryL wrote:
Tue Apr 02, 2019 5:10 pm
nalor511 wrote:
Tue Apr 02, 2019 4:12 pm
dowse wrote:
Tue Apr 02, 2019 3:42 pm
RickBoglehead wrote:
Tue Apr 02, 2019 3:38 pm
Agree that the Informed Delivery connection seems to be unfounded. And it is not new, started 2 years ago yesterday.
All I know is what the bank employee told me. She seemed to be quite concerned about the info they could use. Besides bank statements, I suppose they could figure out what health insurance plan you have. Perhaps building some kind of a profile helps them narrow the range of targets to those with a lot to lose.
How did the bank employee prove herself? I've never had a bank employee willing to give out my personal info (such as birth date) even to me (i.e. the fact that it was one day off), and I actually did have provable identity theft that I was trying to combat/fix. Is it possible she was a scammer fishing for information/confirmation? Just a thought.
This was my thought, too. Is this some sort of meta scam? OP, have you called your bank directly to verify?
I vetted as best I could, and was not asked for more personal info. Not sure what info my bank could verify. This was a bank in another part of the country that I have no accounts with. I called the number of that bank, which was on my caller ID, and it checked out. If it were being spoofed, the caller would have had to keep me on the line, but I didn't answer the call, I called back instead. In any case, credit is now frozen.
Even if you didn't give out "more" information to her, did you verify some of it for her, such as SSN, addresses, birth date? Did you give her the correct employer address or correct birth date when she brought it up? Did she bring up any other personal info that needed verifying? Were you able to check her ID and position with the bank after she called?
John Bogle on his often bumpy road to low-cost indexing: "When a door closes, if you look long enough and hard enough, if you're strong enough, you'll find a window that opens."

dowse
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Re: Scam alert - USPS new feature playing a role

Post by dowse » Thu Apr 04, 2019 8:52 am


Even if you didn't give out "more" information to her, did you verify some of it for her, such as SSN, addresses, birth date? Did you give her the correct employer address or correct birth date when she brought it up? Did she bring up any other personal info that needed verifying? Were you able to check her ID and position with the bank after she called?
I only told her that the birth date and employer position were incorrect. I did not give her the correct info, and she didn't press for it. She didn't present an SSN for verification. I did not take the extra step of checking with bank officials because I felt enough info had already checked out, i.e. phone numbers and the fact that the bank had indeed made a credit inquiry. I agree I could have gone a little further, but I don't think anything I discussed with her provided any additional personal info. The purpose of her call was to ask me if I had applied for a credit card. When I said no, she told me that the card would not be sent out and recommended that I freeze my credit, which I did immediately after. Lesson learned.

Fallible
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Re: Scam alert - USPS new feature playing a role

Post by Fallible » Thu Apr 04, 2019 11:15 am

dowse wrote:
Thu Apr 04, 2019 8:52 am

Even if you didn't give out "more" information to her, did you verify some of it for her, such as SSN, addresses, birth date? Did you give her the correct employer address or correct birth date when she brought it up? Did she bring up any other personal info that needed verifying? Were you able to check her ID and position with the bank after she called?
I only told her that the birth date and employer position were incorrect. I did not give her the correct info, and she didn't press for it. She didn't present an SSN for verification. I did not take the extra step of checking with bank officials because I felt enough info had already checked out, i.e. phone numbers and the fact that the bank had indeed made a credit inquiry. I agree I could have gone a little further, but I don't think anything I discussed with her provided any additional personal info. The purpose of her call was to ask me if I had applied for a credit card. When I said no, she told me that the card would not be sent out and recommended that I freeze my credit, which I did immediately after. Lesson learned.
Thanks for responding and also for sharing your experience here as it will help alert all of us to scams.
John Bogle on his often bumpy road to low-cost indexing: "When a door closes, if you look long enough and hard enough, if you're strong enough, you'll find a window that opens."

SoDakJeff
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Received a Ransomware email

Post by SoDakJeff » Sat Apr 06, 2019 7:38 am

[Thread merged into here, see below (next page) --admin LadyGeek]

I found a ransomware email in my spam folder this morning. Spelling and punctuation were terrible. Accused me of going to explicit websites, and said he had installed keylogger malware on my computer (I use Bitdefender Internet Security) that gave him access to my screen, contacts and webcam (I don't have a webcam on my computer) that supposedly shows me on these websites. He went on to say that unless I pay him $979 in bitcoin (not sure how he settled on that amount) he will send these these videos to all of my contacts.

Now, my first instinct was to ignore or delete the email. What's troubling to me, though, is the email contained my correct name and a password (also correct) that I use on a generic site, which I've now changed.

What's the protocol for something like this? I'm sure not going to pay this guy, and I know he doesn't have webcam footage of me watching explicit videos. What are the odds that he really did get my contacts and will start sending emails of porn to people and claiming that I watch these?

Is there someone I should report this to? Do I involve the police? Or am I just reacting in exactly the way he intended, and therefore should simply forget about it?

Anyone ever had something like this?

lazydavid
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Re: Received a Ransomware email

Post by lazydavid » Sat Apr 06, 2019 7:44 am

This is a very common scam in the past year or so. They got your email and password from a publicly-posted cache of stolen credentials from old website compromises. The goal is to get you to think "how could they know that? The claims must be legit." When in reality, it's just information that is widely available to anyone.

Delete it and move on with your life.

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J G Bankerton
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Re: Received a Ransomware email

Post by J G Bankerton » Sat Apr 06, 2019 7:45 am

I hope you blocked any attachments in the email. If you are going to open spam you should only do that on a test computer. What anti virus do you use? Change all passwords and scan for nasty things on your hard drive.

student
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Re: Received a Ransomware email

Post by student » Sat Apr 06, 2019 7:46 am

Just a scam. Ignore it.

saj
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Re: Received a Ransomware email

Post by saj » Sat Apr 06, 2019 7:48 am

If they actually had a keylogger installed, they probably would have already stolen your money. Do you share the password that they have across multiple sites? More than likely they bought or found a list of password dumps from a hacked website. That site was storing your password improperly (sites shouldn't ever actually store your password, but instead a "hash" of your password that can't be reversed).

If you can link the password to a single site, then it might be valuable to reach out to that site letting them know that someone gained access to your password. I don't have any experience with this happening to me personally, so I'm not sure if there is any value in reaching to local authorities.
Last edited by saj on Sat Apr 06, 2019 7:49 am, edited 1 time in total.

spectec
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Re: Received a Ransomware email

Post by spectec » Sat Apr 06, 2019 7:48 am

I'd ignore it. Any response will just validate for the creep that he has your attention. It is troubling that he has your password, but there's really nothing you can do about that other than change it immediately and never use it again.

Incidentally, I've read that these type of cons deliberately use flawed grammar. The theory is that they are looking for people who don't pay close attention to details (or aren't well-educated), and thus would be more gullible. Don't know if there's any truth to that, but there's a certain logic behind it.
Don't gamble; take all your savings and buy some good stock and hold it till it goes up, then sell it. If it don't go up, don't buy it. - Will Rogers

python99
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Re: Received a Ransomware email

Post by python99 » Sat Apr 06, 2019 7:49 am

Total scam ignore it

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Kenkat
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Re: Received a Ransomware email

Post by Kenkat » Sat Apr 06, 2019 7:53 am

Agree that it is just a scam as well but I would run a scan on your computer using your current anti-virus software as well as a Malwarebytes scan just to be sure.

mortfree
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Re: Received a Ransomware email

Post by mortfree » Sat Apr 06, 2019 7:56 am

Data breach that compromised that specific password used at company x. Now these scammers are using that info to scare folks.

A google search will quickly confirm.

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ResearchMed
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Re: Received a Ransomware email

Post by ResearchMed » Sat Apr 06, 2019 7:57 am

I've gotten several of these in the past few weeks, but they don't have any password of mine showing.

It's pretty clearly copied and pasted as an image, with dreadful spacing/spelling/grammar/etc.
It's SO bad that I actually wondered if it's "real", in that would the bitcoin code really work IF someone tried to pay (I am **NOT** going to test it!), or is it just to upset folks and cause them to panic?

It was startling the first time I received it, but after than, it's just more spam/scam/etc.

One of them spoofed a sending email that used our domain. (We have it set so that "Rumplestiltskin@OurDomain.com" will arrive just as nicely as if it's addressed to "ResearchMed@OurDomain.com" - except that we can NOT *send* from any other username, just receive email addressed to any user name.)
And it was sent to the same spoofed e-address. (This "To" e-address could have been easily done; *sending* from some other username at OurDomain took at least minimal spoofing software, I'd assume.)

Just more annoyances...

RM
This signature is a placebo. You are in the control group.

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RickBoglehead
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Re: Received a Ransomware email

Post by RickBoglehead » Sat Apr 06, 2019 7:59 am

NEVER, EVER open any email with an attachment from anyone, unless you are expecting the attachment. You can email your friend/relative and say "I just got an email from you with an attachment, is that legit?"

Never click on any link in any email.

And, never respond to Ransomware.
Avid user of forums on variety of interests-financial, home brewing, F-150, PHEV, home repair, etc. Enjoy learning & passing on knowledge. It's PRINCIPAL, not PRINCIPLE. I ADVISE you to seek ADVICE.

GmanJeff
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Re: Received a Ransomware email

Post by GmanJeff » Sat Apr 06, 2019 8:01 am

Similar scams are sent by regular U.S. mail, with vague claims of knowledge of compromising conduct which will be disclosed to a spouse if an extortionate payment is not made. The fraudsters can obtain names and addresses from any number of sources, and by sending out a large number of such letters may be successful in randomly selecting one or two addressees with guilty consciences who may pay.

Absent concrete evidence of a problem, threats alone should be ignored. In the case of cyber-facilitated threats, a report can be made to https://www.ic3.gov/default.aspx

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jabberwockOG
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Re: Received a Ransomware email

Post by jabberwockOG » Sat Apr 06, 2019 8:06 am

If they had images of you doing anything at all they would have included an image with the email. If they had a key logger installed the last thing they would do is tell you about it. Ignore the email as another posted the password was likely pasted from a previously stolen hacked set.

Suggest you change all your passwords to any sensitive or important sites immediately, and then change every 6-12 months going forward. Don't use the same password or even a common variation of the same password on more than 1 site.

Luckywon
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Re: Received a Ransomware email

Post by Luckywon » Sat Apr 06, 2019 8:13 am

SoDakJeff wrote:
Sat Apr 06, 2019 7:38 am
What's troubling to me, though, is the email contained my correct name and a password (also correct) that I use on a generic site
could you share what site? others who have registered there may like to know.

criticalmass
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Re: Scam alert - USPS new feature playing a role

Post by criticalmass » Sat Apr 06, 2019 8:18 am

RickBoglehead wrote:
Tue Apr 02, 2019 3:38 pm
Agree that the Informed Delivery connection seems to be unfounded. And it is not new, started 2 years ago yesterday.
In some areas, Informed Delivery has been available for much longer than just two years.

Shallowpockets
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Re: Received a Ransomware email

Post by Shallowpockets » Sat Apr 06, 2019 8:19 am

What is the date on this spam email? If it is old and nothing has happened then ignore it. If it is new, ignore it. Obviously there would be more to come from same source prompting you.
What about the Bitcoin thing? How would one do that anyway. That would take a whole lot of work to implement. Ergo, not serious to me.
Ignore. Change passwords.

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ResearchMed
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Re: Received a Ransomware email

Post by ResearchMed » Sat Apr 06, 2019 8:20 am

GmanJeff wrote:
Sat Apr 06, 2019 8:01 am
Similar scams are sent by regular U.S. mail, with vague claims of knowledge of compromising conduct which will be disclosed to a spouse if an extortionate payment is not made. The fraudsters can obtain names and addresses from any number of sources, and by sending out a large number of such letters may be successful in randomly selecting one or two addressees with guilty consciences who may pay.

Absent concrete evidence of a problem, threats alone should be ignored. In the case of cyber-facilitated threats, a report can be made to https://www.ic3.gov/default.aspx
I thought that IC3 complaint site was for actual victims, not just those who receive the attempted scams...?

RM
This signature is a placebo. You are in the control group.

ohai
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Re: Received a Ransomware email

Post by ohai » Sat Apr 06, 2019 8:20 am

"webcam (I don't have a webcam on my computer)"

Yeah, they are just baiting you. You should probably change any accounts with the old password though.

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ResearchMed
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Re: Received a Ransomware email

Post by ResearchMed » Sat Apr 06, 2019 8:26 am

Shallowpockets wrote:
Sat Apr 06, 2019 8:19 am
What is the date on this spam email? If it is old and nothing has happened then ignore it. If it is new, ignore it. Obviously there would be more to come from same source prompting you.
What about the Bitcoin thing? How would one do that anyway. That would take a whole lot of work to implement. Ergo, not serious to me.
Ignore. Change passwords.
Ha! I didn't even think through HOW I was supposed to pay via bitcoin!

Apparently I was supposed to use any browser and search for how to buy bitcoin, and then copy/paste in the code in the email.
I have no idea if that would have led me to a way to "do it", and I'm not going to do ANY search using the term "bitcoin", obviously.

RM
This signature is a placebo. You are in the control group.

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nisiprius
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Re: Received a Ransomware email

Post by nisiprius » Sat Apr 06, 2019 8:35 am

Fortunately, a friend got one of these before I got one. I have now received several of them, and I must say they do make me anxious despite all the obvious clues that it is a fraud. I waste time doing a Malwarebytes scan after each one.

I remember the first time my wife got spam offering to enlarge an organ she doesn't have. I think that up until then she didn't really believe that an "innocent" person could get that kind of spam.

I find it concerning to imagine the effect that an email like this might have on a young preadolescent or adolescent, who does have a webcam, and actually is secretly visiting adult-oriented sites. At that age, the amount of guilt and shame one feels at the very idea of a parent finding out is intense.

I haven't gone far enough to see how you might go about paying the ransom. I'm sure they have a way to guide you through the process as long as you have access to a credit card.
Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen nineteen and six, result happiness; Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure twenty pounds ought and six, result misery.

GmanJeff
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Re: Received a Ransomware email

Post by GmanJeff » Sat Apr 06, 2019 8:38 am

ResearchMed wrote:
Sat Apr 06, 2019 8:20 am
GmanJeff wrote:
Sat Apr 06, 2019 8:01 am
Similar scams are sent by regular U.S. mail, with vague claims of knowledge of compromising conduct which will be disclosed to a spouse if an extortionate payment is not made. The fraudsters can obtain names and addresses from any number of sources, and by sending out a large number of such letters may be successful in randomly selecting one or two addressees with guilty consciences who may pay.

Absent concrete evidence of a problem, threats alone should be ignored. In the case of cyber-facilitated threats, a report can be made to https://www.ic3.gov/default.aspx
I thought that IC3 complaint site was for actual victims, not just those who receive the attempted scams...?

RM
No, it's to report both actual and attempted scams. Attempts are still criminal acts, and information about them may be able to be correlated with other intelligence to support additional investigation and potential prosecution.

SoDakJeff
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Re: Received a Ransomware email

Post by SoDakJeff » Sat Apr 06, 2019 8:46 am

J G Bankerton wrote:
Sat Apr 06, 2019 7:45 am
I hope you blocked any attachments in the email. If you are going to open spam you should only do that on a test computer. What anti virus do you use? Change all passwords and scan for nasty things on your hard drive.
Thanks to everyone for helping put my mind at rest!

I use Bitdefender Internet Security. It's supposed to have "ransomware remediation".

There were no attachments to the email, although I do know better than to open one except from trusted sources.

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ResearchMed
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Re: Received a Ransomware email

Post by ResearchMed » Sat Apr 06, 2019 8:47 am

GmanJeff wrote:
Sat Apr 06, 2019 8:38 am
ResearchMed wrote:
Sat Apr 06, 2019 8:20 am
GmanJeff wrote:
Sat Apr 06, 2019 8:01 am
Similar scams are sent by regular U.S. mail, with vague claims of knowledge of compromising conduct which will be disclosed to a spouse if an extortionate payment is not made. The fraudsters can obtain names and addresses from any number of sources, and by sending out a large number of such letters may be successful in randomly selecting one or two addressees with guilty consciences who may pay.

Absent concrete evidence of a problem, threats alone should be ignored. In the case of cyber-facilitated threats, a report can be made to https://www.ic3.gov/default.aspx
I thought that IC3 complaint site was for actual victims, not just those who receive the attempted scams...?

RM
No, it's to report both actual and attempted scams. Attempts are still criminal acts, and information about them may be able to be correlated with other intelligence to support additional investigation and potential prosecution.
That's not how I interpreted the initial wording in the link:

"The IC3 accepts online Internet crime complaints from either the actual victim or from a third party to the complainant. We can best process your complaint if we receive accurate and complete information from you. Therefore, we request you provide the following information when filing a complaint:

Victim's name, address, telephone, and email
Financial transaction information (e.g., account information, transaction date and amount, who received the money)
Subject's name, address, telephone, email, website, and IP address
Specific details on how you were victimized
Email header(s)
Any other relevant information you believe is necessary to support your complaint"


Do they really want us to send along whatever limited details exist from all simple "approaches" such as these emails?
There is no money involved, there are no transaction dates/etc., no one was "victimized" (other than perhaps as Nisi pointed out, which could be quite emotionally traumatizing to some).

RM
This signature is a placebo. You are in the control group.

SoDakJeff
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Re: Received a Ransomware email

Post by SoDakJeff » Sat Apr 06, 2019 8:48 am

Luckywon wrote:
Sat Apr 06, 2019 8:13 am
SoDakJeff wrote:
Sat Apr 06, 2019 7:38 am
What's troubling to me, though, is the email contained my correct name and a password (also correct) that I use on a generic site
could you share what site? others who have registered there may like to know.
Kayak - the travel site.

Luckywon
Posts: 601
Joined: Tue Mar 28, 2017 10:33 am

Re: Received a Ransomware email

Post by Luckywon » Sat Apr 06, 2019 8:50 am

SoDakJeff wrote:
Sat Apr 06, 2019 8:48 am
Luckywon wrote:
Sat Apr 06, 2019 8:13 am
SoDakJeff wrote:
Sat Apr 06, 2019 7:38 am
What's troubling to me, though, is the email contained my correct name and a password (also correct) that I use on a generic site
could you share what site? others who have registered there may like to know.
Kayak - the travel site.
Good to know, thanks!

GmanJeff
Posts: 553
Joined: Sun Jun 11, 2017 7:12 am

Re: Received a Ransomware email

Post by GmanJeff » Sat Apr 06, 2019 8:54 am

ResearchMed wrote:
Sat Apr 06, 2019 8:47 am
GmanJeff wrote:
Sat Apr 06, 2019 8:38 am
ResearchMed wrote:
Sat Apr 06, 2019 8:20 am
GmanJeff wrote:
Sat Apr 06, 2019 8:01 am
Similar scams are sent by regular U.S. mail, with vague claims of knowledge of compromising conduct which will be disclosed to a spouse if an extortionate payment is not made. The fraudsters can obtain names and addresses from any number of sources, and by sending out a large number of such letters may be successful in randomly selecting one or two addressees with guilty consciences who may pay.

Absent concrete evidence of a problem, threats alone should be ignored. In the case of cyber-facilitated threats, a report can be made to https://www.ic3.gov/default.aspx
I thought that IC3 complaint site was for actual victims, not just those who receive the attempted scams...?

RM
No, it's to report both actual and attempted scams. Attempts are still criminal acts, and information about them may be able to be correlated with other intelligence to support additional investigation and potential prosecution.
That's not how I interpreted the initial wording in the link:

"The IC3 accepts online Internet crime complaints from either the actual victim or from a third party to the complainant. We can best process your complaint if we receive accurate and complete information from you. Therefore, we request you provide the following information when filing a complaint:

Victim's name, address, telephone, and email
Financial transaction information (e.g., account information, transaction date and amount, who received the money)
Subject's name, address, telephone, email, website, and IP address
Specific details on how you were victimized
Email header(s)
Any other relevant information you believe is necessary to support your complaint"


Do they really want us to send along whatever limited details exist from all simple "approaches" such as these emails?
There is no money involved, there are no transaction dates/etc., no one was "victimized" (other than perhaps as Nisi pointed out, which could be quite emotionally traumatizing to some).

RM
Yes. The IP address and header information of the sender can be useful in determining whether the sender is involved in other activities and consequently merits further investigative attention. The more limited the information you have about the sender, the less can be done, but from an analytic perspective all information is potentially valuable. One-off unsuccessful attempts and cases where victims experience small losses only are, as a practical matter, unlikely to receive much attention, but it's also possible that what appears to any one recipient to be no big deal could in fact turn out to be useful in a broader context known only to the authorities. If the IC3 sees no value in a report, there's no harm done, but not reporting doesn't afford them an opportunity to even assess a matter for themselves.

Cody
Posts: 968
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Location: Stillwater, Mn

Re: Received a Ransomware email

Post by Cody » Sat Apr 06, 2019 9:09 am

A mac guy here. Are there good apps to say limit outsider emails. I would envision selecting emails addresses from a list and checking only those you want to recieve emails from. Or getting an elert that "this email is not from your normal contacts"

Hopefully
Cody

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NCPE
Posts: 50
Joined: Tue Mar 15, 2016 5:10 am
Location: North Carolina

Re: Received a Ransomware email

Post by NCPE » Sat Apr 06, 2019 10:09 am

I received more or less the same "ransomware" email this morning, it did have a generic password that I used years ago for websites that required a password but I figured I would never visit again and had no financial ties. Same blackmail about the websites, which I don't visit and I don't have a webcam.

Trash the email and move on but it is probably a good time to revise / change all of your passwords (I do it every three months) and use a random password generator to create a unique password for each website.

michaelingp
Posts: 262
Joined: Tue Jan 17, 2017 8:46 pm

Re: Received a Ransomware email

Post by michaelingp » Sat Apr 06, 2019 10:23 am

SoDakJeff wrote:
Sat Apr 06, 2019 8:46 am

I use Bitdefender Internet Security. It's supposed to have "ransomware remediation".
The term "ransomware" usually refers to a scam where the bad guys encrypt all the files on your computer and hold them for "ransom". If you don't pay, all your files are gone. If you pay, you hope they give you the encryption key to decrypt your files. "Ransomware remediation" usually refers to applications that keep secure backups so you can restore your files, or in some cases, detect and stop any attempt to encrypt files on your computer.

User avatar
telemark
Posts: 2571
Joined: Sat Aug 11, 2012 6:35 am

Re: Received a Ransomware email

Post by telemark » Sat Apr 06, 2019 10:31 am

Luckywon wrote:
Sat Apr 06, 2019 8:50 am
SoDakJeff wrote:
Sat Apr 06, 2019 8:48 am
Luckywon wrote:
Sat Apr 06, 2019 8:13 am
SoDakJeff wrote:
Sat Apr 06, 2019 7:38 am
What's troubling to me, though, is the email contained my correct name and a password (also correct) that I use on a generic site
could you share what site? others who have registered there may like to know.
Kayak - the travel site.
Good to know, thanks!
Kayak had a publicized security breach in 2012, and of course there may have been others that didn't make the news or weren't noticed.

Kayak.com investigates after customers discover security breach

gtd98765
Posts: 480
Joined: Sun Jan 08, 2017 4:15 am

Re: Received a Ransomware email

Post by gtd98765 » Sat Apr 06, 2019 11:06 am

Here is an article in the press that describes the scam. Nothing to be worried about as long as you don't use this same password on other sites.

https://krebsonsecurity.com/2018/07/sex ... passwords/

123
Posts: 5417
Joined: Fri Oct 12, 2012 3:55 pm

Re: Received a Ransomware email

Post by 123 » Sat Apr 06, 2019 11:11 am

I got one of these ransomware emails a few months back that included a correct password that had been used in the long ago past. I ignored the email and things have been just fine. It's a scam.
The closest helping hand is at the end of your own arm.

tibbitts
Posts: 9410
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 6:50 pm

Re: Received a Ransomware email

Post by tibbitts » Sat Apr 06, 2019 11:19 am

I get these emails but the grammar is perfect and the amount they want in bitcoin is a lot more.

I used to use the same password on sites that weren't financial, but now I use unique passwords. I get notices from Credit Karma sometimes that my old "standard" password has been discovered on some new list - but it's always that same old password.

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Will do good
Posts: 879
Joined: Fri Feb 24, 2012 8:23 pm

Re: Received a Ransomware email

Post by Will do good » Sat Apr 06, 2019 11:19 am

I had them multi-times, It's a scam. Some even use my own email address to send the ransomware.
The scammers sounded like from out of the country, so there's not much can be done. Just move on.

SoDakJeff
Posts: 81
Joined: Mon Mar 13, 2017 11:48 am

Re: Received a Ransomware email

Post by SoDakJeff » Sat Apr 06, 2019 11:21 am

gtd98765 wrote:
Sat Apr 06, 2019 11:06 am
Here is an article in the press that describes the scam. Nothing to be worried about as long as you don't use this same password on other sites.

https://krebsonsecurity.com/2018/07/sex ... passwords/
That's almost exactly word-for-word what my email said. Interesting - Thanks.

gtd98765
Posts: 480
Joined: Sun Jan 08, 2017 4:15 am

Re: Received a Ransomware email

Post by gtd98765 » Sat Apr 06, 2019 11:42 am

Great. Krebs is a great resource on computer security and financial scam issues, since he writes in such an accessible way. I think he was a general assignment reporter for years before he took over the computer beat. I check his website every week to see what else I need to dodge regarding computer and financial scams.

Gnirk
Posts: 1168
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Location: Western Washington

Re: Received a Ransomware email

Post by Gnirk » Sat Apr 06, 2019 12:12 pm

NCPE wrote:
Sat Apr 06, 2019 10:09 am
I received more or less the same "ransomware" email this morning, it did have a generic password that I used years ago for websites that required a password but I figured I would never visit again and had no financial ties. Same blackmail about the websites, which I don't visit and I don't have a webcam.

Trash the email and move on but it is probably a good time to revise / change all of your passwords (I do it every three months) and use a random password generator to create a unique password for each website.
Same here. Second time.

RetiredArtist
Posts: 112
Joined: Wed Aug 26, 2015 4:38 pm

Re: Received a Ransomware email

Post by RetiredArtist » Sat Apr 06, 2019 12:22 pm

Sign up for haveibeenpwned.com, to see how your info leaked out

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