Folks in their 60s and above. What early investment on health do you recommend.

Questions on how we spend our money and our time - consumer goods and services, home and vehicle, leisure and recreational activities
Topic Author
RL1013
Posts: 126
Joined: Wed Mar 21, 2018 10:56 pm

Folks in their 60s and above. What early investment on health do you recommend.

Post by RL1013 » Sun Mar 31, 2019 12:39 pm

Question to all who are in their 60s and above. What specific long term investments in health or healthy habits have worked out for you? What bad habits or unhealthy investments in health do you regret the most? Any advise you would give to your 30 or 40 year old self that you now think will be a game changer health wise?

RadAudit
Posts: 3421
Joined: Mon May 26, 2008 10:20 am
Location: Second star on the right and straight on 'til morning

Re: Folks in their 60s and above. What early investment on health do you recommend.

Post by RadAudit » Sun Mar 31, 2019 12:46 pm

RL1013 wrote:
Sun Mar 31, 2019 12:39 pm
What specific long term investments in health or healthy habits have worked out for you?

Avoid smoking. Avoid drinking to excess.

What bad habits or unhealthy investments in health do you regret the most?

Gained too much weight.

Any advise you would give to your 30 or 40 year old self that you now think will be a game changer health wise?

Eat right. Exercise. Pick your genetic history with care.
FI is the best revenge. LBYM. Invest the rest. Stay the course. - PS: The cavalry isn't coming, kids. You are on your own.

User avatar
bengal22
Posts: 1710
Joined: Sat Dec 03, 2011 6:20 pm
Location: Ohio

Re: Folks in their 60s and above. What early investment on health do you recommend.

Post by bengal22 » Sun Mar 31, 2019 12:56 pm

Advice:

Spend more time with children

Always have a book in the bathroom.

Play pickleball
"Earn All You Can; Give All You Can; Save All You Can." .... John Wesley

camden
Posts: 256
Joined: Sun Sep 27, 2009 12:22 pm

Re: Folks in their 60s and above. What early investment on health do you recommend.

Post by camden » Sun Mar 31, 2019 12:59 pm

MD here. In terms of affecting your long term health and statistical longevity, my first rule would be DO NOT SMOKE. No other behavioral decision is likely to have a greater impact than whether of not you choose to use tobacco products.

Second would be to get regular exercise and stay near your ideal weight. Many people out there are committing slow suicide by excess caloric consumption.

By no means brilliant or original suggestions, but very important ones.

User avatar
DanMahowny
Posts: 878
Joined: Sun Aug 06, 2017 8:25 pm

Re: Folks in their 60s and above. What early investment on health do you recommend.

Post by DanMahowny » Sun Mar 31, 2019 1:03 pm

I'm not 60, but will play anyway.

My recommendation- quit alcohol. Completely.

I loved beer, and it was a regular part of my day for 35 years. And it was never a problem.

But when I quit, I felt maybe 20 years younger? Incredible.
Funding secured

EnjoyIt
Posts: 2172
Joined: Sun Dec 29, 2013 8:06 pm

Re: Folks in their 60s and above. What early investment on health do you recommend.

Post by EnjoyIt » Sun Mar 31, 2019 1:24 pm

camden wrote:
Sun Mar 31, 2019 12:59 pm
MD here. In terms of affecting your long term health and statistical longevity, my first rule would be DO NOT SMOKE. No other behavioral decision is likely to have a greater impact than whether of not you choose to use tobacco products.

Second would be to get regular exercise and stay near your ideal weight. Many people out there are committing slow suicide by excess caloric consumption.

By no means brilliant or original suggestions, but very important ones.
On top of not smoking, keeping weight down, and regular exercise, I will add a few more

1) Minimize junk food and fast food to rarely and if possible to never.
2) Decrease work related stress. You would be surprised how the stress piles up and affects your health. Many times you don't even realize what toll it is taking on you until you relinquish it. I think there are a few ways to achieve this:
a) Be one fo the lucky few that has a low stress, well paying job that you truly enjoy.
b) Build your financial wealth early so that you can cut back at some point in an easier lower stress job. Going part time helps.
c) Accept lower stress work that may provide less financial success but lesss time and stress which will lead to better health.
3) Don't let your material possessions own you such as buying too much house that requires lots of your time fixing up, maintaining, and looking pretty.
4) Spend as much time as you can with friends and family.

Stress is a very powerful disintegrator of health. Don't underestimate it.

Topic Author
RL1013
Posts: 126
Joined: Wed Mar 21, 2018 10:56 pm

Re: Folks in their 60s and above. What early investment on health do you recommend.

Post by RL1013 » Sun Mar 31, 2019 1:35 pm

camden wrote:
Sun Mar 31, 2019 12:59 pm
MD here. In terms of affecting your long term health and statistical longevity, my first rule would be DO NOT SMOKE. No other behavioral decision is likely to have a greater impact than whether of not you choose to use tobacco products.

Second would be to get regular exercise and stay near your ideal weight. Many people out there are committing slow suicide by excess caloric consumption.

By no means brilliant or original suggestions, but very important ones.
Thank you for the tips.

Never been a smoker. Hated it always due to some strange reason.

One question on your second point. How do I know what my ideal weight should be. There are lot of calculations when I do a search in Google. Which weight calculator would you suggest?

Topic Author
RL1013
Posts: 126
Joined: Wed Mar 21, 2018 10:56 pm

Re: Folks in their 60s and above. What early investment on health do you recommend.

Post by RL1013 » Sun Mar 31, 2019 1:38 pm

bengal22 wrote:
Sun Mar 31, 2019 12:56 pm
Advice:

Spend more time with children

Always have a book in the bathroom.

Play pickleball
And now I know what pickleball is :D

DrGoogle2017
Posts: 2528
Joined: Mon Aug 14, 2017 12:31 pm

Re: Folks in their 60s and above. What early investment on health do you recommend.

Post by DrGoogle2017 » Sun Mar 31, 2019 1:47 pm

1) I married my husband who takes a lot of stress of my life, he is a calm and cool person. Had I married a hot head, I might die sooner.

2) Find a hobby that you truly enjoy, gardening has been one of mine. Plus I have excuses to feed my family lots of vegs.

3) I usually don’t drink a lot of alcohol when I pass a certain age, there something about filling out doctors form where they keep asking me about how many glasses of alcohol that I drink per day or per week. It’s obviously not grape juice, otherwise why would they ask that.

4) I don’t smoke.

5) I eat a lot of fishes. Except I did marry to a meat and potato guy, but see the first item.

6) I also drive reasonably slow, about 55mph to 60mph. Not a high speed person unless I’m in the desert or something. No driving tickets for nearly 40 years. :D

7) I do moderate exercise, not a gym rat, but I swim moderately since high school and college days.
Last edited by DrGoogle2017 on Sun Mar 31, 2019 2:02 pm, edited 1 time in total.

larsm
Posts: 68
Joined: Thu Sep 23, 2010 8:04 pm

Re: Folks in their 60s and above. What early investment on health do you recommend.

Post by larsm » Sun Mar 31, 2019 1:49 pm

Avoid gun shot wounds and car accidents. Everything else in moderation...

livesoft
Posts: 66933
Joined: Thu Mar 01, 2007 8:00 pm

Re: Folks in their 60s and above. What early investment on health do you recommend.

Post by livesoft » Sun Mar 31, 2019 2:02 pm

RL1013 wrote:
Sun Mar 31, 2019 1:35 pm
One question on your second point. How do I know what my ideal weight should be. There are lot of calculations when I do a search in Google. Which weight calculator would you suggest?
I don't think you need a calculator. Just do a pinch test: If you grab the skin next to your belly button and pinch lightly a fold, then if the fold is more than half an inch thick, you are above your ideal weight.

As far as exercise goes, what has worked for me is to incorporate exercise into daily living without the need to go to the gym. For instance, I do a strenuous set of core exercises every morning while I cook my oatmeal breakfast. And I have always walked/biked/ran quite a lot as part of commuting or on vacations. I have never paid for a gym membership though I sometimes use hotel gyms and dorm gyms if I am overnighting.

Also I use a bathroom scale every day I am at home. My scale is right there in the bathroom, so I have to step on it or over it to go from closet to shower. By doing so, you will learn which meals create weight gain for you and what kinds of things create weight loss for you. For instance, I am eating a pound of Peanut M&M's now. I expect to gain an extra pound today.

Beside weighing yourself, you can also get a blood pressure monitor and use it every morning. It will also show you your heart rate. So you can do some things to get your resting heart rate consistently in the 30's and your blood pressure will be fine as a by-product of that.
Last edited by livesoft on Sun Mar 31, 2019 2:09 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Wiki This signature message sponsored by sscritic: Learn to fish.

WhyNotUs
Posts: 1518
Joined: Sun Apr 14, 2013 11:38 am

Re: Folks in their 60s and above. What early investment on health do you recommend.

Post by WhyNotUs » Sun Mar 31, 2019 2:09 pm

Advice to 30 yo self.
Mountain Bikes will have suspension soon, don't ride those trails now, wait.
Ease up on the simple carbs

What has worked for me?
Being active
Loving
Not making decisions based on fear
Knowing that I am ultimately not in control
I own the next hot stock- VTSAX

adamthesmythe
Posts: 2834
Joined: Mon Sep 22, 2014 4:47 pm

Re: Folks in their 60s and above. What early investment on health do you recommend.

Post by adamthesmythe » Sun Mar 31, 2019 2:18 pm

1. Moderation in all things. Even moderation.

2. Walk daily.

3. Fundamentals first. Eat fruit and vegetables, don't worry about getting organic goji berries from the Whole Foods.

4. And of course, don't smoke.

User avatar
TomatoTomahto
Posts: 8840
Joined: Mon Apr 11, 2011 1:48 pm

Re: Folks in their 60s and above. What early investment on health do you recommend.

Post by TomatoTomahto » Sun Mar 31, 2019 2:31 pm

Had I known that intermittent fasting and low carb living were easy lifestyle modifications, I might never have become T2 diabetic at all and surely would have never had to inject insulin 5x day.

Better late than never (no longer injecting ANY insulin (from 120 - 150 units daily), no longer on blood thinners other than aspirin, no longer on statins). Loving life.
Okay, I get it; I won't be political or controversial. The Earth is flat.

JediMisty
Posts: 213
Joined: Tue Aug 07, 2018 7:06 am
Location: Central NJ

Re: Folks in their 60s and above. What early investment on health do you recommend.

Post by JediMisty » Sun Mar 31, 2019 2:40 pm

Keep good dental hygiene. Cleanings twice per year, when your dentist will catch issues early. Follow the advice of the dentist with fervor. I'm noticing a huge difference in folks over 60 who took care of their teeth and those who didn't.

Rob1
Posts: 118
Joined: Thu May 04, 2017 2:57 pm

Re: Folks in their 60s and above. What early investment on health do you recommend.

Post by Rob1 » Sun Mar 31, 2019 3:30 pm

If I could offer you only one tip for the future, sunscreen would be it

User avatar
VictoriaF
Posts: 18893
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 7:27 am
Location: Black Swan Lake

Re: Folks in their 60s and above. What early investment on health do you recommend.

Post by VictoriaF » Sun Mar 31, 2019 3:41 pm

I have recently learned about the site Alzheimer's Universe, https://www.alzu.org/ . The site has advice for both healthcare providers and the public. Some advice target 30-year olds.

In my subjective ranking of common causes of death, Alzheimer's is worse than cancer, and cancer is worse than a cardio-vascular disease.

Victoria
WINNER of the 2015 Boglehead Contest. | Every joke has a bit of a joke. ... The rest is the truth. (Marat F)

JPM
Posts: 51
Joined: Sun Aug 19, 2018 2:29 pm

Re: Folks in their 60s and above. What early investment on health do you recommend.

Post by JPM » Sun Mar 31, 2019 5:02 pm

Common sense keys are keep your weight under control, 150 minutes of exercise per week, and don't smoke. Only 3% of people in the USA are able to achieve these things together for more than a short period of time. Archetype of simple but not easy. If you can do this, your chances of a long healthy life are good.

What is weight control? Body mass index of less than 30, even better less than 25 but much harder to achieve and maintain for most US men. Can google bmi calculators.

Have reliable sources of regular medical and dental care and follow the advice they give you.

User avatar
Sandtrap
Posts: 7463
Joined: Sat Nov 26, 2016 6:32 pm

Re: Folks in their 60s and above. What early investment on health do you recommend.

Post by Sandtrap » Sun Mar 31, 2019 6:19 pm

livesoft wrote:
Sun Mar 31, 2019 2:02 pm
RL1013 wrote:
Sun Mar 31, 2019 1:35 pm
One question on your second point. How do I know what my ideal weight should be. There are lot of calculations when I do a search in Google. Which weight calculator would you suggest?
I don't think you need a calculator. Just do a pinch test: If you grab the skin next to your belly button and pinch lightly a fold, then if the fold is more than half an inch thick, you are above your ideal weight.

As far as exercise goes, what has worked for me is to incorporate exercise into daily living without the need to go to the gym. For instance, I do a strenuous set of core exercises every morning while I cook my oatmeal breakfast. And I have always walked/biked/ran quite a lot as part of commuting or on vacations. I have never paid for a gym membership though I sometimes use hotel gyms and dorm gyms if I am overnighting.

Also I use a bathroom scale every day I am at home. My scale is right there in the bathroom, so I have to step on it or over it to go from closet to shower. By doing so, you will learn which meals create weight gain for you and what kinds of things create weight loss for you. For instance, I am eating a pound of Peanut M&M's now. I expect to gain an extra pound today.

Beside weighing yourself, you can also get a blood pressure monitor and use it every morning. It will also show you your heart rate. So you can do some things to get your resting heart rate consistently in the 30's and your blood pressure will be fine as a by-product of that.
+1
When going over a washboard highway or road, whatever shakes, bounces, jiggles, is excess.

Also weigh daily. BP daily.

You are as healthy as what you consume. IE: fish, veg, tofu, brown rice, etc.

After age 65 you can age in cat years. If no exercise, then dog years.
Wiki Bogleheads Wiki: Everything You Need to Know

SC Anteater
Posts: 195
Joined: Thu Jan 10, 2019 6:50 pm

Re: Folks in their 60s and above. What early investment on health do you recommend.

Post by SC Anteater » Sun Mar 31, 2019 6:23 pm

RL1013 wrote:
Sun Mar 31, 2019 12:39 pm
Question to all who are in their 60s and above. What specific long term investments in health or healthy habits have worked out for you? What bad habits or unhealthy investments in health do you regret the most? Any advise you would give to your 30 or 40 year old self that you now think will be a game changer health wise?
Maintain a healthy weight.
Exercise every day. (doesn't have to be a full on workout, can be a 20 minute walk on busy days).
Don't smoke.

User avatar
telemark
Posts: 2457
Joined: Sat Aug 11, 2012 6:35 am

Re: Folks in their 60s and above. What early investment on health do you recommend.

Post by telemark » Sun Mar 31, 2019 9:24 pm

camden wrote:
Sun Mar 31, 2019 12:59 pm
MD here. In terms of affecting your long term health and statistical longevity, my first rule would be DO NOT SMOKE. No other behavioral decision is likely to have a greater impact than whether of not you choose to use tobacco products.

Second would be to get regular exercise and stay near your ideal weight. Many people out there are committing slow suicide by excess caloric consumption.

By no means brilliant or original suggestions, but very important ones.
Those are the big ones. In addition, I would add:

Avoid loud noises and music, and if you can't do that, wear earplugs. I have a lot of deaf friends, and what I've noticed is that they all hate it.

Especially as you get older, do some strength training with an eye to maintaining muscle mass. Frailty can be a problem all by itself.

Finally, remember that you are affecting the odds, not determining the outcome. You can do everything right and still have problems.

User avatar
catdude
Posts: 1702
Joined: Mon Jul 16, 2007 8:11 pm
Location: Central Oregon

Re: Folks in their 60s and above. What early investment on health do you recommend.

Post by catdude » Sun Mar 31, 2019 9:52 pm

I just want to echo the "don't smoke" advice. I don't smoke myself but my dad did, and it killed him. He died at age 70 of lung cancer. I was with him at the end and it was pretty rough. I often think that if everyone could see what I've seen, no one would smoke.
catdude | | "Only in America." (Yogi Berra, after being told that the mayor of Catholic Dublin was Jewish)

radiowave
Posts: 2236
Joined: Thu Apr 30, 2015 5:01 pm

Re: Folks in their 60s and above. What early investment on health do you recommend.

Post by radiowave » Sun Mar 31, 2019 10:00 pm

Minimize or avoid caffeine. It causes vasoconstriction (raises blood pressure by narrowing arteries) and in the long term is not good for you. So stop going to Starbucks and save a few hundred a year you can devote to a nice hiking trip in the mountains.
Bogleheads Wiki: https://www.bogleheads.org/wiki/Main_Page

InMyDreams
Posts: 571
Joined: Tue Feb 28, 2017 11:35 am

Re: Folks in their 60s and above. What early investment on health do you recommend.

Post by InMyDreams » Sun Mar 31, 2019 10:05 pm

Read The Blue Zones. It's all about healthy lifestyles in an easy-to-read format. I've only read the first book.

Younger Next Year also gives a lot of good tips, covering most of what has been given in previous responses, and also in the Zones.

If you want a detailed analysis of the secrets of happiness and longevity, The Okinawa Program. Pretty thick, tho. Covers many factors that contribute to them.

Financial health - Four Pillars of Investment?

Topic Author
RL1013
Posts: 126
Joined: Wed Mar 21, 2018 10:56 pm

Re: Folks in their 60s and above. What early investment on health do you recommend.

Post by RL1013 » Sun Mar 31, 2019 10:15 pm

livesoft wrote:
Sun Mar 31, 2019 2:02 pm
RL1013 wrote:
Sun Mar 31, 2019 1:35 pm
One question on your second point. How do I know what my ideal weight should be. There are lot of calculations when I do a search in Google. Which weight calculator would you suggest?
I don't think you need a calculator. Just do a pinch test: If you grab the skin next to your belly button and pinch lightly a fold, then if the fold is more than half an inch thick, you are above your ideal weight.

As far as exercise goes, what has worked for me is to incorporate exercise into daily living without the need to go to the gym. For instance, I do a strenuous set of core exercises every morning while I cook my oatmeal breakfast. And I have always walked/biked/ran quite a lot as part of commuting or on vacations. I have never paid for a gym membership though I sometimes use hotel gyms and dorm gyms if I am overnighting.

Also I use a bathroom scale every day I am at home. My scale is right there in the bathroom, so I have to step on it or over it to go from closet to shower. By doing so, you will learn which meals create weight gain for you and what kinds of things create weight loss for you. For instance, I am eating a pound of Peanut M&M's now. I expect to gain an extra pound today.

Beside weighing yourself, you can also get a blood pressure monitor and use it every morning. It will also show you your heart rate. So you can do some things to get your resting heart rate consistently in the 30's and your blood pressure will be fine as a by-product of that.
Great tips. Thank you. I have decided to implement these (monitoring weight and blood pressure) in my life.

I like the idea of putting the weight scale out for easy access. I have one but it is kept in a place not easily accessible. This simple tweak will help to regularly track the weight loss progress. Because of this, I even spent some time reflecting what other small tweaks can I make to create / promote good habits. Maybe another Bogleheads thread :D

DonIce
Posts: 601
Joined: Thu Feb 21, 2019 6:44 pm

Re: Folks in their 60s and above. What early investment on health do you recommend.

Post by DonIce » Sun Mar 31, 2019 10:31 pm

1. As others have mentioned, avoid obviously self-harming behaviors like smoking, drinking, and overeating.

2. Get sufficient exercise. This is best done by having a hobby/passion that involves a lot of movement. While most of the benefit can be obtained from just a couple hours per week, there is additional benefit (both physical and mental) to be had from substantially more time spent moving outdoors. If you like hiking, swimming, biking, skiing, etc, and are no longer working you have the free time to enjoy these activities for 20+ hours per week. Do so.

3. Incorporate at least one short strength training session per week. Regardless of other exercise you may do, strength training brings unique benefits including preventing/reducing the loss of muscle mass and bone density with age.

4. Maintain meaningful interactions and relationships with other people (not just your spouse). Disengagement and loneliness are among the biggest mortality risk factors for people after retirement. Leaning heavily on just a single relationship by seeing each other for 3-10x more time weekly than you had gotten used to for the prior decades may work out well sometimes, but may put excessive strain on the relationship for other people. Additionally, a lack of other meaningful relationships will severely harm the surviving spouse.

5. Have regular medical check-ups so that any potential health problems that require intervention can be caught early, allowing for the greatest chance of them being resolved quickly and with the least side effects.

6. Keep yourself mentally sharp by doing intellectually challenging tasks daily. Expose yourself to new information and ideas on a daily basis

User avatar
VictoriaF
Posts: 18893
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 7:27 am
Location: Black Swan Lake

Re: Folks in their 60s and above. What early investment on health do you recommend.

Post by VictoriaF » Sun Mar 31, 2019 10:36 pm

radiowave wrote:
Sun Mar 31, 2019 10:00 pm
Minimize or avoid caffeine. It causes vasoconstriction (raises blood pressure by narrowing arteries) and in the long term is not good for you. So stop going to Starbucks and save a few hundred a year you can devote to a nice hiking trip in the mountains.
Coffee, black tea, and green tea have health benefit. Starbucks does not have have health benefits, and you can have inexpensive coffee and tea at home.

One of my rules is not to have caffeinated drinks after 2pm so that all caffeine would leave my digestive system by the time of the night sleep.

Victoria
WINNER of the 2015 Boglehead Contest. | Every joke has a bit of a joke. ... The rest is the truth. (Marat F)

Spirit Rider
Posts: 10766
Joined: Fri Mar 02, 2007 2:39 pm

Re: Folks in their 60s and above. What early investment on health do you recommend.

Post by Spirit Rider » Sun Mar 31, 2019 10:43 pm

Lots of good advice. I will add an important one. Avoid excessive sugar, there is nothing good that can come from it.

Topic Author
RL1013
Posts: 126
Joined: Wed Mar 21, 2018 10:56 pm

Re: Folks in their 60s and above. What early investment on health do you recommend.

Post by RL1013 » Sun Mar 31, 2019 10:47 pm

VictoriaF wrote:
Sun Mar 31, 2019 3:41 pm
I have recently learned about the site Alzheimer's Universe, https://www.alzu.org/ . The site has advice for both healthcare providers and the public. Some advice target 30-year olds.

In my subjective ranking of common causes of death, Alzheimer's is worse than cancer, and cancer is worse than a cardio-vascular disease.

Victoria
Timing on this is perfect. I was thinking on doing some research on this front. Started with their lessons. Thank you.

Topic Author
RL1013
Posts: 126
Joined: Wed Mar 21, 2018 10:56 pm

Re: Folks in their 60s and above. What early investment on health do you recommend.

Post by RL1013 » Sun Mar 31, 2019 11:03 pm

TomatoTomahto wrote:
Sun Mar 31, 2019 2:31 pm
Had I known that intermittent fasting and low carb living were easy lifestyle modifications, I might never have become T2 diabetic at all and surely would have never had to inject insulin 5x day.

Better late than never (no longer injecting ANY insulin (from 120 - 150 units daily), no longer on blood thinners other than aspirin, no longer on statins). Loving life.
Thank you for your inputs. What kind of fasting do you do? Time restricted diet or full days of water only fast?

yeahman
Posts: 190
Joined: Thu Mar 02, 2017 11:27 am

Re: Folks in their 60s and above. What early investment on health do you recommend.

Post by yeahman » Sun Mar 31, 2019 11:11 pm

1. Don't smoke. Don't worry about second hand smoke. It may smell bad but it won't kill you.
2. Eat in moderation. You don't need to avoid anything but avoiding certain foods may help you consume fewer calories. E.g., many people find cutting out bread, soda, alcohol, or juice a fairly easy way to reduce caloric intake.
3. Regular cardio. Anything that gets your heart rate elevated. Even a few mins is better than nothing. Enjoyability is a priority so you keep on doing it.
4. Check blood pressure and cholesterol. Don't worry about salt or dietary cholesterol. Cardio and medication are the best medicine.
5. For strength, do some resistance training. Not necessary for longevity but great for when you have to move the couch.
6. Get your shots. Flu shot is best to get in November.
7. Wash your hands. Carry hand sanitizer.
8. Sit up straight. Support that lumbar.
9. SPF 30. Stay in the shade. Don't worry, everyone's vitamin D "deficient" and it haven't been shown to have any negative impact.
10. Floss and get a regular cleaning.
11. Wear your seat belt and don't drink/text and drive. Better yet, Uber.
12. Know what meds you're taking and don't OD.
13. Slip-proof your bathroom.
14. Make sure your smoke alarm is working.
15. If you aren't going to work, join some sort of group that meets at least once a week and has your contact info. Church, club, team, etc. They'll be your second line of defense after your spouse in noticing if something is wrong.
16. Maintain relationships. This is for mental health.

DrGoogle2017
Posts: 2528
Joined: Mon Aug 14, 2017 12:31 pm

Re: Folks in their 60s and above. What early investment on health do you recommend.

Post by DrGoogle2017 » Sun Mar 31, 2019 11:16 pm

Have a good immune system is the first line of defense, I think I got mine through many acupuncture sessions, plus I eat lots of mushrooms, google for it, it improves your immune system. Not a medical advice, just my experience. I never received flu shots, but I rarely get sick. It’s been 15 years now. Same with my husband because he eats the same food.
I also like to add, have a positive outlook in life, don’t stress the little things, get a good night sleep. Sometimes alcohol interferes with my sleep, that’s why I rarely drink it.
Last edited by DrGoogle2017 on Sun Mar 31, 2019 11:18 pm, edited 1 time in total.

yeahman
Posts: 190
Joined: Thu Mar 02, 2017 11:27 am

Re: Folks in their 60s and above. What early investment on health do you recommend.

Post by yeahman » Sun Mar 31, 2019 11:18 pm

VictoriaF wrote:
Sun Mar 31, 2019 10:36 pm
radiowave wrote:
Sun Mar 31, 2019 10:00 pm
Minimize or avoid caffeine. It causes vasoconstriction (raises blood pressure by narrowing arteries) and in the long term is not good for you. So stop going to Starbucks and save a few hundred a year you can devote to a nice hiking trip in the mountains.
Coffee, black tea, and green tea have health benefit. Starbucks does not have have health benefits, and you can have inexpensive coffee and tea at home.

One of my rules is not to have caffeinated drinks after 2pm so that all caffeine would leave my digestive system by the time of the night sleep.

Victoria
That hiking trip is probably more dangerous than the coffee/tea.

yeahman
Posts: 190
Joined: Thu Mar 02, 2017 11:27 am

Re: Folks in their 60s and above. What early investment on health do you recommend.

Post by yeahman » Sun Mar 31, 2019 11:27 pm

As far as we know, Alzheimer's can't be prevented. Best you can do is to mitigate its effects. Maintain a routine and relationships. Use a pill box. Use lists. Put as much of your life as possible on autopilot. Have a plan.

Topic Author
RL1013
Posts: 126
Joined: Wed Mar 21, 2018 10:56 pm

Re: Folks in their 60s and above. What early investment on health do you recommend.

Post by RL1013 » Sun Mar 31, 2019 11:45 pm

DrGoogle2017 wrote:
Sun Mar 31, 2019 11:16 pm
Have a good immune system is the first line of defense, I think I got mine through many acupuncture sessions, plus I eat lots of mushrooms, google for it, it improves your immune system. Not a medical advice, just my experience. I never received flu shots, but I rarely get sick. It’s been 15 years now. Same with my husband because he eats the same food.
I also like to add, have a positive outlook in life, don’t stress the little things, get a good night sleep. Sometimes alcohol interferes with my sleep, that’s why I rarely drink it.
I love mushrooms but spouse doesn't. What kind of mushrooms do you eat?

FoolStreet
Posts: 771
Joined: Fri Sep 07, 2012 12:18 am

Re: Folks in their 60s and above. What early investment on health do you recommend.

Post by FoolStreet » Sun Mar 31, 2019 11:56 pm

Rob1 wrote:
Sun Mar 31, 2019 3:30 pm
If I could offer you only one tip for the future, sunscreen would be it
I see what you did there.

DrGoogle2017
Posts: 2528
Joined: Mon Aug 14, 2017 12:31 pm

Re: Folks in their 60s and above. What early investment on health do you recommend.

Post by DrGoogle2017 » Mon Apr 01, 2019 12:02 am

RL1013 wrote:
Sun Mar 31, 2019 11:45 pm
DrGoogle2017 wrote:
Sun Mar 31, 2019 11:16 pm
Have a good immune system is the first line of defense, I think I got mine through many acupuncture sessions, plus I eat lots of mushrooms, google for it, it improves your immune system. Not a medical advice, just my experience. I never received flu shots, but I rarely get sick. It’s been 15 years now. Same with my husband because he eats the same food.
I also like to add, have a positive outlook in life, don’t stress the little things, get a good night sleep. Sometimes alcohol interferes with my sleep, that’s why I rarely drink it.
I love mushrooms but spouse doesn't. What kind of mushrooms do you eat?
All kinds. Oyster, brown, white, shiitake. I love shiitake the best. I eat them weekly. My husband likes the other kinds better.

User avatar
SevenBridgesRoad
Posts: 418
Joined: Sat Jul 07, 2018 12:14 am

Re: Folks in their 60s and above. What early investment on health do you recommend.

Post by SevenBridgesRoad » Mon Apr 01, 2019 12:35 am

yeahman wrote:
Sun Mar 31, 2019 11:11 pm
1. Don't smoke. Don't worry about second hand smoke. It may smell bad but it won't kill you.
2. Eat in moderation. You don't need to avoid anything but avoiding certain foods may help you consume fewer calories. E.g., many people find cutting out bread, soda, alcohol, or juice a fairly easy way to reduce caloric intake.
3. Regular cardio. Anything that gets your heart rate elevated. Even a few mins is better than nothing. Enjoyability is a priority so you keep on doing it.
4. Check blood pressure and cholesterol. Don't worry about salt or dietary cholesterol. Cardio and medication are the best medicine.
5. For strength, do some resistance training. Not necessary for longevity but great for when you have to move the couch.
6. Get your shots. Flu shot is best to get in November.
7. Wash your hands. Carry hand sanitizer.
8. Sit up straight. Support that lumbar.
9. SPF 30. Stay in the shade. Don't worry, everyone's vitamin D "deficient" and it haven't been shown to have any negative impact.
10. Floss and get a regular cleaning.
11. Wear your seat belt and don't drink/text and drive. Better yet, Uber.
12. Know what meds you're taking and don't OD.
13. Slip-proof your bathroom.
14. Make sure your smoke alarm is working.
15. If you aren't going to work, join some sort of group that meets at least once a week and has your contact info. Church, club, team, etc. They'll be your second line of defense after your spouse in noticing if something is wrong.
16. Maintain relationships. This is for mental health.
Fantastic list. Really! I'll respond. Retired last year, age 62.
1) Never smoked.
2) OK, one of my passions/hobbies is brewing beer. I have a very high end garage brewery. I love the whole process. It's a laboratory and I'm a scientist. The trick is sharing everything with friends and neighbors, and not drinking too much of the output. That's one reason I have a canning machine. Easier to package beer for friends.
3) Pickleball, hiking, snowshoeing, kayaking, rec center classes. My wife and I are avid square dancers, which is mainly mental puzzle solving and learning. Good cardio. I highly recommend square dancing for mental and cardio fitness.
4) Yes. These are OK. Agree with everything in #4.
5) Rec center classes.
7) Yep!!! We also vocally promote hand sanitizing at any group event we are in (we bring a big pump bottle for the group).
8)Yep!
9) Yep! Or higher. Don't forget the lips. I use 70 here.
10) Absolutely! Floss once or even twice a day. Before I retired, I had floss in my desk drawer and used daily at work. Strangely hooked on the 6-month cleanings.
11) Seat belts should be #2 after no smoking. I can't believe there are still people who don't buckle up. Have a designated driver. It's actually pretty cool to be the non-drinking one for the evening.
12) I don't take any meds. Yay.
13) Yes, and assess the rest of your home for trip hazards.
14) Yes, calendar all of your smoke alarm battery changes and alarm tests.
15) I have several groups. But also I'm plenty enjoying my downtime. I read. I take naps.
16) Yes! Calling my sons a bit more than before retirement. Already had frequent calls with parents (still alive and active), sibs, and a few close friends.
Retired 2018 | Every day I choose how I spend my energy | One Vanguard TDF except for bunch of individual stocks...still recovering from my Fidelity AUM days years ago | Now sleeping well at night

Rob1
Posts: 118
Joined: Thu May 04, 2017 2:57 pm

Re: Folks in their 60s and above. What early investment on health do you recommend.

Post by Rob1 » Mon Apr 01, 2019 12:43 am

FoolStreet wrote:
Sun Mar 31, 2019 11:56 pm
Rob1 wrote:
Sun Mar 31, 2019 3:30 pm
If I could offer you only one tip for the future, sunscreen would be it
I see what you did there.
:wink:

livesoft
Posts: 66933
Joined: Thu Mar 01, 2007 8:00 pm

Re: Folks in their 60s and above. What early investment on health do you recommend.

Post by livesoft » Mon Apr 01, 2019 6:21 am

RL1013 wrote:
Sun Mar 31, 2019 10:15 pm
I like the idea of putting the weight scale out for easy access. I have one but it is kept in a place not easily accessible. This simple tweak will help to regularly track the weight loss progress. Because of this, I even spent some time reflecting what other small tweaks can I make to create / promote good habits. Maybe another Bogleheads thread :D
Put a pair of dumbbells next to any stairs in the house that you go up and dow. Never use the stairs empty handed.

Read the book "Younger Next Year"
Wiki This signature message sponsored by sscritic: Learn to fish.

fru-gal
Posts: 584
Joined: Wed Jan 02, 2019 9:48 pm

Re: Folks in their 60s and above. What early investment on health do you recommend.

Post by fru-gal » Mon Apr 01, 2019 6:26 am

Be a vegetarian. Based on tests, my heart is in great shape at age 75. I attribute this in part to being a vegetarian for forty or so years.

I lost several family members who were smokers to lung cancer at about age 60. Also, keep your weight down to normal and walk for exercise.

User avatar
tennisplyr
Posts: 2224
Joined: Tue Jan 28, 2014 1:53 pm
Location: Sarasota, FL

Re: Folks in their 60s and above. What early investment on health do you recommend.

Post by tennisplyr » Mon Apr 01, 2019 6:58 am

Retired, in my late 60s, here a few things I've done:

-stay active, don't be afraid to challenge yourself physically
-try to stay at suggested weight, blood pressure
-get routine health tests...they can save your life
-don't overdrink alcohol or overindulge in fatty foods
-don't smoke
-be optimistic about life :happy
Those who move forward with a happy spirit will find that things always work out.

Grt2bOutdoors
Posts: 20742
Joined: Thu Apr 05, 2007 8:20 pm
Location: New York

Re: Folks in their 60s and above. What early investment on health do you recommend.

Post by Grt2bOutdoors » Mon Apr 01, 2019 7:01 am

Choice of drink - water!
Eat greens, berries, mushrooms, onions, garlic (not to much your significant other won’t appreciate it!), lighten up on meat, use beans instead. Go for a walk.
"One should invest based on their need, ability and willingness to take risk - Larry Swedroe" Asking Portfolio Questions

JoeRetire
Posts: 2551
Joined: Tue Jan 16, 2018 2:44 pm

Re: Folks in their 60s and above. What early investment on health do you recommend.

Post by JoeRetire » Mon Apr 01, 2019 7:04 am

RL1013 wrote:
Sun Mar 31, 2019 12:39 pm
Question to all who are in their 60s and above. What specific long term investments in health or healthy habits have worked out for you?
Never smoking.
Never drinking to excess.
Never doing drugs.
What bad habits or unhealthy investments in health do you regret the most?
Not enough regular exercise.
Any advise you would give to your 30 or 40 year old self that you now think will be a game changer health wise?
Never smoke.
Don't drink to excess.
Don't do drugs.
Get regular exercise.
Moderation in everything.
Marry someone who has a similar outlook on healthy habits.

User avatar
TomatoTomahto
Posts: 8840
Joined: Mon Apr 11, 2011 1:48 pm

Re: Folks in their 60s and above. What early investment on health do you recommend.

Post by TomatoTomahto » Mon Apr 01, 2019 7:20 am

RL1013 wrote:
Sun Mar 31, 2019 11:03 pm
TomatoTomahto wrote:
Sun Mar 31, 2019 2:31 pm
Had I known that intermittent fasting and low carb living were easy lifestyle modifications, I might never have become T2 diabetic at all and surely would have never had to inject insulin 5x day.
Better late than never (no longer injecting ANY insulin (from 120 - 150 units daily), no longer on blood thinners other than aspirin, no longer on statins). Loving life.
Thank you for your inputs. What kind of fasting do you do? Time restricted diet or full days of water only fast?
I usually eat one (large) meal a day, which I’ve been moving closer to noon unless it’s on a weekend, since an evening meal is more “social.” I fast using water, coffee (Kona, yum!), or tea. Sometimes on the weekend I’ll eat more than one meal, driven more by social desires than hunger. Not eating is easy, stopping eating requires will.

I have not done any extended multi-day fasts. I have a continuous glucose monitor (CGS), and the two times I intended to do a multi-day, I felt that my glucose was too low (< 70) to trust that I wouldn’t go hypoglycemic during the night (as my endocrinologist said, “you wouldn’t want to wake up dead.”) For non-diabetics, extended fasts are NOT a problem, but given my history (I consider myself a “diabetic in remission”), I did not want to risk it.

Someday I will set an alarm for every few hours during the night and take a reading and see if I can do a 48 or 72 hour fast — there are autophagy benefits that are curtailed by breaking a fast after only 23 hours.

The benefits of intermittent fasting are myriad, and more are being discovered all the time. I think my chances of getting Alzheimer’s (sometimes called Diabetes Type 3) are reduced from fasting, and that’s one reason I want to do multi-day fasts.
Okay, I get it; I won't be political or controversial. The Earth is flat.

fru-gal
Posts: 584
Joined: Wed Jan 02, 2019 9:48 pm

Re: Folks in their 60s and above. What early investment on health do you recommend.

Post by fru-gal » Mon Apr 01, 2019 8:09 am

My doctor is always preaching staying hydrated. The standard 8 8oz glasses of fluid a day may not even be enough according to current thinking, but that's what I aim for.

GlennK
Posts: 30
Joined: Tue Mar 26, 2019 7:20 am

Re: Folks in their 60s and above. What early investment on health do you recommend.

Post by GlennK » Mon Apr 01, 2019 8:19 am

Rob1 wrote:
Sun Mar 31, 2019 3:30 pm
If I could offer you only one tip for the future, sunscreen would be it
+1 Too many sunburns as a kid and throughout young adulthood has led to skin cancer tumor (surgery removal) and actinic keratosis. Thesea are pre-cancerous skin lesions that I must get frozen off twice a year at the dermatologist.

Shallowpockets
Posts: 1196
Joined: Fri Nov 20, 2015 10:26 am

Re: Folks in their 60s and above. What early investment on health do you recommend.

Post by Shallowpockets » Mon Apr 01, 2019 8:27 am

OP. This is a question that should not be a question. You should already be doing exercise of some sort. There are plenty of suggestions here and a huge amount of things online to direct you. Go look. Take your pick. There are no magic answers. You can try different things. See what works. That is what we all do.
If you are 30-40 get moving now. Why have you not been in the loop on this health quest before now? It is not new news.

Actor
Posts: 5
Joined: Mon Dec 17, 2018 1:50 pm

Re: Folks in their 60s and above. What early investment on health do you recommend.

Post by Actor » Mon Apr 01, 2019 8:32 am

Minimize your commute to work

User avatar
DartThrower
Posts: 894
Joined: Wed Mar 11, 2009 4:10 pm
Location: Philadelphia

Re: Folks in their 60s and above. What early investment on health do you recommend.

Post by DartThrower » Mon Apr 01, 2019 9:22 am

I'm fairly late to this thread and I agree with the majority of what has been said. One thing I will add is that if at all possible don't just WATCH sports on tv, but PLAY sports. Whether it's tennis or golf or bike racing or running. Whatever you're into. Be a kid. Be the star of your own life.

There have been periods of my adult life when I was really into playing sports, and during those times eating became something of a chore almost. I just ate to give my body fuel for the next great adventure or for taking on a rival at raquetball. Or I would eat a hearty meal to recover from the 10k I just ran. As work became more stressful due to a job change I stopped playing competitive sports and somehow eating became an end in itself - almost a way to get high.

Another benefit of playing sports is that I would always keep in shape because I knew I had to compete in some sport. So my surface motivation for exercise was to play sports and have fun, but my deeper motivation was to be healthy. It worked. These motivations reinforced and amplified each other.

Lastly, it's really good to have friends to be teamates or competitors. There are lots of meetup websites where you can find teams for things like ultimate frisbee or hiking or even dancing. These friends will put a little subtle pressure on you to show up for events so you don't let your teammates down. Once you show up you'll be glad you did!

As for your ideal body weight, ask your doctor. My doctor told me to aim for being the weight I was in high school (190 lbs). I never was able to get below 210, but at that weight I could easily run a half-marathon and I felt great so I didn't feel bad about not achieving 190. Again, ask your doctor. YMMV

Good luck.
A Boglehead can stay the course longer than the market can stay irrational.

Locked