I would like a boat. I also know nothing about boats

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ponyboy
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Re: I would like a boat. I also know nothing about boats

Post by ponyboy » Mon Mar 25, 2019 2:04 pm

Best two days of boat ownership..

The day you buy, and the day you sell.

btenny
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Re: I would like a boat. I also know nothing about boats

Post by btenny » Mon Mar 25, 2019 3:40 pm

I am sorry for all the do not own a boat advice here. I love my boat (third one) and have a ton of fun ever summer using it. Both my kids and my grand kids and my wife love boating as well. It is a great family activity. All these non boat people just do not get it.

Since you have not been out in a boat a lot I suggest you go rent one a few times in the early summer to see what size and type boat you like. Go to some marinas and boat stores near your home and talk to them. Rent a small boat from them and ask for driving lessons to start. In many cases they will teach you enough to start having fun in 1-2 hours. Some people want more than one lesson. Others want to go out with friends who know how to drive a boat. It is very dependent on you and the local conditions. The key is to log some miles on the water in the captains seat. Learn how to launch and how to dock a boat. Learn about port and starboard and safe seating and speed and which way traffic goes on your lake. Learn about driving and passing protocol. Then rent a open bow boat and go for a ride. Then rent a cuddy cabin boat and go for a ride. Then rent a pontoon boat and go for ride. Take the Marine safety driving course to learn the rules of the road and how to stay safe while out boating.

Then by late summer or next spring you will know what kind of boat you want to buy. I prefer a nice used boat and take my time making buy decision. I save money this way but have to fix older boat repair and maintenance issues that arise. Others prefer buying new and enjoying the extra fun of a new things.

Come back and let us know what you buy and why. Good luck and have fun.

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smitcat
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Re: I would like a boat. I also know nothing about boats

Post by smitcat » Mon Mar 25, 2019 3:41 pm

ponyboy wrote:
Mon Mar 25, 2019 2:04 pm
Best two days of boat ownership..

The day you buy, and the day you sell.
Sorry to hear about your experience - which boat make and model did you own and not like?

dave_k
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Re: I would like a boat. I also know nothing about boats

Post by dave_k » Mon Mar 25, 2019 4:05 pm

HomerJ wrote:
Mon Mar 25, 2019 1:15 pm
Grt2bOutdoors wrote:
Mon Mar 25, 2019 12:35 pm
I let my relatives buy the boat
If I want to drive a boat, I’ll rent it
These are both VERY good plans, I admit. Best way to do it for most people.

OP has a house by the lake with a dock though.

If he's going to spend multiple weekends and a 1-2 vacation weeks up at the lake each summer/fall, having his own boat is definitely a decent idea.
I too live in a house on a lake with a dock. If I wasn't on the water, there's no way I'd own a boat, but since I am, there's no way I wouldn't. Even though the weather is only good enough less than half the year, we use it multiple times a week when it's warm, making it definitely worthwhile to own. Renting or trailering would be such a hassle by comparison that we'd never bother. Maintenance and winterization costs haven't been too bad. Gas is the biggest expense - boats aren't exactly fuel efficient!

Not sure the OP would want to go the same route, but we bought a used jet boat that seats 6 (5 comfortably). It's a blast with 240 HP and being so light, and can easily pull skiers and tubes. The ride can be punishing when the water is rough though - it likes to fly over waves rather than cut through them. Most people on our lake have pontoon boats or boats set up for wakeboarding/skiing, or fishing boats.

nick evets
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Re: I would like a boat. I also know nothing about boats

Post by nick evets » Mon Mar 25, 2019 4:09 pm

ponyboy wrote:
Mon Mar 25, 2019 2:04 pm
Best two days of boat ownership..

The day you buy, and the day you sell.
If that's the case, I've had quite a few good days...and more to come!

SunThruMist
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Re: I would like a boat. I also know nothing about boats

Post by SunThruMist » Mon Mar 25, 2019 4:38 pm

As some have noted, living on the lake with a dock makes boat ownership make sense. Getting boats in and out of the water is not the enjoyable part. As I'm sure you are aware, boats need TLC - nothing like trying to start up the boat only to find that the muskrats have chewed through some important wires. Maintaining patience and humor helps a lot. Getting a boat lift down the road is also a nice investment to help maintain your boat (see muskrat damage above).

+1 on boat safety course. There are actually a lot of laws about boating, and you do not want someone to get hurt nor to get a ticket for not having the right life jackets or lights working on your boat. Maybe your lake is small enough, but most reasonably sized lakes are policed. Also, remember there are no brakes on a boat. This may seem like an obvious statement, but seriously, there are no brakes on a boat. Do not underestimate momentum. I've seen some rather horrifying things happen because people underestimate their momentum. Having someone explain how to drive a boat, and practicing a little is a good idea for everyone's comfort and enjoyment.

My family wanted a boat to do exactly the things you have listed. Over the course of the 12 years that we lived on a lake, we bought 2 different used bowriders, roughly 19 ft. They were onboard/outboard engines with enough power to pull a skier. We couldn't afford the fanciest brands, like MasterCraft, but rather chose a more middle-of-the-road brand like a SeaRay (can't currently remember the brand of the first boat). Mostly our buying choices were predicated on budget, what was available within reasonable driving distance in reasonable shape, and reviews of reliability. We had a lot of good times on our first ugly little boat.

We chose to go with a bowrider over a pontoon because the ability to ski won over being able to bring 12 people on board. Wanting to board that many people happened once in a blue moon, but we skiied much more often. We managed large groups by taking turns, which is doable when you have a dock. Pontoons are great for cruising and tubing, but honestly anything more is less fun. Depending on how much oomph the pontoon has, it can actually be quite hard to get up on skis, because they will drag you along in the water for longer. Granted, if you start off too fast, like can happen behind a jetski, you just rip the rope out of the person's hands, which also hurts.

In any case, congrats on the lakefront property! I miss it and the lifestyle it brought.

Cheers :sharebeer

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JoeRetire
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Re: I would like a boat. I also know nothing about boats

Post by JoeRetire » Mon Mar 25, 2019 4:49 pm

AirTimeMD wrote:
Sun Mar 24, 2019 11:23 pm
Would anyone more intelligent than I am on the subject matter mind sharing some insight on the best way to approach this purchase?
Talk to your already-boated neighbors.

Since a lot of boat purchase factors are local (size and depth of lake, local market for new and used boats, etc), your neighbors may well be the most useful source of knowledge. And they might even want to sell a boat.

My personal suggestion - buy used for your first-ever boat. Eventually, you'll learn what features are important for you and your family on your particular lake, and what features are not important.
Don't be a lemming.

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TheAccountant
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Re: I would like a boat. I also know nothing about boats

Post by TheAccountant » Mon Mar 25, 2019 4:59 pm

20-23 foot bowrider with a fuel injected V8.

I did a blog post outlining every single expense incurred since purchasing my boat last year. You can read it here if you’re interested: http://chrisleoonline.com/how-much-a-bo ... -per-year/

If you’re trailering, 20 feet would probably be the best compromise between ease of transport and passenger comfort. The most I’ve had on mine is five, including myself. I believe the boat is rated for 8 or 9. I’m at 8’3” for beam, anything larger than 8’6” requires a wide load permit.

If you’re slipping it for the season, go as big as you can afford. Also, a head (with a porta-potti) is a useful thing to have, especially with female passengers.

Have the boat surveyed or at least inspected prior to signing anything. Don’t forget the trailer (if included) as well. Aim for something galvanized/aluminum with a tandem axle and brakes.

I’ve had mine for a year and am already having “foot-itis.” I guess being a trailer boater is good in the sense that it keeps me from upgrading in size every year. Basically, for something like this, buy it once and keep it for as long as you can. Boats, especially composite structured ones, can last for decades, if not indefinitely.

Feel free to shoot me a PM if you have any further questions. I’ve been on the water every year since 1995.
Making cents out of every dollar.

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aspirit
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Re: I would like a boat. I also know nothing about boats

Post by aspirit » Mon Mar 25, 2019 5:05 pm

Two friends selling boats in a heavily watercraft available saturated mkt., both asking 10k, both will accept much, much less. South of Miami.
Good luck
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RickBoglehead
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Re: I would like a boat. I also know nothing about boats

Post by RickBoglehead » Mon Mar 25, 2019 5:15 pm

To legally carry 8 people on a boat is one thing, to plane off and drive at speed another. Outside a pontoon boat, you would likely be in a 22+ foot and 150+ hp.

We bought a 16 foot with 70hp due to restrictions with existing boathouse and lift. Great for 2 adults. 4 adults requires 2 be in front until we plane off.

You will be spending some serious coin. Do you research and buy nothing that you don't sea trial in the conditions you expect with your planned load.


A boat is a hole in the water, surrounded by wood or fiberglass, into which you pour money...
Last edited by RickBoglehead on Mon Mar 25, 2019 7:35 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Trader Joe
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Re: I would like a boat. I also know nothing about boats

Post by Trader Joe » Mon Mar 25, 2019 5:19 pm

AirTimeMD wrote:
Sun Mar 24, 2019 11:23 pm
I am accustomed to being (or thinking that I am) reasonably educated on most purchases that I make; however, I find myself in a situation where I will be purchasing a boat for the family.

We purchased a home on a nice lake several years ago and have slowly renovated the backyard including the dock that came with the house. Everything is now done and we are ready to purchase a boat for the family. I am absolutely overwhelmed when going to websites where people sell boats at the 20+ different genres of boats.

Here is what I am looking for:
Something that is powerful enough to tow the kids for wake boarding/water fun but also that can seat 5-8 people for lake cruising and relaxing. My boat slip is approximately 23 feet long and 9 feet wide. Would anyone more intelligent than I am on the subject matter mind sharing some insight on the best way to approach this purchase? I obviously know that a boat is a depreciating luxury item but I'm trying to make the best decision given the original thought that I am going to purchase one...

Thank you.
ATD
This is a very exciting time for you. Lots to learn and to experience. Look around to see what others have. Speak to those that you can. You are smart. You will figure it out.

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oldzey
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Re: I would like a boat. I also know nothing about boats

Post by oldzey » Mon Mar 25, 2019 6:48 pm

My family had a fixer-upper lake house when I was growing up. We spent about 2% of our time on the lake and the other 98% either traveling to or working on the lakehouse, in addition to the dock, boat hoists, yard, broken pipes, renting/dealing with tenants, taking the boats/trailers to the marina for repair, etc. etc. etc. I wouldn't trade the memories for anything, but if I did it myself, I would simply rent a boat for the weekend (and not own anything boat-related).
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munemaker
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Re: I would like a boat. I also know nothing about boats

Post by munemaker » Mon Mar 25, 2019 7:45 pm

smitcat wrote:
Mon Mar 25, 2019 12:45 pm
Grt2bOutdoors wrote:
Mon Mar 25, 2019 12:35 pm
ThankYouJack wrote:
Mon Mar 25, 2019 11:52 am
Jimbo9911 wrote:
Mon Mar 25, 2019 9:29 am
munemaker wrote:
Mon Mar 25, 2019 9:15 am


Image
+1
Jim
Grt2bOutdoors wrote:
Mon Mar 25, 2019 1:39 am
It’s been said before, boaters safety course before you start looking at boats. Boat = bust out another thousand.
I get tired of hearing all the common never own boat sayings on here every boat thread. There are two types of people - land people and water people.
Curious if the "never own a boat" crowd has ever owned a boat?

OP, you have the perfect setup for a boat. Assuming you're going to be using it a lot, I might buy new but get something basic since it's your first one. You can always upgrade later. Don't be scared off from the land people. Get one and enjoy! And if you need someone to help you drive, give me a call :)
No, I let my relatives buy the boat, shell out thousands for repairs, followed by them selling it for next to nothing. If I want to drive a boat, I’ll rent it and not have to worry about maintaining it, paying docking fees, and pulling it out of the water come fall.
Boats are not for you - that's for sure. One less thing to have to decide about...
You say that like it is a bad thing...

drawpoker
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Re: I would like a boat. I also know nothing about boats

Post by drawpoker » Mon Mar 25, 2019 7:58 pm

Thesaints wrote:
Mon Mar 25, 2019 1:25 am

The first thing to know about a boat is that she will make you very happy twice: first when you buy her and then when you sell her.
:P :P :P
Yep, around here, Chesapeake Bay, with only about a zillion of them, the saying goes like this:

"The happiest days in a boat owner's life is the day he buys the boat and the day he sells the boat".


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HomerJ
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Re: I would like a boat. I also know nothing about boats

Post by HomerJ » Mon Mar 25, 2019 8:41 pm

oldzey wrote:
Mon Mar 25, 2019 6:48 pm
My family had a fixer-upper lake house when I was growing up. We spent about 2% of our time on the lake and the other 98% either traveling to or working on the lakehouse, in addition to the dock, boat hoists, yard, broken pipes, renting/dealing with tenants, taking the boats/trailers to the marina for repair, etc. etc. etc. I wouldn't trade the memories for anything, but if I did it myself, I would simply rent a boat for the weekend (and not own anything boat-related).
Or a buy a lake condo where all the maintenance is done for you, and the only thing you have to do is boat, drink a beer on your deck, and write a HOA check every 3 months. :)
The J stands for Jay

ThankYouJack
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Re: I would like a boat. I also know nothing about boats

Post by ThankYouJack » Mon Mar 25, 2019 9:01 pm

drawpoker wrote:
Mon Mar 25, 2019 7:58 pm
Thesaints wrote:
Mon Mar 25, 2019 1:25 am

The first thing to know about a boat is that she will make you very happy twice: first when you buy her and then when you sell her.
:P :P :P
Yep, around here, Chesapeake Bay, with only about a zillion of them, the saying goes like this:

"The happiest days in a boat owner's life is the day he buys the boat and the day he sells the boat".

Have either of you owned a boat?

I'm starting to get convinced that boaters are actually the ones spreading these sayings to scare all the non-boaters away :)

westie
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Re: I would like a boat. I also know nothing about boats

Post by westie » Mon Mar 25, 2019 9:19 pm

nothing better than cruising down the lake or river in someone else's boat.

dknightd
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Re: I would like a boat. I also know nothing about boats

Post by dknightd » Mon Mar 25, 2019 9:22 pm

JoeRetire wrote:
Mon Mar 25, 2019 4:49 pm
Talk to your already-boated neighbors.

Since a lot of boat purchase factors are local (size and depth of lake, local market for new and used boats, etc), your neighbors may well be the most useful source of knowledge. And they might even want to sell a boat.

My personal suggestion - buy used for your first-ever boat. Eventually, you'll learn what features are important for you and your family on your particular lake, and what features are not important.
Yep +1
You live on a lake so you pretty much have to have a boat.
It could be a sail boat, or a canoe, or paddle board, or power boat.
Ask your neighbor to drag your kids around using their boat. Some kids like this. Some don't

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White Coat Investor
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Re: I would like a boat. I also know nothing about boats

Post by White Coat Investor » Mon Mar 25, 2019 9:23 pm

AirTimeMD wrote:
Sun Mar 24, 2019 11:23 pm
I am accustomed to being (or thinking that I am) reasonably educated on most purchases that I make; however, I find myself in a situation where I will be purchasing a boat for the family.

We purchased a home on a nice lake several years ago and have slowly renovated the backyard including the dock that came with the house. Everything is now done and we are ready to purchase a boat for the family. I am absolutely overwhelmed when going to websites where people sell boats at the 20+ different genres of boats.

Here is what I am looking for:
Something that is powerful enough to tow the kids for wake boarding/water fun but also that can seat 5-8 people for lake cruising and relaxing. My boat slip is approximately 23 feet long and 9 feet wide. Would anyone more intelligent than I am on the subject matter mind sharing some insight on the best way to approach this purchase? I obviously know that a boat is a depreciating luxury item but I'm trying to make the best decision given the original thought that I am going to purchase one...

Thank you.
ATD
Are you sure that water skiing, wakeboarding, and especially wakesurfing are not activities you want to do? Because what you're requesting can be done VERY cheaply. It doesn't take much of a boat to cruise around and pull tubes.
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Regattamom
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Re: I would like a boat. I also know nothing about boats

Post by Regattamom » Mon Mar 25, 2019 10:46 pm

Sandtrap wrote:
Mon Mar 25, 2019 12:52 am
Slightly used 17 foot Boston Whaler that has been checked out by a boat professional/appraiser/etc.

Quality
Reputation
Flotation Hull, always floats: Safety.
Incredible resale value
Large enough to be safe and stable.
Small enough to be easily docked and handled by 1 or 2 people.

Not sure how large your lake is.
+1 on the Boston Whaler but I would go up a couple of feet in size if your slip will accomodate. They are pricier to buy than some other brands, but they hold their value very well. Besides the pros that Sandtrap listed, they are also good looking.

Don't let the boating naysayers get you down. We own three boats and we use them all. We have a 30 ft sailboat, a 17 ft center console for fishing and crabbing and towing tubes, and a Star for sail racing. Most of our best memories are on the water. Your family will create wonderful memories with this boat.

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Sandtrap
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Re: I would like a boat. I also know nothing about boats

Post by Sandtrap » Mon Mar 25, 2019 10:57 pm

Regattamom wrote:
Mon Mar 25, 2019 10:46 pm
Sandtrap wrote:
Mon Mar 25, 2019 12:52 am
Slightly used 17 foot Boston Whaler that has been checked out by a boat professional/appraiser/etc.

Quality
Reputation
Flotation Hull, always floats: Safety.
Incredible resale value
Large enough to be safe and stable.
Small enough to be easily docked and handled by 1 or 2 people.

Not sure how large your lake is.
+1 on the Boston Whaler but I would go up a couple of feet in size if your slip will accomodate. They are pricier to buy than some other brands, but they hold their value very well. Besides the pros that Sandtrap listed, they are also good looking.

Don't let the boating naysayers get you down. We own three boats and we use them all. We have a 30 ft sailboat, a 17 ft center console for fishing and crabbing and towing tubes, and a Star for sail racing. Most of our best memories are on the water. Your family will create wonderful memories with this boat.
+1
If your slip is large enough.
2 boats.
Boston Whaler
Hoby Cat 17 foot or larger. Catamaran.
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4nwestsaylng
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Re: I would like a boat. I also know nothing about boats

Post by 4nwestsaylng » Mon Mar 25, 2019 11:15 pm

fourwheelcycle wrote:
Mon Mar 25, 2019 6:45 am
Sandtrap wrote:
Mon Mar 25, 2019 12:52 am
Slightly used 17 foot Boston Whaler that has been checked out by a boat professional/appraiser/etc.

Quality
Reputation
Flotation Hull, always floats: Safety.
Incredible resale value
Large enough to be safe and stable.
Small enough to be easily docked and handled by 1 or 2 people.

Not sure how large your lake is.
+1 The Boston Whaler is a solidly built, classic, all purpose boat. It will serve the purposes you have described and last a long, long time if you buy one new or in carefully checked-out used condition. It is not a pro ski boat, but it would be perfectly suited for tubing, non-competitive wake boarding, and family skiing on two skis.
Agree, the Boston Whaler is more expensive, but keeps its resale. The Montauk would be a great choice. Probably about $25K used in good condition.You have to get an inspection, since it has a double hull and if there are any holes or patched holes, the inner core might be waterlogged.

The pontoon boat is also an excellent choice. I see a few on our lake, they have a sun canopy, usually twin 90hp Mercury engines, they can create the waves for a wakeboard. Actually if you like entertaining, the pontoon might be the best bet.

I don't know whatever happened to the fun sport of water skiing, especially slalom. All I see on our lake is tubes and wakeboards.Also remember your boat has to come out of the water in winter, be stored, covered or shrink wrapped for winter, the engines need winterizing.

Boats, like sports cars or classics, are not a financial decision conducive to BH analysis. You are either into them or you aren't.I like boats.

smitcat
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Re: I would like a boat. I also know nothing about boats

Post by smitcat » Tue Mar 26, 2019 6:35 am

munemaker wrote:
Mon Mar 25, 2019 7:45 pm
smitcat wrote:
Mon Mar 25, 2019 12:45 pm
Grt2bOutdoors wrote:
Mon Mar 25, 2019 12:35 pm
ThankYouJack wrote:
Mon Mar 25, 2019 11:52 am
Jimbo9911 wrote:
Mon Mar 25, 2019 9:29 am


+1
Jim
Grt2bOutdoors wrote:
Mon Mar 25, 2019 1:39 am
It’s been said before, boaters safety course before you start looking at boats. Boat = bust out another thousand.
I get tired of hearing all the common never own boat sayings on here every boat thread. There are two types of people - land people and water people.
Curious if the "never own a boat" crowd has ever owned a boat?

OP, you have the perfect setup for a boat. Assuming you're going to be using it a lot, I might buy new but get something basic since it's your first one. You can always upgrade later. Don't be scared off from the land people. Get one and enjoy! And if you need someone to help you drive, give me a call :)
No, I let my relatives buy the boat, shell out thousands for repairs, followed by them selling it for next to nothing. If I want to drive a boat, I’ll rent it and not have to worry about maintaining it, paying docking fees, and pulling it out of the water come fall.
Boats are not for you - that's for sure. One less thing to have to decide about...
You say that like it is a bad thing...
I think that everyone has different interests - each person should do whatever makes them happy.
Ii is always curious why folks need to comment negatively on subjects they say they are not interested in ...kinda interesting.

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JoeRetire
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Re: I would like a boat. I also know nothing about boats

Post by JoeRetire » Tue Mar 26, 2019 6:53 am

dknightd wrote:
Mon Mar 25, 2019 9:22 pm
JoeRetire wrote:
Mon Mar 25, 2019 4:49 pm
Talk to your already-boated neighbors.

Since a lot of boat purchase factors are local (size and depth of lake, local market for new and used boats, etc), your neighbors may well be the most useful source of knowledge. And they might even want to sell a boat.

My personal suggestion - buy used for your first-ever boat. Eventually, you'll learn what features are important for you and your family on your particular lake, and what features are not important.
Yep +1
You live on a lake so you pretty much have to have a boat.
It could be a sail boat, or a canoe, or paddle board, or power boat.
Ask your neighbor to drag your kids around using their boat. Some kids like this. Some don't
The ideal situation is to own a kayak, but be very friendly with neighbors who have a power boat.
Don't be a lemming.

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oldzey
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Re: I would like a boat. I also know nothing about boats

Post by oldzey » Tue Mar 26, 2019 7:12 am

drawpoker wrote:
Mon Mar 25, 2019 7:58 pm
Thesaints wrote:
Mon Mar 25, 2019 1:25 am

The first thing to know about a boat is that she will make you very happy twice: first when you buy her and then when you sell her.
:P :P :P
Yep, around here, Chesapeake Bay, with only about a zillion of them, the saying goes like this:

"The happiest days in a boat owner's life is the day he buys the boat and the day he sells the boat".

Before selling boat:
Image

After selling boat:
Image

If you want a boat, go on a cruise (they're called ships). :beer
"The broker said the stock was 'poised to move.' Silly me, I thought he meant up." ― Randy Thurman

unstartable
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Re: I would like a boat. I also know nothing about boats

Post by unstartable » Tue Mar 26, 2019 7:22 am

4nwestsaylng wrote:
Mon Mar 25, 2019 11:15 pm
fourwheelcycle wrote:
Mon Mar 25, 2019 6:45 am
Sandtrap wrote:
Mon Mar 25, 2019 12:52 am
Slightly used 17 foot Boston Whaler that has been checked out by a boat professional/appraiser/etc.

Quality
Reputation
Flotation Hull, always floats: Safety.
Incredible resale value
Large enough to be safe and stable.
Small enough to be easily docked and handled by 1 or 2 people.

Not sure how large your lake is.
+1 The Boston Whaler is a solidly built, classic, all purpose boat. It will serve the purposes you have described and last a long, long time if you buy one new or in carefully checked-out used condition. It is not a pro ski boat, but it would be perfectly suited for tubing, non-competitive wake boarding, and family skiing on two skis.
Agree, the Boston Whaler is more expensive, but keeps its resale. The Montauk would be a great choice. Probably about $25K used in good condition.You have to get an inspection, since it has a double hull and if there are any holes or patched holes, the inner core might be waterlogged.

The pontoon boat is also an excellent choice. I see a few on our lake, they have a sun canopy, usually twin 90hp Mercury engines, they can create the waves for a wakeboard. Actually if you like entertaining, the pontoon might be the best bet.

I don't know whatever happened to the fun sport of water skiing, especially slalom. All I see on our lake is tubes and wakeboards.Also remember your boat has to come out of the water in winter, be stored, covered or shrink wrapped for winter, the engines need winterizing.

Boats, like sports cars or classics, are not a financial decision conducive to BH analysis. You are either into them or you aren't.I like boats.
I really don't see how a Boston Whaler would be a good boat for OP.

il0kin
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Re: I would like a boat. I also know nothing about boats

Post by il0kin » Tue Mar 26, 2019 11:14 am

A lightly used aluminum hull deck boat with an outboard is a great solution for your needs as the aluminum hull is far less maintenance than fiberglass, and an outboard is far less maintenance than an inboard. Deck boats are a do-it-all solution. They have a deck similar to a pontoon, but a more sportboat style hull for more speed/agility, and are generally set up to be easy to fish from as well. It should be very doable to find a used one in good shape in the 20-30k range.

I would look for a 20-22 foot boat with a 150 or 175 HP motor. Check out the Lowe SD224 as an example.

nick evets
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Re: I would like a boat. I also know nothing about boats

Post by nick evets » Tue Mar 26, 2019 11:27 am

unstartable wrote:
Tue Mar 26, 2019 7:22 am
I really don't see how a Boston Whaler would be a good boat for OP.
It *wouldn't* be, but the point of this thread is to either repeat the "two happiest days..." aphorism, or supply a boat (or canoe!) brand or style that you, yourself, are partially familiar with.

Oh, and to admonish the OP that he or she needs a boating license, even if not required or even offered where he or she lives....

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Re: I would like a boat. I also know nothing about boats

Post by tibbitts » Tue Mar 26, 2019 9:50 pm

I don't understand how a 17ft Boston Whaler even entered the conversation as it is completely inappropriate for the OP's stated requirements. I understand the BW safety features (I had a non-BW boat that did indeed sink - and it was built the year before positive upright flotation was required) but there is more to a boat than merely staying afloat.

I can't really imagine having a house on a lake, with a dock no less, and not having a boat. Of course there are many different choices, and to some extent the choice will depend on the characteristics of the water - how rough it gets. If you can only use the boat on certain days and in certain parts of the lake that would be... limiting. Of course if the boat is on something like one of the Great Lakes for example, well, sometimes you have to accept some limitations.

Boat and motor technology has changed a lot since I owned one, although it seems that today there are greater differences between brands/models. For example with outboard motors, now you have a choice two or four stroke, and some of the maintenance on four strokes is kind of alarming. I mean, I thought I was done with valve adjustments when I retired the Slant Six (actually even it had moved on to hydraulic lifters very late in its life.) And timing belts on interference engines? Oh my, that's concerning.

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Re: I would like a boat. I also know nothing about boats

Post by smitcat » Wed Mar 27, 2019 7:46 am

tibbitts wrote:
Tue Mar 26, 2019 9:50 pm
I don't understand how a 17ft Boston Whaler even entered the conversation as it is completely inappropriate for the OP's stated requirements. I understand the BW safety features (I had a non-BW boat that did indeed sink - and it was built the year before positive upright flotation was required) but there is more to a boat than merely staying afloat.

I can't really imagine having a house on a lake, with a dock no less, and not having a boat. Of course there are many different choices, and to some extent the choice will depend on the characteristics of the water - how rough it gets. If you can only use the boat on certain days and in certain parts of the lake that would be... limiting. Of course if the boat is on something like one of the Great Lakes for example, well, sometimes you have to accept some limitations.

Boat and motor technology has changed a lot since I owned one, although it seems that today there are greater differences between brands/models. For example with outboard motors, now you have a choice two or four stroke, and some of the maintenance on four strokes is kind of alarming. I mean, I thought I was done with valve adjustments when I retired the Slant Six (actually even it had moved on to hydraulic lifters very late in its life.) And timing belts on interference engines? Oh my, that's concerning.

'I mean, I thought I was done with valve adjustments when I retired the Slant Six (actually even it had moved on to hydraulic lifters very late in its life.) And timing belts on interference engines? Oh my, that's concerning.'

I agree with your concerns but FWIW:
- Valve adjust are at 1,200 hrs and typically require no shims (check only) Even if requited this is less than a 3 hour job for a 4 cyl 4 stroke
- Timing belts are very robust but the few I changed just for the heck of it took less than 1/2 hour per engine , you do typically need one gear puller.
Just not too much maintenance for the super quiet, fast start, excellent idle and relative great mpg.

researcher
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Re: I would like a boat. I also know nothing about boats

Post by researcher » Wed Mar 27, 2019 1:19 pm

The first thing to know about a boat is that she will make you very happy twice: first when you buy her and then when you sell her.
Boat = bust out another thousand.
The only thing you need to know about boats is that you don’t want a boat.
And if you think renting is expensive, try ownership.
Boat: A hole in the water through which you can throw money.
BOAT: Bust Out Another Thousand
Best two days of boat ownership..The day you buy, and the day you sell.
A boat is a hole in the water, surrounded by wood or fiberglass, into which you pour money...
"The happiest days in a boat owner's life is the day he buys the boat and the day he sells the boat".
To the dozen or so people who made one of the posts above...
- What types/makes/models of boats did you previously own?
- What problems did you experience?
- What expenses did you have during your boat ownership period?

These posters can't actually answer such questions, because they've never owned a boat before.
They have absolutely no clue what they are talking about.

As with anything, boating can be as cheap or expensive as you want it to be.
- A 50' ocean going cabin cruiser with dual inboard diesel motors will be expensive to operate and maintain, as would a Lamborghini.
- Conversely, a 22' inland lake pontoon boat with a single outboard motor is more comparable to say, a Toyota Corolla.

All of these posters also failed to read the original post, which explicitly stated...
"I obviously know that a boat is a depreciating luxury item but I'm trying to make the best decision given the original thought that I am going to purchase one"

redfox721
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Re: I would like a boat. I also know nothing about boats

Post by redfox721 » Wed Mar 27, 2019 1:34 pm

Definition of Boat: Hole in water surrounded by wood or fiberglass into which you throw money...

researcher
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Re: I would like a boat. I also know nothing about boats

Post by researcher » Wed Mar 27, 2019 1:36 pm

redfox721 wrote:
Wed Mar 27, 2019 1:34 pm
Definition of Boat: Hole in water surrounded by wood or fiberglass into which you throw money...
What types of boats have you owned? What problems did you experience? What were your expenses?

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midareff
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Re: I would like a boat. I also know nothing about boats

Post by midareff » Wed Mar 27, 2019 1:39 pm

A boat is a hole in the water you attempt to fill in by throwing money in as fast as you can.

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Re: I would like a boat. I also know nothing about boats

Post by shawndoggy » Wed Mar 27, 2019 1:41 pm

Holy cow there is some TERRIBLE advice in this thread. Like a boston whaler for wakeboarding? wow.

If you want the boat for watersports (wakeboarding / skiing / surfing), you need an inboard, and if the focus is on surfing and wakeboarding, a v-drive. If you aren't a serious skier, the vdrive also has the better cabin layout (no motor in the middle of the boat).

Big three brands are mastercraft, nautique and malibu. Others are axis (malibu's budget brand), centurion, tige, supreme, supra, moomba (supra's budget brand) sanger, and MB Sports.

OP -- first question -- what's your budget? Older (say mid-2000s) vdrives are at the bottom of their depreciation curve and won't really depreciate more if cared for. Expect to pay $30-50K for a good used example. If you keep up with care and maintenance, you are very unlikely to lose much money on resale (many have even made money on resale in the current market).

New boats have gone loony on pricing and you can pay nearly $200K if you want to. Inboard vdrive pricing is going to start around $60K and go up quickly as you add options (sanger, MB, axis, moomba).

I'd suggest getting yourself over to www.themalibucrew.com (a malibu owner's site, but a decent place to start for the inboard-curious) and ask questions there.

NOTHING beats a day on the water with your kids and their friends, especially if you are on a lake with no cell service.

Image

researcher
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Re: I would like a boat. I also know nothing about boats

Post by researcher » Wed Mar 27, 2019 1:42 pm

midareff wrote:
Wed Mar 27, 2019 1:39 pm
A boat is a hole in the water you attempt to fill in by throwing money in as fast as you can.
What types of boats have you owned? What problems did you experience? What were your expenses?

btenny
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Re: I would like a boat. I also know nothing about boats

Post by btenny » Wed Mar 27, 2019 2:05 pm

I have had three boats over 60 years. I do not spend a lot on my boats and we use the current one 3 times per week all summer. I see boating as a good low cost hobby that we all enjoy.

My first boat was really my uncles fishing boat. He kept it beached at a lake near my house. And he let me use it when I was in high school. It was a 16 foot open wooden boat with a 60HP outboard. We sunk it on shore by removing the plug after each use to keep the wooden joints from leaking. It was slow but good for fishing. It cost about a $1 to go out for the day in gas and oil.

I bought my first boat for $3K in 1971. It was a 1970 Sea Ray 20 ft inboard with a Jacuzzi jet drive. It was fast and fun. We could ski at 40 MPH and drive around at 52 MPH with 4 people in the boat. It was cheap to maintain but drank gas, like 40 gallons in a day. I used that boat for skiing and camping for 30 years. I gave it to a charity for a $3K tax deduction in 1999. The charity fixed it up and sold it for $3K.

I currently own a 1995 23 foot Maxum Cuddy cabin. It has a big V8 with a Merc I/O drive. I paid $14K for it in 2005. It seats 6 people and sleeps 2 in the cabin. It has a toilet and a big V-berth and small cooler and small stove. We can ski and camp and cruise all over safely in deep rough water. Maintenance cost have run $800 per year due to winterizing and summarizing plus a few repairs. We have also spent about $4K on new canvas and trailer repairs and some gel coat refinishing. It is 25 years old now. It is OK on gas if you go modest speeds. So not real cheap but not bad IMO.

Good Luck. Have fun on the water.

btenny
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Re: I would like a boat. I also know nothing about boats

Post by btenny » Wed Mar 27, 2019 2:20 pm

Here is a You Tube Video of a boat similar to mine on the water. They still sell for about $10K to $15K as shown in the second video from 2015. I am sure you can find newer models for more money but less wear and tear.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4U-rB1AJ8iQ
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wp645gHFJ0g

Good Luck.

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Re: I would like a boat. I also know nothing about boats

Post by smitcat » Wed Mar 27, 2019 3:29 pm

midareff wrote:
Wed Mar 27, 2019 1:39 pm
A boat is a hole in the water you attempt to fill in by throwing money in as fast as you can.
Which make and model boat did you own that worked out so poorly?

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midareff
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Re: I would like a boat. I also know nothing about boats

Post by midareff » Wed Mar 27, 2019 3:42 pm

researcher wrote:
Wed Mar 27, 2019 1:42 pm
midareff wrote:
Wed Mar 27, 2019 1:39 pm
A boat is a hole in the water you attempt to fill in by throwing money in as fast as you can.
What types of boats have you owned? What problems did you experience? What were your expenses?
Cobra ski boat.. lost the motor when it blew a piston. Expense was most of the price of the boat. Why is this important to you?

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midareff
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Re: I would like a boat. I also know nothing about boats

Post by midareff » Wed Mar 27, 2019 3:43 pm

smitcat wrote:
Wed Mar 27, 2019 3:29 pm
midareff wrote:
Wed Mar 27, 2019 1:39 pm
A boat is a hole in the water you attempt to fill in by throwing money in as fast as you can.
Which make and model boat did you own that worked out so poorly?
Cobra ski boat, lived on a lake at the time.

smitcat
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Re: I would like a boat. I also know nothing about boats

Post by smitcat » Wed Mar 27, 2019 3:48 pm

midareff wrote:
Wed Mar 27, 2019 3:43 pm
smitcat wrote:
Wed Mar 27, 2019 3:29 pm
midareff wrote:
Wed Mar 27, 2019 1:39 pm
A boat is a hole in the water you attempt to fill in by throwing money in as fast as you can.
Which make and model boat did you own that worked out so poorly?
Cobra ski boat, lived on a lake at the time.
Very sorry to hear that - Our boats have been very fulfilling.
We have enjoyed 1,000's of great days/nights on our boats.
Many vacations and traveling, exploring, skiing, diving, all kinds of stuff.
And in our most recent boat we sold it for a good amount more than we paid for it.

cashmoney
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Re: I would like a boat. I also know nothing about boats

Post by cashmoney » Wed Mar 27, 2019 4:08 pm

AirTimeMD wrote:
Sun Mar 24, 2019 11:23 pm
I am accustomed to being (or thinking that I am) reasonably educated on most purchases that I make; however, I find myself in a situation where I will be purchasing a boat for the family.

We purchased a home on a nice lake several years ago and have slowly renovated the backyard including the dock that came with the house. Everything is now done and we are ready to purchase a boat for the family. I am absolutely overwhelmed when going to websites where people sell boats at the 20+ different genres of boats.

Here is what I am looking for:
Something that is powerful enough to tow the kids for wake boarding/water fun but also that can seat 5-8 people for lake cruising and relaxing. My boat slip is approximately 23 feet long and 9 feet wide. Would anyone more intelligent than I am on the subject matter mind sharing some insight on the best way to approach this purchase? I obviously know that a boat is a depreciating luxury item but I'm trying to make the best decision given the original thought that I am going to purchase one...

Thank you.
ATD


Best jack of all trades boats especially for lakes and rivers is a deck boat.I dont have a boat anymore but I have a few friends that have these and they are very functional and actually have decent resale value for a boat https://www.hurricaneboats.com/sundecksport

shawndoggy
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Re: I would like a boat. I also know nothing about boats

Post by shawndoggy » Wed Mar 27, 2019 4:28 pm

Sailboats /Boston whalers / canoes / go-fasts / cabin cruisers really have no place in this discussion.

If OP lives on a lake he should be looking in one of three directions:

1. Inboard Watersports boat (best for sports)
2. Pontoon (best for grillin’ N chillin’)
3. Inboard/outboard runabout (meh at everything, good dockside menuverability).

If OP wants to wakesurf, #1 is the only legitimate choice.

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Re: I would like a boat. I also know nothing about boats

Post by nisiprius » Wed Mar 27, 2019 7:21 pm

Kenneth Grahame, The Wind in the Willows:
"This has been a wonderful day!" said [the Mole], as the Rat shoved off and took to the sculls again. "Do you know, I've never been in a boat before in all my life."

"What?" cried the Rat, open-mouthed: "Never been in a—you never—well I—what have you been doing, then?"

"Is it so nice as all that?" asked the Mole shyly, though he was quite prepared to believe it as he leant back in his seat and surveyed the cushions, the oars, the rowlocks, and all the fascinating fittings, and felt the boat sway lightly under him.

"Nice? It's the only thing," said the Water Rat solemnly as he leant forward for his stroke. "Believe me, my young friend, there is nothing—absolute nothing—half so much worth doing as simply messing about in boats. Simply messing," he went on dreamily: "messing—about—in—boats; messing—"

"Look ahead, Rat!" cried the Mole suddenly.

It was too late. The boat struck the bank full tilt. The dreamer, the joyous oarsman, lay on his back at the bottom of the boat, his heels in the air.

"—about in boats—or with boats," the Rat went on composedly, picking himself up with a pleasant laugh. "In or out of 'em, it doesn't matter. Nothing seems really to matter, that's the charm of it. Whether you get away, or whether you don't; whether you arrive at your destination or whether you reach somewhere else, or whether you never get anywhere at all, you're always busy, and you never do anything in particular; and when you've done it there's always something else to do, and you can do it if you like, but you'd much better not."
Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen nineteen and six, result happiness; Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure twenty pounds ought and six, result misery.

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F150HD
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Re: I would like a boat. I also know nothing about boats

Post by F150HD » Wed Mar 27, 2019 8:32 pm

vineviz wrote:
Mon Mar 25, 2019 2:24 am
The only thing you need to know about boats is that you don’t want a boat.
:wink:

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Re: I would like a boat. I also know nothing about boats

Post by tibbitts » Wed Mar 27, 2019 10:11 pm

HomerJ wrote:
Mon Mar 25, 2019 12:27 pm
ThankYouJack wrote:
Mon Mar 25, 2019 11:52 am
OP, you have the perfect setup for a boat.
This.

The entire annoying thing about owning a boat is having to trailer it, drive it to a lake, put it in, take it out.

Whenever you see someone selling a jetski with only 11 hours on it, you know that poor guy found it too much trouble each weekend to haul it to a lake.

Having your own dock on the lake (with a lift) makes owning a boat or a jetski a breeze.
We had a house on a lake with a dock and kept the boat there generally. Sometimes, in one day, we'd drive the boat 2mi to the ramp, take it out, trailer it an hour to another lake, take it off the trailer, use it, put it back on the trailer, drive an hour back, put it in the water again, and drive it three miles back from the ramp. It wasn't that difficult. It's more difficult however if you have to all that by yourself. Doable but I wouldn't do it in one day by myself even back then - and definitely wouldn't now.

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Re: I would like a boat. I also know nothing about boats

Post by tibbitts » Wed Mar 27, 2019 10:14 pm

midareff wrote:
Wed Mar 27, 2019 3:42 pm
researcher wrote:
Wed Mar 27, 2019 1:42 pm
midareff wrote:
Wed Mar 27, 2019 1:39 pm
A boat is a hole in the water you attempt to fill in by throwing money in as fast as you can.
What types of boats have you owned? What problems did you experience? What were your expenses?
Cobra ski boat.. lost the motor when it blew a piston. Expense was most of the price of the boat. Why is this important to you?
What caused the piston to fail? As in any engine that can happen, but it's unusual. "Blew" as in a hole was blown into the top of the piston, presumably as the result of unusually violent combustion? None of the other pistons were damaged?

tibbitts
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Re: I would like a boat. I also know nothing about boats

Post by tibbitts » Wed Mar 27, 2019 10:24 pm

smitcat wrote:
Wed Mar 27, 2019 7:46 am
tibbitts wrote:
Tue Mar 26, 2019 9:50 pm
I don't understand how a 17ft Boston Whaler even entered the conversation as it is completely inappropriate for the OP's stated requirements. I understand the BW safety features (I had a non-BW boat that did indeed sink - and it was built the year before positive upright flotation was required) but there is more to a boat than merely staying afloat.

I can't really imagine having a house on a lake, with a dock no less, and not having a boat. Of course there are many different choices, and to some extent the choice will depend on the characteristics of the water - how rough it gets. If you can only use the boat on certain days and in certain parts of the lake that would be... limiting. Of course if the boat is on something like one of the Great Lakes for example, well, sometimes you have to accept some limitations.

Boat and motor technology has changed a lot since I owned one, although it seems that today there are greater differences between brands/models. For example with outboard motors, now you have a choice two or four stroke, and some of the maintenance on four strokes is kind of alarming. I mean, I thought I was done with valve adjustments when I retired the Slant Six (actually even it had moved on to hydraulic lifters very late in its life.) And timing belts on interference engines? Oh my, that's concerning.


'I mean, I thought I was done with valve adjustments when I retired the Slant Six (actually even it had moved on to hydraulic lifters very late in its life.) And timing belts on interference engines? Oh my, that's concerning.'
I agree with your concerns but FWIW:
- Valve adjust are at 1,200 hrs and typically require no shims (check only) Even if requited this is less than a 3 hour job for a 4 cyl 4 stroke
- Timing belts are very robust but the few I changed just for the heck of it took less than 1/2 hour per engine , you do typically need one gear puller.
Just not too much maintenance for the super quiet, fast start, excellent idle and relative great mpg.
That is a fairly long maintenance interval, and I'm guessing most people don't do it and get away with that for quite a while.

I definitely don't long for the days of clouds of blue smoke, although my understanding is that the newest two-strokes have largely overcome that.

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Re: I would like a boat. I also know nothing about boats

Post by smitcat » Thu Mar 28, 2019 7:39 am

tibbitts wrote:
Wed Mar 27, 2019 10:24 pm
smitcat wrote:
Wed Mar 27, 2019 7:46 am
tibbitts wrote:
Tue Mar 26, 2019 9:50 pm
I don't understand how a 17ft Boston Whaler even entered the conversation as it is completely inappropriate for the OP's stated requirements. I understand the BW safety features (I had a non-BW boat that did indeed sink - and it was built the year before positive upright flotation was required) but there is more to a boat than merely staying afloat.

I can't really imagine having a house on a lake, with a dock no less, and not having a boat. Of course there are many different choices, and to some extent the choice will depend on the characteristics of the water - how rough it gets. If you can only use the boat on certain days and in certain parts of the lake that would be... limiting. Of course if the boat is on something like one of the Great Lakes for example, well, sometimes you have to accept some limitations.

Boat and motor technology has changed a lot since I owned one, although it seems that today there are greater differences between brands/models. For example with outboard motors, now you have a choice two or four stroke, and some of the maintenance on four strokes is kind of alarming. I mean, I thought I was done with valve adjustments when I retired the Slant Six (actually even it had moved on to hydraulic lifters very late in its life.) And timing belts on interference engines? Oh my, that's concerning.


'I mean, I thought I was done with valve adjustments when I retired the Slant Six (actually even it had moved on to hydraulic lifters very late in its life.) And timing belts on interference engines? Oh my, that's concerning.'
I agree with your concerns but FWIW:
- Valve adjust are at 1,200 hrs and typically require no shims (check only) Even if requited this is less than a 3 hour job for a 4 cyl 4 stroke
- Timing belts are very robust but the few I changed just for the heck of it took less than 1/2 hour per engine , you do typically need one gear puller.
Just not too much maintenance for the super quiet, fast start, excellent idle and relative great mpg.
That is a fairly long maintenance interval, and I'm guessing most people don't do it and get away with that for quite a while.

I definitely don't long for the days of clouds of blue smoke, although my understanding is that the newest two-strokes have largely overcome that.
Yup - Most people do not even do it and have no issues.
I did the timing belts on a 115 Yamaha on a RIB and twin 150 Yamahas on another RIB - not much of a job, past belts were in good condition.
I checked the valves on a few 4 strokes in the 4 cylinder ranges and only had to shim one engines valves - not really a tough job at all , shims were like in the 0.002" - 0.003" range.
On a number of occasions we had 2 and 4 strokes at the same time and cruised with other boats that had a variety as well - there is no comparison with older style 2 stokes and the 4 strokes. The newer e-tec 2 strokes are much different and represent the best features of 2 and 4 strokes of the past - IMHO.

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